Change search
Refine search result
23456 201 - 250 of 252
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 201.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Sociolinguistics and epistemic reflexivity2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this brief paper, I argue that some sociolinguistic research seems to end up showing and saying exactly what one would have expected it to show and say, based on the position – social, academic or otherwise – from which the research was produced. Often, this is because scholars embody the values of the group they investigate and, all too often, fail to create a rupture with their inherited view of the problem they investigate. Bourdieu’s principle of epistemic reflexivity offers a way of understanding and, subsequently, handling one’s own position and dispositions, as handed down by one’s field. Thus, it offers the critical researcher the intellectual means to equip oneself with the necessary means to understand one’s naïve view of the object of study (Bourdieu 1996a, 207) and thereby ‘avoid being the toy of social forces in your practice’ (Bourdieu & Wacquant 1992, 183, empha sis removed). Therefore, it is also a pivotal driver for yielding better sociolinguistic research.

  • 202.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    The linguistic sense of placement: Habitus and the entextualization of translingual practices in Swedish academia2015In: Journal of Sociolinguistics, ISSN 1360-6441, E-ISSN 1467-9841, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 511-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper adopts a Bourdieusian approach to discourse in contemporary Swedish academia. Habitus, entextualization, and translingual practice are employed as epistemological perspectives for investigating the place of Swedish in the text trajectories of two disciplines where English prevails in publishing. Data from meeting recordings, email correspondence, and interviews show that Swedish is the legitimate language throughout in the text production and that discipline-specific Swedish is practiced so long as it encompasses all participants’ repertoires. In fact, the researchers point to an almost physical awkwardness linked to the unwarranted use of English among themselves. Following Bourdieu, it is argued that these sensibilities pertain to the linguistic sense of placement of socialized agents and that the unease of being out of place prevents them from lapsing into what is socially perceived as unacceptable discourse in their translingual practices. 

  • 203.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    The sociolinguistics of academic publishing: A relational approach to language choiceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents a sociolinguistics of academic publishing in historical as well as in contemporary times. From the perspective of Swedish academia, it unites a wide range of scholarly knowledge, including perspectives from the sociology of science, history of science and ideas, and research policy. The study focuses on pub­lishing practices in the empirical realities of two disciplinary fields, history and psychology. Drawing on facts and figures from publishing practices as well as inter­views, the study argues that English is currently making inroads into the field of history, in line with and aided by the field-external power of new regimes of research evaluation and performance-based funding impinging on the university field at large. In the field of history, unlike in psychology, the English language is thus currently a weapon since it provides access to international publishing markets where new forms of scientific authority can be obtained. This option seems to be most compel­ling for junior scholars seeking to enter the field. Fol­lowing Bourdieu, publishing in English is here interpreted as pertaining to a social strategy, enacted in pur­suit of investing differently, so as to subvert the order of the historical field. 

  • 204.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    The sociolinguistics of academic publishing: language and the practices of homo academicus2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book presents a sociolinguistics of academic publishing from an historical and contemporary perspective. Using Swedish academia as a case study, it focuses on publishing practices within history and psychology. The author demonstrates how new regimes of research evaluation and performance-based funding are impinging on university life. His central argument, following the French sociologist Bourdieu, is that the trend towards publishing in English should be understood as a social strategy, developed in response to such transformations. Thought-provoking and challenging, this book will interest students and scholars of sociolinguistics, language planning and language policy, research policy, sociology of science, history and psychology.

  • 205.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Thinking about language with Bourdieu: Pointers for social theory in the language sciences2018In: Sociolinguistic Studies, ISSN 1750-8649, E-ISSN 1750-8657, Vol. 12, no 3-4, p. 523-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents Pierre Bourdieu's sociological gaze, agenda and toolkit to scholars of language, so as to offer a social theoretical framework within which sociolinguistic questions can be fruitfully investigated. It outlines Bourdieu's dual conception of social life and presents the key thinking tools - field and habitus - with which this dualism can be explored empirically. In addition, it locates work produced at the nexus of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology where Bourdieusian insights have been productively employed. It also discusses Bourdieu's reputation as a macro theorist, and argues that this image must be supplemented with an understanding of his idea that social reality also has a mode of existence in people's bodies, habitus, and practices. The paper argues that Bourdieu's gaze and thinking tools import with them a solid social theoretical base of the comprehension of human practice, including linguistic practice, which therefore offers some purchase to account for the relationship between the market side of language and its embodied manifestations.

  • 206.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Vad händer med den akademiska svenskan?2017Other (Other academic)
  • 207.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Är engelska vår tids latin? Om publiceringsspråk och nygamla stridigheter2017In: Folkbildning & Forskning: Årsbok 2017, Stockholm: Föreningen för folkbildningsforskning , 2017, p. 27-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Salö, Linus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Karrebæk, Martha Sif
    Mother tongue instruction in Sweden and Denmark: Language policy, cross-field effects, and linguistic exchange rates2018In: Language Policy, ISSN 1568-4555, E-ISSN 1573-1863, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 591-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates mother tongue instruction (MTI) in Sweden and Denmark in a historical, comparative perspective, with a view to accounting for key differences in language policy enacted in educational fields. Whereas in Sweden, MTI is offered to linguistic minority children irrespective of their linguistic and ethnic backgrounds, in Denmark the right to state-sponsored MTI has been abolished for children of non-European descent. Moreover, while the policies of both states devalue skills in mother tongues other than the legitimate language of each society, this position is more pronounced in the Danish context. The article explores the two state’s position on MTI, as expressed in policy as well as in discourse produced in the political and academic field of each state. It subscribes to Pierre Bourdieu’s framework, within which state policy is conceived as the product of historical struggle and cross-field effects. The analysis shows that the national differences in MTI exist because of the differing ways in which agents from the academic vis-à-vis the political field have succeeded in imposing their visions in the bureaucratic field from which policies are produced. Ultimately, this circumstance explains why the Swedish discussion on MTI may be characterized as having been academically founded, while the Danish discussion has remained a matter of political consideration. In the latter case, we argue, it is particularly tangible that MTI is a politicized object of struggle, where agents seek to control the exchange rate of linguistic resources and, in effect, the social worth of different speakers.

  • 209.
    Salö, Linus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hanell, Linnea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Performance of unprecedented genres: interdiscursivity in the writing practices of a Swedish researcher2014In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 37, p. 12-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the sociolinguistic repertoire and writing practices of a Swedish computer science researcher and his first-time performance of unprecedented genres. Since the use of written computerese Swedish has no historical anchorage in the social practices of his discipline, texts-to-text relationships cannot be drawn from as models of action. Lacking this option, the researcher construes type and token interdiscursive connectivity from iconic Swedish and English texts and from prior discursive events of using academic Swedish orally. The resources comprising an individual’s repertoire are, thus, significantly transposable across languages, modes and genres, when they are enacted in new discursive events.

  • 210.
    Salö, Linus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Landrapport Sverige: Parallellspråkighet vid svenska universitet och högskolor2014In: Hvor parallelt: om parallellspråkighet på Nordens universitet / [ed] Frans Gregersen, Köpenhamn: Nordisk Ministerråd, 2014, p. 261-319Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 211.
    Samuel, Steven
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of Essex, UK.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Cooper, Rachel
    Athanasopoulos, Panos
    Illuminating ATOM: Taking time across the colour category border2018In: Acta Psychologica, ISSN 0001-6918, E-ISSN 1873-6297, Vol. 185, p. 116-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Walsh's A Theory Of Magnitude (ATOM) contends that we represent magnitudes such as number, space, time and luminance on a shared metric, such that more of one leads to the perception of more of the other (e.g. Walsh, 2003). In support of ATOM, participants have been shown to judge intervals between stimuli that are more discrepant in luminance as having a longer duration than intervals between stimuli whose luminance differs by a smaller degree (Xuan, Zhang, He, & Chen, 2007). We tested the potential limits to the ability of luminance to influence duration perception by investigating the possibility that the luminance-duration relationship might be interrupted by a concurrent change in the colour of that luminance. We showed native Greek and native English speakers sequences of stimuli that could be either light or dark versions of green or blue. Whereas for both groups a shift in green luminance does not comprise a categorical shift in colour, for Greek speakers shifts between light and dark blue cross a colour category boundary (ghalazio and ble respectively). We found that duration judgements were neither interrupted nor inflated by a shift in colour category. These results represent the first evidence that the influence of luminance change on duration perception is resistant to interference from discrete changes within the same perceptual input.

  • 212.
    Sandell Ring, Anniqa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hassanpour, Arash
    Pedagogisk kartläggning av nyanlända elever2013In: Symposium 2012: lärarrollen i svenska som andraspråk / [ed] Mikael Olofsson, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag, 2013, 1, p. 97-113Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna artikel behandlar pedagogisk kartläggning av nyanlända elever i en svensk kontext. Begreppet nyanländ definieras och en bakgrund av nyanlända elevers utbildning ges utifrån Skolverkets och Skolinspektionens rapporter. Därefter förs resonemang om vad kartläggning innebär och exempel ges på kartläggning av nyanländas modersmål. Avslutningsvis ges en kortfattad beskrivning av ett språk- och kunskapsutvecklande arbetssätt som kan vara ett stöd vid kartläggning.

