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  • 151.
    Molander, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Love should be fun: Mothering as a practice2014In: NA - Advances in Consumer Research / [ed] June Cotte, Stacy Wood, Duluth: Association for Consumer Research , 2014, Vol. 42, p. 130-131Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper illustrates how mothering can be conceptualized as practice and how consumption can be understood as something that this practice requires. It spotlights emotions and how mothering expresses love towards a needing child with the help of consumption – practice performances many times facilitated by bringing in the fun.

  • 152.
    Molander, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Mothering men and their consumption2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 153.
    Molander, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Not just a mother: embodied and positional aspects of consumer learning from a practice perspective2017In: Consumption, markets & culture, ISSN 1025-3866, E-ISSN 1477-223X, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 131-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumer socialization is usually associated with young consumers, but transitions that require learning new types of consumption patterns can occur at any point in life. Although the literature on transitional consumers is quite fragmented, an important body of consumer research explores transitional consumers from the perspective of role theory. Nonetheless, role theory has not problematized learning and due to its static nature role theory tends to overlook how consumer learning becomes embodied over time as well as how this learning is affected by experiences from related practices. With a practice theory approach to learning and based on an ethnographic study of mothering through dinner consumption, this paper highlights learning as an embodied experience influenced by the practitioners’ positioning in time and space as well as by multiple sources among which the market has become increasingly important.

  • 154.
    Molander, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Vardagsmiddagen som praktisk och kommunikativ arena2017In: Konsumentbeteende: klassiska & samtida perspektiv / [ed] Karin M. Ekström, Mikael Ottosson, Anders Parment, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, p. 192-193Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 155.
    Molander, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    What is mothering really all about? And how does consumption fit into the picture? 2013In: Consumer behaviour: a European perspective / [ed] Michael Solomon, Gary Bamossy, Søren Askegaard, Margaret K. Hogg, Harlow: Pearson Education , 2013, 5, p. 520-522Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 156.
    Molander, Susanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Ingeborg Astrid, Kleppe
    Östberg, Jacob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    The new ideal of involved fatherhood: A critical visual analysis2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 157.
    Molander, Susanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Kleppe, Ingeborg Astrid
    NHH Norwegian School of Economics, Norway.
    Transformative Social Marketing: Sharing ‘Swedish Dads’ with the World2021In: Advances in Consumer Research, ISSN 0098-9258, Vol. 49, p. 46-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 158.
    Molander, Susanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Östberg, Jacob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Swedish Style: Politics, Aesthetics and Materiality2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 159.
    Molander, Susanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Östberg, Jacob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    The underdog billionaire: how indie producers protect their filed-dependent investments in light of success2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 160.
    Molander, Susanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Östberg, Jacob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    What's cooking? The different practices and meanings involved in the same consumption situation2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 161. Molander, Susanna
    et al.
    Östberg, Jacob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Kleppe, Ingeborg Astrid
    Swedish Dads as a National Treasure: Consumer Culture at the Nexus of the State, Commerce, and Consumers2019In: Nordic consumer culture: state, market and consumers / [ed] Søren Askegaard, Jacob Östberg, Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 119-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molander, Östberg, and Kleppe uses the case of fatherhood in Sweden to illustrate how consumer culture evolves at the nexus of the (welfare) state, individual consumers’ lived lives, and companies’ marketing activities. The chapter thereby implicitly draws on the idea of statist individualism, whereby the Swedish state’s feminist agenda attempts to liberate both mothers and fathers from their traditional roles. This freedom, however, should not be confused for some sort of anarchy where anything is allowed. Instead, the freedom is highly regulated by various actors who both prescribe and capitalize on particular modes of being a progressive father.

  • 162.
    Molander, Susanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Östberg, Jacob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Peñaloza, Lisa
    Brand Morphogenesis: The Role of Heterogeneous Consumer Sub-Assemblages in the Change and Continuity of a Brand2023In: Journal of consumer research, ISSN 0093-5301, E-ISSN 1537-5277, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 762-785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do brands change in environments defined by increasing consumer heterogeneity? Drawing on assemblage theory, this research develops the concepts of brand morphogenesis and consumer sub-assemblage to explain how heterogeneous consumer groups instigate, reinforce, and hinder the evolution of a brand. This longitudinal case study of a Swedish fashion brand delineates the role of heterogeneous consumer sub-assemblages in the continual process of emergence and transformation of a brand assemblage through space and time—a process defined as brand morphogenesis. The findings detail brand morphogenesis in the sub-assemblage dynamics of exploration, actualization, and habituation of value, as heterogeneous consumer groups form consumer sub-assemblages in interaction with other brand components and interact in patterns of coexisting with, coopting, and contesting other sub-assemblages. By charting consumers’ value negotiations as they play out within and among consumer sub-assemblages, this research contributes to understanding continuity and change for brands that face increasing consumer heterogeneity. 

