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  • 2001.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Roma, Gotland: Magnetometerprospektering2015Report (Other academic)
  • 2002.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Runsa: Magnetometerprospektering2013Report (Other academic)
  • 2003.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Sandbyborg: Teknisk rapport: Magnetometerprospektering av Sandbyborg, Raä 45:1 Öland, Sverige2012Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    AFLrapport19
  • 2004.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Stensborg: Geofysisk och geokemisk prospektering av RAÄ 527,Grödinge socken, Södermanland2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report deals with the results from a geophysical and geochemical prospection survey of the Stone Age site Stensborg (RAÄ 527) in Grödinge parish, Sweden

  • 2005.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Söderköpings Franciskanerkonvent: Georadarprospektering2015Report (Other academic)
  • 2006.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    The Big Five: Mapping the subsurface of Iron Age forts on the Island of Öland, Sweden2015In: Archaeologia Polona: Special theme: Archaeological Prospection / [ed] Aleksandra Rzeszotarska-Nowakiewicz, 2015, Vol. 53, p. 521-525Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The island of Öland in the Baltic Sea is home to several large ring-forts dated to about AD 200–700 (Fig. 1). Eighteen ring-forts are known from historical maps and records, but only 15 have been preserved. Only one of these forts, Eketorp, was subject to large-scale archaeological investigations and the fort was completely excavated in 1964–74 (Borg et al. 1976). During the excavations some 53 stone house foundations were discovered inside the fort (Fig. 2) and surveys and archaeological testing have confirmed the existence of similar foundations in at least ten other forts on the island (Fallgren 2008). Since Eketorp is the only completely excavated ring-fort, it is seen as a model for all the other Ölandic forts, despite the fact that the other forts may have held different functions. Several ring-forts are also too large for traditional archaeological excavations and as a consequence little is known about them. Many forts, at least since the beginning of the 17th century (e.g., Tegnér 2008: 44), were subject to intensive agricultural activity, which may have had a detrimental effect on the preservation of archaeological remains.“The Big Five” is a project funded by the Swedish research council and the Royal Academy of Letters History and Antiquities to use geophysical prospection methods in the investigation of five of these ring-forts: Gråborg, Vedby borg, Bårby borg, Löts borg and Svarteberga borg. The purpose of the surveys is to nuance the picture of the Ölandic forts by providing new information regarding any preserved remains buried in the forts. An underlying purpose is also to evaluate the deleterious impact of earlier agricultural activity.The forts will be surveyed using the moto-rised ground-penetrating radar (GPR) system MIRA (MALÅ imaging radar array). This sys-tem can be used to survey large areas at high speed and collect high-resolution data without affecting the buried remains below ground and has been tested successfully in Sweden before (e.g., Trinks et al. 2010; Trinks and Biwall 2011; Trinks et al. 2013). The GPR measurements will be complemented by magnetometer sur-veys in selected areas and also include mobile mapping system (MMS) documentation using the GeoTracker at Gråborg and Vedby borg (see Viberg and Larson: 396-399 in this vol-ume). The geophysical results would advance our understanding of these forts by providing information regarding their spatial layout and by identifying different activity areas. This information can be used for 3D reconstructions and provide archaeologists with detailed maps of the subsurface, which can enable future tar-geted excavations.

  • 2007.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Tortuna: Georadarprospektering2015Report (Other academic)
  • 2008.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Umeå länsresidens och trädgård: Georadarprospektering2016Report (Other academic)
  • 2009.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Vadstena kloster: Georadarprospektering i Nunneträdgården, Munkträdgården, Kyrkogården samt Munkklostret RAÄ 17:1, Vadstena sn, Östergötland2015Report (Other academic)
  • 2010.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Berntsson, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Archaeological prospection of a high altitude Neolithic site in the Arctic mountain tundra region of northern Sweden2013In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 2579-2588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the summer of 2008 archaeological excavations and geophysical prospection surveys were carried out in the mountain tundra region of north-eastern Sweden. The investigations focused on locating settlement remains connected with a Middle Neolithic tool production site discovered by archaeologists in 2001. Magnetic susceptibility surveys using the MS2D system by Bartington Instruments and an EM38 by Geonics measuring the Inphase component of the electromagnetic field were used for the prospection of measurable traces of anthropogenic activity and structures such as hearths and middens within the estimated settlement area. Soil samples for phosphate analysis were also collected and analysed using a field analysis method developed by Merck. The magnetic susceptibility measurements successfully located a waste heap containing fire-cracked stones and refuse from a seasonal settlement. The results of the survey were confirmed by subsequent archaeological excavations, which also revealed a piece of resin with the imprint of a human tooth. One additional piece of resin dated the site to 3340-3100 BC. The soil phosphate analysis showed slightly increased values over the central part of the site and over the heap of fire-cracked stones. Comparison between the MS2D and EM38 measurements revealed a weak impact of the bedrock on the results, indicating a potential for the applicability of magnetic surveys to this specific type of environment. Future geophysical archaeological prospection in the Swedish mountain tundra region could benefit from a combined approach using high-resolution magnetometry and magnetic susceptibility measurements.

  • 2011.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Berntsson, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Archaeological Prospection of a High Altitude Neolithic Site in the Arctic Mountain Tundra Region of Northern SwedenIn: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The project Arctic Sweden initiated during the International Polar Year (2007-2008) was aimed at investigating aspects of the natural and cultural environment in this area. During the summer of 2008 archaeological excavations and geophysical prospection surveys were carried out in the mountain tundra region of north-western Sweden. The investigations focused on locating settlement remains connected with a Middle Neolithic tool production site discovered by archaeologists in 2001. Magnetic susceptibility surveys using the MS2D system by Bartington Instruments and an EM38 by Geonics measuring the Inphase component of the electromagnetic field were used for the prospection of measureable traces of anthropogenic activity and structures such as hearths and middens within the estimated settlement area. Soil samples for phosphate analysis were also collected and analysed using a field analysis method developed by Merck. The magnetic susceptibility measurements successfully located a waste heap containing fire-cracked stones and refuse from a seasonal settlement. The results of the survey were confirmed by subsequent archaeological excavations, which also revealed a piece of resin with the imprint of a human tooth. One additional piece of resin dated the site to 3340 to 3100 BC. The soil phosphate analysis showed slightly increased values over the central part of the site and over the heap of fire-cracked stones, suggesting the applicability of the method to a mountain tundra environment. Comparison between the MS2D and EM38 measurements revealed a weak impact of the bedrock on the results, indicating a potential for the applicability of magnetic surveys to this specific type of environment. Future geophysical archaeological prospection in the Swedish mountain tundra region could benefit from a combined approach using high-resolution magnetometry and magnetic susceptibility measurements.

  • 2012.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Brorson Schultzén, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Wikström, Anders
    Meshing around: integrating ground-penetrating radar surveys andphotogrammetric documentation for the reconstruction of the spatiallayout of the church of St. Lawrence, Sigtuna, Sweden2016In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 8, p. 295-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims at providing evidence for the usefulness of combining data from both above and below the ground in order to provide a more complete understanding of an archaeological site. For this purpose a Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) survey was carried out next to the standing ruins of the west tower of the church of St. Lawrence in Sigtuna, Sweden. The tower ruins were also documented using photogrammetry providing an accurate 3D-model of the site. The result of the GPR survey clearly images the buried wall foundations of the church but it is only when this data is combined with the photogrammetric 3D-model of the tower ruins that the spatial layout becomes complete. The results clearly provide evidence of the benefits of using such an integrated approach. The available evidence suggests that the tower, nave and choir (with a possible apse) were constructed during the 12th century. During the 15th century the church porch was built and arches added to the nave. The building history of the church is thus rather ordinary compared to other contemporary Swedish churches and, as a consequence, it is likely that that the church was built for the city congregation.

  • 2013.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Gustafsson, Christer
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Multi-Channel Ground-Penetrating Radar Array Surveys of the Iron Age and Medieval Ringfort Bårby on the Island of Öland, Sweden2020In: Remote Sensing, ISSN 2072-4292, E-ISSN 2072-4292, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a part of the project “The Big Five”, large-scale multi-channel ground-penetrating radar surveys were carried out at Bårby ringfort (Swedish: borg), Öland, Sweden. The surveys were carried out using a MALÅ Imaging Radar Array (MIRA) system and aimed at mapping possible buried Iron Age and Medieval remains through the interior in order to better understand the purpose of the fort during its periods of use. An additional goal was to evaluate the impact of earlier farming on the preservation of the archaeological remains. The data provided clear evidence of well-preserved Iron Age and Medieval buildings inside the fort. The size and the pattern of the Iron Age houses suggest close similarities with, for example, the previously excavated fort at Eketorp on Öland. Given the presence of a substantial cultural layer together with a large number of artefacts recovered during a metal detection survey, it is suggested that Bårby borg’s primary function during the Iron Age was as a fortified village. The Medieval houses partly cover some of the Iron Age buildings. They are placed in a U-shape with an open square in the middle facing the edge of a limestone cliff. As in the case of Eketorp, it is suggested that the activities during Medieval times changed, but the precise purpose of the Medieval Bårby settlement is still a question open for debate. Future targeted archaeological investigations are needed in order to better understand its purpose. Rescue excavations may also be necessary, as the western steep cliff ledge is eroding and the well-preserved archaeological remains are at risk of being destroyed.

  • 2014.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Gustafsson, Christer
    Burks, Jarrod
    On the interpretation of geophysical data and the suggested presence of a western moat at Gråborg on Öland2017In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 112, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2007 a magnetometer survey was carried out at the ring fort Gråborg on the Swedish island of Öland. The results were interpreted as indicating the remains of over 60 buildings, several roads, wells and a large moat outside the fort's northwestern gate. In 2011 these interpretations were severely criticised, and it was suggested that the moatlike anomaly in the geophysical data had actually been caused by a lightning strike. It was also suggested that none of the other interpreted features were actually supported by the presented magnetometry data.

    This paper presents the results of a groundpenetrating radar (GPR) survey of the same area. The GPR data were collected in 2014 using themultiantenna Malå Imaging Radar Array (MIRA) system, covering an area of approximately 3.8 ha. The results show that the ground inside and outside the fort's walls is heavily disturbed by farming. Most of the underground features visible in the data can be interpreted as drainage ditches and power cables, but a fewlinear features are identified as being of possible archaeological interest. When comparing the radar data to the buildings, roads andwells suggested in the magnetometry interpretation, no apparent correlation can be established. There is furthermore no sign of any moat in the suggested area. The GPR results therefore support the idea that this moatlike feature is indeed the remains of a lightning strike.

  • 2015.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Hjulström, Björn
    Georadarundersökning i Söderköping: Sjöbodar och marknadsplats vid Tvärån, Söderköping socken och kommun, Östergötland2013Report (Other academic)
  • 2016.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Larson, Magnus
    Mobile laser scanning and 360° photography for the documentation of the Iron Age ring fort Gråborg, Öland, Sweden2015In: Archaeologia Polona: Special theme: Archaeological Prospection / [ed] Aleksandra Rzeszotarska-Nowakiewicz, 2015, Vol. 53, p. 396-399Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In May 2014, four prehistoric ring-forts on the island of Öland, namely Gråborg, Vedby borg, Bårby borg and Löts borg, were surveyed using a motorized ground penetrating radar (GPR) system. The surveys were carried out as a part of the project “The Big Five”, financed by the Swedish research council and the Royal Academy of Letters, history and Antiquities, and included high-resolution GPR data collection, covering in total approximately 7.5 ha of land inside the forts.As a complement to the geophysical survey the remaining walls and surroundings of Gråborg and Vedby borg were surveyed with a MMS Geotracker. MMS systems are currently being used for high-resolution documentation of, for example, railroad tracks, but are also important for road planning and maintenance, asset management and for the generation of 3D city models (see Kutterer 2010: 293 ff.). It has also been tested and evaluated on archaeological sites (e.g., Stud-nicka et al. 2013). The Geotracker system had not previously been used for the documentation of archaeological remains and the survey was considered a pilot study to evaluate its advantages and disadvantages for archaeological applications.