  • 213.
    Schmidt, Lili Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    "Hon har SFI-uttal": En perceptionsstudie om hur vuxna andraspråksinlärare uppfattar modersmålssvenska och andraspråkssvenska2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Being able to identify and understand different varieties of the target language is a fundamental condition for learners of Swedish as a second language in order to gain full language proficiency and become a participant in today’s multilingual Swedish society. The present study is an explorative investigation of how adult second language learners acquire knowledge of native and non-native variation in Swedish and of sociolinguistic awareness. A listening experiment is used to collect and analyse data in three steps, i.e. how L2 listeners judge different speakers, how they explain their judgements, and how they perceive their own Swedish compared to different speakers. A questionnaire is used to collect information about language experience and to find correlations between this and L2 listeners’ judgements. The results indicate that L2 listeners’ knowledge of variation varies to a great extent, and that some of them seem to have identical judgements to the native control group. The data in this study does not support that there are any correlations between L2 listeners’ language experience and judgements. Possible interpretations and explanations of what can affect L2 listeners’ knowledge are presented as well. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 214.
    Setréus, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Kärlek eller elände, det svåra valet: En studie om lärares val av skönlitteratur inom ämnet Svenska som andraspråk på gymnasieskolans introduktionsprogram.2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie behandlar lärares val av skönlitteratur inom gymnasieskolans språkintroduktionsprogram samt hur dessa val motiveras ifråga om tema och tänkbar identifikation för den aktuella elevgruppen. Syftet är att undersöka vilka litterära teman som föredras och varför samt att även identifiera om särskilda teman undviks i undervisningen. Genom att även inventera den litteratur som studiens informanter använder så undersöks skolans föreställningar om de nyanlända eleverna och deras erfarenheter för att utreda huruvida stereotypa roller riskerar reproduceras genom det skönlitterära valet. Resultatet visar att de intervjuade lärarna i Svenska som andraspråk ser litteraturvalet som en stor utmaning men att de har vitt skilda strategier vad gäller val av tema och innehåll i de böcker som de arbetar med. Här framkommer en vattendelare ifråga om att välja litteratur som behandlar flykt och krig som de nyanlända eleverna har egna erfarenheter av eller att tvärtom välja bort denna till förmån för allmänmänskliga teman eller litteratur som behandlar svenska förhållanden. Vidare framgår att oavsett ståndpunkt i frågan så skildrar merparten av informanternas använda litteratur just teman såsom invandring, flykt, krig och utanförskap. Detta kan ses som en implikation på att gruppen nyanlända särskiljs från skolans övriga elever i en andrafierande process. Frågan är av stor av vikt för att belysa de utmaningar som lärare i Svenska som andraspråk möter i sitt arbete samt för att säkerställa en jämställd och likvärdig utbildning för alla, oavsett ursprung och bakgrund.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 215. Shaikjee, Mooniq
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Fanon in drag: Decoloniality in sociolinguistics?2017In: Journal of Sociolinguistics, ISSN 1360-6441, E-ISSN 1467-9841, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 371-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In focus in this paper is the genre of drag, and the uses to which it is put by its proponents in subverting conventional and repressive (Western) models of gender, sexuality and race. We raise the question of to what extent performances of drag, while arguably disrupting gender stereotypes, nevertheless continue to reproduce colonialities of race and sexuality. Framing an analysis of a drag king performance in a sociolinguistics of subjectification inspired by the work of Frantz Fanon, we offer an account that recognizes how, rather than subverting or challenging conventional images of gender, the performance is one part of a complex circulation of textual and corporeal semiotics that enregisters racialized categories of male and female cut to the cloth of coloniality/modernity. On the other hand, the analysis also reveals that there are moments of interruption and slippage in the reproduction of colonial constructs of race, gender and sexuality that may offer more complex and multifarious understandings of what may comprise the exercises of decoloniality. We conclude with a discussion of what a decolonial Fanonian approach to subjectification might offer sociolinguistics.

  • 216.
    Simonis, Rita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    The effects of multilingualism on executive processing.2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the first decades of the 20th century, research on bilingualism was just beginning. The first studies on bilingual children proposed a substantial disadvantage with respect to intelligence and learning abilities. This first proposition was later discarded when Peal and Lambert (1962) suggested that, on the contrary, speaking two languages was providing children with significant advantages in their cognition. At the present time, it is assessed that, while knowing more than one language is not negative, the supposition that bilingualism might have positive effects on executive processing is subject to controversy. The Bilingual Executive Advantage (BEA) hypothesis has been tested many times and in several ways. Nevertheless, it appears more like an overstated theory rather than a real and proven fact.

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to this scholarly debate not only by conducting one more experiment but also by investigating a possible extension to the original hypothesis, more specifically, the possibility that additional languages might confer an even greater cognitive advantage than the one that has been claimed to exist for bilingual individuals. In the study, 23 young adults were tested on a version of the Attentional Network Task and a Colour-Shape switching task, both used in a previous study on professional interpreters (Babcock and Vallesi, 2017). The subjects were divided in two groups, bilinguals and multilinguals. The comparison of their performances in the two task revealed no significant difference in any of the examined measures.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 217.
    Smeds, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Blindness and Second Language Acquisition: Studies of Cognitive Advantages in Blind L1 and L2 speakers2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether blind individuals display cognitive advantages over sighted individuals with regard to second language acquisition. Previous studies from neuropsychology have indicated that this is the case. It has been found that blind L1 speakers can compensate for loss of vision by developing better perceptual and cognitive skills compared to sighted individuals, skills that are highly relevant to language acquisition. These studies do not, however, investigate blind L2 speakers, for whom it is not clear whether these advantages are also found.  In all, 80 adults participated in the study: 40 L2 speakers of Swedish (11 early blind, 9 late blind, 20 sighted, AO<18) and a matching group and subgroups of L1 speakers. These speakers underwent tests on speech perception in noise, accentedness in an L2 and memory functions. The results revealed that L2 speakers are at a great disadvantage perceiving speech in noise compared to L1 speakers, and that there was no advantage associated with blindness. In the L1 speakers group, however, the results revealed that the early blind had advantages compared to the late blind and sighted in white noise, but that both blind groups were more negatively affected by babble noise than the sighted. The results in relation to accentedness in an L2 revealed that there were no advantages associated with blindness. The results further revealed there were no advantages associated with blindness on the episodic memory test. The results did, however, reveal that the early blind performed significantly better than the late blind and sighted on all phonological short-term memory tests and that both the early and late blind were significantly better than the sighted on recognition memory for new words, irrespective of language background. The conclusion is that blindness is associated with advantages in, for example, ability to learn new words and syntax, acquisition rate, ultimate L2 attainment, and language aptitude.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (pdf)
    errata
    Download (jpg)
    omslagsframsida
  • 218.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    A postscript on the postracial2017In: Entangled Discourses: South-North Orders of Visibility / [ed] Caroline Kerfoot, Kenneth Hyltenstam, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 230-238Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 219.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Afterword: Turbulent deflections2015In: Language, Literacy and Diversity: Moving Words / [ed] Christopher Stroud, Mastin Prinsloo, New York: Routledge, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 220.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Halvspråkighet och rinkebysvenska som språkideologiska begrepp2013In: Svenska som andraspråk: i forskning, undervisning och samhälle / [ed] Hyltenstam, Kenneth & Lindberg, Inger, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 2. uppl., p. 313-342Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 221.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Introduction: Language Rights and Linguistic Citizenship2018In: The Multilingual Citizen: Towards a politics of language for agency and change / [ed] Lisa Lim, Christopher Stroud, Lionel Wee, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2018, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 222.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Linguistic Citizenship2018In: The Multilingual Citizen: Towards a politics of language for agency and change / [ed] Lisa Lim, Christopher Stroud, Lionel Wee, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2018, p. 17-39Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 223.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Of Monkeys, Shacks and Loos: Changing times, changing places2018In: Making sense of People and Place in Linguistic Landscapes / [ed] Amiena Peck, Christopher Stroud, Quentin Williams, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018, p. 180-200Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 224.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bock, Zannie
    Zombie landscapes: Representations of apartheid in the discourses of young South Africans2018In: Making Sense of People and Place in Linguistic Landscapes / [ed] Amiena Peck, Christopher Stroud, Quentin Williams, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018, p. 11-22Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 225.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Guissemo, Manuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique.
    Linguistic Messianism: Multilingualism in Mozambique2017In: Sociolinguistics in African Context: Perspectives and Challenges / [ed] Augustin Emmanuel Ebongue, Ellen Hurst, Springer, 2017, p. 35-51Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on the idea that in Mozambique, multilingualism, commonly understood as the co-existence and juxtaposition of more than one language, is one mechanism whereby essential features of colonial social logics are reconfigured in contemporary ‘postcolonial’ societies. They interrogate how multilingualism, whilst ostensibly promising a trope for linguistic (and cultural) diversity, is best seen, in common with other forms of neoliberal governance, as a response to ‘the effects of anti and postcolonial movements in the liberal world’. They conclude that this constancy is not accidental, but a key dimension of how multilingualism as a particular political regime of language organization has been used historically and in contemporary time as a technology of liberal governance. The paper highlights the meaning, the significance and the indexical values that African languages have vis a vis Portuguese, in a context where African languages are subordinated.

  • 226.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Towards rethinking multilingualism and language policy for academic literacies2013In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 396-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The language policy of the University of the Western Cape (2003) reflects the temperedtraces of historically and politically charged negotiations. We argue that a reinterpreta-tion of ‘policy failure’ as responsive engagement with complex new forms of linguisticand social diversity can lead to a critical rethinking of the nature of multilingualism andlanguage policy in a South African tertiary education sector in transformation. We submitthat university language policies need to consider (a) how the complex linguistic and non-linguistic repertoires of students can be mobilised for transformative discipline-specificcurricula and pedagogies, and (b) the concept of multilingualism both as a resource anda transformative epistemology and methodology of diversity. We suggest a policy devel-opment process that moves from micro-interaction to macro-structure, tracing processesof resemiotisation, interrogating legitimised representational conventions, and reshapinginstitutional practices and perceptions. We discuss the implications for register formationand for broader epistemological access and ownership.

  • 227.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Prinsloo, Mastin
    Language, Literacy and Diversity: Moving Words2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 228.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Prinsloo, Mastin
    Preface2015In: Language, Literacy and Diversity: Moving Words / [ed] Christopher Stroud, Mastin Prinsloo, New York: Routledge, 2015, p. IX-XIVChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 229.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa .
    Williams, Quentin
    Multilingualism as utopia: Fashioning non-racial selves2017In: AILA Review, ISSN 1461-0213, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 167-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The challenge of contemporary South Africa is that of building a (post)nation of postracial equity in a fragmented world of a globalized ethical, economic and ecological meltdown. In this paper, we seek to explore the idea of multilingualism as a technology in the conceptualization of alternative, competing futures. We suggest that multilingualism is understood in terms of how encounters across difference are mediated and structured linguistically offer a space for interrupting colonial relationships. Furthermore, we argue that multilingualism should be approached as a site where colonial power dynamics of languages and speakers are troubled, and where the potential for new empowering linguistic mediations of the mutualities of our common humanity with different others are worked out.

  • 230.
    Stölten, Katrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Effects of age and speaking rate on voice onset time: The production of voiceless stops by near-native L2 speakers2015In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 71-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of a research project on the investigation of second language (L2) ultimate attainment in 41 Spanish early and late near-native speakers of L2 Swedish, the present study reports on voice onset time (VOT) analyses of the production of Swedish word-initial voiceless stops, /p t k/. VOT is analyzed in milliseconds as well as in percentages of word duration, thereby accounting for speaking rate effects. The results revealed an overall age effect on VOT production; however, this age effect became salient and sta­tistically significant for all three stops only when speaking rate was taken into consider­ation. Similarly, when speaking rate was accounted for, only a small minority of the late learners exhibited actual nativelike L2 behavior, and most (but far from all) early learn­ers performed within native-speaker range. The results are taken as an indication for relative VOT, as opposed to absolute VOT, constituting a reliable measure of nativelike L2 stop production, which has important implications for future research on age effects and maturational constraints in L2 acquisition.

