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  • 1801.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Europeiseringen av Norge i ett jämförande perspektiv: The Europeanization of Norway in a Comparative Perspective2012In: Internasjonal Politikk, ISSN 0020-577X, E-ISSN 1891-1757, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 287-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on Europeanization clearly shows that membership in the European Union over time affects the national political systems of member states. Given Norway’s extensive integration within the EU, it is relevant and important to assess whether and, if so, how the Norwegian political system, too, has changed as a result, and how these effects compare with the general patterns among EU member states. Exploring the Europeanization of Norway in a comparative perspective, the article maps the effects of European integration for four central power relationships in the Norwegian political system: national-supranational authority, executive-legislative-judicial authority, political-administrative authority and national-regional authority. It is demonstrated that integration within the EU to a large extent has had the same effects in Norway as in the member states of the EU, despite Norway’s alternative form of affiliation: extensive delegation of power to the supranational level, strengthening of the government in relation to the parliament, an increasingly important role for national courts, expanded power and autonomy of the executive administration in relation to the political leadership, and some strengthening of the regions vis-à-vis the central government.

  • 1802.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    EU:s politiska system2013 (ed. 5)Book (Other academic)
  • 1803.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    EU:s politiska system2004Book (Other academic)
  • 1804.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    EU:s politiska system: Tredje upplagan2007Book (Other academic)
  • 1805.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Executive Power and Accountability in the European Union2009In: The Illusion of Accountability in the European Union / [ed] Sverker Gustavsson, Christer Karlsson och Thomas Persson, London: Routledge , 2009, p. 111-125Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 1806.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Explaining the institutional foundations of European Union negotiations2010In: Journal of European Public Policy, ISSN 1350-1763, E-ISSN 1466-4429, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 633-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    European Union (EU) negotiations take place within the framework of a set of formal and informal institutions. Member states negotiate in the organizational context of the Council and the European Council, take decisions through alternative procedures and decision rules, and sustain a set of norms for the conduct of negotiations. While the effects of these institutions on negotiation behaviour and outcomes have received extensive attention, the question of why these particular institutions have been established or evolved remains underexplored. This contribution makes an argument in favour of systematic attention to the design of negotiation institutions in the EU, and suggests that we should draw on general theoretical approaches to institutional design for these purposes. Moreover, rather than engaging in the exercise of trying to prove or falsify theoretical approaches, we should exploit the potential for explanatory complementarities in concrete empirical domains. To this end, the paper advances a domain-of-application approach to institutional design and illustrates its applicability to EU negotiation institutions through four empirical illustrations.

  • 1807.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Explaining the Institutional Foundations of European Union Negotiations2010In: Negotiation Theory and the EU: The State of the Art / [ed] Andreas Dür, Gemma Mateo & Daniel Thomas, London: Routledge , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1808.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Global stakeholder democracy: a reality-check2012In: Comparison, quotas and critical change: in honor of Drude Dahlerup / [ed] Lenita Freidenvall och Michele Micheletti, Stockholm: Department of Political Science, zStockholm University , 2012, p. 185-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1809.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    När Europa kom till Sverige: ordförandeskapet i EU 20012001Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 1810.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Orchestrating enforcement: international organizations mobilizing compliance constituencies2015In: International Organizations as Orchestrators / [ed] Kenneth W. Abbott et al., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015, p. 166-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most broadly shared conclusion in scholarship on dispute settlement, legalization and compliance over the past two decades is probably the virtue of granting private actors access to international courts and tribunals. Yet for all its benefits, private access is not a universally available and effective institutional design option. This chapter shows that IGOs sometimes compensate for these limits by turning to a strategy of orchestration, and identifies the conditions under which this takes place. Where procedures for private enforcement are lacking, orchestration can offer a substitute, as when IGOs independently create mechanisms for compliance complaints. Where such procedures exist but private actors face resource barriers, orchestration can offer a complement, as when IGOs provide funding and training to potential litigants. This chapter argues that orchestration of enforcement in both its variants will only happen when three necessary conditions are fulfilled: a) IGOs lack sufficient capabilities to effectively enforce compliance through other governance means; b) private actors hold privileged information about state compliance; and c) IGOs enjoy a capacity for independent action, as shaped by entrepreneurial resources and state oversight.

  • 1811.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Summit Diplomacy in the European Union2009In: Diplomacy in Theory and Practice: Essays in Honour of Christer Jönsson / [ed] Karin Aggestam och Magnus Jerneck, Malmö: Liber , 2009, p. 375-390Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1812.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The Power of the Chair: Formal Leadership in International Cooperation2010In: International Studies Quarterly, ISSN 0020-8833, E-ISSN 1468-2478, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 241-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the influence wielded by the formal leaders of international cooperation-those state or supranational representatives that chair and direct negotiations in the major decision bodies of multilateral organizations and conferences. This is a topic that so far has received limited systematic attention by IR theorists, who have tended to treat bargaining parties as functionally and formally equivalent, leaving little theoretical space for formal leadership. Drawing on rational choice institutionalism, I introduce a theory that develops a coherent argument for the delegation of authority to the chairmanship, the power resources of negotiation chairs, and the influence of formal leaders over outcomes. I assess the explanatory power of this theory through evidence on formal leadership in three alternative organizational settings: the European Union, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade/the World Trade Organization, and the United Nations environmental conferences. I find in favor of the chairmanship as a source of independent influence in international cooperation. Formal leaders perform functions of agenda management, brokerage, and representation that make it more likely for negotiations to succeed, and possess privileged resources that may enable them to steer negotiations toward the agreements they most prefer.

  • 1813.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Transnational Access to International Institutions: Three Approaches2010In: Transnational Actors in Global Governance: Patterns, Explanations, and Implications / [ed] Christer Jönsson & Jonas Tallberg, Basingstoke: Palgrave , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1814.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Transparency2016In: The Oxford Handbook of International Organizations / [ed] Jacob Katz Cogan, Ian Hurd, Ian Johnstone, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1815.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Uppsatsexamination i statsvetenskap: lärdomar från studentcentrerad pedagogik2007In: Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift, Vol. 109, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1816.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Vem har makten i Europa2013In: Statsvetenskapens frågor / [ed] Li Bennich-Björkman, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, p. 154-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1817.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Bengtsson, Rikard
    Statsvetenskapliga institutionen, Lunds universitet.
    Avslutning: Lärdomar från två svenska EU-ordförandeskap2010In: I Europas tjänst: Sveriges ordförandeskap i EU 2009 / [ed] Rikard Bengtsson, Stockholm: SNS Förlag , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1818.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Dellmuth, Lisa M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Duit, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    NGO Influence in International Organizations: Information, Access, and Exchange2018In: British Journal of Political Science, ISSN 0007-1234, E-ISSN 1469-2112, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 213-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While there is broad consensus that non-governmental organizations (NGOs) sometimes succeed in influencing policy-making within international organizations (IOs), there is much less agreement on the factors and conditions that make NGO lobbying effective. In this article, we make two contributions to this debate. First, we examine the determinants of influence among NGOs active in different IOs, issue areas, and policy phases. The analysis builds on original survey data of more than 400 NGOs involved in five different IOs, complemented by elite interviews with IO and state officials. Second, we advance a specific argument about how the strategic exchange of information and access between NGOs and IOs increases NGO influence in IOs. We contrast this argument, derived from theories of lobbying in American and European politics, with three alternative explanations of NGO influence, privileging material resources, transnational networks, and public-opinion mobilization, and sketch the broader implications of our results for research on NGOs in global governance.

  • 1819.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Jönsson, Christer
    Statsvetenskapliga institutionen, Lunds universitet.
    Transnational Actor Participation in International Institutions: Where, Why, and with What Consequences?2010In: Transnational Actors in Global Governance: Patterns, Explanations, and Implications / [ed] Christer Jönsson & Jonas Tallberg, Basingstoke: Palgrave , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1820.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Jönsson, ChristerStatsvetenskapliga institutionen, Lunds universitet.
    Transnational Actors in Global Governance: Patterns, Explanations, and Implications2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 1821.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Smith, James McCall
    Dispute Settlement in World Politics: States, Supranational Prosecutors, and Compliance2014In: European Journal of International Relations, ISSN 1354-0661, E-ISSN 1460-3713, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 118-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses one prominent expression of the interplay between politics and law in international cooperation: the dynamics of bargaining in the settling of compliance disputes. Our central argument is that the formal structure of dispute settlement systematically shapes the likelihood and terms of negotiated compliance settlements. We introduce an ideal type distinction between interstate dispute settlement, where the authority to sue states for non-compliance resides exclusively with states, and supranational dispute settlement, where this authority is partly or entirely delegated to a commission or secretariat with a prosecutorial function. We hypothesize that systems relying on supranational prosecution are more effective in addressing noncompliance, and more likely to mediate the impact of power asymmetries on dispute settlement outcomes, compared to systems relying on state-initiated complaints only. We find support for this proposition in an in-depth comparison of dispute settlement and compliance bargaining in the World Trade Organization and the European Union, and in a brief survey of experiences from other international organizations.

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  • 1822.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sommerer, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Squatrito, Theresa
    Democratic Memberships in International Organizations: Sources of Institutional Design2016In: The Review of International Organizations, ISSN 1559-7431, E-ISSN 1559-744X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 59-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Domestic regime type has emerged a powerful explanation of multiple phenomena in world politics. This article extends this argument to the design of international organizations (IOs), where a profound development in recent decades is growing access for transnational actors (TNAs). While earlier research has shown that democracy in IO memberships helps to explain IO openness, we know little about the mechanisms that drive this effect. This article unpacks the relationship between democratic memberships and IO design by theorizing and assessing the impact of three different constellations of democracies on the openness of IOs. Empirically, we conduct a multivariate analysis of TNA access to 50 IOs from 1950 to 2010, combined with a case study of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe. Our main findings are three-fold. First, democracy’s effect on openness is primarily a product of the combined weight of democracies within IOs and their resulting capacity to secure support for their polity preferences. Second, in contrast, we only find limited support for a specific influence of new democracies and democratic major powers on IO openness. Third, decision rules that allow for openness reforms to be adopted by a majority of member states facilitate and strengthen the influence of democracies, by reducing the ability of autocracies to block change. The findings have implications for our understanding of institutional design in global governance and democracy’s effects in world politics.

  • 1823.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sommerer, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Squatrito, Theresa
    Jönsson, Christer
    Explaining the Transnational Design of International Organizations2014In: International Organization, ISSN 0020-8183, E-ISSN 1531-5088, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 741-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Past decades have witnessed a shift in international cooperation toward growing involvement of transnational actors (TNAs), such as non-governmental organizations, multinational corporations, and philanthropic foundations. This article offers a comprehensive theoretical and empirical account of TNA access to IOs. The analysis builds on a novel dataset, covering formal TNA access to 298 organizational bodies from 50 IOs over the time period 1950 to 2010. We identify the most profound patterns in TNA access across time, issue areas, policy functions, and world regions, and statistically test competing explanations of the variation in TNA access. The central results are three-fold. First, the empirical data confirm the existence of a far-reaching institutional transformation of IOs over the past sixty years, pervading all issue areas, policy functions, and world regions. Second, variation in TNA access within and across IOs is mainly explained by a combination of three factors: functional demand for the resources of TNAs, domestic democratic standards in the membership of IOs, and state concerns with national sovereignty. Third, existing research suffers from a selection bias that has led it to overestimate the general importance of a new participatory norm in global governance for the openness of IOs.

  • 1824.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sommerer, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Squatrito, Theresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Jönsson, Christer
    The opening up of international organizations: transnational access in global governance2013Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Once the exclusive preserve of member states, international organizations have become increasingly open in recent decades. Now virtually all international organizations at some level involve NGOs, business actors and scientific experts in policy-making. This book offers the first systematic and comprehensive analysis of this development. Combining statistical analysis and in-depth case studies, it maps and explains the openness of international organizations across issue areas, policy functions and world regions from 1950 to 2010. Addressing the question of where, how and why international organizations offer transnational actors access to global policy-making, this book has implications for critical issues in world politics. When do states share authority with private actors? What drives the design of international organizations? How do activists and businesses influence global politics? Is civil society involvement a solution to democratic deficits in global governance?

  • 1825.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sommerer, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Squatrito, Theresa
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The performance of international organizations: a policy output approach2016In: Journal of European Public Policy, ISSN 1350-1763, E-ISSN 1466-4429, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 1077-1096Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many problems confronting today’s societies are transnational in character, leading states to increasingly rely on international organizations (IOs) for policy solutions. Yet the performance of IOs varies extensively. As an initial step toward explaining variation in IO performance, this article discusses how performance may best be conceptualized for empirical analysis. We advance an output-based account of IO performance, privileging the results IOs produce in terms of policy output. This conceptualization is distinct from the main alternative perspectives on IO performance, emphasizing either behavioral change by targets (policy outcome) or problem-solving effectiveness (policy impact). In addition, we introduce a typology of output that captures five generic features of IO policy of theoretical importance: policy volume, orientation, type, instrument, and target. We conclude by highlighting the implications of an output-based account to IO performance for the study of institutional design and effectiveness in global governance.

  • 1826.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Squatrito, Theresa
    Sommerer, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Explaining Patterns in IO Openness: Governance Problems, Policy Approaches, and Institutional Design2014In: Politische Vierteljahresschrift, ISSN 0032-3470, E-ISSN 1862-2860, no 49, p. 370-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While international organizations (IOs) in recent decades have expanded the opportunities for transnational actors (TNAs) to participate in policy-making, significant differences remain across and within IOs. We argue that a neglected source of variation in openness is the policy approaches of IOs, understood as organizational styles of problem-solving. Policy approaches matter because one and the same governance problem may be tackled in multiple ways. Based on a descriptive statistical analysis and two case studies (Asian Development Bank, Commonwealth), we show that IOs which pursue a centralized approach to problem solving are less likely to involve TNAs than IOs that pursue a decentralized policy approach.

  • 1827.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Uhlin, Anders
    Lunds universitet, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Civil society and global democracy: an assessment2012In: Global democracy: normative and empirical perspectives / [ed] Daniele Archibugi, Mathias Koenig-Archibugi and Raffaele Marchetti, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012, p. 210-232Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Civil society actors are increasingly seen as holding the promise of a democratization of global governance. Rejecting confederal and federal blueprints for global democracy, a number of theorists in recent years have advanced models for how to democratize existing institutional arrangements through the involvement of civil society actors. In this chapter, we assess the empirical viability of this normative vision, varyingly referred to as global stakeholder democracy, transnational democracy, and democratic polycentrism. This chapter thereby seeks to advance a new agenda in research on global democracy, informed by the ambition to explore the empirical preconditions of alternative theoretical models. We conclude that existing procedures and practices in global governance fall short of fulfilling the normative proposals in the vision of democratic polycentrism, but may qualify as a step in a long-term process of democratization toward this vision.

  • 1828.
    Taloyan, Rojan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Brottslighet, men vad för bestraffning? En idéanalytisk studie av de tre största Riksdagspartiernas kriminalpolitiska idéer när det gäller brottslighet och bestraffning2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 1829.
    Taloyan, Rojan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Våldtäkt med samtycke? En idéanalytisk studie av Riksdagspartiernas idéer angående våldtäktslagstiftningen2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 1830.
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Adamsson, Emelie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Den eskalerande organiseringen bakom skapandet av en trovärdig miljömärkning: exemplet Svanen2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A challenge for eco-labeling organizations in general is to be perceived as credible in the role as an intermediary between, on the one hand, consumers and purchasers of eco-labeled products, and producers who sell these products, on the other. From the perspective of consumers and purchasers it is crucial that the eco-labeling organization is perceived as neutral and independent from the producers that pay to be audited in order to use the eco-label on their products. Thus, consumers expect eco-labeling organizations to prove their independence in their role as inspectors and gatekeepers of eco-friendly values. From a producer perspective it is also crucial that consumers percieve the eco-labels trustworthy and decisive for the customers’ purchasing decisions, however, it is also vital that the requirements of the eco-labeling organization are percieved relevant and that compliance with the criteria is viable at a reasonable cost. In turn, this means that eco-labeling organizations, that depend on having customers willing to pay a fee to be audited, also need to act in the role of a decent business partner. Given this fundamental dilemma facing eco-labeling organizations, the question raised in the report is: How do eco-labeling organizations handle this tension to become credible? The report presents a qualitative study conducted by the state-run eco-labeling organization Svanen (the Swan) which is one of the largest and most recognized labels in Sweden. The study included interviews with twelve people in and around Svanen’s business activities. In the analysis, four organizing mechanisms are proposed to explain the construction of the credibility of Svanen: the reference to the state mandate; the use of inclusiveness in the criteria development work; the separation of organizational functions; and the promotion of Svanen as a "modern actor". It is concluded that these organizing activities (mechanisms) have expanded over time in terms of coordination and control activities, which in turn have generated additional efforts of coordination and control, not only from within the organization but also involving external auditors. In other words, an escalating pattern of coordination and control activities is identified. The findings from this study is compared to the existing knowledge about the legitimacy and credibility in the context of labeling organizations and certification auditing activities.

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  • 1831.
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Boström, Magnus
    Forest Stewardship Council2012In: The Globalization Reader / [ed] Frank J. Lechner, John Boli, Chichester, West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons, 2012, 4, p. 471-476Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1832.
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Thedvall, Renita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Managing Administrative Reform through Language Work. Implementing Lean in Swedish Public Sector Organisations2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 2001-7405, E-ISSN 2001-7413, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 89-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper accounts for the early implementation of Lean in two Swedish public sector organisations justifying Lean as a remedy for the negative consequences of New Public Management (NPM). But is Lean radically different, or rather yet another NPM reform? We use a social constructivist approach and focus on the role of language in influencing employees’ minds and subjective perceptions, and thereby mobilising new patterns of governance. The concept of ‘language work’, comprising three organisational levels, is suggested for analysing the meaning and consequences of the Lean efforts studied. The analysis reveals that the first level of Lean language work largely mirrors typical NPM ideals, including entrepreneurship, empowerment and customer orientation. In contrast, there are more salient differences at the second level about labels used for organisational classifications having both empowering and disempowering effects on categorised people. At the third level of analysis targeting the day-to-day practice, we see a return of NPM performance measurement–oriented practices and their (often-unintended) consequences discussed in research on NPM reforms, although they surface in somewhat new ways, including communicative symbols and other linguistic expressions. The main contribution lies in the conceptualisation of language work widening the scope of the constitutive role of language to include the levels of political programmes and technologies of government as well as organisational classifications.

  • 1833.
    Tarschy, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    The Parliament and the Budget: Enhancing Its Capacity for Oversight2009In: Bütçe sürecinde parlamentonun deĝişen rolü, Ankara, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance budgeting is sweeping the globe. What role can legislatures play as agencies of monitoring and oversight? Observers are none too optimistic. "There is very little direct evidence that performance information in budgets and annual reports is directly used by members of parliament in their oversight", concludes one recent comparative study. Most parliaments have limited amending competence in budgetary decisions and exercise scant control and monitoring over the execution of budgets. There seems to be general agreement that MPs pay little attention to the formal reporting on administrative performance. But there are several ways in which parliaments can get involved in decisions on public policy and public finance. Enhancing their contribution to boosting government performance requires attention to the analytical resource base as well as to parliamentary procedure.

  • 1834.
    Tarschys, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Apropå företagens uppgiftsplikt: måste blankettflödet växa?1975Book (Other academic)
  • 1835.
    Tarschys, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Beyond the State: The Future Polity in Classical and Soviet Marxism1972Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 1836.
    Tarschys, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Demokratin och den offentliga sektorns expansion.1978Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 1837.
    Tarschys, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Den kommunistiska framtiden1974Book (Other academic)
  • 1838.
    Tarschys, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Förvaltningen i grundlagen2014In: Demokrati och förvaltning: en festskrift till Rune Premfors / [ed] Bengt Jacobsson & Göran Sundström, Stockholm: Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research , 2014, p. 95-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1839.
    Tarschys, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    "Impulser hit, impulser dit": Några anteckningar från gränslandet mellan statskunskap mellan och politik2010In: Kontraster och nyanser: Svensk statsvetenskap i brytningstid / [ed] Magnus Jerneck & Björn Badersten, Lund: Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift , 2010, Vol. 5, no 112, p. 578-590Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1840.
    Tarschys, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Petita: hur svenska myndigheter argumenterar för högre anslag1975Book (Other academic)
  • 1841.
    Tarschys, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Riksdagen och regeringen: Den svenska modellen2008In: Mellan folkhem och Europa / [ed] LI Bennich-Björkman & Paula Blomqvist, Malmö: Liber , 2008, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1842.
    Tarschys, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sovjetunionens politiska problem 1950, 1960, 19701978Book (Other academic)
  • 1843.
    Tarschys, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The Soviet political agenda: problems and priorities, 1950-19701979Book (Other academic)
  • 1844.
    Tarschys, Daniel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Hägg, IngemundUppsala universitet.
    I välståndets rävsax: konsumenter, producenter och den offentliga tillväxten.1988Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 1845.
    Tarschys, Daniel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Lemne, MarjaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Vad staten vill: mål och ambitioner i svensk politik2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 1846.
    Tarschys, Daniel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Tham, Carl
    Den nygamla vänstern1969 (ed. 2. uppl.)Book (Other academic)
  • 1847.
    Tawaifi, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    From Amity to Enmity: The sudden deterioration in Turkish-Syrian relations2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 1848.
    Tawaifi, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The Perfect Storm: How Offensive Opportunity and Ideational Distance led to third-party interventions in Syria, Yemen and Bahrain.2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 1849.
    Thedvall, Renita
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Casula Vifell, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Organizing for social sustainability: Governance through bureaucratization in meta-organizations2012In: Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, ISSN 1548-7733, Vol. 8, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1850. Thomas, Peter
    et al.
    Sznitman Rödner, Sharon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Overview of Volume 22008In: A Cannabis Reader: Global Issues and Local Experiences: Volume II, EMCDDA, Lisbon , 2008, p. xix-xxiiiChapter in book (Other academic)
34353637383940 1801 - 1850 of 2048
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