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  • 201.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Frida Ehrnsten har disputerat!2020In: Nordisk Numismatisk Unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 2, p. 2p. 55-56Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Rapport från Frida Ehrnstens disputation med avhandlingen Pengar för gememe man? Det medeltida myntbruket i Finland, Helsingfors 16 november 2019.

  • 202.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Från brödbyte och silverpenningar till kontantuppror2020In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Att lära medeltidens nordbor att använda mynt tog hundratals år. Nu står vi först i kön till det kontantlösa samhället, vilket lär få oanade konsekvenser för vår relation till pengar – och varandra.

  • 203.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Handelsfred och korstågsromantik: Gotlands första mynt, ca 1140-12902019In: Gunnar Holsts stiftelse för numismatik: 1991-2015 / [ed] Bengt Holmén, Göteborg: Göteborgs numismatiska förening , 2019, p. 80-81Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Föredraget behandlade den äldsta gotländska myntningen, som präglades från ca 1140 till ca 1290 e.Kr.

  • 204.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Händelser vid vatten: Maritima studier med allmänarkeologisk relevans2012In: Marinarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1100-9632, no 3, p. 11-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Är den maritima arkeologin fast i ”specialiseringens dilemma”? På vilket kulturhistoriskt område kan maritim arkeologi säga något väsentligt som inte kan belysas utifrån andra premisser? Här föreslås en ökad, snarare än minskad, närhet till det empiriska materialet, men även till allmänarkeologisk teori och problemformuleringar. I skärningspunkten mellan människa, vatten och ting finns den maritima arkeologins särskilda förutsättningar och unika kvalitéer att förvalta och utveckla.

  • 205.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Imitation as citation: coin imitation as rhetoric and discourse2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coinage began to be used from around AD 995 in Scandinavia. These early coins imitated contemporary Anglo-Saxon coins but not in a passive or unquestioning way, but as part of complex chain of citations by which imported artefacts were adapted and re-contextualized. For more than thirty years the English and Scandinavian coinages were closely connected through a network of humans and objects that moved, physically and conceptually, between mints and kingdoms. Different iconographical models were used in a strategic/rhetorical way by commissioners and artisans to create relations between cognitive nodes through association, referencing, paraphrasing and appropriation. When circulating, the coins linked users to an official and shared discourse, and maintained the created relations through the impact of their materiality. While many re-contextualizing practices in the Viking Age seem to deal with reconnection with the past, the coin-imitation practice apparently worked mainly within a contemporary conceptual framework, although there are components of ‘ancientness’ as well. Object agency and the hybrid, creative, characters of these coins provide starting points for a deeper understanding of the coins’ wider connotations and meanings, as well as for the imitative practice itself.

  • 206.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Introduction: Faith and Ritual Materialised: Coin Finds in Religious Contexts2018In: Divina Moneta: Coins in Religion and Ritual / [ed] Nanouschka Myrberg Burström, Gitte Tarnew Ingvardson, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coins have played an important role in religious and ritual practice ever since they started to be produced. The claim is sustained by numerous sources: coin finds in archaeological contexts,written sources and images. Why people deposit coins is therefore a fundamental question for understanding both the use of the material object and the conceptual framework within which ritual activity occurred.

  • 207.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Jonathan Lindström, Biskopen och korståget 1206. Om krig, kolonisation och Guds man i Norden (Stockholm: Norstedts 2015)2017In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 137, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Linn Eikje Ramberg har disputerat2018In: Svensk numismatisk tidskrift, ISSN 0283-071X, no 1, p. 21-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 209.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Linn Eikje Ramberg har disputerat2018In: Nordisk Numismatisk Unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 210.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Money, Coins and Archaeology2018In: Money and Coinage in the Middle Ages / [ed] Rory Naismith, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2018, p. 231-263Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter focuses on three themes: conceptions of "money" and "coins" within archaeology, coins as archaeological material, and coins as part of archaeological research history. The argument builds on many illuminating cases and examples from old and recent research within archaeology and numismatics, and theory and method are emphasised.

  • 211.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Nordiskt numismatiskt forskarsymposium IX i Helsingfors2020In: Nordisk Numismatisk Unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 2, p. 52-54Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Rapport från Nordiskt numismatiskt forskarsymposium IX, Helsingfors, 15 november 2019.

  • 212.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Shared Values: Links and hybridity in the Anglo-Scandinavian coin-web2017In: 18th Viking Congress, Denmark, 6–12 August 2017: Abstracts – Papers and Posters, 2017, p. 13-13Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In present-day Scandinavia a coinage was initiated about AD 995, which imitated contemporary Anglo-Saxon coins. For more than thirty years the English and Scandinavian coinages were closely connected through a network of humans and objects that moved, physically and conceptually, between mints and kingdoms. Coinage is often seen as articulating sovereign rights in a certain area, but the Anglo-Scandinavian coinage network instead cut across kingdoms from west to east. Despite ongoing state-formation processes, key valuables like artisans and dies were shared in the network, causing change in power relations and conceptions of value.

    Different iconographical models were used in a strategic/rhetorical way by commissioners and artisans to create relations between cognitive nodes through association, referencing, paraphrasing and appropriation. When circulating, the coins linked users to an official and shared discourse, and maintained the created relations through the impact of their materiality. While many re-contextualizing practices in the Viking Age seem to deal with reconnection with the past, the coin-imitation practice apparently worked mainly within a contemporary conceptual framework, although there are components of ‘ancientness’ as well. Die-link studies here provide a source of theoretical inspiration for how to study linear as well as non-linear connections and networks in the past. Through the repetitive practices of coin-making, artefact types experience gradual changes and thus new categories and articulations are created. Object agency and the hybrid character of these coins provide starting points for a deeper understanding of the coins’ wider connotations and meanings, as well as for the imitative practice itself.

  • 213.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Sture Bolin, medeltidsforskare mellan historia och arkeologi2012In: Nordisk Numismatisk Unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 4, p. 64-69Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 214.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles, British Museum Anglo-Saxon Coins. Part I: Early Anglo-Saxon Gold and Anglo-Saxon and Continental Silver Coinage of the North Sea Area, c.600–760 (Vol. 63), by Anna Gannon; Part II: Southern English Coinage from Offa to Alfred, c.760–880 (Vol. 67), by Rory Naismith2018In: English Historical Review, ISSN 0013-8266, E-ISSN 1477-4534, Vol. 133, no 564, p. 1274-1277Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The latest volume in the series Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles (Vol. 67) deals with the substantial and high-quality collections held by the British Museum. It is here reviewed jointly with the first part dedicated to the same collection (Vol. 63). The two volumes provide an important summary and update on the research on Anglo-Saxon coinage, and make it available and accessible to a general audience, collectors and scholars.

  • 215.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles, Norwegian Collections, Parts I (Vol. 65) and II (Vol. 66), by Elina Screen2017In: English Historical Review, ISSN 0013-8266, E-ISSN 1477-4534, Vol. 132, no 554, p. 102-103Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 216.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The Chair: Situating knowledge and authority in Viking and Medieval Scandinavia2019In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 153-155Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientia potentia est — knowledge is power. Few things embody this sentence better than the chair. We will explore it through an amulet from the Eketorp hoard (Närke, Sweden), deposited in a wetland in the 960s.

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  • 217.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The Hatched Cross: Gotlandic Coins of the 13th century Baltic Sea area2012In: Monetary History of the Baltic in the Middle Ages (12-16th C.) / [ed] Ivar Leimus, Tallinn: Eesti Ajaloomuuseum , 2012, p. 180-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 12th century, some authority on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea started off a coinage, the first ever on Gotland and the first medieval coinage of Sweden as a whole. Quite remarkably, these and any following coins minted on the island never adjusted to the Swedish mainland royal coins in weights or iconography, but seem to have been independently administered even though the island was within Swedish power (for any period when it was not under somebody else’s control). In the 12th century and well into the 13th, Gotlandic coins had a strong impact on certain areas of the mainland, and in the 13th century they were even used as a model for new coinages in the Baltic Sea area. Interestingly, these first Gotlandic coins in several ways show where their inspiration came from, and thus perhaps who or what motivated their coming into being: trading partners and other guests from the southwestern parts of the Baltic and North Sea.

