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37383940 1951 - 1959 of 1959
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  • 1951.
    Åse, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ship of shame: gender and nation in narratives of the soviet submarine crisis in Sweden2016In: Journal of Cold War Studies, ISSN 1520-3972, E-ISSN 1531-3298, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 112-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article demonstrates that the concepts of gender and nation illuminate the Swedish-Soviet submarine crisis in February 1981, when a nuclear-armed Soviet submarine was stranded for ten days in the Swedish archipelago. The crisis challenged both the Swedish armed forces’ status as protectors of the national territory and the government's foreign policy doctrine of neutrality. The article analyzes Swedish media from 1981 to identify the interpretive frames, with a particular emphasis on emotions and body imagery. Gendered notions of protection permeated the crisis narratives. Male bodies embodied national and military agency, whereas women's bodies symbolically merged with the Swedish nation's territory. The Soviet intruders were disparaged and Swedish military prestige redeemed through gendered and corporeal representations. The article improves our understanding of the way the Swedish ideal of the neutral soldier and the foreign policy doctrine of neutrality incorporated gender.

  • 1952.
    Åse, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Skammens skepp: när U137 gick på grund2014In: Det dolda hotet: 12 forskare om ubåtar / [ed] Andreas Linderoth, Karlskrona: Marinmuseum , 2014, p. 131-151Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1953.
    Åse, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Vi är överens: Om monarki och demokrati2008In: Sverigebilder: Det nationellas betydelse i politik och vardag, Institutet för Framtidsstudier , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1954.
    Åse, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Quirico, Monica
    Wendt, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Gendered Grief: Mourners' Politicisation of Military Death2019In: Gendering Military Sacrifice: A Feminist Comparative Analysis / [ed] Cecilia Åse, Maria Wendt, Abingdon: Routledge, 2019, p. 145-176Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter investigates how the relatives of the European soldiers who died in the Afghanistan war (2001–2014), particularly mothers, organised and acted publicly and politically. What is the potential for personal grief to contest political and justificatory war narratives? Feminist scholarship on the relationship between gender, war grief, and politics provides the theoretical framework. Using cross-country comparison as a feminist method of denaturalisation, the chapter discusses gendered grief in the six European countries, with a specific focus on Italy, Sweden and the UK. The comparative analysis identifies general patterns and pinpoints the national differences that had a key influence on the politicisation of war grief. A “politico-emotional war contract” is put forward as a key component both opening up space for and stifling bereaved relatives’ political agency. The chapter discusses how relatives made use of gender representations to challenge established war narratives, but also shows how women’s grief was silenced or appropriated and used to sanction and beautify military violence. An important result concerns how different national contexts condition the possibilities for women’s agency as grieving mothers and wives.

  • 1955.
    Åse, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Wendt, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Comparison as Feminist Method: Denaturalising Gender and Nation2019In: Gendering Military Sacrifice: A Feminist Comparative Analysis / [ed] Cecilia Åse, Maria Wendt, Abingdon: Routledge, 2019, p. 17-40Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter develops the cross-country comparison as a feminist method for the critical interrogation of naturalised ideas and representations. Recognising denaturalisation as a shared feminist approach, Cynthia Enloe’s concept of “feminist curiosity” is developed in order to advance cross-national comparison. The basic idea is that comparison assists denaturalisation because it enables the analysis of taken-for-granted ideas, identities, and emotional investments. The chapter presents the comparative methodology used in the subsequent chapters of the volume Gendering Military Sacrifice, where meaning-making associated with military losses in the Afghanistan war (2001–2014) are examined in six European countries. Discussing the methodological challenges related to denaturalising constructions of gender and nation, several research strategies used in the following empirical contributions are presented. These include working collectively, combining in-depth contextual knowledge with comparisons between national contexts, and presenting research according to empirical sites rather than based on a nation-by-nation perspective. As a necessary background to the following transnationally arranged chapters, this chapter also presents the differing war legacies and the building blocks of national identities as well as the overarching gender/nation relations for all the countries discussed in the volume.