  • 163.
    Moltaji, Niloofar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Effects of textual and visual information in social media on international students’ choice of study destination: A qualitative study on how forms of information in social media affect international students’ decision-making with regards to the choice of study destination2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Social media has become an important tool for communication and marketing, and proper use of visual and textual information is very influential in social media marketing. Research has gone a long way explaining how information content significantly influences decision-making, however, it still lacks the knowledge about how different forms of information (such as textual, visual and audio-visual) in social media affects decision-making.  The aim of this study was to identify the use of social media by international students for choosing study abroad destinations, as well as the forms of information content that have a greater influence in their decision-making process. To achieve the aim, a qualitative approach was applied to collect data through semi-structured interviews with fourteen international master students at Stockholm Business School in Sweden. This study shows that social media has a low influence on international students’ decision-making with regards to the choice of study destination; however, they use social media as a search tool to conceptualise and justify their choice, feel stronger about their decision, and to increase their confidence. This study suggests that social media could indirectly or subconsciously play a part in students’ choice of study destination as the students could be subconsciously affected by social media information, in particular, by visual and audio-visual information. Moreover, information contents such as videos that are more provocative, based on multisensory and emotional cues, could have a greater influence on the international student. Additionally, international students experience higher levels of trust when they feel that the content is authentic. Finally, the thesis concludes with theoretical implications and recommendations for further research.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Effects_of_textual_and_visual_information_in_social_media_on_international_students_choice_of_study_destination_master_spring2018
  • 164.
    Mostaghel, Rana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Oghazi, Pejvak
    Lisboa, Ana
    The transformative impact of the circular economy on marketing theory2023In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 195, article id 122780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The circular economy (CE) is growing, and an increasing number of businesses are becoming aware of it. Demand from customers and new regulations from policymakers motivated many practitioners to transform their business models into circular business models. However, academia has not followed the same pace. Considering that the circular economy encloses unique attributes, it is crucially required to re-frame traditional marketing strategy theories. This article rigorously investigates marketing theory and practice in the CE, identifies the challenges of marketing in the CE, and introduces a new definition of marketing and additional stimulus in the marketing mix. Further, the article provides theoretical and managerial implications.

  • 165.
    Nilsson, Marianne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Lindquist, Sven-Olof
    Kulturisten2006Book (Other academic)
  • 166.
    Nordin, Camilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Schwartz, Daniela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Stridfelt, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Branding Sweden: A study of social media driven democracy and its implications2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The general purpose of this qualitative study is to investigate the implications in regard to power, structure and control connected to the project Curators of Sweden. The study looks at nation branding through the use of social media. The idea with the project Curators of Sweden is to invite citizens to participate at the official Twitter platform to project a multi-faceted image of Sweden. Through granting citizens access to an official channel some power and control is relinquished.The empirical data is collected through ten semi-structured interviews with curators and stakeholders. In addition a netnography is conducted based on historic secondary data in the form of tweets from the @sweden Twitter account. The data is analyzed through qualitative content analysis with coding inspired by grounded theory. The thematic codes from the analysis of the Stakeholders and Curators are then compared in regard to concepts that could be related.The themes that emerge from the analysis of data generated from the interviews of stakeholders and curators include: invisible hand, asymmetry in relations, national identity, tied hands and crisis as defining moment, self-censorship, bias, empowerment, social control and self-establishing format.The findings suggest that in the context of building national identity through social media incidents prove both challenging and rewarding. The incidents test the project, attract a lot of attention and confirm the Swedish core values of progressivity. When inviting citizens to participate in creating the content a blurring of accountability is evident since ownership over channel and content is separated. The account becomes self-establishing when locus of control is unclear and no one has full ownership.

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    Branding Sweden
  • 167.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Options for dealing with incompatible industrial service buyers2012In: SERVSIG International Research Conference 2012, Helsinki, Finland., 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 168.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Agndal, H
    Consequences of Outsourcing for Organisational Capabilities: Some Experiences from Best Practice2009In: Benchmarking: An International Journal, ISSN 1463-5771, E-ISSN 1758-4094, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 316-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The research on effects of outsourcing tends to focus on financial effects and effects at a country level. These are not the only consequences of outsourcing, though. When firms outsource functions previously performed in-house, they risk losing important competencies, knowledge, skills, relationships, and possibilities for creative renewal. Such non-financial consequences are poorly addressed in the literature, even though they may explain financial effects of outsourcing. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to develop a model that enables the study of non-financial consequences of outsourcing.

    Design/methodology/approach – Based on a review of the literature on interdependencies between organizational functions, a main proposition is developed: given that savings gained from outsourcing are not reinvested in the organization, outsourcing of any function will negatively impact the capabilities of that and other functions in the organization. This proposition is broken down into sub-propositions, which are tested through a focus group study. Respondents include purchasing professionals with experience from best practice outsourcing.

    Findings – The initial proposition is developed through identification of variables mediating the proposed negative consequences of outsourcing. Mediating variables are broken down into four categories: variables relating to the outsourcer, the outsourcee, the relationship between the parties, and the context.

    Research limitations/implications – By developing a model for the study of non-financial consequences of outsourcing, this paper takes a step towards opening up an important avenue for future research.

    Originality/value – This paper contributes to the outsourcing field by not only considering non-financial effects, but also by drawing on examples of best practice outsourcing to identify ways in which potentially negative consequences of outsourcing may be managed.

  • 169.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Brozovic, Danilo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    The Spineless Organization: The Most Extreme Form of Service Organization?2016In: Conference Proceedings: SERVSIG 2016, Maastricht, 2016, p. 449-453Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flexibility is generally considered an important driver of customer-perceived value (Lapierre, 2000). In contemporary business environments where the rapid development of new technologies, globalization, and an upheaval in industrial markets have led to increased uncertainty for firms acting in these markets (Sanchez, 1995, Hitt, Keats & DeMarie, 1998), this appears even more pertinent. Further, it is even more relevant for firms that strive to reposition themselves as part of their customers’ businesses (Normann, 2001). Although flexibility may seem like a natural part of service activities, the service literature is rather vague about this notion. For the most part, prior studies merely note that flexibility is important in a service context, with unsubstantiated claims such as “a degree of flexibility, after all, is central to good service” (Lovelock, 1993, p. 46)or “whereas typical manufacturing values often focus on efficiency, economies of scale, and the notion that variety and flexibility are costly, service-oriented values centre on innovation, customization, and the view that flexibility and variety create profits” (Gebauer, Fleisch & Friedli, 2005, p. 21). Indeed, there is an emerging body of research focusing on how flexibility can contribute to customer’s value creation (e.g., Hansen, Samuelsen & Silseth, 2008, Brozovic, Nordin & Kindström, 2016), but no one takes this issue as far as we attempt to do in this article by conceptualizing the “spineless organization”. A spineless organization is here defined as an organizational unit that always puts the customer's needs at the centre and is able tomeet them rapidly and efficiently regardless of what they are about and whether they were expected or not.

  • 170.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Brozovic, Danilo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Industriell marknadsföring och industriell ekonomi.
    A Flexibility Perspective on Services: A Critical Review and Reconceptualization2011In: Track 1: Perspectives on Service Research, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of flexibility has received substantial interest among academic scholarsover many years, particularly focusing on manufacturing related issues. Given an increasedturbulence in many markets, the interest seems well justified. However, the literature issurprisingly devoid of analysis of flexibility in service settings, or how flexibility and servicesare interrelated. The purpose here is therefore to offer a critical analysis of the literature and toconceptualize the interrelationship between flexibility and services. As such, this papercontributes with a novel perspective on services and may serve as a starting point for thedevelopment of a more formal flexibility-perspective on services.