  • 218.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Things of quality: possessions and animated objects in the Scandinavian Viking Age2015In: Own and be owned: Archaeological approaches to the concept of possession / [ed] Alison Klevnäs, Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies , 2015, p. 23-48Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 219.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Ingvardson, Gitte Tarnow
    Divina moneta: Coins in Religion and Ritual2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This edited collection analyses the phenomenon of coin use for religious and ritual purposes in different cultures and across different periods of time. It proposes an engagement with the theory and interpretation of the ‘material turn’ with numismatic evidence, and an evidence-based series of discussions to offer a fuller, richer and fresh account of coin use in ritual contexts. No extensive publication has previously foregrounded coins in such a model, despite the fact that coins constitute an integrated part of the material culture of most societies today and of many in the past. Here, interdisciplinary discussions are organised around three themes: coin deposit and ritual practice, the coin as economic object and divine mediator, and the value and meaning of coin offering. Although focusing on the medieval period in Western Europe, the book includes instructive cases from the Roman period until today. The collection brings together well-established and emerging scholars from archaeology, art history, ethnology, history and numismatics, and great weight is given to material evidence which can complement and contradict the scarce written sources.

  • 220.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Ingvardson, Gitte Tarnow
    Preface2018In: Divina Moneta: Coins in Religion and Ritual / [ed] Nanouschka Myrberg Burström, Gitte Tarnow Ingvardson, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018, p. xvii-xviiiChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 221.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Williams, Howard
    University of Chester.
    Chains of citations: Re-contextualization in the Viking Age.2013In: The European Archaeologist, ISSN 1022-0135, no 40, p. 84-88Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For Scandinavia and regions subject to Norse contact and settlement across northern and western Europe, the Viking Age heralded new patterns and processes by which material culture circulated through plunder, trade and exchange, but also through imitation, influence and adaptation. The theme of citation draws upon research into the agency and the social and mnemonic affects of material culture and monuments in instigating social change. Citation provides a useful pivot around which to consider the active reconfiguring and vocation of previous landscapes, monuments and material culture in the creation of new social and religious worlds by Viking-period communities and individuals. There are a number of reasons for adopting the original theme of citation, as an alternative to considering the cultural biography of things, monuments and landscapes, which is otherwise often investigated when approaching the phenomenon of re-contextualization. Citation helps us to think of the active roles of enmeshed networks of people and things in the emergence of creolizing cultures of the Viking Age. This network-based approach has numerous advantages in understanding socio-economic, political and religious change. Through networks linking together the Viking world, citations provided a distinctive medium for social communication, identity-creation and commemoration including how things and places were imitated, adapted, reinvented, depicted, denoted, displayed, combined, fragmented, recycled and/or deposited alongside the biographical emphasis upon curation and reuse. Thus, exploring citational strategies equips archaeologists with the conceptual tools to adequately understand the shifting and not always linear linkages between different artefact types and assemblages in the construction of identities and memories in the Viking world.

  • 222.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    A worth of their own: on Gotland in the Baltic Sea, and its 12th-century coinage2010In: Medieval Archaeology, ISSN 0076-6097, E-ISSN 1745-817X, Vol. 54, p. 158-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In about AD 1140, the island of Gotland initiated what was to become one of the most influential coinages of the medieval Baltic Sea area. This was part of a strategy to meet the impact and pressure from the world outside in a period characterised by large-scale political and ideological changes. In this situation, old and new networks were important to maintain autonomy from those aiming for dominance over the island. The coins, with an independent weight standard and an iconography inspired by NW German and Frisian coins, were one way of attracting partners to the island’s main harbour, where its inhabitants could maintain control and trading peace.

    Coins incorporate in them the dimensions of object, text and picture. A historical archaeology of coins needs not only focus on large-scale perspectives and formal power, but must also give weight to the archaeological context, the life biography of the coins and the social negotiations behind their production and use. Thus intention and reality, symbolism and social practice may be studied to find openings to the stories behind the objects. The different dimensions of the coins together with historical sources give away plenty of information on several levels: about the networks, ideological framework, artisanship and changing loyalties of this time and area.

  • 223.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Botulf - helgon eller frifräsare?2010In: Gotländskt Arkiv, ISSN 0434-2429, Vol. 82, p. 34-45Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Botulf – Saint or Free Mover? (summary)

    “For Botulf ”. A cryptic inscription on a series of Gotlandic coins from c. 1210 is discussed in this article in relation to different types of references to the name Botulf on Gotland. Gravestones, farmsteads, mural paintings, toll lists and numismatic evidence all provide clues as to what or whom the inscription may be alluding to. Was Botulf, the English saint, popular on Gotland to the point of having dedication coins minted in his honour? Or was Botulf, the Gotlandic tradesman, taking advantage of a temporary change of powers on the island to gain a reputation for himself? Enigmatic and fortified Västergarn on Gotland’s west coast, the German Bishop Albert’s Riga, and the Hanseatic Steelyard of London all play roles in the story of Botulf of Gotland.

  • 224.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Det gotländska myntet från Bårarp2008In: Nordisk numismatisk unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 1, p. 30-36Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    År 1932 gjordes ett mynt fynd i Bårarp, Halland, som kunde dateras till ca 1153-55 (mynt från Svend Grate) (Jensen 1983). Med utgångspunkt från detta fynd kunde en serie gotländska 1100-talsmynt 25 år senare tidfästas vilket blev en viktig hållpunkt i arbetet med den gotlåndksa myntningen.

  • 225.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    PAX PORTA NY: Gotländsk uttolkning av ett fridskoncept2009In: Samlad Glädje II: Numismatiska Klubben i Uppsala 40 år / [ed] Ekström, Curt & Holmberg, Kjell, Uppsala: Numismatiska klubben i Uppsala , 2009, p. 149-154Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In about 1140 AD, the island of Gotland, off the Swedish coast, initiated what was to become one of the most influential coinages of the medieval Baltic Sea Area. One of the types minted was inscribed PAX PORTA NY. The paper argues that these coins were part of a strategy adopted by the Gotlanders in the 1160s, to proclaim peace in the town of Visby and to direct their international partners to where control and trading peace could be maintained. The different dimensions of the coins (object, text and picture) give away plenty of information on several levels when combined with historical sources, and tell us about the networks, ideological framework, artisanship, and changing loyalties of this time and area.

  • 226.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Shared values: Creative links and hybridity in an Anglo-Scandinavian techno-web2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In present-day Denmark, Norway and Sweden a coinage was initiated about AD 995, which imitated contemporary Anglo-Saxon coins. For more than 30 years the English and Scandinavian coinages were closely connected. Individuals (commissioners, moneyers, artisans) as well as objects (e.g. coin-dies) moved between the mints. Coinage is often perceived of as expressing sovereign rights in a certain area. Instead, the Anglo-Scandinavian coinage network was not limited by realms and borders, but cut across kingdoms from west (England) to east (Byzantium) through Scandinavia and the Southern Baltic. Despite the ongoing “state-formation processes” and competition between the areas, values like artisans and dies were shared within the network.

    The material underlines how “social” technology is; dependent on choices, cooperative skills, talent, capital, etc. The coin images, inscriptions and links offer unique openings for a situated study of a process of change in the past, of different levels and actors in the network, of patterns of movement, and of ideological and historical contexts. Imitations are often depreciated out from our contemporary notions of authenticity. Here, the creative and hybrid character of the material is instead underlined, opening up for a deeper understanding of the wider connotations and meanings of the objects.

  • 227.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The colour of money: crusaders and coins in the thirteenth-century Baltic Sea 2010In: Making sense of things: archaeologies of sensory perception / [ed] Fredrik Fahlander & Anna Kjellström, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies , 2010, 1, p. 83-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how colour was perceived differently in the European Middle Ages and carried significance beyond what we ascribe it today. It also considers how the various colours worked as important carriers of values and concepts in this context, where pigments were rare and expensive.

    A way to access the medieval understanding of colour is through heraldry and its colours, the tinctures, which combine hard and soft materials, even and three-dimensional surfaces, in a way that evades present-day definitions of colour. Medieval people used their senses in a cross-modal way to perceive colour and connect it to an intricate world of symbolism and values. To them, it is argued, colour was a texture just as much as a hue.

    The aim of the paper is to investigate this relationship between colour, ideas and materiality, filtered through the senses, and made manifest in a group of thirteenth-century Scandinavian coins. Were coins actually perceived as coloured?

  • 228.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Kemmers, Fleur
    JW Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main.
    Re-thinking numismatics: The archaeology of coins2011In: Archaeological Dialogues, ISSN 1380-2038, E-ISSN 1478-2294, no 2, p. 87-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper sets out to re-member coins into archaeological discourse. It is argued that coins, as part of material culture, need to be examined within the theoretical framework of historical archaeology and material-culture studies. Through several case studies we demonstrate how coins, through their integration of text, image and existence as material objects, offer profound insights not only into matters of economy and the ‘big history’ of issuers and state organization but also into ‘small histories’, cultural values and the agency of humans and objects. In the formative period of archaeology in the 19th century the study of coins played an important role in the development of new methods and concepts. Today, numismatics is viewed as a field apart. The mutual benefits of our approach to the fields of archaeology and numismatics highlight the need for a new and constructive dialogue between the disciplines.

  • 229.
    Nilsson, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Hijacked by the Bronze Age discourse? A discussion of rock art and ownership2015In: Own and be owned: Archaeological approaches to the concept of possessions / [ed] Alison Klevnäs, Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University , 2015, p. 109-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
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    Hijacked by the Bronze Age discourse?
  • 230.
    Nilsson, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Sörman, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    En gjutform av täljsten från den yngre bronsåldern: Spår av bronshantverk vid Rambodal i Norrköping2015In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 110, no 2, p. 84-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The excavation of a Late Bronze Age settlement at Rambodal, just outside the city of Norrköping, has provided interesting evidence for Bronze Age metalworking, including the third Bronze Age stone casting mould found to date in the county of Östergötland. The settlement consisted of a single farm with dates from Per. V of the Bronze Age to the earliest Iron Age. In addition to high-quality ceramics, the settlement yielded several traces of bronze casting, such as a copper melt and part of a soapstone mould for a small socketed axe, probably dating to Per.VI. Soapstone moulds are rarely found at settlement sites. The find provides interesting data for discussions of the molds’ use contexts. The evidence for small-scale household metalworking at a minor farmstead like Rambodal holds significant potential for future research on the spread and organisation of this craft.

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  • 231.
    Nordahl, Ebba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Tune i Buttle och gotländska tunegårdar från mellersta järnåldern2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the connection between the size of the stone house foundations and their distribution in parishes with evidence of place names connected to the roman iron age phenomena Tuna farms on the island of Gotland. This is done using diagrams and tables of length – width variables and landscape and prehistoric remains analysis together with place name discussions in each parish.

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  • 232.
    Noterman, Astrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Aspöck, Edeltraud
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Van Haperen, Martine
    Zintl, Stephanie
    La perturbation des sépultures au haut Moyen Âge: discussion et collaboration européenne2020In: Ritualiser, gérer, piller: Rencontre autour des réouvertures de tombes et la manipulation des ossements / [ed] Astrid Noterman, Mathilde Cervel, Chauvigny: Association des Publications Chauvinoises , 2020Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 233.
    Nyberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    A Peaceful Sleep and Heavenly Celebration for the Pure and Innocent: The Sensory Experience of Death during the Long Eighteenth Century2010In: Making Sense of Things: Archaeologies of Sensory Perception / [ed] Fahlander, Fredrik & Kjellström, Anna, Stockholm: Stockholm University , 2010, p. 15-33Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 234.
    Oehrl, Sigmund
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Re-Interpretations of Gotlandic Picture Stones Based on the Reflectance Transformation Imaging Method (RTI): Some Examples2019In: Myth, Materiality and Lived Religion: In Merovingian and Viking Scandinavia / [ed] Klas Wikström af Edholm, Peter Jackson Rova, Andreas Nordberg, Olof Sundqvist, Torun Zachrisson, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2019, p. 141-185Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 235.
    Ohlsson, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Varför ligger du i rännan?: Fallstudier av tidigmedeltida bengömmor i kantrännor till gravhögar från yngre järnålder i Dalarna2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Early medieval burials in ditches surrounding grave mounds from the Vendel Period and Viking Age are analyzed through three case studies from Dalarna in Sweden. The historical context during the late Iron Age and early Medieval Period is discussed to create an understanding of these graves. By making use of the theories constructed by Catherine Bell about ritualization as a strategic mode of practice to produce relationships of power, the early medieval graves are interpreted as an archaistic social strategy to justify the farm as the superior social unit during a time of change in Dalarna.

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    Varför ligger du i rännan?
  • 236. Ojala, Karin
    et al.
    Sörman, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Medelhavsbrons i Närke: Hasslefyndet kastar ljus över kontaktvägar, metallanvändning och offerskick under bronsålderns slutskede2020In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 28-34Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 237.
    Palmqvist, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Domarringarnas placering i landskapet: En studie av nordligaste Smålands järnåldersbygd2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this essay I analyze the stone circles known as domarringar in northern Småland. In order to understand the stone circles, one must understand the society that built them, I argue. Therefore I first date them so I can put them in a context. After dating them to late Roman Iron Age and Migration period, I discuss hill forts, gold bracteates and rotary querns as a starting point for understanding the society and ideology that built the stone circles. I argue that the stone circles are a product of the midgård-ideology and that they have to be understood in that light. The stone circles are always found close to a road and often relatively high in the landscape. They manifest boundaries in the landscape.

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  • 238.
    Petré, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gravfältet Raä 13 Söderby, Lovö SN, Uppland: Ett gravfält med två familjer från yngre järnålder. Rapport, analys, tolkning.1999Book (Other academic)
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  • 239.
    Qviström, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Demonen som inte kunde gå runt hörn: Fönster och fönsterlösa norrsidor i kyrkor på Gotland2019In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 189-191Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 240.
    Qviström, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Lysande frånvaro - om senmedeltida lampor2019In: Meta H: historiskarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 2002-0406, p. 163-178Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On the absence of late medieval lamps in Sweden. From a handful of written documents, we know that lamps were used in churches, and probably in castles, in late medieval Sweden. But the texts do not tell us what kinds of lamps were used, or if they were employed in other contexts. The relative lack of relevant archaeological finds from this period is discussed in this article, together with the forms of lamps and fuels that may have existed.

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  • 241.
    Rahm, Annabell
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Jordbruk och järnproduktion i Jämtland: Två näringar i södra Storsjöbygden under folkvandringstid2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay is about two areas called Hackås and Myrviken, situated in the middle of Sweden around the lake Storsjön. In Hackås we can see traces after an early agrarian settlement, and in Myrviken we find Jämtlands largest concentration of ironmaking sites from around 400 AD. There are no clear evidence of the agrarian settlement in Myrviken, and only two ironmaking sites in Hackås. These two economies functioned at the same time, but were clearly separated. My purpose is to discuss if it was the farmers of Hackås who made iron in Myrviken, or if it was somebody else.

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    Jordbruk och järnproduktion i Jämtland - två näringar i södra Storsjöbygden under folkvandringstid
  • 242. Riede, Felix
    et al.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Anthropology, weather and climate change2016In: The European Archaeologist, ISSN 1022-0135, Vol. 49, p. 24-27Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 243.
    Röst, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Tydlig gravgömma saknas?: Stenkonstruktioner och depositioner av kremerade ben på två gravfältslokaler från yngre bronsålder i Södermanland2014In: I skuggan av solen: Nya perspektiv på bronsåldersarkeologier och bronsålderns arkeologiska källmaterial / [ed] Magnus Ljunge, Anna Röst, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag, 2014, p. 117-147Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 244.
    Röst, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ljunge, MagnusStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    I skuggan av solen: Nya perspektiv på bronsåldersarkeologier och bronsålderns arkeologiska källmaterial2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 245. Saag, Lehti
    et al.
    Laneman, Margot
    Varul, Liivi
    Malve, Martin
    Valk, Heiki
    Razzak, Maria A.
    Shirobokov, Ivan G.
    Khartanovich, Valeri I.
    Mikhaylova, Elena R.
    Kushniarevich, Alena
    Scheib, Christiana Lyn
    Solnik, Anu
    Reisberg, Tuuli
    Parik, Juri
    Saag, Lauri
    Metspalu, Ene
    Rootsi, Siiri
    Montinaro, Francesco
    Remm, Maido
    Magi, Reedik
    D'Atanasio, Eugenia
    Crema, Enrico Ryunosuke
    Diez-del-Molino, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Thomas, Mark G.
    Kriiska, Aivar
    Kivisild, Toomas
    Villems, Richard
    Lang, Valter
    Metspalu, Mait
    Tambets, Kristiina
    The Arrival of Siberian Ancestry Connecting the Eastern Baltic to Uralic Speakers further East2019In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 1701-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we compare the genetic ancestry of individuals from two as yet genetically unstudied cultural traditions in Estonia in the context of available modern and ancient datasets: 15 from the Late Bronze Age stone-cist graves (1200-400 BC) (EstBA) and 6 from the Pre-Roman Iron Age tarand cemeteries (800/500 BC-50 AD) (EstIA). We also included 5 Pre-Roman to Roman Iron Age Ingrian (500 BC450 AD) (IngIA) and 7 Middle Age Estonian (1200-1600 AD) (EstMA) individuals to build a dataset for studying the demographic history of the northern parts of the Eastern Baltic from the earliest layer of Mesolithic to modern times. Our findings are consistent with EstBA receiving gene flow from regions with strong Western hunter-gatherer (WHG) affinities and EstIA from populations related to modern Siberians. The latter inference is in accordance with Y chromosome (chrY) distributions in present day populations of the Eastern Baltic, as well as patterns of autosomal variation in the majority of the westernmost Uralic speakers [1-5]. This ancestry reached the coasts of the Baltic Sea no later than the mid-first millennium BC; i.e., in the same time window as the diversification of west Uralic (Finnic) languages [6]. Furthermore, phenotypic traits often associated with modern Northern Europeans, like light eyes, hair, and skin, as well as lactose tolerance, can be traced back to the Bronze Age in the Eastern Baltic.

  • 246.
    Sandberg, Nina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Offerträdet.: Spår av offer, blot och kult under vikingatiden på Frösön, Jämtland.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 247.
    Schultzén, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    I Europas utmark: Sigtunas handelsvägar och kulturkontakter i äldsta medeltid2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the eastern silver crisisin the mid 10th century on the cultural connections and trade routes of the Late VikingAge Sveonic realm. By studying status symbols, such as weapons, glassand the decorative parts of the male and female dress, I expected to find that eastern influencesdeclined in favour of more western elements. This proved to beproblematic. The material indicates a continued strong cultural exchange between the Sveonic realmand theSlavic regions, even though trade clearly shifted westward. My explanation for this is thateven though, and perhaps because of, king and church favoured a shift towards west, the demand for western goods other than silverremained low during the late 10th and 11th century.In addition to this,even though the direction of trade shifted, it was still largely conducted within the Slavic cultural sphere. There is also very little indicating the presence of foreign merchantsother than Slavicand probablyFrisianin early Sigtuna. My explanation for this is that the Sveonsmainly went overseasto sell their merchandise, and that they were forced to do so since Sigtuna,as opposed to Birka, could offer no unique goods which wouldattract foreign merchants.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 248.
    Smith, Martina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Källor om källor: En studie av källkult i Uppland från järnålder till modern tid2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay researches cultural behaviour and rites surrounding wells in Uppland County, Sweden. The wells examined in this paper are mainly medieval with a few exceptions from Scandinavian Iron age (550 BC – 1050 AD). The material is compared with other forms of ritual activities surrounding water from the same area, as well as excerpts from the Poetic Edda. The purpose of this study was to find patterns of ritual behaviour surrounding the wells and argues for a ritual use spanning a longer time period than what previously has been assumed.

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  • 249.
    Solfeldt, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ett mesolitiskt gränsland: En GIS-baserad studie av Närkes kolonisationsprocess2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to understand the colonization process of the county Närke in relation to the surrounding archaeologically defined areas western Sweden and eastern central Sweden. By using a comparative analysis and a landscape analysis in combination with a theoretical framework that advocates for colonization as a process and not an event, I argue that Närke was colonized from within eastern central Sweden around 8 500 BC, based on the use of local raw material quartz. Further, I argue for the importance of the sea to the mesolithic people in the area around 7 500–4 500 BC as more than just an economic resource. Around 4 500 BC contact with groups in western Sweden increased which in time brought the idea of farming to the area. The late mesolithic sites in Närke show continuity into the early neolithic age, rejecting the idea of a Funnelbeaker migration in the area. 

  • 250.
    Spangen, Marte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    "It could be one thing or another" - on the construction of an archaeological category2013In: Fennoscandia Archaeologica, ISSN 0781-7126, Vol. XXX, p. 67-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the history of the archaeological category Sámi circular offering sites, which refers to certain dry wall structures in Finnmark and Troms in northern Norway. In recent years the term has been used more frequently outside this geographical area too, at times to refer to structures vastly different from those originally labelled as circular offering sites. Such interpretations may be questioned, but perhaps it is the category itself that needs to be re-evaluated; a study ofthe research history suggests that the term is a result of a mid-19th century hypothesis that was established due to a lack of other plausible explanations rather than based on indicative finds or on local traditions. This interpretation has later been adopted by key researchers and has never really been challenged by any alternative hypothesis. This article proposes that the stone structures in question could represent other cultural phenomena, and that this needs further investigation.

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    "It could be one thing or another"
23456 201 - 250 of 297
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