  • 1956.
    Åse, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Wendt, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Conclusion: The Gendered Politics of Contemporary Military Sacrifice2019In: Gendering Military Sacrifice: A Feminist Comparative Analysis / [ed] Cecilia Åse, Maria Wendt, Abingdon: Routledge, 2019, p. 177-197Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combining the results of the feminist comparative cross-country analyses presented in this book, this concluding chapter underlines the shared features as well as the national differences in European nations’ efforts to give meaning to the military losses during the Afghanistan war (2001–2014). Humanitarian justifications could motivate dispatching soldiers to Afghanistan, but were inadequate when the countries faced military fatalities. The establishment of national history and time, the renegotiation of relations between home and away, and the family trope rendered the war deaths meaningful and affected possibilities to critically discuss the war mission. An important argument is that potential for dissent vis-à-vis military violence depended on gendered national narratives. Discussing Feminist International Relations, the chapter addresses gendered protector/protected renegotiations, and spells out the gender consequences of the linkage between state sovereignty and military sacrifice. In closing, the chapter proposes the denaturalisation and politicisation of gender–nation constructions as essential to advancing war-critical narratives and effective anti-militarist strategies.

  • 1957.
    Åse, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Wendt, MariaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Gendering military sacrifice: A feminist comparative analysis2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What does military sacrifice mean in today’s globalised world? For what ethical principles and beliefs are citizens prepared to die and to sacrifice their loved ones? In present-day security discourses emphasising human rights and an international responsibility to protect, traditional masculinised obligations to die for the homeland and its women and children are challenged and renegotiated. Working from a critical feminist perspective, the authors examine the political and societal justifications for sacrifice in wars motivated by post-national and humanitarian values. This volume provides original empirical research from six European countries, demonstrating how gendered and nationalistic representations saturate contemporary notions of sacrifice and legitimate military violence. A key argument is that a gender perspective is necessary in order to understand, and to oppose, the idea of the honourable military death.

    Bringing together a wide range of materials – including public debates, rituals, monuments and artwork – to analyse the justifications for soldiers’ deaths in the Afghanistan war (2001–2014), the analysis challenges methodological nationalism. The authors develop a feminist comparative methodology and engage in cross-country and transdisciplinary analysis. This innovative approach generates new understandings of the ways in which both the idealisation and political contestation of military violence depend on gendered national narratives.

  • 1958.
    Åse, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Wendt, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Gendering the new hero narratives: Military death in Denmark and Sweden2018In: Cooperation and Conflict, ISSN 0010-8367, E-ISSN 1460-3691, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 23-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 20th century, wars were fought primarily in the name of protecting the homeland.Making the ‘ultimate sacrifice’ was a national masculine duty and a key feature of military heroism.Today, human rights and international values justify war-making and legitimise military action.In one of these post-national wars, the International Security Assistance Force operation inAfghanistan, more than 700 European soldiers have lost their lives. How have these deaths beenlegitimised, and how has the new security discourse affected notions of masculinised heroism andsacrifice? This article investigates how the dimensions of national/international and masculinity/femininity are negotiated in media narratives of heroism and sacrifice in Denmark and Sweden.Regarding scholarly discussions on the professionalisation, individualisation and domesticationof military heroism, the empirical analysis demonstrates that the Danish/Swedish nationremains posited as the core context for military heroism and sacrifice. In the media narratives,professionalism is represented as an expression of specific national qualities. The media narrativesconflate nation and family and represent military heroes as distinctively masculine and nationalfigures. It is argued that a family trope has become vital in present-day hero narratives. This tropeis disposed towards collective emotions, national loyalty and conservative gender ideals.

  • 1959.
    Ördén, Hedvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Deferring substance: EU policy and the information threat2019In: Intelligence and national security, ISSN 0268-4527, E-ISSN 1743-9019, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 421-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article describes EU cross-sectoral policy work on online information threats, focusing on the intersection between values and 'referent objects'. Examining discussions on strategic communication, censorship, media literacy and media pluralism, two value-perspectives were identified: while abstract procedural values of efficiency and coherence guide content management in the security/defence/internet communities, media/education communities highlight the end-goals of content pluralism and enhanced citizen judgement. In implementation, the former's lack of substantive goals, coupled with an outsourcing of content management, may give rise to hybrid values. The findings highlight the danger of neglecting substance in favor of efficient management of an online 'battlespace'.

37383940 1951 - 1959 of 1959
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