  • 2017.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Schultzén, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Geophysical prospection and 3D documentation of archaeological remains in the city of Volterra, Tuscany, Italy: Preliminary survey report2014Report (Other academic)
  • 2018.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Schultzén, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Wikström, Anders
    Reconstructing the spatial layout of the church of St Lawrence Sigtuna using Ground penetrating radar and Photogrammetry2013In: Archaeological Prospection. Proceedings of the 10th International conference - Vienna. May 29th - June 2nd 2013 / [ed] Wolfgang Neubauer; Immo Trinks; Roderick B. Salisbury; Christina Einwögerer, Wien: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2019.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Trinks, Immo
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    A Review of the Use of Geophysical Archaeological Prospection in Sweden2011In: Archaeological Prospection, ISSN 1075-2196, E-ISSN 1099-0763, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 43-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While geophysical prospection for iron ores has a long history in Sweden the use of geophysical archaeological prospection has been limited compared to other countries. In this paper we discuss the likely reasons for this situation and present a brief history of geophysical prospection and in particular geophysical archaeological prospection in Sweden. The first use of different prospection methods, such as metal detection, earth resistance, magnetic, ground-penetrating radar, seismic and electro-magnetic prospection in Swedish archaeology are presented. The archaeological Iron Age sites of Uppåkra and Birka have been subject to relatively intensive prospection activity and are therefore mentioned separately. An overview of the current situation of geophysical archaeological prospection and related issues is given, and pitfalls and possibilities are discussed. The paper finishes with an outlook on possible future developments.

  • 2020.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Trinks, Immo
    UV-teknik, Archaeological Excavation Department, Swedish National Heritage Board.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    A short review of the use of geophysical prospection methods in Swedish archaeology2009In: Mémoire du sol, Espace des hommes, Rennes: Groupe des méthodes pluridisciplinaires contribuant à l'archéologie , 2009, p. 375-378Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2021.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Trinks, Immo
    UV-teknik, Archaeological Excavation Department, Swedish National Heritage Board.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Archaeological prospection in the Swedish mountain tundra region2009In: Mémoire du sol, Espace des hommes, Rennes: Groupe des méthodes pluridisciplinaires contribuant à l'archéologie , 2009, p. 167-169Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with geophysical and geochemical prospection surveys at the Stone Age site RAÄ 1372 at the shores of lake Luspasjaure in the province of Lapland, Sweden. The geophysical surveys measuring electrical conductivity as well as magnetic susceptiblity of the thin soil layer at the site, revealed a waste heap consisting mainly of fire cracked stones. The fire cracked stones werre interpreted to have been used during the preparation of food.

  • 2022.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Victor, Helena
    Fischer, Svante
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    A Room with a View: Archaeological Geophysical Prospection and Excavations at Sandby ringfort, Öland, SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeological investigations and clear aerial photographs have identified the presence of house foundations within several ring forts on the island of Öland, situated east of the Swedish mainland. One of them, Sandbyborg, was selected for further investigations by means of a ground-penetrating radar (GRP) and magnetometry survey. The purpose of the geophysical survey was to establish the fort’s spatial layout, to identify any internal constructions within the houses and to investigate whether the fort had multiple building phases. Targeted archaeological excavations was subsequently carried out to verify the validity of the geophysical results and to recover datable material that would enable the understanding of how Sandbyborg was chronologically related to the other ringforts of the island. This information could then be used to better understand the function of Sandbyborg. The results of the geophysical survey clearly show the presence of 36 or 37 stone foundations for houses situated radially aroundthe wall of the fort as well as 16 or 17 similar house foundations in a central building group. The geophysical results also provided information on the possible location of hearths, kilns and pits within the fort and also confirm the location of a third gate situated in the north-western part of the fort. The spatial layout and inner size of Sandbyborg is very similar to one of the other Migration Period ring forts on Öland, Eketorp II. However, there is no evidence of multiple building phases in the data from Sandbyborg. The subsequent excavations showed a very good correlation with the geophysical data. Datable finds, a 14C date from a human metatarsal found in one of the trenches and the lack of geophysical evidence of multiple building phases indicate that the ringfort was used for a limited period of time during thelate fourth century AD. Given the available evidence it is suggested that Sandbyborg primarily was used for military purposes or as a place of refuge intimes of unrest as its location in the outfields, far from arable lands, contradicts an interpretation of Sandbyborg as a fortified village, but as the evidence about the ringforts on Öland is restricted a continued use of geophysical prospection and excavations within the other forts is suggested as a means of obtaining a deeper understanding of the purpose and context of these highly interesting structures.

  • 2023.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Wikström, Anders
    St. Mary's Dominican Convent in Sigtuna Revisited: Geophysical and archaeological investigations2011In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 106, no 4, p. 322-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A ground-penetrating radar (GPR) survey and an archaeological excavation of the buried remains of the Medieval Dominican convent in Sigtuna (Raä 30) produced new information on the ground plan of the convent and the condition of the buried structures remaining at the site. The site has hitherto seen surprisingly little archaeological investigations, and it is now over 30 years since the previous fieldwork. In addition to the foundation walls of the convent and adjoining structures, GPR also revealed an earlier building phase and a previously unknown lavatorium connected to the southern range. These interpretations were confirmed by excavations in September 2009. A suggestion as to the function of the various buildings, based on comparison with other convents, is offered.

  • 2024.
    Virtala, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Jämtländska reliefspännebärare: Ledande kvinnor under folkvandringstid2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with two women who wore relief brooches from Häste and Brunflo during the Migration period in Jämtland. The purpose of the essay is to investigate similarities and differences in the women’s relief brooches, graves and places in order to understand the women’s relations to each other and their time. The essay has implemented gender theory and a comparative method, complemented by a landscape analysis. The conclusion is that the women from Häste and Brunflo were leaders during their time. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2025.
    von Ehrenheim, Hedvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    A pure mind and the notion of guilt as a cause of disease in the iamata of Epidauros2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2026.
    von Ehrenheim, Hedvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Antik och tidigkristen inkubation – likheter och skillnader2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2027.
    von Ehrenheim, Hedvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Early commentaries on the Hexaemeron - a survey with examples1996Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2028.
    von Ehrenheim, Hedvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Greek incubation rites from the beginning in Archaic times up until the birth of Christ2010In: AIACNews. Bollettino quadrimestrale dell'Associazione Internazionale di Archeologia Classica Onlus 6:2, 2010, 7-9. / [ed] Associazione Internazionale di Archeologia Classica onlus (AIAC)., Rom, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2029.
    von Ehrenheim, Hedvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Greek Incubation Rituals and Healing Sanctuaries2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2030.
    von Ehrenheim, Hedvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Greek incubation rituals in Classical and Hellenistic times2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study documents and analyzes the structure and function of Greek incubation rituals in Classical and Hellenistic times. The first part (Chapter 2) examines all relevant literary and epigraphical testimonia concerning the rites and rules surrounding incubation. In the second part (Chapters 3-5) the structure and function of the ritual complex are analyzed. As a first step, it is shown that there was no coherent structure of the ritual at all the sanctuaries offering it, but that the ritual practice varied according to local customs and factors such as size of the cult (the common factor being to sleep in a sacred place). In the next step, theoretical models are used to explain the function of the rituals. Previous approaches, explaining incubation as a Chthonian phenomenon, a rite of passage, or comparable to initiation in mystery cults, are shown not to conform to the testimonia at hand on incubation rites. An analysis of the social context of the rites surrounding incubation shows that incubation rites other than at the dormitory differed surprisingly little from the rites of other worshippers at these sanctuaries. Various ritual factors are explored to explain why low intensity rites might create a high intensity experience. In the final chapter, the structure of incubation rituals, entailing both ordinary rites for any worshipper and rites comparable to those of priests acting as intermediaries with the gods, is examined in the light of its origins in Greece. Disproving previous theories on the origins of incubation, it is argued that the phenomenon started as an exclusive consultation technique for priests, magistrates and select worshippers, being a natural variant of oracular techniques in Archaic and Early Classical Greece. When incubation appeared for everyone in society in Classical times and in the cult of Asklepios, rituals for the masses were constructed, keeping some rites for intermediaries but adding new motivational factors, which in total made up for very popular cults. This development might be seen as a democratization of the phenomenon of incubation.