  • 171.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Lindahl, Ingela
    Linköping University.
    Brege, Staffan
    Linköping University.
    Extending the perspective on service operations strategy: An exploratory study of service infusion in a low-tech industry2009In: 16th International Annual EurOMA Conference: Implementation - realizing Operations Management knowledge, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of solutions offerings in manufacturing industries has been an issue of growing interest, since it may be a means of counteracting the commoditisation of products. The literature on solutions offerings generally focuses on the high-tech industry, however. This paper therefore investigates if, why, and how the solutions literature is applicable also to firms in the low-tech industry. To this aim, qualitative data from interviews with executives at seven furniture manufacturing firms were investigated. Based on the results, a tentative model that links product complexity and dimensions of solutions offerings is put forth.

  • 172.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Lindahl, Ingela
    Brege, Staffan
    The Applicability of Integrated Solutions Offerings: Differential Effects of Product Complexity2013In: Journal of Relationship Marketing, ISSN 1533-2667, E-ISSN 1533-2675, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 59-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to develop a conceptual model of the influences of product complexity on the applicability and adoption of solutions offerings as a marketing strategy. Qualitative data from in-depth interviews with executives at 7 furniture manufacturing firms were investigated and a conceptual model was developed. Based on the results, a model for relationships between different aspects of complexity and solutions is proposed and an expansion of the complexity concept suggested. The article expands the knowledge on both solutions strategy and complexity and may also guide managers in the development of their marketing strategies.

  • 173.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Ravald, Annika
    Managing relationship gaps: An practitioner perspectiveIn: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 174.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Ravald, Annika
    Mohr, Jakki
    Capabilities for managing high-technology business networks2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a business landscape characterized by increasing competition and rapid technological development, managers are exposed to particular challenges, including how an increasing speed of development can be balanced with other requirements such as being cost effective. Inter-organizational cooperation is posited as a viable strategic strategy to balance these competing challenges and is particularly logical in high tech contexts. Of particular interest in this article are the different options for how organizations in technology intensive markets can manage their business network in order to develop and capture value in both the short and long term. We identify two different perspectives on uncertainty and dynamics in high-tech contexts, the dominant perspective that views uncertainty as somewhat predictable and an emerging perspective that views uncertainty as inherently unpredictable, and hence requires a more fluid approach to network management, one grounded in the notion of complex adaptive systems. Using the theoretical lens of organizational capabilities, as applied to network management capabilities, we develop the notion that different types of network management must be adapted for the very different types of uncertainty inherent in high-tech markets. The central thesis in this article is that the requisite capabilities for network management differ, depending upon these different types of turbulence, dynamism, and uncertainty.

  • 175.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Ravald, Annika
    Möller, Kristian
    Mohr, Jakki J.
    Network management in emergent high-tech business contexts: Critical capabilities and activities2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 74, p. 89-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to their inherent uncertainty, emerging high-tech business fields require a unique set of network management capabilities. Drawing from the dynamic capabilities literature and the networking capability literature, we develop a framework for network management in such environments. The framework consists of three interrelated capabilities context handling, network construction, and network position consolidation. A longitudinal case study of a start-up company in the smart energy sector validates and provides an illustrative understanding of the three capabilities. The findings identify how they are enacted through a portfolio of activities, providing a microfoundational insight into how a focal actor in an entrepreneurial and explorative manner navigates and manages a business field in the making. Our research contributes a novel conceptualization of network management capabilities with an explicit focus on attracting, establishing and managing relationships in the complex and uncertain environment of emerging high-tech fields. In addition, our research offers guidance to managers with respect to the capabilities they need to galvanize and coalesce actors in an emerging business network.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 176.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Ravald, Annika
    Viio, Paul
    Making marketing decisions in turbulent business contexts2018In: Conference Proceedings (extended abstracts) of 23rd International Conference CBIM2018: Sustainable Business Models: Integrating Employees, Customers and Technology / [ed] María L. Martín-Peña, José L. Ruiz-Alba, 2018, p. 53-57Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most, if not all, business contexts today are characterised by rapid change due to emerging technologies and macro-level disruptions. This makes decision making inherently challenging as increasingly complex issues need to be addressed and made sense of, often based on insufficient information and under time constraints. Although there is notable research on decision making in fast-moving markets (e.g., Eisenhardt, 1989), research with empirical grounds providing a real-world understanding (Basel & Brühl 2013) is scarce. We propose that there is a need for further research on how decision-making procedures and procedures align with different decision contexts. This knowledge gap is also addressed by Wierenga (2011), proposing more research on the determinants, outcomes, and conditions of decision-making processes in marketing. The purpose of this paper is to address this in gap in marketing theory, both in terms of better understanding how managers make sense of marketing problems in turbulent business contexts and what strategies they apply when making marketing decisions. We develop a conceptual model and provide empirically based propositions for how and why certain types decision processes (characterised by, e.g., their pace and nature) are adopted in specific decision contexts (with different problem structures, problem complexity, and problem context). Our specific focus is on marketing decisions in turbulent contexts where new business fields are emerging or where present business fields are disrupted. Such contexts are characterised by a lack of clear market structures and by high uncertainty concerning both the technological solutions and the potential key actors, their resources, and contributions (Nordin et al, 2017). Few research efforts have examined managerial marketing decisions in such contexts. A notable exception is provided by Yang and Gabrielsson (2017), 54 focusing on decision-making by entrepreneurs. Whereas they use effectuation theory (Sarasvathy, 2001) as the theoretical basis, we draw upon the problem-solving literature (e.g., Jonassen, 2000) and the behavioural aspects of decision making (Wierenga 2011, Basel & Brühl 2013). Thereby we contribute a novel perspective to this research area.

  • 177.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Rehme, J
    Risk in industrial offerings2009In: Creating business out of industrial offerings / [ed] D. Kindström, MTC , 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 178.
    Näslund, Linda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Nihlén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    KLIVET FRÅN ANSLAGSTAVLAN: – en fallstudie på försäkringskassan2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syfte: Arbetet syftar till att undersöka Försäkringskassans imagearbete och hur de arbetar med att skapa en image som rättvist avspeglar den nya identiteten ”Den Nya Försäkringskassan”.

    Metod: Vi utgår ifrån ett hermeneutiskt tolkande perspektiv för att skapa djupare förståelse i det som undersöks. Detta kombineras med en abduktiv ansats vid alstringen av kunskap där vi väger teori och empiri lika tungt, samt skapar dessa med hänsyn till varandra. Datainsamlingen består av både kvantitativa och kvalitativa insamlingsmetoder så som primärdata i form av semistruktureradeintervjuer och en enkätundersökning. Sekundärdata genom årsredovisning och budgetunderlag. Vi använder även oss av medarbetartidningen Dagens Socialförsäkring i sökandet efter empiri.

    Teori: Teorin grundar sig på rykteshantering och en varumärkesproblematik kring förmedlingen av identitet och skapandet av en image. Hur marknadskommunikation kan användas som verktyg för att förmedla identiteten till medborgarna samt de svårigheter som kan förekomma om organisationen dras med ett dåligt rykte.

    Empiri: Det empiriska materialet är insamlat ur två perspektiv, Försäkringskassans och medborgarnas. Enligt de representanter vi intervjuat på Försäkringskassan handlar ”Den Nya Försäkringskassan” dels om en förbättrad informationsförmedling samtidigt som den är en del av arbetet med förmedlingen av myndigheten som en ”trovärdig avsändare”. Resultatet av attitydundersökningen visar dock att det finns en låg grad av tillförlit och trovärdighet från medborgarna gentemot Försäkringskassan.

    Analys: Analysen tar utgångspunkt ur de två perspektiv som behandlats under uppsatsens gång. Vi visar med utgångspunkt från en eget utformad analysmodell på de förutsättningar och svårigheter en integration mellan identitet och image står inför.

    Diskussion: Varför förändras inte bilden av försäkringskassan till det bättre, trots de ambitiösa ansatserna till att skapa högre trovärdighet? Det kan antas att kunderna påverkas av egna upplevelser och erfarenheter i större utsträckning än den externa marknadskommunikationen samtidigt som de redan inpräglade negativa associationerna med offentlig sektor kan ha satt djupaspår hos Försäkringskassans rykte.

    Slutsatser: Försäkringskassan är genom sitt imagearbete inne på rätt spår vid skapandet av ett bättre rykte. Integrationen mellan identitet och image, som är grunden till ett gott rykte står dock inför en utmaning eftersom den påverkas av faktorer som Försäkringskassan själva inte kan kontrollera.

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    fulltext
  • 179. Ordabayeva, Nailya
    et al.
    Çakanlar, Aylin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    System Justification and Sharing EconomyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Ordonez Asenjo, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Power, Social Identity and Fashion Consumption: A thesis on how female executives use power-coded dressing as a tool to accentuate power as a part of their social identity.2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the thesis is to contribute to the CCT research field on social identity, by placing a focus on power from a customer perspective and studying how power can be accentuated within social identity. Theory from CCT with a focus on social identity has been used in combination with extensive literature on power and authority from a sociological perspective and literature from Fashion-Studies focusing on power-dressing, conspicuous consumption and luxury.

    The research question is: How is power-dressing and consumption of high-end luxury fashion brands used by female executives/senior managers in an attempt to accentuate power as a part of their social identity?

    In-depth semi-structured interviews where used as the main data collection method interviewing five female senior managers/female executives working in Stockholm; using the fashion consumption of female senior managers as its empirical sample.

    The main conclusion on this thesis is the creation of the concept of power-coded-dressing.This thesis implications are that it develops the CCT field slightly by adding a consumer-power perspective into the theoretical discourse. Its practical and social implications help women accentuate their power through, power-coded-dressing.

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    Power, social identity and fashion consumption
  • 181.
    Ostberg, Jacob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    En riktig man: konsumtionskulturteori om mode2009In: Mode: en introduktion: en tvärvetenskaplig betraktelse / [ed] Dirk Gindt och Louise Wallenberg, Stockholm: Raster förlag, 2009, 1, p. 392-407Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 182.
    Ostberg, Jacob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    The Moral Stigmatization of the Noveaux Pauvres: An analysis of the TV-show The Luxury Trap2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 183.
    Parment, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Die Generation Y: Mitarbeiter der Zukunft: Herausforderung und Erfolgsfaktor für das Personalmanagement.2009Book (Other academic)
  • 184.
    Parment, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Distribution Strategies for Premium and Volume Brands in Highly Competitive Consumer Markets2008In: Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, ISSN 0969-6989, E-ISSN 1873-1384, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 250-265Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 185.
    Parment, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Formalisera generations- och kompetensväxlingen2009In: Med blicken framåt. Några framtida utmaningar och möjligheter för en attraktiv arbetsgivare / [ed] Parment, A., Wetterberg, G. & Lindström, L, SKL , 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 186.
    Parment, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Fungerande belöningssystem – en framgångsfaktor2009In: Med blicken framåt. Några framtida utmaningar och möjligheter för en attraktiv arbetsgivare / [ed] Parment, A., Wetterberg, G. & Lindström, L, SKL , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 187.
    Parment, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Ny tid kräver nya förhållningssätt och strategier2009In: Med blicken framåt. Några framtida utmaningar och möjligheter för en attraktiv arbetsgivare / [ed] Parment, A., Wetterberg, G. & Lindström, L., SKL , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 188.
    Pavlovica, Nadezda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Lendeng, Jeannie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    The consumer perspective of brand activism: A qualitative study of how consumers view brand activism and the genuineness of it2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Upon Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and the outbreak of war in early 2022, brands around the world took a stand to mark their position against Russia and in support of Ukraine. Even brands that did not have any direct ties to Russia or any involvement in the conflict distanced themselves from being associated with Russia by ceasing operations, stopping sales, or changing brand names. Brands engaging in sociopolitical issues, i.e., brand activism, has become more prevalent in recent years and thus become a topic of research. Previous research on brand activism focuses heavily on the corporate perspective, and only recently have scholars studied the effects on consumers. Guided by the research question “How do consumers perceive brand activism and what role does brand authenticity play in their evaluation of genuine brand activism?”, this study aims to offer a deeper understanding of consumers’ views on brand activism and how they evaluate its genuineness using qualitative methods. With a starting point in a recent event that brands have engaged in, namely the war in Ukraine, the study reveals that consumers' views on brand activism vary greatly, and for the majority, brand activism is not a decisive factor in their choice of brand. However, consumers still have a positive attitude towards brands engaging in brand activism and some find it somewhat important that brands do it. Despite this, consumers do not find it necessary for brands to engage in sociopolitical issues. Further, the study found that, in evaluating the genuineness of brand activism, consumers tend to refer to the existing associations with a brand, how authentic they perceive the brand prior to the brand taking a stand, and how well the brand associations align with the sociopolitical issue the at hand.

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    The consumer perspective of brand activism - A qualitative study of how consumers view brand activism and the genuineness of it
  • 189. Perry, Chad
    et al.
    Gummesson, Evert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Action research in marketing.2004In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 38, no 3/4, p. 310-320Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 190.
    Persson, Cornelia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Nilsson, Sabina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    "Äkta" reklam du ej kan ignorera: En studie av hur lyssnare upplever sig påverkas av native advertising som reklamformat  i podcasts2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Marketing is undergoing a continuous developing phase, in the same phase as the society is moving forward. Hence, there will always be new marketing formats to analyze and understand. Native advertising is a way of advertising that most media today use and podcasts are one of the media channels that has embraced this. Native advertising aims to lend credibility from editorial content and is also known as editorially disguised advertising.The purpose of this study is to attain a deeper understanding of how listeners to podcasts perceive that they are being influenced by native advertising as an advertising format. A lot of studies have been conducted of how consumers relate and experiencing native advertising in written medias such as newspapers. However, how listeners to podcasts experience this is significantly less explored. This study investigates consumers' perceptions of native advertising in podcast, with “Fredagspodden” as an empirical example as it was the first Swedish podcast to present their advertising in this format. To create a deeper understanding of the matter, a qualitative approach has been chosen, where 10 semi structured interviews have been conducted. The respondents' answers were then analyzed using the theory "Psychological Reactance" as well as advertising as influence and information tool. By the results of the study, it was found that the placement of advertising could be experienced as manipulative when it occurred in the middle of the podcast program, as it was not always clear that it was sponsored content. It was also discovered that the listeners partly perceived the editorial advertisement as entertaining and informative, but at the same time ridiculed which lowered its credibility. Well-targeted and customized advertising that becomes relevant to the listeners, proved vital for a positive response. Thus, the two chosen theories could be used to explain the problematization of the matter.

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    fulltext
  • 191. Persson, Lennart
    et al.
    Skärvad, Per-Hugo
    Söderman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Långsiktsplanering inom tyngre industri: fallstudier med analys1975Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 192.
    Pihl, Christofer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Brands, community and style: exploring linking value in fashion blogging2014In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 3-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – By using the concept of style, this article aims to elaborate on the notion of brand community. More specifically, it seeks to explore how style can function as a linking value in forms of communities centred on brands that emerge within the empirical context of fashion and social media.

    Design/methodology/approach - A netnography of the content produced by 18 fashion bloggers in Sweden was conducted. Content analysis of this material was used to map how consumption objects, in terms of fashion brands, were integrated in activities taking place on blogs, and through these processes, acted as a linking value for community members.

    Findings – This paper demonstrates how fashion bloggers, together with their readers, constitute a form of community centred on style. It also shows how fashion bloggers, by combining and assembling fashion brands and products, articulate and express different style sets, and how they, together with their followers, engage in activities connected to these style ideals.

    Research limitations/implications - As this study has been empirically limited to a Swedish setting, future research would benefit from findings of international expressions of communities of style.

    Practical implications - Based on this study, strategies for managing communities of style is suggested to represent a potential source of competitive advantage for fashion firms.

    Originality/value – In the context of the conceptual discussion about what brings members of communities together, this study provides evidence of how style can function as a linking value in the setting of consumer communities that emerge within the boundaries of fashion and social media.

  • 193.
    Pihl, Christofer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    When customers create the ad and sell it: a value network approach2013In: Journal of Global Academy of Marketing Science, ISSN 1229-7119, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 127-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within marketing research, the notion of “vigilante marketers” has been offered to describe consumers' increased participation in the production of marketing messages and processes of value co-creation. Using a value network approach, the purpose of this study is to explain the role of vigilante marketers in their interaction with firms seeking to impose managerial control and influence processes of co-creation of brand values. A netnography of the content produced by 18 market-leading fashion bloggers in Sweden was conducted during 2009. This study revealed that these fashion bloggers are part of an emergent value network and have realised the value that they co-create for brands using various forms of vigilante marketing. The findings presented in this paper challenge the notion of vigilante marketing as an independent and unpaid activity, illustrating how a value network approach can facilitate the study of the borderlands emerging between consumers and producers.

  • 194.
    Pihl, Christofer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Christian, Sandström
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Social media, value creation and appropriation: the business model of fashion bloggers in Sweden2011In: 12th International Continuous Innovation Network (CINet) Conference, Arhus, Denmark, 11-13 September, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 195.
    Pihl, Christofer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Consumer involvement and engagement in user-generated content: an explorative study of Swedish fashion brands in social media2013In: 22nd Nordic Academy of Management Conference: held at University of Iceland Reykjavík, 21-23 August, 2013: final program and abstracts, Nordic Academy of Management (NFF) , 2013, p. 100-100Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 196. Pomering, Alan
    et al.
    Frostling-Henningsson, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Anthropomorhic brand presenters: The appeal of Frank the Sheep2014In: Brand mascots: And other marketing animals / [ed] Stephen Brown, Sharon Ponsonby-McCabe, Routledge, 2014, p. 141-162Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the appeal of anthropomorphism to marketers. This is done through reference to three relevant advertising models, the Symbolic Communications Model, the Symbolic Transfer Device Model, and the VisCAP Presenter Model, and one critical case study involving an anthropomorphized sheep presenter for a Swedish mobile telecommunications company. The advertising models are found to support the effectiveness of the symbolic presenter, Frank the Sheep, particularly explaining how meaning is transferred from the presenter to the brand, and the effects the presenter has on advertising communication effects such as brand awareness and brand attitude. We extend previous research on how linking anthropomorphic associations to brands can be employed to increase effectiveness of these common marketing communication tactics. We show that anthropomorphized animals can work effectively and quickly when presenting a new brand to the market, but also offer several cautions for managers.

    Summary statement of contribution

    We contribute to theory by drawing together three different but related strands of advertising to explicate how the anthropomorphic brand presenter can increase advertising effectiveness, particularly in quickly positioning or repositioning a brand and developing brand equity. We contribute to managerial practice by demonstrating, through the use of one critical case study, how the choice of anthropomorphic brand presenter must be a considered process, but is one that can add to advertising effectiveness if managed appropriately.

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    Anthropomorhic brand presenters
  • 197.
    Preiholt, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Creative capabilities in fashion extended to the supply chain2015In: Global Fashion Management Conference: Proceedings, 2015, p. 288-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study illuminates the inherent difficulty to manage creativity in fashion design as well as the innovation capabilities in an entire fashion firm. The paper is elaborating creative capabilities in fashion extended to the entire supply chain. In addition to manufacturers and retailers the supply chain also includes transporters, warehouses, stores, and even customers themselves. Within each stage includes all parts needed to get and satisfy customer requirements. This research is based on data from two of the most rapid growing and profit increasing fashion brands in Sweden, which are Cheap Monday and Acne Studios. The analysis has three starting points and definitions. i.e. fashion design, creativity and innovation. The results show that creative capabilities have to been spread out in the entire supply chain to be an efficient component in the building and managing an innovative firm such as it is the case in the fashion industry.

  • 198.
    Preiholt, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    From Collective Selection to Individual Style: A Symbolic Transfer in Fashion2012In: Journal of Global Fashion Marketing, ISSN 2093-2685, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 5-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper aims to uncover the reasons why fashion appears in terms of collective selection in a movement towards individual style in the way people dress. Here, fashion is viewed in terms of collective fashion trends and personal style. Thus, it is the clothes, dressing habits, and garments that are observed in the research. The paper shows how the theory of symbolic interactionism can be used as an analytical tool to bring transparency to the movement from collective selection towards individual style in the fashion industry. This theoretical approach, which is connected to social interaction helps avoid the classical research trap of making statements through the study of cause and effect. The analysis is made based on examples of meanings created around the garment through an observation of the process from the initial meaning the person gives to as a symbol in social interaction, to the final stage when it becomes an individual style. There are four such phases that together create the final picture of why fashion is heading towards individual style. All these phases have different sources, and naturally provide different answers to the initial research question in this paper. Once the garment is turned into an individual style and, as customers seek more details in garments, there then occur a collapse of the “total look” towards hyper individuality.

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    fulltext
  • 199.
    Preiholt, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Köpa eller Tillverka: Valet mellan inköp och egentillverkning i svensk verkstadsindustri1986Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 200.
    Preiholt, Håkan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Kumar, Nishant
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Managerial innovation practices in fashion companies2016Conference paper (Other academic)
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