  • 231.
    Stölten, Katrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Effects of age of learning on voice onset time: Categorical perception of Swedish stops by near-native L2 speakers2014In: Language and Speech, ISSN 0023-8309, E-ISSN 1756-6053, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 425-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the effects of age of onset (AO) of L2 acquisition on the cate­gorical perception of the voicing contrast in Swedish word-initial stops varying in Voice Onset Time (VOT). Three voicing continua created on the basis of natural Swedish word pairs with /p–b/, /t–d/, /k–ɡ/ in initial position were presented to 41 Spanish early (AO < 12) and late (AO > 12) near-native speakers of L2 Swedish. 15 native speakers of Swedish served as controls. Categorizations were influenced by AO and listener status as L1/L2 speaker, in that the late learners deviated the most from native-speaker perception. In addition, only a small minority of the late learners perceived the voicing contrast in a way comparable to native-speaker cate­gorization, while most early L2 learners demonstrated nativelike categorization patterns. However, when the results were combined with the L2 learners’ produc­tion of Swedish voiceless stops (Stölten, 2005; Stölten, Abrahamsson & Hylten­stam, in press), nativelike production and perception was never found among the late learners, while a majority of the early learners still exhibited nativelike pro­duction and perception. It is concluded that, despite their being perceived as mother-tongue speakers of Swedish by native listeners, the late learners do not, after detailed phonetic scrutiny, exhibit a fully nativelike command of Swedish VOT. Consequently, being near-native rather than nativelike speakers of their second language, these individuals do not constitute the evidence necessary to reject the hypothesis of one or several critical (or sensitive) periods for language acquisition.

  • 232.
    Svensson Nordell, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Flerspråkighet i klassrummet utifrån ett lärarperspektiv: Lärares attityder till och praktiska tillämpning av flerspråkighet i klassrumskontext2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Andraspråksundervisningen och samhället i stort har präglats av en enspråkig norm (Ortega, 2013). Det har funnits en oro för att modersmålet stör andraspråksinlärningen och att språk därför bör hållas isär (Lindberg, 2002). De senaste decennierna har mer och mer forskning belyst flerspråkigheten som en resurs för lärande och en flerspråkig norm inom andraspråksinlärning förespråkas. Denna studie undersöker om det bland verksamma svenska som andraspråkslärare finns ett resurs- eller bristperspektiv på modersmålet i undervisningskontext och hur lärarna ser på modersmålets roll för identiteten. Resultatet är baserat på digitala enkäter (N=61). Enkäten publicerades i en intressegrupp för svenska som andraspråk på Facebook. Undersökningen visar ett tydligt resursperspektiv på modersmålet och att flerspråkigheten används för pedagogiska ändamål. Det samstämmiga resursperspektivet diskuteras i ljuset av tidigare forskning. Det diskuteras även huruvida kontexten deltagarna befinner sig i (Facebookgruppen) påverkar resultatet.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 233.
    Tan, Maryann Su Lin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Xie, Xin
    University of Rochester.
    Jaeger, T Florian
    University of Rochester.
    Analysing L2 Swedish word-final stops2019In: Proceedings ExLing 2019: 10th Tutorial and Research Workshop on Experimental Linguistics, 24–27 September, Lisbon, Portugal. Lisbon: Lisbon University/FLUL, Letras Lisboa. 193–196. / [ed] A. Botinis, 2019, p. 193-196Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compare native (L1) and non-native (L2) word-final plosive voicing in Swedish. The L1 of the L2 speaker (Flemish) does not have word-final plosive voicing contrasts. In order to assess the effectiveness of a common approach to L2 instruction, L2 speech was elicited under two conditions: either unassisted or by playing an example L1 production and asking the L2 speaker to mimic it. Three cues to voicing-vowel, closure, and burst durations-were measured. L2 productions relied on different cues for voicing than L1 production. Mimicking reduced the difference between L1 and L2 speech.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 234. Thøgersen, Jacob
    et al.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Londen, Monica
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Engelsk som undervisningssprog på nordiske universiteter: hvordan gör man?2014In: Hvor parallelt: om parallellspråkighet på Nordens universitet / [ed] Frans Gregersen, Köpenhamn: Nordisk Ministerråd, 2014, 1, p. 55-115Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 235.
    Toth, Jeanette
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Agency and Affordance in Translanguaging for Learning: Case Studies from English-medium Instruction in Swedish Schools2017In: New Perspectives on Translanguaging and Education / [ed] BethAnne Paulsrud, Jenny Rosén, Boglárka Straszer, Åsa Wedin, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2017, p. 189-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 236.
    Toth, Jeanette
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Translanguaging Practices and Perspectives: Case Studies from English-Medium Instruction in Swedish Schools2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation addresses language alternation in English-medium instruction (EMI) lessons as related to the concept of translanguaging, with a focus on the practices and perspectives of teachers and students in two Swedish schools offering EMI. The research questions were as follows:

    1) What patterns of language alternation can be found in the EMI classroom?

    2) What are the functions of language alternation in the EMI classroom?

    3) How do teachers and students view the use of English and Swedish in these classrooms?

    The studies, based in linguistic ethnography, included classroom observations and interviews with teachers and students in one elementary school classroom and one high school classroom, as well as the collection of artifacts (e.g. lesson plans). In the thematic analysis of the rich data, key concepts emerged, including the notions of affordances and constraints, agency and translanguaging.

    The results indicate that language alternation is viewed as an affordance, allowing access to subject content and subject-specific language. Additionally, language choices reveal teacher and student agency in the EMI lessons. Teachers and students may use Swedish and English based on school policy as well as de facto classroom policies, although perspectives on language choice vary. In the elementary school, peer collaboration in Swedish provides support for comprehension and facilitates communication. Use of Swedish is, however, seen by the teacher as a constraint when it resists classroom policies. In the high school, the practice of translanguaging is not explicitly promoted, but is nonetheless a strategic feature of EMI. 

    While this multiple case study may not be generalizable to all EMI, the results suggest broader implications in terms of how both implicit and explicit language policies are implemented in classrooms. Awareness of the possibilities presented by the process of translanguaging may provide educators with a meaningful tool for the development of bilingual pedagogies.

  • 237.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Towards a unified account of the Spanish subjunctive mood: Epistemic dominion and dominion of effective control2013In: Lingua, ISSN 0024-3841, E-ISSN 1872-6135, Vol. 131, p. 179-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study analyses the semantics of the Spanish subjunctive mood from a Cognitive Grammar perspective. The proposed hypothesis is that the subjunctive mood designates events that are located outside the conceptualiser’s dominion in two alternate ways. In accordance with Maldonado (1995), the subjunctive mood is claimed to designate events that are located outside the conceptualiser’s epistemic dominion. However, the present paper goes one step further, extending the notion of dominion to also include the conceptualiser’s effective control over the event described by the subjunctive mood. A qualitative analysis of the occurrence of the subjunctive mood in a number of grammatical contexts corroborates the initial claim that the semantics of the subjunctive mood is related to the notion of dominion.

  • 238.
    Visnjar, Mojca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Skönlitteratur i SVA-klassrummet: Om lättläst, läslust, och lärares val av skönlitteratur2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna studie var att få en inblick i fyra lärares skönlitteraturanvändning i ämnet svenska som andraspråk. Data från semi-strukturerade intervjuer organiserades och analyserades i tematiska områden med fyra övergripande motiv: i vilken utsträckning fyra svenska som andraspråkslärare använder sig av skönlitteratur i deras undervisning, hur detta kopplas till styrdokument, deltagarnas uppfattning om läsning av litteratur i originalversion och lättläst form samt mål med undervisning i, och med hjälp av, skönlitteratur. 

    Denna studie visade att alla fyra lärare uppger att de använder skönlitteratur i minst hälften av all sin undervisning dock anser de ändå att detta inte räcker. Studiens deltagare är eniga om att skönlitteratur kan användas i nästintill alla områden av svenska som andraspråksundervisning. Det kan gynna elevernas grammatikfärdigheter, ordförråd, hör- och läsförståelse samt skrivförmåga. 

    Även om de fyra lärare i denna studie anser att modersmål är en viktig resurs i andraspråksinlärning tillåter de inte dess användning i samband med skönlitteraturaktiviteter under sina lektioner. Stor vikt läggs på val av skönlitteratur som är långt ifrån okomplicerat. Hänsyn måste tas till elevernas ålder, tidigare erfarenhet samt deras intressen. 

    Vidare forskning i större skala behövs för att få ett omfattande och representativt överblick på användning av skönlitteratur i ämnet svenska som andraspråk. Denna studie tjänar dock som en hänvisning till hur omfattande användningen av skönlitteratur kan vara och i synnerhet dess ofta oupptäckta potential i ämnet svenska som andraspråk. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Skönlitteratur i SVAklassrummet Om lättläst, läslust, och lärares val av skönlitteratur
  • 239.
    Volvach, Natalia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Still Ukrainian or Already Russian? The Linguistic Landscape of Sevastopol in the Aftermath of Crimean Annexation2019In: Euxeinos - Culture and Governance in the Black Sea Region, E-ISSN 2296-0708, Vol. 9, no 28, p. 93-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The annexed city of Sevastopol as a part of the Crimean peninsula remains de jure a Ukrainian territory for the most of the European countries and be- yond. De facto this city is a new subject of the Russian Federation. A case study conducted in November 2017 demonstrates that in spite of its politically con- tested status, the linguistic landscape of Sevastopol indexes the Russian pow- er. Through the foundational principles of indexicality and emplacement, the study shows how Ukrainian and Crimean Tatar refer to Sevastopol’s past, and Russian represents its present and its future.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 240.
    Wiklund, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Social networks and proficiency in Swedish: a study of bilingual adolescents in both mono- and multicultural contexts in Sweden2002Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    According to official statistics, bilingual students make up a disproportionate share of the students who attend individual programmes (programmes designed for students who cannot follow the ordinary national programmes) in the upper secondary school in Sweden. This seems to indicate that national programmes cause problems for many bilingual students. This situation relates to the fact that literacy in the language of schooling, proficiency in that language, cognitive development and school success are closely linked. This study investigates the importance of characteristics of social networks on proficiency in Swedish. More exactly it investigates the characteristics of individual students’ interaction with their nearest friends from different ethnic backgrounds and the frequency of a handful linguistic features typical of written and spoken texts respectively, as well as the use of Swedish in interaction. The aim of this study is twofold. One aim is to study the possible relation between social network characteristics, use of Swedish and frequency of selected features of Swedish, and, the other, to develop methods for the analyses of the informants’ network characteristics, language use and selected features of their L2 performance. Thirty-nine bilingual students participated in all parts of the study. The informants’ social networks outside the school context were defined for their density, multiplexity and for different activities and frequency of interaction with these students’ best friends from three different network orientations, namely (1) the students’ own ethnic group, (2) monolingual Swedes, and, (3) bilingual groups other than their own. Furthermore, a measure of the informants’ integration into the different groups was defined and scored, and the different interactional patterns within the networks were defined and measured. Excerpts of each informant’s production of written texts, i.e. school compositions (examples of a context-reduced and demanding register) and transcriptions of informal interviews (examples of a context-embedded and undemanding register) were analysed and scored for selected linguistic features that were correlated to network data. The frequency of the following selected linguistic features was scored, namely (1) verbal complexity: long words, mean length of words, non-recurring words and number of different words; (2) nominalisations and passive constructions (typical of context-reduced and cognitively demanding texts) and (3) first-person pronouns and negations (typical of contextembedded and cognitively undemanding texts). The study was carried out at two schools: one suburban, where bilingual students are in the majority, and one provincial, where they are in the minority. A tendency was noted that students who were more integrated into Swedish-oriented networks and whose network multiplexity was strengthened by higher frequency in interaction in networks directed towards monolingual Swedes demonstrated higher frequency of linguistic features which are typical of more advanced mastery of Swedish. The relationship between network interaction, integration and language proficiency was complex, however, and no statistically significant differences were seen among informants with different orientations of their social networks. The results point to an intricate co-variation between several social network characteristics and the selected linguistic features. Some integral components of the informants’ social networks were analysed, namely time of residence in Sweden, school year, gender and residential area, but there are assumedly a great number of other components which, solely or in combination, affect proficiency in Swedish.

  • 241. Williams, Q. E.
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Multilingualism remixed: Sampling, braggadocio and the stylization of local voice2013In: Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics, ISSN 2223-9936, Vol. 42, p. 17-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among the many challenges posed by contexts of social transformation and extensive mobility is the question of how multilingual voice may carry across media, modalities and context. In this paper, we suggest that one approach to this complex problem may be to look at multilingual voice from a sociolinguistic perspective of performance. Our focus here is thus on how marginalised voices on the periphery of Cape Town become mainstreamed within the city’s hip-hop community. Specifically, we ask how emcees sample local varieties of language, texts and registers to stage their particular stylisation of voice. By way of conclusion, we make brief recommendations with respect to the study of multilingualism in South Africa and how the stylisation of local voices in Cape Town hip-hop could inform studies on multilingual policy and planning.

  • 242. Williams, Quentin E.
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Linguistic citizenship Language and politics in postnational modernities2015In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 406-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major challenge facing South Africa is that of reconstructing a meaningful and inclusive notion of citizenship in the aftermath of its apartheid past and in the face of narratives of divisiveness that reach back from this past and continue to reverberate in the present. Many of the problems confronting South African social transformation are similar to the rest of the postcolonial world that continues to wrestle with the inherited colonial divide between citizen and subject. In this article, we explore how engagement with diversity and marginalization is taking place across a range of non-institutional and informal political arenas. Here, we elaborate on an approach towards the linguistic practices of the political everyday in terms of a notion of linguistic citizenship and by way of conclusion argue that the contradictions and turmoils of contemporary South Africa require further serious deliberation around alternative notions of citizenship and their semiotics.

  • 243. Williams, Quentin E.
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Linguistic citizenship: Language and politics in postnational modernities2017In: Language and Citizenship: Broadening the Agenda / [ed] Tommaso M. Milani, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, p. 90-110Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 244. Williams, Quentin Emmanuel
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Multilingualism in transformative spaces: contact and conviviality2013In: Language Policy, ISSN 1568-4555, E-ISSN 1573-1863, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 289-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    South Africa is a highly mobile country characterized by historical displacements and contemporary mobilities, both social and demographic. Getting to grips with diversity, dislocation, relocation and anomie, as well as pursuing aspirations of mobility, is part of people's daily experience that often takes place on the margins of conventional politics. A politics of conviviality is one such form of politics of the popular that emerges in contexts of rapid change, diversity, mobility, and the negotiation and mediation of complex affiliations and attachments. The questions in focus for this paper thus pertain to how forms of talk, born out of displacement, anomie and contact in the superdiverse contexts of South Africa, allow for the articulation of life-styles and aspirations that break with the historical faultlines of social and racial oppression. We first expand upon the idea of (marginal) linguistic practices as powerful mediations of political voice and agency, an idea that can be captured in the notion of linguistic citizenship, the rhetorical foundation of a politics of conviviality. We then move on to analyze the workings of linguistic citizenship in the multilingual practices of two distinct manifestations of popular culture, namely hip hop and a performance by a stand-up comedian in Mzoli's meat market in Gugulethu, Cape Town. The paper concludes with a general discussion on the implications for politics of multilingualism and language policy.

  • 245.
    Williams, Quentin
    et al.
    University of the Western Cape.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape.
    Battling race: Stylizing language and co-producing whiteness and colourdness in a freestyle rap performance2014In: Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, ISSN 1055-1360, E-ISSN 1548-1395, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 277-293, article id DOI: 10.1111/jola.12064Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246.
    Williams, Sarah
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    L1 and L2 influence in L3 production: Evidence from language switches1997Report (Other academic)
  • 247.
    Young, Nathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Benim är vårt nya jag2019In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 8, p. 52-57Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 248.
    Zhang, Zhiyin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Språkanvändning i språkinlärning: En studie om hur kinesiska förstaspråktalare använder befintliga språkliga resurser i expandering av sina språkrepertoarer2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här studien studerar kinesiska förstaspråktalares beskrivning och självbedömning av sina språkrepertoarer, med fokus på hur deras språkanvändning och omgärdande språkideologier inverkar på deras inlärning av svenska. Informanterna som deltog i studien har lärt sig engelska efter deras första språk och de behärskar dessutom andra språkvarieteter i olika utsträckning. Studien visar att informanternas självbedömning av deras språkrepertoarer påverkar deras språkanvändning i form av språkval och språknivåer. I jämförelse med informanternas generella självbedömningar och utförliga självbedömningar framkommer att informella verbala kommunikativa förmågor värdesatts extra i deras självbedömningar. Detta har sin grund i informanternas språkideologier, där informanternas förhållningssätt till sig själva som språkinlärare i samhället avgör vad som är viktigt i kommunikationen och språkinlärningen.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Språkanvändning i språkinlärning
  • 249. Zilliacus, Harriet
    et al.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Explicit and implicit discourses on multilingual education in Swedish and Finnish national curricula2016In: 6th Conference on Explorations in Ethnography, Language and Communication: Diversities in Global Societies, Södertörns högskola, 22−23 September 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While Finland and Sweden are internationally known for having education systems promoting equity and equality, recent societal and political changes linked to increased immigration have created new challenges in efforts to support diversity in these contexts.  Concepts such as multilingual education and intercultural education commonly aim to promote equality in education and are well established in the Nordic educational field. However, these concepts have been subject to constant re-conceptualizations and shown to be vague both in theoretical and practical use. The present study aims at clarifying the conceptual frameworks in the two countries, with a focus on the discourses on multilingual education in the respective national curricula. This study represents one part of the larger research project, MINTED (Multilingual and Intercultural Education in Sweden and Finland), investigating national policies, teacher training and teaching practice.

    The comprehensive school curricula from Finland (2014) and Sweden (2011), together with other selected relevant policy documents, were analyzed using discourse analysis.  In the Finnish curricula there is an explicit discourse of a pluralist-oriented education, which places multilingual education and social justice issues at the forefront. While language is key in the Swedish curricula, multilingual and intercultural education are not explicitly covered, but may be gleaned from the focus on human rights and democracy. Thus, the analyzed education policies create different implementational and ideological spaces for multilingual education. These spaces are key to our possibilities as educators to promote linguistic diversity and social justice in the schools of today’s global societies. Therefore, the next step in the MINTED project will be an ethnographic study of classroom practices, investigating how teachers re-contextualize current national policies in diverse education settings.

  • 250. Zilliacus, Harriet
    et al.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Multilingual and intercultural education in Swedish and Finnish curricula2016In: 2nd Biennial JustEd Conference: 'Actors for Social Justice in Education', 8–9 March 2016, University of Helsinki, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multilingualism and interculturality are established concepts in the Nordic countries. Due to societal change and increasing diversity in schools, these concepts have been subject to constant re-conceptualizations within the educational field. In light of this, the present study explores Swedish and Finnish national school curricula, examining key concepts within the framework of critical multicultural education, including multilingual education. The aim is to investigate how the discourses on multilingual and intercultural education have developed in the Finnish and the Swedish national curricula from1994-2014. The study represents one part of the research project, MINTED (Multilingual and Intercultural Education in Sweden and Finland), investigating the relationship between education policy and teacher training programs in Sweden and Finland. The overall aim of MINTED is to acquire a deeper understanding of how both multilingual and intercultural education are embodied explicitly and implicitly in national policies, teacher training and teaching practice. While the focus is on the Swedish and Finnish contexts, how education policies have developed in relation to the concepts of multilingual and intercultural education is of international interest to scholars and practitioners involved in creating education policy for compulsory schools within an increasingly global context and a culturally and linguistically diverse world.

    Methods/methodology

    The curricula and policy texts were analyzed using discourse analysis. This discourse analytic perspective recognizes that language is not transparent but rather constitutive and represents a site where meaning is created and changed. The analysis searches for patterns in the curricula, which are associated with the topics of multilingual and intercultural education, seeking to understand the language linked to these terms as situated within the cultural contexts and positionings made within the documents. The Finnish documents included comprehensive school curricula from 1994, 2004 and 2014, as well as their amendments. Supporting documents included the government’s five-year Development Plans for Education and Research from 1991-2016. The Swedish documents comprised the following: the Swedish Curriculum for the Compulsory School System, the Pre-School Class and the Leisure-time Centre (1994); the Swedish Curriculum for the compulsory school, preschool class and the recreation centre (2011); and the Education Act (2010, last updated 2015).

    Expected outcomes/results

    The preliminary results reveal that in both contexts there has been a move away from a discourse on interculturalityas equivalent to othering, towards seeing interculturality as an intrinsic part of the school. In the Finnish curricula, this discursive development appears explicitly, as a movement from tolerance-oriented to pluralist-oriented education. Likewise, there is a development in Finnish curricula from promoting language as enrichment to enhancing multilingualism in education and in students’ identities. While language is key in the Swedish curricula, multilingual and intercultural education are not explicitly covered, but may be gleaned from the focus on human rights and respect for all. Thus, while there clearly is a movement towards more critical approaches to multilingualism and interculturality in the Finnish context, this is not evident in the Swedish context. A discussion on points of silence is thus necessary for understanding how the discourses on multilingual and intercultural education have developed.

     

23456 201 - 250 of 252
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf