Change search
Refine search result
1234 151 - 161 of 161
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151.
    Wahlström, Joakim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Magnusson, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Parents’ drinking, childhood hangover? Parental alcohol use, subjective health complaints and perceived stress among Swedish adolescents aged 10–18 years2023In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, article id 162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Alcohol abuse is not only harmful to the consumer but may also negatively impact individuals in the drinker’s social environment. Alcohol’s harm to others is vital to consider when calculating the true societal cost of alcohol use. Children of parents who have alcohol use disorder tend to have an elevated risk of negative outcomes regarding, e.g., health, education, and social relationships. Research on the general youth population has established a link between parental drinking and offspring alcohol use. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding other outcomes, such as health. The current study aimed to investigate the associations between parental drinking and children’s psychological and somatic complaints, and perceived stress.

    Methods Data were derived from a nationally representative sample, obtained from the 2010 Swedish Level-of-Living survey (LNU). Parents and adolescents (ages 10–18) living in the same households were interviewed independently. The final study sample included 909 adolescents from 629 households. The three outcomes, psychological and somatic complaints and perceived stress, were derived from adolescents’ self-reports. Parents’ selfreports of alcohol use, both frequency and quantity, were used to categorise adolescents as having abstaining, lowconsuming, moderate-drinking, or heavy-drinking parents. Control variables included adolescents’ gender, age, family structure, and household socioeconomic status. Linear and binary logistic regression analyses were performed.

    Results Parental heavy drinking was more common among adolescents living in more socioeconomically advantaged households and among adolescents living with two custodial parents or in reconstituted families. Adolescents with heavy-drinking parents reported higher levels of psychological and somatic complaints and had an increased likelihood of reporting stress, compared with those having moderate-drinking parents. These associations remained statistically significant when adjusting for all control variables.

    Conclusion The current study’s results show that parental alcohol consumption is associated with poorer offspring adolescent health. Public health policies that aim to reduce parental drinking or provide support to these adolescents may be beneficial. Further studies investigating the health-related outcomes among young people living with heavy-drinking parents in the general population are needed to gain more knowledge about these individuals and to implement adequate public health measures.

  • 152.
    Wahlström, Joakim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Svensson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Löfstedt, Petra
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Sense of Unity and Self-Reported Health Among 15-year-Olds: Findings From the Swedish 2017/18 Health Behavior in School-Aged Children Study2021In: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 66, article id 621964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Sense of unity refers to the positive feeling of being part of a larger socialstructure. This study aimed to investigate to what extent adolescents report sense of unityand if this differs across groups, and to assess the associations between sense of unityand self-reported health while taking into account sociodemographic characteristics andtangible social relationships.

    Methods: Data were obtained from the 2017/18 Swedish Health Behavior in School-agedChildren study, using information collected among 15-year-old students (n1,392). Linearand binary logistic regression analyses were performed.

    Results: The participants reported overall high levels of sense of unity. Sense of unity didnot differ by gender, but adolescents without an immigrant background and those withhigher family affluence reported higher levels. Sense of unity was inversely associated withpsychological complaints, somatic complaints, and less than good self-rated health, evenwhen adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and family, classmate, and teacherrelationships.

    Conclusion :This study suggests that sense of unity may be an important socialdeterminant for adolescent health. More research is needed on the origins andimplications of sense of unity.

  • 153.
    Wahlström, Joakim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). The Swedish Council for Information on Alcohol and Other Drugs, Sweden.
    Löfstedt, Petra
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    There’s a tear in my beer: Bullying victimisation and young teenage drinking in Sweden2023In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 154, article id 107123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Victims of bullying are at an increased risk not only of developing adverse mental health, but also of engaging in health risk behaviours. One way in which adolescents may cope with the health-related consequences of bullying victimisation is through substance use such as alcohol and narcotics, as posited by the self-medication hypothesis. Indeed, previous research has found a link between traditional (face-to-face) bullying victimisation and alcohol use among adolescents, albeit with some inconsistencies. However, studies examining both traditional bullying and cyberbullying among youth often report an association only between cyberbullying victimisation and drinking. The current study seeks to add to this field of research by analysing the predictive capacity of traditional and cyberbullying victimisation for youth drinking whilst also adjusting for bullying perpetration and sociodemographic characteristics. In the analyses, we distinguished between occasional and frequent victimisation, and performed separate investigations of how specific types of traditional bullying and cyberbullying victimisation are related to youth drinking. Data were obtained from the Swedish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey, with pooled cross-sectional information from 2013/14 and 2017/18 collected among 13- and 15-year-old students (n =7126). Any alcohol use and drunkenness during the past 30 days were used as dependent variables. The respondents were categorised as non-victims, occasional victims, and frequent victims of traditional and cyberbullying, respectively. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the associations between bullying victimisation and youth drinking. The results showed that 21.2% of students reported that they had been bullied at least once or twice in the past months, either as victims of traditional bullying only (8.3%), cyberbullying only (7.8%), or both (5.1%). When both types of bullying victimisation were mutually adjusted for, only cyberbullying remained significantly associated with an increased risk of drinking. However, when specific types of face-to-face bullying victimisation were analysed, several statistically significant associations with youth drinking were found, even when controlling for cyberbullying victimisation. Associations with any alcohol use and drunkenness were overall very similar. To conclude, this study corroborates previous research which has shown youth drinking to be more consistently related with cyberbullying victimisation than with traditional bullying victimisation. The study also extends previous knowledge by showing that the association between traditional bullying victimisation and youth drinking differs depending on the operationalisation of victimisation. Future research might benefit from examining this more thoroughly. The findings highlight that interventions targeting bullying and its effects should consider both face-to-face and online victimisation. 

  • 154. Wallander, Lisa
    et al.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Fat Words or Useful Concepts? Consensus and Variation in Conceptions of Problematic Drinking in Contemporary Sweden2019In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 241-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to bring to light the meanings attributed to four concepts denoting problematic drinking—"alcoholism," "alcohol dependence," "alcohol misuse," and "risky drinking"—and to investigate whether individuals' preferences for using these concepts vary depending on their demographic characteristics, their stakeholder group membership, and their own drinking habits. These questions were examined by means of a vignette experiment, in which Swedish social workers, health care staff, journalists, researchers, and the general public (n = 863) read a series of 10 randomly constructed fictitious cases (vignettes; n = 8,630) and made judgments about which of the four concepts best portrayed the case descriptions. Results based on multilevel multinomial logistic regression showed that alcoholism was the concept chosen for the "heaviest" and most problematic drinking, whereas risky drinking was most often employed to describe moderate drinking habits that resulted in few negative consequences. The concepts alcohol misuse and alcohol dependence were positioned between alcoholism and risky drinking, and while misuse was linked to drinking large quantities and to more negative consequences, dependence was more frequently used to describe vignettes that involved depictions of craving. Moreover, the respondents' conceptual choices were affected by their own gender, age, drinking habits, and stakeholder group membership. Taken together, the study's findings reveal both consensus and variation in the respondents' choice of concepts, indicating that while these concepts may to some extent be employed for making meaningful distinctions between different types of problematic drinking, there is substantial variation in the way the concepts are employed.

  • 155. Weatherall, Teagan J.
    et al.
    Conigrave, James H.
    Conigrave, Katherine M.
    Perry, Jimmy
    Wilson, Scott
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
    Fitts, Michelle S.
    Hayman, Noel
    Lee, K. S. Kylie
    Prevalence and correlates of alcohol dependence in an Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representative sample: Using the Grog Survey App2022In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 125-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Little is known about the prevalence of current alcohol dependence in Indigenous Australian communities. Here we identify the frequency of reported symptoms, estimate the prevalence and describe the correlates of current alcohol dependence. Methods. A representative sample of Indigenous Australians (16+ years) was recruited from an urban and remote community in South Australia. Data were collected between July and October 2019 via a tablet computer-based application. Participants were likely dependent if they reported two or more dependence symptoms (ICD-11; in the last 12 -months), weekly or more frequently. Chi-square tests described the relationship between demographics, remoteness and alcohol dependence. Spearman correlations estimated the relationship between symptoms of dependence, consumption characteristics and demographics. Results. A total of 775 Indigenous Australians participated. The most frequently reported symptoms were prioritising alcohol over other things and loss of control. Overall, 2.2% were likely dependent on alcohol (n = 17/775). Prevalence did not vary by remoteness. Participants who drank more and more frequently tended to report more frequent symptoms of dependence. In the urban site, men tended to report more frequent symptoms of dependence than women. Age, income and schooling were not linked to dependence. Discussion and Conclusions. The prevalence of current alcohol dependence in this representative sample was similar to that of the general Australian and international estimates. Understanding risk factors for current alcohol dependence will be useful to inform the allocation of funding and support. Accurate estimates of the prevalence of current alcohol dependence are important to better identify specialist treatment needs.

  • 156. Wilkinson, Claire
    et al.
    MacLean, Sarah
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
    Restricting alcohol outlet density through cumulative impact provisions in planning law: Challenges and opportunities for local governments2020In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 61, article id 102227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: There is international interest in how to limit growth in alcohol availability in areas of high outlet density in order to reduce alcohol-related harms. Town planning legislation in Victoria, Australia, allows local government officers to refuse planning permits for new licensed premises on ‘cumulative impact’ grounds (impacts from existing alcohol outlet density). State guidelines (PN61) outline how local government planners should approach cumulative impact assessments. This paper explores officers’ views and experience assessing cumulative impact in order to understand whether the legislation assists officers limit alcohol availability in areas of high outlet density.

    Methods: Interviews with 22 officers from 11 local governments who were recruited with purposive sampling to reflect a range of licensing environments. Interview transcripts were analysed inductively, and content categorized accordingly.

    Findings: Officers challenged the definition and relevance of the alcohol outlet density threshold provided in state guidelines. They faced problems securing relevant amenity data for assessing cumulative impact and pointed to the guidelines’ inadequacy for assessing off-premise licences. They pointed to the limits of cumulative impact assessments as a tool for planning and were unconvinced they would lead to reductions in permits granted.

    Conclusions: A single state-wide density threshold to guide cumulative impact assessments is unlikely to be a relevant measure for several local governments. A greater orientation towards municipal variation and alcohol outlet characteristics is needed. Further research is needed to investigate whether cumulative impact assessments increase restrictions on liquor licence planning permits and whether the adoption of local planning

  • 157. Wilms, Nicolas
    et al.
    Seitz, Nicki-Nils
    Schwarzkopf, Larissa
    Olderbak, Sally
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany; ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary.
    Alcoholic Beverage Preference in Germany: An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis of Trends 1995-20182023In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 426-435Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Germany is experiencing a decline in alcohol consumption but not for every alcoholic beverage type. Given the differential health impacts of alcoholic beverage type, it is important to understand the drivers of these trends. We investigated: (a) temporal trends in beverage preference and (b) the effects of age, period and cohort on these trends.

    Methods: Data came from nine waves (1995–2018; ntotal = 75,550) of the German Epidemiological Survey of Substance Abuse, a nationally representative household survey of individuals aged 18–59 years. The quantity of beer, wine, spirits and mixed drinks drank in the last 30 days was transformed into grammes of ethanol, and the beverage type preference was estimated as the proportion of total ethanol consumption. Fractional multinomial logit regression was applied to analyse the age, period and cohort effects on temporal trends of beverage preference by sex.

    Results: The preference for spirits and mixed drinks decreased with increasing age, while the preference for wine increased with no age effect on beer. There was a general decrease in the preference for beer and an increase in the preference for wine among both sexes, with an additional increase in the preference for spirits in males.

    Conclusion: Trends in beverage preference were more related to individual ageing and changes in the whole population than to cohorts. With the continued reduction in alcohol consumption, the decreasing preference for beer and the growing preference for wine suggest a positive development. Trends of an increasing preference for spirits in males are of concern.

  • 158. Wright, Cassandra
    et al.
    Dietze, Paul M.
    Kuntsche, Emmanuel
    Livingston, Michael
    Agius, Paul A.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
    Raggatt, Michelle
    Hellard, Margaret
    Lim, Megan S. C.
    Effectiveness of an Ecological Momentary Intervention for Reducing Risky Alcohol Consumption Among Young Adults: Protocol for a Three-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial2020In: JMIR Research Protocols, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 9, no 3, article id e14190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recent research has investigated the utility of mobile phone-delivered interventions for reducing risky single-occasion drinking, also known as binge drinking. In the past five years, focus has been placed on ecological momentary interventions (EMIs), which aim to deliver intervention content in correspondence to real-time assessments of behavior, also known as ecological momentary assessments (EMAs).

    Objective: This study aims to assess the effect of a fully automated, tailored, mobile phone-delivered EMI termed Mobile Intervention for Drinking in Young people (MIDY) on young people's risky single-occasion drinking behavior.

    Methods: We will use a three-armed randomized controlled trial design to determine the impact of MIDY on peak consumption of alcohol among young people. A list of mobile telephone numbers for random digit dialing will be generated, and researchers will telephone potential participants to screen for eligibility. Participants will be randomized into one of three intervention groups. For 6 weeks, EMI, EMA, and attention control groups will complete hourly EMA surveys on their mobile phones on Friday and Saturday nights. EMI participants will receive personalized feedback in the form of text messages corresponding to their EMA survey responses, which focus on alcohol consumption, spending, and mood. EMA participants will not receive feedback. A third group will also complete EMA and receive feedback text messages at the same time intervals, but these will be focused on sedentary behavior and technology use. All groups will also complete a short survey on Saturday and Sunday mornings, with the primary outcome measure taken on Sunday mornings. A more detailed survey will be sent on the final Sunday of the 6-week period, and then again 1 year after recruitment.

    Results: The primary outcome measure will be an observed change (ie, reduction) in the mean peak number of drinks consumed in a single night over the 6-week intervention period between the EMI and attention control groups as measured in the weekly EMA. We expect to see a greater reduction in mean peak drinking in the EMI group compared to that in the attention control group. As a secondary aim, we will assess whether mean peak drinking is reduced in the EMA group compared to the attention control group. We will use a random-effects mixed-modeling approach using maximum-likelihood estimation to provide estimates of differences in peak drinking across time periods between those receiving the intervention (EMI) and attention control participants. An intention-to-treat approach will be taken for the analysis. Individuals and study groups will be modeled as random and fixed factors, respectively.

    Conclusions: This study extends our previous work investigating the efficacy of a mobile EMI (MIDY) for reducing risky drinking among young adults in Australia, and will add to the expanding literature on the use of mobile interventions for reducing risky alcohol consumption.

  • 159. Wullinger, Pia M.
    et al.
    Bickl, Andreas M.
    Loy, Johanna K.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany; Eötvöos Loránd University, Hungary.
    Schwarzkopf, Larissa
    Longitudinal associations between psychiatric comorbidity and the severity of gambling disorder: Results from a 36-month follow-up study of clients in Bavarian outpatient addiction care2023In: Journal of Behavioral Addictions, ISSN 2062-5871, E-ISSN 2063-5303, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 535-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: Individuals with gambling disorder (GD) often suffer from psychiatric comorbidities. Previous studies demonstrated greater severity of GD among gamblers with psychiatric comorbidities. However, evidence on the association between psychiatric comorbidity and course of GD severity during and after outpatient treatment is sparse. This study analyses data from a longitudinal one-armed cohort study on outpatient addiction care clients over three years. Methods: We investigated the course of GD severity using data from 123 clients in 28 outpatient addiction care facilities in Bavaria using generalized estimation equations (GEE). We applied time* interaction analyses to examine different development profiles in participants with and without (1) affective disorders, or (2) anxiety disorders, and (3) to account for the co-occurrence of both. Results: All participants benefitted from outpatient gambling treatment. Improvement in GD severity was poorer in participants with anxiety disorders compared to participants without anxiety disorders. The co-occurrence of affective and anxiety disorders was linked to a less favourable course of GD than the presence of affective disorders alone. However, the combined occurrence of both disorders was more favourable than the presence of anxiety disorders alone. Discussion and conclusions: Our study suggests that clients with GD, with and without psychiatric comorbidities, benefit from outpatient gambling care. Psychiatric comorbidity, especially comorbid anxiety disorders, seems to be negatively associated with the course of GD within outpatient gambling care. Addressing psychiatric comorbidity within the treatment of GD and offering individualised help are required to meet the needs of this clientele.

  • 160. Ye, Yu
    et al.
    Cherpitel, Cheryl J.
    Witbrodt, Jane
    Andreuccetti, Gabriel
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
    The interactive effect of location, alcohol consumption and non-traffic injury2020In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 115, no 9, p. 1640-1649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim This study aimed to assess the extent to which the association between recent alcohol consumption and risk of non-traffic injury varies according to location at the time of the injury. Design Case-cross-over design. Setting and participants A total of 15 625 injury patients from 49 emergency departments (EDs) in 22 countries. Measurements Recent alcohol consumption and location at the time of the injury were assessed for when the injury occurred and for the same time 1 week prior to this. The confounding and interactive effects of location were examined by estimating the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of injury from alcohol consumption adjusting for location and then by examining the alcohol consumption x location interaction. Findings There were significant interactive effects of location and alcohol consumption on injury risk. For example, the ORs for volume 0.1-3.0 drinks and street/public place each were 3.0 and 14.2, respectively, whereas the OR for their joint effect was 44.1, suggesting a positive additive interaction [relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) = 27.9, P < 0.05] and zero multiplicative interaction (OR = 1.0, P = 0.895). The interactions of alcohol consumption with drinking establishment location, work-place and other locations were mostly additive and negative on the multiplicative scale (e.g. for interaction between volume 0.1-3.0 drinks and drinking establishment location: RERI = 1.19, P = 0.529; multiplicative interaction OR = 0.54, P < 0.05). Conclusions Location appears to influence the relationship between alcohol consumption and risk of injury. The association between alcohol consumption and injury appears to be greater in locations such as streets and public places compared with private residences.

  • 161. Yeung, Jun-Ting
    et al.
    Livingston, Michael
    Callinan, Sarah
    Wright, Cassandra
    Kuntsche, Emmanuel
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
    Dietze, Paul
    Effects of Question Type and Order When Measuring Peak Consumption of Risky Drinking Events2020In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 631-640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: There is new interest in measuring alcohol consumption during risky drinking events, but there is little guidance on how to best ask such questions. In this study, we contrast two different types of questions on peak consumption over a single heavy drinking occasion. We used a general question that ask respondents to recall the total amount consumed (total consumption question), and location-specific questions that ask respondents to recall consumption in each drinking location (location-specific peak consumption, LSPC).

    Methods: Heavy drinkers (>= 11 Australian Standard Drinks (ASD) per occasion for males, >= 8 for females) from the second wave of a prospective cohort study were recruited via landline random digit dial from Melbourne in 2012. Respondents were randomly assigned to surveys of different question order, and either first received total consumption (n = 127) or LSPC questions (n = 147). T-tests compared peak consumption between categories stratified by sex and consumption tercile.

    Results: Mean peak consumption was 12.5 ASD. Irrespective of question order, consumption amounts for total consumption and LSPC questions were not significantly different for both sexes. However, drinkers in the highest tercile asked LSPC questions first provided significantly higher consumption estimates in response to the total consumption question than in response to the LSPC questions.

    Conclusion: At a population level, LSPC and total consumption questions produce similar estimates of peak consumption for risky drinking events. Except for heavy drinkers, general consumption questions may be sufficient when asking about these drinking events in consumption surveys, without the greater response burden of longer LSPC questions.

1234 151 - 161 of 161
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf