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  • 151.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    The cosmopolitan organization: An essay on corporate accountability2003In: Global Networks, ISSN 1470-2266, E-ISSN 1471-0374, Vol. 3, no 3, 355-370 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transnational corporations increasingly seek to present a vision of social responsibility alongside the business vision. This reflects greater awareness of ‘the world as one single place’, of global risk scenarios, and the politics of doing business. There are also demands for greater transparency and accountability in corporate actions by state representatives, grassroots movements and organized consumers. Transnational corporations now aim to be socially responsible and to engage in ‘corporate citizenship’ by adhering to voluntary codes of conduct, social accountability standards, etc. This discourse of corporate accountability is part of a discourse of globality, or ‘globe talk’, a vital component of contemporary world culture, largely produced, diffused, and sustained by organizations with expansive ambitions of regulating global business; transnational corporations, business associations, international organizations, NGOs and INGOs. Awareness of the global nature of trade and capitalism, the associated risk scenarios, and the attempts at approaching something like a humane globalization by the setting up of ethics standards and codes of conduct, may be understood as a particular case of ‘worldism’. This ‘worldism’ is foundational, with universalizing and homogenizing claims. ‘Corporate citizenship’ and ‘accountability’ are therefore treated as a form of organizational culture that involves a particular kind of moral cosmopolitanism.

  • 152.
    Olsson, Erik O A
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Väljer att vara annorlunda2003In: I&M, ISSN 1404-6857Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 153.
    Olsson, Erik A O
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Väljer att vara annorlunda2003In: I&M, ISSN 1404-6857Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 154.
    Alneng, Victor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The modern does not cater for natives: Travel ethnography and the conventions of form2002In: Tourist Studies, ISSN 1468-7976, E-ISSN 1741-3206, Vol. 2, no 2, 119-142 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a response to editors Adrian Franklin and Mike Crang’s outline of ‘the trouble with tourism and travel theory’, this article sketches some further troubles. It is argued that researchers have adopted modernist spatio-temporal distinctions that reproduce a singularity of the Tourist-as-Westerner. Meanwhile non-Westerners are mostly seen as immobile pre-modern participants of Western tourism. As non-Western tourism involves considerably more people than Western tourism, tourism theories on the whole do not necessarily fit most tourists of the world today, and they may even serve to re-enforce the global geopolitical hierarchy. Illustrated with ethnographic examples from Vietnam, it is suggested that a radical questioning of autocentric spatio-temporal distinctions is needed to arrive at a more heterogeneous and complex view of both modernity and tourism. While this will open up the field of inquiry, a sensitivity to socio-cultural diversities and, more importantly, global inequalities and the situated knowledge production is needed.

  • 155.
    Alneng, Victor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    What the Fuck is a Vietnam?: Touristic Phantasms and the Popcolonization of (the)Vietnam (War)2002In: Critique of anthropology, ISSN 0308-275X, E-ISSN 1460-3721, Vol. 22, no 4, 461--489 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the introduction of the reform project doi moi in 1986, Vietnam turned to tourism as a major new economic resource. Demands from international visitors have entailed a commodification of the Vietnam War. This article approaches tourism as an ideologically saturated nexus where identities and worldviews are continuously being represented, consumed, reconfirmed, negotiated and modified. Practices and narrations of Western backpackers, who travel to Vietnam spurred by phantasms of Vietnam as a war, are related to discourses of Vietnam in tourism literature, popular media, academia, journalism and politics, and traced to a `popcolonial' fantasy of Western superiority. At the core are the hegemonic implications the `been there, done that' cliché carries when war and tourism go hand in hand. It is argued that the dichotomies of here/there and war/peace need to be dislodged in order to understand the ideologies of both tourism and war.

  • 156.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Yo-yo Fieldwork: Mobility and Time in a Multi-Local Study of Dance in Ireland2002In: Anthropological Journal on European Cultures, Vol. 11, 117-136 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 157.
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Auspicious Beginnings for the Anthropology of Finance: American Anthropological Association session review2001In: Economic Sociology Newsletter, Vol. JanuaryArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 158.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Indigenous politics: commmunity formation and indigenous peoples' struggle for self-deterrmination in North-East India2001In: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, ISSN 1070-289X, E-ISSN 1547-3384, Vol. 8, no 1, 7-45 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with a number of questions relating to politics based on “ethnicity” or community belonging among “tribal” or indigenous peoples in India's northeastern region. In particular, I probe the complex question of indigenous peoples’ right to self‐determination, a right that most indigenous organizations in the world regard as crucial and that is central to the UN draft Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Autonomy or self‐determination, in one form or another, is on the agenda of more or less all mobilized communities in Northeast India. In multi‐ethnic contexts, however, it is not easy to translate such demands into viable political solutions. By discussing several different cases, the contemporary Bodoland movement, the Naga struggle for sovereignty, and the mobilization of the Rabha people, the paper brings the issue of indigenous politics in India into focus.

  • 159.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Korsdrag: Socialantropologi i blandade akademiska miljöer2001In: Antropologiska studier, Vol. 68-69, 7-13 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 160.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Play at work: Contested frames of hacking2001In: Focaal: European Journal of Anthropology, ISSN 0920-1297, E-ISSN 1558-5263, Vol. 37, 89-101 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 161.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Grey, Chris
    Cambridge University.
    Trust, control and post-bureaucracy2001In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 22, no 2, 229-250 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a contribution to the analysis of intra-organizational trust. From a discussion of concepts of trust, we suggest that trust is something which is constructed for and by people in organizations, thereby producing some degree of predictability. Trust is a precarious social accomplishment enacted through the interplay of social or discursive structures, including those of work organizations, and individuated subjects. We argue that bureaucratic organizations effected this construction in such an efficient manner that it `disappeared' as an issue for organizational theorists, but that shifting organizational forms have re-opened it. We suggest that the advent of corporate culturism in the 1980s offered one kind of reconfiguration of trust in organizations. However, subsequent extensions of organizational reform have undermined corporate culture as a way of constructing trust. These extensions, which, with some caveats, may be called post-bureaucratic, have brought with them new potential bases for trust, and hence control, in organizations. We explore these in two ways. First, we discuss how various types of managerial languages and techniques have the capacity to provide a global `script' through which particular local contexts can be made sense of, and which allow possible subject positions and identities to be secured. Second, we develop this discussion with reference to two different kinds of employees whose work is in some senses post-bureaucratic: accountants and consultants in Big Five firms, and temporary workers (temps) working through agencies to provide clerical and other services. In a conclusion, we comment on the durability of post-bureaucratic modes of trust

  • 162.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    www.iranian.com:an Ethnographic Approach to An Online Diaspora2000In: ISIM Newsletter, Vol. 6, no 1, 13-13 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While exile refers to a glamorous return to the 'real' homeland, diaspora creates an alternative homeland, an imagined one. Exile denies 'here' and mourns for 'there'. Diaspora lessens the unbearable nostalgia by constructing a community based on the networks which link the dispersed. Exile emphasizes a centralized relationship with the spatial homeland. In diaspora, through the romantization of the 'promised land', emphasis is placed on a cobweb of relations amongst the scattered. Diaspora suggests deterritorialization, which does not mean geographical displacement - as it is for exile - but refers to the collapse of a fixed link between identity, culture, existence and a single place. In other words, diaspora is a deterritorialized World Wide Web.

  • 163.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Betwixt and between: Temporary employees as liminal subjects in flexible organizations1999In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 20, no 4, 601-617 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As organizations change to become more flexible and transient, the use of a flexible workforce becomes an attractive solution. Temporary employees are here tentatively viewed as being `betwixt and between' organizational structures, in transit between the relatively fixed positions of full-time, regular employment. Building on previous fieldwork and recent interviews among temporary employees in Sweden and the US, the notion of liminality is employed to explore aspects of temporary work. The liminal position of `temporaries', it is suggested, is an ambiguous position involving both risks and opportunities for individuals, temporary staffing agencies, and client organizations alike. It may be seen as a seedbed of cultural creativity, where old perspectives on work and subjectivity are contested and new ones created. Related to the transient, mobile character of temporary employment, is an enhanced awareness of substitutability and a continuous reflexive monitoring of manners and competencies. Furthermore, the mobile and temporary character of assignments lead to the development of transient and episodic imagined communities of the workplace.

    Through the lens of liminality then, temporal and contractual flexibilization of work is seen to challenge the old boundaries of industrial society and to suggest new ways of organizing and experiencing work, as well as new ways of constructing organizational subjectivity.

  • 164.
    Olsson, Erik O A
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Bofasthetens operativsystem: Imer- och globaliseringsforskningen om livsformer och global rörlighet1999In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 165.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Displacement and Entrepreneurship: Iranian small businesses in Stockholm1999In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 25, no 3, 493-508 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing unemployment in Sweden has affected non‐Western residents particularly hard. A shrinking public sector, and toughening attitudes toward migrant job‐seekers within the private sector, frequently leave self‐employment as the only option. The emergence of an ethnic economy is partly due to the opportunity structure in the host society, and partly to available ethnic resources. This article examines Iranian small businesses in Stockholm. The Swedish labour market, and the situation of Iranian migrants within it, are crucial factors in. bringing about the Iranian entry into self‐employment. Yet, ethnic resources and previous work experiences in Iran also play an important role in shaping economic activities among Iranians in Sweden. This article portrays how Iranians, whose social space has been distorted by displacement, contrive to reconstruct this in the Swedish setting.

  • 166.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ecodevelopment in crisis: Buxa Tiger Reserve and Forest People1999In: Economic and Political Weekly, ISSN 0012-9976, Vol. 34, no 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Rabhas who live in the Buxa tiger reserve buffer zone must see some irony in their officially acknowledged status of partner's in wildlife conservation. The tiger project has so far meant only curtailed employment and access to the forest for them, for the concept of popular participation in conservation is still only a concept. What is wanting is an effort to address appropriately the question of indigenous peoples rights.

  • 167.
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Market as mirror or model: how traders reconfigure economic and social transactions in a rural economy1999In: Ethnos, Vol. 64, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 168. Friedman, Jonathan
    Rhinoceros 21999In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 40, no 5, 679-694 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 169.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Wildflowers, Nationalism and the Swedish Law of Commons1998In: Worldviews, ISSN 1363-5247, E-ISSN 1568-5357, Vol. 2, no 3, 281-302 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In post-war Sweden, overt demonstrations of political nationalism have been considered bad taste. In middle-class culture, the construction and emotional charging of Swedishness have instead taken place in terms of an idiom of love for nature. Conceptions of freedom and equality are by this idiom tied up with symbolic references to childhood and to the flora of forests and meadows. The Swedish 'Every Man's Law' regulating access to flowers and berries and mobility in the natural landscape in this context comes to stand as a central national symbol.

  • 170.
    Olsson, Erik O A
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Att leva nära en flygplats: Chilenska migrante rmellan hemland och värdland1997In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, no 1, 43-63 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 171.
    Olsson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Att vara invandrare: – igen1997In: I&M, ISSN 1404-6857, Vol. 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 172.
    Olsson, Erik A O
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    En grupp blir till1997In: I&M, ISSN 1404-6857, Vol. 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 173.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations (CEIFO).
    Graham, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Home is Where You Make It: Repatriation and Diaspora Culture among Iranians in Sweden1997In: The Journal of Refugee Studies, ISSN 0951-6328, E-ISSN 1471-6925, Vol. 10, no 2, 115-133 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines attitudes toward returning to Iran among Iranian refugees in Sweden. Differences between Iranians are traced to various factors including economic position and political involvement The idea of a home and a homeland, as well as that of a home culture, are critically examined in the light of the creation of a diaspora culture in Sweden and elsewhere that seeks to reconstruct aspects of Iranian culture. It is argued that not only the ‘when’ of return migration must be examined, but also the ‘where’, in a situation of dynamic cultural change which redefines the meaning of the home culture and the location of home itself

  • 174.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Grey, Chris
    Cambridge University.
    How to become oneself: Discourses of subjectivity in postbureaucratic organizations1997In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 4, no 2, 211-228 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the face of widespread organizational change which some claim heralds the demise of bureaucracy, and in the context of the cultural and intellectual uncertainties of postmodernism, how do people in organizations respond? In this paper, we explore the role of `How To' books for managers in the elaboration of these responses. How To books may be read as part of a long-standing tradition of self-help which represents a form of the secularized Protestant ethic. However, in contemporary conditions it is also congruent with emerging forms of reflexivity and projects of the self. The How To books we discuss promise to yield control of the world around them to managers who learn to know and control their `inner-worlds'. They also offer techniques of self-presentation and self-appraisal which, we argue, are particularly congruent with the likely control problems within post-bureaucratic organizations.

  • 175.
    Norman, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Vad betyder leken?: Mening som skapas i och genom leken1997In: Locus, ISSN 1100-3197, no 2, 4-12 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 176.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Can a Khan be an Anthropologist?1996In: Antropologiska studier, ISSN 0345-0902, no 54-55Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 177.
    Norman, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Ironic Body: Obscene Joking Among Swedish Working-Class Women1994In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 59, no 3-4, 187-211 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes the usage of every day forms of obscene joking among primarily working-class women in a small town in Sweden. The author considers obscenity as symbolically related to the sometimes painful, sometimes absurd experiences of sexuality and bodily functions, andas an expression for and a means of coping with the incongruities of social life. Through the form of humor, obscenity becomes a subtle and complex means of cultural and social critique. This also creates a sense of community among the women who engage in the obscene joking.

  • 178.
    Norman, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Celebrating Nikolaus Day: Ideology and Emotion in a German Children’ s Ritual1993In: Ethnology, ISSN 0014-1828, Vol. 32, no 4, 325-338 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Focuses on Nikolaus day and a few themes related to the rearing and educating of children in a German community. Appearance of themes to ritual situations; Revelation of these themes to children; Relationship between the individual and the collectivity; Person-forming project of upbringing by ideological and moral mission of the ritual; Emotions of young participants as part of the message.

  • 179.
    Norman, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Controlling a Future by Admiring a Past: An Ecomuseum in Sweden1993In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 58, no 1-2, 37-51 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article considers some aspects of an historical open-air museum, an 'eco-museum', in a region called the Bergslag in mid-Sweden, an area renowned for its age-old iron -ore mining and iron foundries and its modern steel industry. It is now an area in economic decline with a relatively high unemployment rate—proclaimed by the state some years ago as a 'crisis area' in need of 'economic and cultural support and development'. The argument of the article is that concern with controlling the future is a central motivation for the ecomuseum to turn to the past, since history is interpreted as a rational continuity and the roots of local identity, essential ingredients in the making of a good future. This lends the concentration on varying techniques of iron production and work some of its cultural meaning. This concentration is a projection of present values and interests on to the past—from which people in turn seek knowledge as if it were something natural of the past while in fact the cultural identity and a sense of uniqueness are inherent in the events of their ongoing lives, tied to places and networks of social relations.

  • 180.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Beja of Sudan and the Famine of 1984-19861991In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 20, no 5, 189-191 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Howthe Beja, largely apolitical nomadic pastoralists of northeastern Sudan, perceived their profound misfortunes during the drought of the 1 980s is examined. The famine of 1984-1986 was considered neither to have resulted from their own actions nor to be amenable to alleviation by them-both being functions of God, perhaps acting through the central government. Those Beja who were forced by the famine to abandon their traditional ways appear to be ripe for politicization.

  • 181.
    Kulick, Don
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Christianity, cargo and ideas of self: Patterns of literacy in a Papua New Guinean village1990In: Man, Vol. 25, no 2, 286-304 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Literacy in a small, rural, newly literate Papua New Guinean village is analysed by placing it in the context of local notions of Christianity, the self and language. Villagers' interpretations of the relationship between Catholicism and the written word are based on their Cargo-oriented world-view and on their pre-Christian beliefs about language as a powerful means by which individuals could bring about transformations in their world. Local ideas of the self and others are articulated and reinforced through an emphasis on particular dimensions of oral language use. This emphasis has consequences for the uses to which literacy is put, the structure of the writing the villagers produce, and the ways in which they attribute meaning to written texts.

     

  • 182.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Berättelse som bot1983In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 60, no 7, 389-394 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
1234 151 - 182 of 182
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