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  • 151.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gribshunden - det sista drakskeppet?2019In: Gränsløs, ISSN 2001-4961, Vol. 10, p. 11-27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 152.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gribshunden: medeltidens modernaste skepp2019In: Gribshunden 1495: medeltidens modernaste skepp / [ed] Siiri Irskog, Marcus Sandekjer, Karlskrona: Blekinge museum , 2019, p. 11-40Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 153.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    How Large Was Mars? An investigation of the dimensions of a legendary Swedish warship, 1563–15642019In: Mariner´s mirror, ISSN 0025-3359, E-ISSN 2049-680X, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 260-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish warship Mars was considered to have been one of the largest ships in the world when it exploded and sank in 1564. The problem is that no written accounts clearly reveal its dimensions. This article reviews how different researchers have discussed the size of Mars in the past. It also aims to shed new light on this topic by using information from the archaeological survey carried out at the wreck site since 2011. Even if the result is approximate it clearly shows that Mars was indeed an impressively large ship by sixteenth century standards, but not as large as many previous researchers have thought.

  • 154.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Invasionsfartyget som blev en mjölskuta: identifieringen av ”Dalarövraket” som strussen Bodekull (1661-1678)2018In: Forum navale, ISSN 0280-6215, E-ISSN 2002-0015, no 74, p. 12-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2003 a well preserved shipwreck was discovered north of Dalarö in the Stockholm Archipelago. Artefacts indicated that the ship sank during the mid or later half of the 17th century. An archaeological survey revealed that even if the vessel was very small it showed many details that are usually found on large sailing warships, such as gun ports along the sides and a lion figure head. Despite the massive attention the wreck has achieved, from researchers, media and others, the original identity of the wreck has remained an open question until now. In the preserved minutes and letters of the Swedish Admiralty kept in the Military Archives reveal that the Swedish king Karl X Gustav ordered a number of small vessels to be used for transport of horses and soldiers in his war against Denmark in 1659. After the unpredicted death of the king, the campaign against Denmark was cancelled and the unfinished ships were rebuilt in different ways. One of these was Bodekull, which was built under supervision of the newly recruited English Master Shipwright Thomas Day between 1659 and 1661. As the design was changed during construction, several unique details, that are also visible on the wreck, are mentioned in the preserved correspondence between the shipyard and the Admiralty. In October 1678 the Bodekull was sent from Kalmar to grind cereals ata mill along the coast. Despite his instructions he sailed to Fagerholmen in the Stockholm archipelago. On its way back the ship hit a rock and sank. 20 barrels of water soaked flour was sent to Stockholm. This article summarizes the archival research that has led to the identification of the ship.

  • 155.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Maktanspråk snidade i trä: Skulpterad symbolik på 1600-talsskepp2020In: Skulpturerna på Vasa: En berättelse om makt / [ed] Anna Maria Forssberg, Stockholm: Vasamuseet/Statens maritima och transporthistoriska museer , 2020, p. 43-60Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 156.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Med ting och text i samma båt: arkeologi och historia kring strussen Bodekull, förlist 16782019In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung et al., Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 38-39Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 157.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Recent Advancements in the Riddarholmen Ship Puzzle: A New Interpretation of the Architecture of an Early 16th-century Clinker-Built Gun-Carrying Warship2023In: International Journal of Nautical Archaeology, ISSN 1057-2414, E-ISSN 1095-9270, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 317-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 16th-century Riddarholmen Ship was discovered in the middle of Stockholm in 1930. Despite being exhibited since 1947, the efforts to reconstruct the ship have been limited. A substantial portion of the recovered parts has never been put on display. This paper aims to shed new light on the ship´s architecture using the original material from the excavation together with an inventory of the timbers in the collections of the Medieval Museum. From this, it is argued that the ship originally had a full deck, three masts, and a forecastle and that it resembles an early purpose-built, gun-carrying warship.

  • 158.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Riddarholmsskeppet: missförstådd klenod2023In: Vrak: Havets rika historia / [ed] Carl Douglas, Stockholm: Max Ström , 2023, p. 118-141Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 159.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Riksäpplet (1676): resurrecting a neglected wreck2017In: Baltic and beyond: Change and continuity in shipbuilding: Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Symposium on Boat and Ship Archaeology, Gdańsk 2015 / [ed] Jerzy Litwin, Gdańsk: National Maritime Museum , 2017, p. 39-48Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • 160.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Skeppsvrak i Haninge skärgård2017In: Haninge - kulturhistorisk översikt, Haninge: Haninge kommun , 2017, p. 30-33Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 161.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Sveriges äldsta skeppsritning: en utredning och ett tolkningsförsök2020In: Forum navale, ISSN 0280-6215, E-ISSN 2002-0015, Vol. 76, p. 14-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden´s oldest Ship Drawing: an investigation and interpretationSweden’s oldest drawing of a ship is kept in the National Archives. It depictsa warship with two rows of gunports, hence the working name ‘Theanonymous two-decker’. Unfortunately, nothing is known regarding itsprovenance, when it was made, or who drew it. Most likely we will neverknow which ship is depicted. However, this does not imply that the drawingis totally vapid or incomprehensible. The aim of this article is to datethe drawing, but also to narrow down in which historical context the drawingmay have been created in. The article also sets out to discuss whichships may have been of a similar design. An underlying motif is to makethe drawing more accessible for further research.38 39Drawings from the seventeenth century and earlier are very rare.Through comparing the present drawing with the few other examples thatexist it is apparent that it has not been used for calculating lines and shapeof the ship’s hull, but rather to present the general layout and arrangementof decks, gunports and different rooms aboard.An analysis of the drawing reveal that it was drawn in 1:64 scale usinga ruler of about one foot’s length as the single tool. Contemporary mastershipwrights used dividers, curve rulers and similar to produce their drawings.Hence ‘The anonymous two-decker’ is more of a sketch than a properdrawing. With no doubt it was made by a person with substantial knowledgeabout ships and how to draw and calculate with scale, but it questionableif it was a master shipwright.The drawing has several notes and texts in English. The colour of thetext differs from the colour of the ink in the drawing, which indicates thatthe text is secondary. This means that the person who drew the image andthe one who wrote on it do not have to be the same. Previous researchershave suggested that the drawing was made in England or from an Englishoriginal, but in fact there were several English and Scottish master shipwrightsworking at Swedish shipyards in the late sixteenth and early seventeenthcentury. The text could have been made by one of them.The drawing reveals the ship´s main dimensions: Length of keel, width,depth of hold, as well as some other measurements. It is not possible toidentify a particular ship that corresponds to these dimensions, but it is apparentthat the ship is proportionally wide in relation to its length, whichis archaic. The number of gunports however corresponds to what we knowregarding the Swedish ship Scepter, this without saying that the drawingdepicts this very ship. Scepter was likely much larger than ‘The anonymoustwo-decker’.

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  • 162.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Södertörn University, Sweden.
    The ship Riksäpplet and the introduction of English naval architecture in Sweden in the 17th century2017In: Post-Medieval Archaeology, ISSN 0079-4236, E-ISSN 1745-8137, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 309-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 84-gun ship Riksapplet was one of the first ships in Sweden built under supervision of the newly recruited English master. In 1676, the ship came adrift, struck a rock and sank. In 2015 a minor field survey of the wreck was undertaken. An inventory of finds recovered from the wreck in various museum collections and in private hands has been compiled and the preserved correspondence from the construction of the ship has been re-examined. This material has provided new insights regarding the peculiarities and special architecture of Riksapplet.

  • 163.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Brorsson, Torbjörn
    Daly, Aoife
    Hansson, Jim
    Isaksson, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    The Maderö wreck: a ship loaded with bricks from Lübeck sunk in the Stockholm Archipelago in the late 15th century2024In: International Journal of Nautical Archaeology, ISSN 1057-2414, E-ISSN 1095-9270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Maderö wreck was discovered in the 1960s in the Stockholm Archipelago, Sweden. An archaeological investigation undertaken in 2022 included the inspection and documentation of visible ship parts, sampling for dendrochronological analysis and sampling for ICP analysis from the brick cargo. The results show that the wood originates from the Baltic Sea area and was felled after 1467, while the clay for the brick originates from the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern area. The ship's technical analysis shows that it is a large clinker-built merchant ship. Traces of iron on a recovered stone shot indicate that the ship was armed when it sank.

  • 164.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Rönnby, Johan
    Mars (1564): the initial archaeological investigations of a great 16th-century Swedish warship2017In: International Journal of Nautical Archaeology, ISSN 1057-2414, E-ISSN 1095-9270, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 92-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Before the Swedish warship Mars exploded and sank in action against a combined Danish and Lubeckian fleet in 1564, it was one of the largest ships in the world. In 2011 the wreck was relocated off the island of Oland in the Baltic Sea. Thanks to the favourable conditions in the brackish water, about two thirds of the hull is preserved on the sea bottom, including the stern with the large sterncastle. The aim of this article is to present initial archaeological observations and results of work since 2011. We briefly describe the historical context and research perspectives regarding this wreck.

  • 165.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Schallin, Ann-Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Asine från sjösidan: Ett svenskt marinarkeologiskt projekt i Grekland2023In: Populär arkeologi, ISSN 0281-014X, no 3, p. 36-43Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 166.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Schallin, Ann-Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Asine revisited: En marinarkeologisk undersökning2022In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 1, p. 49-50Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 167.
    Eriksson, Sebastian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Sandby borg och bygden: Öländska järnåldersstudier2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Characteristic of the cultural landscape on Öland during the middle part of the Iron Age (ca. 200-550AD) are the today visible house foundations and fences made of stone. The house foundations were three-aisled houses with roof-bearing pillars and the stone foundations are traces of what constituted outer stone walls. Adjacent to the house foundations are usually stone fences. The studies in this essay are limited to three parishes near the Sandby hillfort. The purpose is to understand the fort’s relationship to the surrounding settlements. The material consists of registered ancient remains and archaeological finds. Place names and maps are analyzed.

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  • 168.
    Espolin Norstein, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Parted Pairs: Viking Age oval brooches in Britain, Ireland, and Iceland2023In: Broken Bodies, Places and Objects: New Perspectives on Fragmentation in Archaeology / [ed] Anna Sörman; Astrid A. Noterman; Markus Fjellström, London: Routledge, 2023, p. 86-99Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among the most characteristic artefacts of the Viking Age (c. 800–1050 CE) are the pairs of oval brooches. They have come to be regarded as essential parts of female Scandinavian costume, and in the various overseas settlements, their discovery is seen as evidence for the presence of Scandinavian women. The oval brooches as a group have been seen as communicators of female gender and Scandinavian ethnicity, but the individual brooches have received less attention. This chapter examines the brooches discovered in Britain, Ireland, and Iceland more closely, demonstrating that they were not always used as matching sets. It presents a number of non-matching brooches, single brooches, and brooch fragments. Although the oval brooches were made as matching sets and were normally also deposited as such in graves, the examples presented demonstrate variations in use and perhaps also in meaning. These variations highlight the oval brooches as more than parts of a set; they are individual objects with distinct life histories. By examining the oval brooches in detail as well as the context in which they were discovered, this chapter addresses the question: How and why were the pairs split apart, and how do they function in their new context?

  • 169.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Fantastic Beings and Where to Make Them: Boats as Object-Beings in Bronze Age Rock Art2019In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 27, p. 191-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The boat motif in Bronze Age rock art is generally assumed to represent real or symbolic boats in some form. In this paper, however, it is argued that Bronze Age rock art motifs are independent material articulations, made to do something rather than to represent. From such a perspective, the hybrid character of the boat motif as part animal, part object is conceived as a special type of entity, an object-being that has no original elsewhere. The change of perspective, from representation to articulation, and from object to being, allows for a more coherent view of Bronze Age rock art as primarily enacted imagery integrated with rock and metal as vitalist devices, aimed to affect the world.

  • 170.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Fishy theory for fishy materials? A comment to Craig N. Cipolla: “When smoking pipes grow fins: revisiting the matter-meaning dualism in archaeology”2023In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 64, no 5, p. 67-68Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 171.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Livet efter döden: Hanteringen av döda2009In: Döda personers sällskap: Gravmaterialens identiteter och kulturella uttryck / [ed] I-M. Back Danielsson, I. Gustin, A. Larsson, N. Myrberg & S. Thedéen, Stockholm: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Stockholms universitet , 2009, p. 35-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present text concerns theoretical and methodological aspects of burial archaeology with special attention given to the temporal dimension. It is argued that burial places need to be discussed individually from a bottom-up perspective in order to minimise the bias of regional and culture-centred generalisations. Such a microarchaeological approach focuses on social practice involved in the disposal of the dead as a mediating level between the local and particular on one hand and the normative and general on the other. Further, it is argued that the horizontal stratigraphy of burial places needs to be investigated in order to distinguish phases of change and alteration within sites. Such phases constitute more relevant points of departure for comparisons with phases of other sites, thus facilitating a more nuanced discussion on periods of contact and hybridisation between different social groups.

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  • 172.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Mesolithic Childhoods: Changing Life-Courses of Young Hunter-Fishers in the Stone Age of Southern Scandinavia2012In: Childhood in the Past: An International Journal, ISSN 1758-5716, E-ISSN 2040-8528, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 20-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper stresses the importance of distinguishing between different categories of children in order to better understand their changing lives and their shifting relations with the adult world. The example is taken from the Mesolithic burial/settlement site of Skateholm at the southernmost coast of Sweden. By contrasting grave content and spatial arrangement of the site it is argued that the inhabitants recognised differences between infants (<1 year), younger children up to seven years, and older children between about eight to thirteen years. The children seem to have started to engage in the adult world by the age of seven or eight, and by the age of around fourteen years, their graves are inseparable from those of the adults. Individuals of the intermediate age-group, between the ages nine to thirteen, are completely missing among the burials. It is suggested that their absence is not singularly due to lower mortality rate, but rather that this age-span constituted a socially distinct transitional phase between childhood and adulthood.

  • 173.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Reala kroppar och dödens realitet: Rumslighet och horisontell stratigrafi på Ajvide och Skateholm2009In: I tillvarons gränsland: perspektiv på kroppen mellan liv och död / [ed] Ekengren, F. & Nilsson Stutz, L., Lund: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens historia, Lunds universitet , 2009, p. 106-145Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Slavoj Zizek har föreslagit som experiment att man under kärleksakten skulle tänka på sin partners reala materialitet, dvs vad kroppens tunna biologiska skal döljer i form av blod, slem, tarmar och ben, och sedan försöka fortsätta med akten. Zizeks poäng här är att illustrera Jacques Lacans Imaginära, Reala och Symboliska dimensioner; kroppen som vi vanligtvis (vill) se den är i hög grad en Imaginär och Symbolisk omskrivning av sin Reala materialitet. Sådana omskrivningar är dock inte allmänmänskligt givna, relationerna mellan det imaginära, symboliska och Reala varierar mellan olika kollektiv över tid och rum; vi kan mao faktiskt tänka oss att någonstans någongång kopulerar två biologiska enheter av blod, kött och slem med varandra utan att bekymras av sin reala konstitution.

    Naturligtvis är även döden något Realt och dess oundviklighet tenderar även den att omskrivas eller tom förträngas för att göra den acceptabel och fattbar. Synen på kroppen är i högsta grad kopplad till de praktiker som är knutna till döden och döda kroppar; de kan analyseras för att diskutera synen på det döda (och tillika livet i viss grad). Med utgångspunkt i dessa kroppens och dödens Realiteter diskuteras hanteringen av döda kroppar (människor såväl som djur) under mesolitikum och neolitikum utifrån gravfälten i Ajvide och Skateholm.

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  • 174.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Recension av Åsa Berggrens avhandling 'Med kärret som källa. Om begreppen offer och ritual inom arkeologin'2011In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 228-230Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 175.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Size Matters: Hyperbolism in South Scandinavian Rock Art2019In: Fennoscandia Archaeologica, ISSN 0781-7126, Vol. 36, p. 53-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This text discusses aspects of hyperbolism in south Scandinavian rock art as a particular mode of material articulation. In the Late Bronze Age (900-500 BC), a limited number of extraordinary large-scale motifs begin to appear on the rocks. This hyperbolic mode is generally restricted to anthropomorphs, boats and encircling motifs up to ten times the normal size. The phenomenon is represented at most of the major rock art clusters of southern Scandinavia (Trøndelag, Østfold, Tanum, Scania, Norrköping, and Uppland), and is here examined in detail through a case study of the Boglösa area of central-eastern Sweden. It can be shown that the increased size does not add detail to the motifs; the images are basically enlarged versions of pre-existing motifs. It is argued that the enlargement of certain motifs is not primarily about symbolic representation or increased visibility but is related to a function of the petroglyphs as magical devices.

  • 176.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    The skin I live in. The materiality of body imagery2015In: Own and be owned: Archaeological approaches to the concept of possessions / [ed] Alison Klevnäs, Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Stockholm: Department of archaeology and classical studies, Stockholm university , 2015, p. 49-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Tredimensionell dokumentation av hällar och hällbilder i Uppland: Rapport från ett FOU-projekt: Digitala bilder för forskning och publik2023Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Projektet digitala bilder för forskning och publik syftade till att utveckla en digital dokumentationsstrategi för hällbilder anpassad för aktuella forskningsfrågor kring bronsålderns bildbruk. Metoden utgick från en flexibel kombination av två- och tredimensionell dokumentation som utöver själva bilderna också omfattar hela hällarna. De tredimensionella modellerna är tänkta att ligga till grund för både forskning och publik förmedling utan behov av destruktiva metoder som att framhäva bilderna med färg. De utgör även ett digitalt underlag för skade- inventering och analys av slitage och vittring av hällarna.Projektet dokumenterade 36 hällar i sydvästra Uppland med olika metoder. Av dessa tolkades 31 okulärt och 27 med tredimensionella tekniker. Projektet utvärderade olika metoder och apparatur som Structure from motion (SfM), fotogrammetri med stereopar, 3D-scanners (Leica MS60 och RTC360). Mest effektiv visade sig vara en kombination av okulär besiktning (tolkning) och 3D- modeller skapade genom SfM vilket fångade såväl svaga ristningsfigurer som hällens mikrotopografi. En positiv synergieffekt av projektet var också många nyfynd av tidigare okända figurer samt nya tolkningar av tidigare kända motiv.

  • 178.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Axelsson, Tony
    The rock, the whole rock, and everything about the rock: 3D-scanning of Bronze Age rock art sites in central-eastern Sweden using Leica MS60 and RTC3602023In: In Situ. Västsvensk arkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-4964, Vol. 16, p. 49-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The different documentation methods of rock art all have their pros and cons in recording petroglyphs. Traditionally it is the figurative content that has been in focus, but because Bronze Age motifs often relate to and incorporate the topography and mineral composition of the rock there is a need to also capture these aspects to a higher degree. The new 3D-techniques offer interesting possibilities to achieve this. Hitherto, handheld scanners and photogrammetrical approaches have been employed to record smaller areas of rock art but they are only rarely capable of capturing a larger part of an outcrop. To capture a fuller context of the petroglyphs, we have evaluated the potential of other types of 3D-scanners; a Multistation scanner, Leica MS60 and a dedicated dome-scanner, Leica RTC360, to record seven whole rock outcrops with rock art in central-eastern Sweden. Our tests conclude that although the scanners perform parts of the recording process differently, they both are capable of capturing even faint petroglyphs as well as the curvature and topography of a whole outcrop, including textures in colour. 

  • 179.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Vinberg, Ann
    Arkeologiska undersökningar i Jordbro 2017-19: Gravar och aktivitetsytor från bronsålder och äldre järnålder på̊ Jordbrogravfältet (Österhaninge 1822023Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under tre år (2017–19) har institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur bedrivit fältkurser på Jordbrogravfältet i Österhaninge, Södermanland (L2014:3046). Sex stensättningar undersöktes på gravfältet. En rund övertorvad stensättning i gravfältets sydöstra utkant, en oregelbunden i gravfältet mellersta del, samt en rund, en fyrsidig och två tresidiga gravar i gravfältets nordöstra del. Samtliga stensättningar väster om gångvägen tolkades utifrån formen på stenkistor och ned- grävningar samt fynd av tandemalj som jordbegravningar, vilka indirekt kan dateras till huvud- sakligen romersk järnålder. Den övertorvade stensättningen i den sydöstra delen var en krema- tionsgrav med något senare datering i övergången mellan romersk järnålder–folkvandringstid vilket antyder en generell horisontell stratigrafi i sydöstlig riktning. Gravarna i den nordöstra delen överlagrade delvis åtta ben- och keramikdepositioner/gravgömmor, tre mindre gravar från yngre bronsålder samt boplatslämningar från stenålder. I området utan synliga anläggningar syd- öst om gravfältet grävdes sammanlagt 16 sökschakt om 1x4–7m. I dessa framkom stolphål och odlingspår från huvudsakligen historisk tid, men även en härdbotten och en nedgrävning med krossad keramik av äldre järnålderskaraktär.

  • 180.
    Fast, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    De norska grottmålningarna och ljuset2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The relation between the cave and the circumpolar light conditions has long been a part of the interpretation of the meaning of the Norwegian cave art. This paper explores the relationship by trading the concept of a sensory dichotomy between light and darkness for that of a perceptual relationship between the paintings, the environment and the light.

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  • 181.
    Frödeen, Agnes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    "Vad är det där för sten?": Monumentala fornlämningar och skyltningen som beskriver dem2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay explores the relationship between ancient monuments and the signage erected next to them during the 20th century. This is done by applying both textual- and image analysis to the content of the signs currently placed at three different ancient monuments. The goal being to understand how the addition of signs affect the perception of ancient monuments and how the connection to ancient monuments in turn may affect the perception of actors responsible for the signage. In addition, the author summarizes the historical context pertaining to protective cultural heritage laws from the 17th century until now in order to understand the motivations behind the creation of signage. By examining legislation, official publications and interviewing respondents currently working with sign production, the desired (and unintended) effects of signage are analyzed.

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  • 182.
    Gustin, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
     Kvinnan, tornet och makten i Bjälbo2009In: Triangulering: historisk arkeologi vidgar fälten / [ed] M. Mogren, M. Roslund, B. Sundnér & J. Wienberg, Lund: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens historia, Lunds Universitet , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 183.
    Gustin, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Magnus, Bente
    Birka och Hovgården2009Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 184.
    Haking, Linn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Tracing Upper Palaeolithic People in Caves: Methodological developments of cave space analysis, applied to the decorated caves of Marsoulas, Chauvet and Rouffignac, southern France2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Upper Palaeolithic cave art research has tended to focus on the images themselves, rather than the physical and social circumstances of their production. This dissertation explores and develops new practice-based ways of investigating cave art. A method analysing features of the cave environment, such as light, space and accessibility, internal conditions etc., and how these relate to traces of human activity, is developed and applied to three decorated caves from Upper Palaeolithic in southern France: Marsoulas (Haute-Garonne), Chauvet (Ardèche) and Rouffignac (Périgord). New insights are suggested into the underlying practice of cave art and its significance in Upper Palaeolithic societies.

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    fulltext
  • 185.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    A short note about Stone Age farmers who did not adopt elk hunting, and elk hunters who did not adopt farming2010In: Transference. Interdisciplinary Communications, ISSN 0809-8735, Vol. 2008/2009Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 186.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ancestors in the lake? On the ritual display and deposition of human skulls at Kanaljorden, Motala, SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 187.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Early pottery among hunter-horticulturalists and hunter-gatherers in central Fenno-Scandinavia2009In: Early Farmers, Late Foragers, and Ceramic Traditions: On the Beginning of Pottery in the Near East and Europe / [ed] Dragos Gheorghiu, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars , 2009, p. 215-238Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The hunter-gatherers of Mälardalen (eastern central Sweden) adopted ceramic technology at the same time as they adopted aspects of farming around 3900 cal. BC. The region thus appears to be a classic case of “Neolithisation”, with hunter-gatherers turning hunter-horticulturalists, adopting cereal cultivation and cattle herding along with the characteristic pottery of the Funnel Beaker Culture (albeit with local and regional peculiarities). Immediately to the north of the Funnel Beaker Culture (TRB) of Mälardalen, there lived hunter-gatherers of the northern Scandinavian Slate Culture that did not adopt either agriculture or pottery during the period in question. Thus, in central Scandinavia, there was formed a border between part-time farmers with pottery to the south, and hunter-gatherers without pottery to the north. However, while pottery was absent in Mälardalen before 3900 cal. BC, ceramics appeared already 5000 cal. BC immediately to the east, on Åland, a group of islands in the middle of the Baltic Sea. The oldest pottery along the eastern shores of the Baltic Sea, including the Åland archipelago, appeared in hunter-gatherer contexts, the centuries before 5000 cal. BC. During this time we have a contrast between hunter-gatherers with pottery to the east, and hunter-gatherers without pottery to the west. The Early Neolithic funnel-beaker pottery of Mälardalen display several peculiarities reminiscent of Comb Ware designs. Around 3300 cal. BC the eastern traits are accentuated with the introduction of pointed bottomed vessels and pits arranged in “chessmanner”, a pottery that is known as the Pitted Ware tradition. Parallel to these changes in the design of pottery, the settlement pattern was rearranged with a larger focus on aquatic resources and a diminishing role for agricultural practices.

  • 188.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Foreign in origin and local in pattern: Mesolithic pottery around the Baltic Sea2009In: Mesolithic horizons: papers presented at the Seventh International Conference on the Mesolithic in Europe, Belfast, 2005 / [ed] McCartan, S., Schulting, R., Warren, G. & Woodman, P., Oxford: Oxbow Books , 2009, p. 397-406Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 189.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Mesolithic skull depositions at Kanaljorden, Motala, Sweden2011In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 19, p. 244-246Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 190.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    North of the "North-group"? The TRB of Mälardalen and Bergslagen, Eastern central Sweden2013In: From funeral monuments to household pottery: Current advances in Funnel Beaker Culture (TRB/TBK) research: proceedings of the BorgerMeetings 2009, The Netherlands / [ed] J. A. Bakker, S. B.C. Bloo, M. K. Dütting, Oxford: Archeopress, 2013, p. 159-170Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 191.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Rituell praktik i trattbägarkulturens norra gränsland: Tidigneolitiska gravar och offerplatser i Mälardalen, östra Mellansverige2012In: Agrarsamfundenesekspansion i nord: Symposium på Tanums Hällristningsmuseum, Underslös, Bohuslän, d. 25.-29. maj 2011 / [ed] Flemming Kaul, Lasse Sørensen, København: Nordlige Verdener, Nationalmuseet København , 2012, p. 87-101Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 192.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Rituella våtmarksdepositioner från äldre stenålder på Kanaljorden i Motala2011In: Motalabygd, Årsskrift för Motala Musei- och hembygdsföreningArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 193.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    The early 'Trichterbecher' of Mälardalen, eastern Central Sweden2011In: Bericht der Römisch-Germanischen Kommission, ISSN 0341-9312, E-ISSN 2364-6012, Vol. 89, p. 111-134Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 194.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Tiny islands in a far sea: On the seal hunters of Åland, and the Nortwestern limit in the spread of early pottery2009In: Ceramics Before Farming: The Dispersal of Pottery Among Prehistoric Eurasian Hunter-Gatherers / [ed] Jordan, P. & Zvelebil, M., Walnut Creek, Calif.: Left Coast Press , 2009, p. 375-393Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 195.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Skandfer, Marianne
    Local perspectives on innovation and dispersal of ceramic technologies in northern Stone Age foraging and farming societiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 196.
    Hedin, Albin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gnestaleden under järnålder och vikingatid: Centralplatser längst en vattenled i Södermanland2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this essay I look into central entities along a water route that connect Mälaren in Mariefred with the Baltic sea in Trosa. I start with tuna magnate farms from the middle iron age (200- 550) to then focus on the entity that replaced tuna magnate farms in the late iron age and at last focus on early churches.

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    Gnestaleden under järnålder och vikingatid
  • 197.
    Hedin, Albin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gnestaleden under järnålder och vikingatid: Centralplatser längst en vattenled i Södermanland2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this essay I look into central entities along a water route that connect Mälaren in Mariefred with the Baltic sea in Trosa. I start with tuna magnate farms from the middle iron age (200- 550) to then focus on the entity that replaced tuna magnate farms in the late iron age and at last focus on early churches.

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    Gnestaleden under järnålder och vikingatid
  • 198.
    Hedin, Albin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Myntcirkulation i Skåneland under Erik av Pommern: Cirkulation av inhemska och utländska mynt ca. 1396-14392023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The coin circulation in Denmark during Eric of Pomerania’s reign (1396-1439) has been studied systematically within the borders of today’s Denmark, but not Skåneland. This area is in today’s Sweden consisting of Halland, Scania, Blekinge and (Danish) Bornholm. The coin finds show that during 1400-1420 there was a considerable percentage of foreign coins in circulation, especially in churches. These were mostly used for fees in churches, but also had use in urban environments. The copper sterling represents the circulation of domestic coins during 1420-1440. The distribution of its minting cities showed that the local Lund type is the most common, followed by a similar percentage of Næstved and Randers types, and a lesser percentage of Odense types. The percentages of Lund and Odense types were expected but the similarities between Næstved and Randers types were not. Since Næstved types are the most common in today’s Denmark, and Randers types are a less circulated coin.

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    Myntcirkulation i Skåneland under Erik av Pommern: Cirkulation av inhemska och utländska mynt ca. 1396-1439
  • 199. Hegardt, Johan
    et al.
    Källén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Translated Objects: The Olov Janse Case2014In: Museum Worlds: Advances in Research, ISSN 2049-6729, E-ISSN 2049-6737, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 42-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the movements of archaeological and ethnographic objects and museum collections connected with the Swedish-born archaeologist and ethnographer Olov R. T. Janse (1892–1985). Janse pursued a cosmopolitan career in the years between 1920 and 1960, in and between the national contexts of Sweden, France, Indochina, the Philippines, and the United States, where he found himself in different political contexts such as colonialism, nationalism, and the Cold War. He initiated object exchanges between French and Swedish museums, and he collected archaeological and ethnographic objects from Indochina and the Philippines for museums in Sweden, France, and the United States. The complexity of object movements in the wake of Olov Janse's career suggests that we should think and talk about object mobility in terms of translation rather than simple transmission. In seven sections, each exploring one chapter of Janse's life, we discuss how changes in world politics became entangled with changes in Janse's own position as an archaeologist and ethnographer, affecting the movements of objects and contributing to an active translation of their meaning.

  • 200.
    Helene, Sjöstedt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Brobyhägnaden På Lappnäsudden: Bronsåldern utmed Fryken i Värmland2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    Brobyhägnaden på Lappnäsudden
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