  • 2031.
    von Ehrenheim, Hedvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Humour in Roman villa garden sculpture: Laughter for social cohesion?2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2032.
    von Ehrenheim, Hedvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Identifying incubation areas in pagan and Early Christian times2009In: Proceedings of the Danish Institute at Athens, ISSN 1108-149X, Vol. 6, p. 237-276Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2033.
    von Ehrenheim, Hedvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Incubation in antiquity until the seventh century A.D.: Continuity and discontinuity as seen in definitions of the cultic practice2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2034.
    von Ehrenheim, Hedvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Inkubation i antik och tidigkristen tid – kontinuitet och förändring med utgångspunkt i den arkeologiska evidensen2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2035.
    von Ehrenheim, Hedvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Taking a walk in a Roman villa garden: Affirming social status and entertaining guests2014In: Bulletin för trädgårdshistorisk forskning, ISSN 1652-2362, E-ISSN 2001-1261, no 27, p. 20-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2036.
    von Ehrenheim, Hedvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The Origins of Greek Incubation2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2037.
    von Ehrenheim, Hedvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The rituals surrounding pagan incubation2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2038.
    von Ehrenheim, Hedvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The titulus Lucinae and the saint Lucina2012In: San Lorenzo in Lucina: The transformations of a Roman quarter / [ed] Olof Brandt, Stockholm: Svenska Institutet i Rom , 2012, p. 155-176Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2039.
    von Hackwitz, Kim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Changing Scenery. Historicity in the area of Lake Hjälmaren, Sweden, c. 2800-2300 BC2008In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 15-16, p. 73-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    von Hackwitz, Kim. 2009. Current Swedish Archaeology, Vol 15-16 2007/2008, pp 73-89

    The article addresses changes in the archaeological record during the Middle Neolithic B in the area of Lake Hjälmaren. The main focus is on the difference between the Pitted Ware sites and the Boat-Axe sites with regard to choice of location. Traditionally the different distributions of these two assemblages have been understood as designating two different and more or less contemporaneous “cultures”. An alternative view to the conventional understanding is that the material cultures represent use and re-use activities associated with different spaces in the landscape. In the author’s opinion, the choices and activities that constitute these spaces should be understood as reflecting activities that took place in relation to a pre-existing landscape. In order to describe and analyse the relationship, the author applies theories of historicity and landmark, pointing towards an active social reproduction of a landscape.

  • 2040.
    von Hackwitz, Kim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Längs med Hjälmarens stränder och förbi - relationen mellan den gropkeramiska kulturen och båtyxekulturen2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The nature of the relationship between the Pitted Ware Culture and the Boat Axe Culture has dominated Swedish Middle Neolithic research, since the question was raised a century ago. Basically, the debate is concerned with whether or not the two material cultures express two different ethnical groups. Proponents for the currently established perspective stress that the cultures represent two distinct ethnic groups. A large amount of research has focused on identifying differences between the two cultures in the archaeological record.

    This study will test an alternative approach to the archaeology of the Middle Neolithic. Rather than presuming an antithetical relationship between the two cultures attention will be given to investigating the relationship between the Pitted Ware Culture and the Boat Axe Culture. This will be done by a landscape centered approach.

    In the first case I will test the conventional opinion expressing that the two cultures are spatially separated to the coast and the inland. In addition, the analysis seeks to understand how different activities were located in relation to various landscape phenomena. In the second case study, phenomenology and current landscape theory combined with a viewshed GIS-analysis will form the basis for a discussion regarding the localisation and function of the Pitted Ware sites. In the third case I will discuss connective features of the Middle Neolithic landscapes in the Lake Hjälmaren area. Focus will be given to the long-term processes and the reproduction of the cultural landscapes over time.

    Based on the results, I will propose that the Middle Neolithic archaeological record, rather than being the result of two ethnic groups, express a dynamic and active society that manifests itself through a variety of different places, which were maintained for specific purposes.

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  • 2041.
    von Heijne, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Särpräglat: Vikingatida och tidigmedeltida myntfynd från Danmark, Skåne, Blekinge och Halland (ca 800-1130)2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis takes as its subject the Viking-Age and early medieval coin finds from South Scandinavia (i.e. Denmark and the provinces Scania, Blekinge and Halland in southern Sweden). The study consists of two parts. The first part is an analysis of regional variations in the distribution of coin finds from the investigation area. The second part is a catalogue of recorded coin finds from South Scandinavia from the period c.800-c.1130 (about 70,000 coins from 692 finds). The regional variations are mainly studied through hoard composition and the distribution of coins with diverse origins. The study is therefore based on a wide range of material, comprising coins of Islamic, Carolingian, German, Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian (Nordic, Anglo-Scandinavian and Danish) origin.

    Regional characteristics are visible from the outset and prove to be relatively consistent over time. Similarities are observed over a large territory, the ‘central area’, which includes south-western Scania, Zealand, Funen and Jutland. During the 9th century the earliest Nordic and Carolingian coins occur in this area. Many of them are found at ‘central places’ dating to the Iron Age. A shift is seen in the 10th century, when later Nordic coins appear to relate to ring-forts, which were in active use in the central area at that time. In the 990s a general increase in the importation of German and Anglo-Saxon coins is apparent. The city of Lund was established in Scania, and from c.995 Lund was a mint. The hoards in the central area contain a higher proportion of Anglo-Saxon coins than hoards from other parts of South Scandinavia. Mints were established in all regions of the central area, and a regional coin circulation was introduced c.1075.

    Bornholm differs in several ways from the central area. During the 9th century Carolingian and Nordic coins of the earliest types did not reach the island, but there are several finds of Islamic coins dating to this time. In the 10th century there are few Nordic coins of the later Cross-types. In the 990s, when the number of German and Anglo-Saxon coins being imported increased, many Anglo-Saxon coins also reached Bornholm. However, a shift occurred c.1000 and all subsequent hoards until the beginning of the 12th century were dominated by German coins. The number of Danish coins also decreased in Bornholm after c.1050-55, in direct contrast with the situation in the central area. Finally, a mint was never established in Bornholm.

    When a long term perspective is taken the other regions in South Scandinavia do not correspond with developments in the central area, or on Bornholm. These regions are instead characterised by their relative dearth of coin finds and the absence of mints. There are, however, significant connections at specific points in time.

    The context of hoards from Scania (c.990-c.1046) has also been examined. A major increase of hoards c.1000 has often been explained as a reflection of political aggression resulting from the incorporation of Scania into the Danish kingdom. This thesis argues that the increase of hoards is more likely to have been related to the activities of the mints in the different regions.

  • 2042.
    Wahlberg Sandberg, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Antikens farmaceutiska valmöjligheter2009In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, ISSN 0349-456X, no 3, p. 45-47Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2043.
    Wahlberg Sandberg, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Antikens läkare under ed: "Jag skall inte ge någon gift även om jag blir ombedd..."2010In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 107, no 12, p. 851-853Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2044.
    Wahlberg Sandberg, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The human skeletons2010In: A Roman villa by Lake Nemi, the finds: The Nordic Excavations by Lake Nemi, loc. S. Maria (1998-2002) / [ed] Mette Moltesen & Birte Poulsen, Rom: Edizioni Quasar , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2045.
    Wahlstedt, Sabina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Fragment av forntida Helgö: En osteoarkeologisk och tafonomisk studie med fokus på djur, rum, praktik och handling utifrån animalt benmaterial från Husgrupp 4 på Helgö2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Zooarchaeological material from prehistoric settlements usually make up a large amount of the archaeological record. Despite this, research on the material is seldom utilized to its full potential. This is very much the case for the famous iron age settlement at Helgö. Therefore, in this thesis animal bones recovered from building group 4 at Helgö were analyzed using both osteological and taphonomic, as well as spatial variables as a mean to gain a better understanding of various aspects of the settlement and life at prehistoric Helgö. The results from the zooarchaeological analysis provide insight in social activities and practices concerning both human and animal interactions. The animals are found to have been an important part of the lives of the people at Helgö. Both spatial and structural differences in the material reveal various attitudes towards the animals and bring to light a diversity of activities and practices surrounding the settlement and Helgö.

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    Fragment av forntida Helgö
  • 2046.
    Wallgren, Josef
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    De dödas öar och stränder: Fågelbacken, Äs och Bollbacken - stenålderslokaler med många kulturer2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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    fulltext
  • 2047.
    Wallin, Erik Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Pärlorna på Gudings slott2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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    Pärlorna på Gudings slott
  • 2048. Wang, Yi-ting
    et al.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Sundström, Aksel
    Jansson, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Paxton, Pamela
    Lindberg, Staffan I.
    Women's rights in democratic transitions: A global sequence analysis, 1900–20122017In: European Journal of Political Research, ISSN 0304-4130, E-ISSN 1475-6765, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 735-756Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What determines countries’ successful transition to democracy? This article explores the impact of granting civil rights in authoritarian regimes and especially the gendered aspect of this process. It argues that both men's and women's liberal rights are essential conditions for democratisation to take place: providing both women and men rights reduces an inequality that affects half of the population, thus increasing the costs of repression and enabling the formation of women's organising – historically important to spark protests in initial phases of democratisation. This argument is tested empirically using data that cover 173 countries over the years 1900–2012 and contain more nuanced measures than commonly used. Through novel sequence analysis methods, the results suggest that in order to gain electoral democracy a country first needs to furnish civil liberties to both women and men.

  • 2049.
    Wartel, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Institute for Future Studies, Sweden .
    Lind, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Whatever you want: Inconsistent results are the rule, not the exception, in the study of primate brain evolution2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 7, article id e0218655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primate brains differ in size and architecture. Hypotheses to explain this variation are numerous and many tests have been carried out. However, after body size has been accounted for there is little left to explain. The proposed explanatory variables for the residual variation are many and covary, both with each other and with body size. Further, the data sets used in analyses have been small, especially in light of the many proposed predictors. Here we report the complete list of models that results from exhaustively combining six commonly used predictors of brain and neocortex size. This provides an overview of how the output from standard statistical analyses changes when the inclusion of different predictors is altered. By using both the most commonly tested brain data set and the inclusion of new data we show that the choice of included variables fundamentally changes the conclusions as to what drives primate brain evolution. Our analyses thus reveal why studies have had troubles replicating earlier results and instead have come to such different conclusions. Although our results are somewhat disheartening, they highlight the importance of scientific rigor when trying to answer difficult questions. It is our position that there is currently no empirical justification to highlight any particular hypotheses, of those adaptive hypotheses we have examined here, as the main determinant of primate brain evolution.

  • 2050. Webb, Emily C.
    et al.
    Honch, Noah V.
    Dunn, Philip J. H.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Evershed, Richard P.
    Compound-specific amino acid isotopic proxies for detecting freshwater resource consumption2015In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 63, p. 104-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Of central importance to palaeodietary reconstruction is a clear understanding of relative contributions of different terrestrial (i.e., C3 vs. C4 plants) and aquatic (i.e., freshwater vs. marine) resources to human diet. There are, however, significant limitations associated with the ability to reconstruct palaeodiet using bulk collagen stable isotope compositions in regions where diverse dietary resources are available. Recent research has determined that carbon-isotope analysis of individual amino acids has considerable potential to elucidate dietary protein source where bulk isotopic compositions cannot. Using δ13CAA values for human and faunal remains from Zvejnieki, Latvia (8th – 3rd millennia BCE), we test several isotopic proxies focused on distinguishing freshwater protein consumption from both plant-derived and marine protein consumption. We determined that the Δ13CGly-Phe and Δ13CVal-Phe proxies can effectively discriminate between terrestrial and aquatic resource consumption, and the relationship between essential δ13CAA values and the Δ13CGly-Phe and Δ13CVal-Phe proxies can differentiate among the four protein consumption groups tested here. Compound-specific amino acid carbon-isotope dietary proxies thus enable an enhanced understanding of diet and resource exploitation in the past, and can elucidate complex dietary behaviour.

383940414243 2001 - 2050 of 2139
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