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  • 201.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    PAX PORTA NY: Gotländsk uttolkning av ett fridskoncept2009In: Samlad Glädje II: Numismatiska Klubben i Uppsala 40 år / [ed] Ekström, Curt & Holmberg, Kjell, Uppsala: Numismatiska klubben i Uppsala , 2009, p. 149-154Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In about 1140 AD, the island of Gotland, off the Swedish coast, initiated what was to become one of the most influential coinages of the medieval Baltic Sea Area. One of the types minted was inscribed PAX PORTA NY. The paper argues that these coins were part of a strategy adopted by the Gotlanders in the 1160s, to proclaim peace in the town of Visby and to direct their international partners to where control and trading peace could be maintained. The different dimensions of the coins (object, text and picture) give away plenty of information on several levels when combined with historical sources, and tell us about the networks, ideological framework, artisanship, and changing loyalties of this time and area.

  • 202.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The colour of money: crusaders and coins in the thirteenth-century Baltic Sea 2010In: Making sense of things: archaeologies of sensory perception / [ed] Fredrik Fahlander & Anna Kjellström, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies , 2010, 1, p. 83-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how colour was perceived differently in the European Middle Ages and carried significance beyond what we ascribe it today. It also considers how the various colours worked as important carriers of values and concepts in this context, where pigments were rare and expensive.

    A way to access the medieval understanding of colour is through heraldry and its colours, the tinctures, which combine hard and soft materials, even and three-dimensional surfaces, in a way that evades present-day definitions of colour. Medieval people used their senses in a cross-modal way to perceive colour and connect it to an intricate world of symbolism and values. To them, it is argued, colour was a texture just as much as a hue.

    The aim of the paper is to investigate this relationship between colour, ideas and materiality, filtered through the senses, and made manifest in a group of thirteenth-century Scandinavian coins. Were coins actually perceived as coloured?

  • 203.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Kemmers, Fleur
    JW Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main.
    Re-thinking numismatics: The archaeology of coins2011In: Archaeological Dialogues, ISSN 1380-2038, E-ISSN 1478-2294, no 2, p. 87-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper sets out to re-member coins into archaeological discourse. It is argued that coins, as part of material culture, need to be examined within the theoretical framework of historical archaeology and material-culture studies. Through several case studies we demonstrate how coins, through their integration of text, image and existence as material objects, offer profound insights not only into matters of economy and the ‘big history’ of issuers and state organization but also into ‘small histories’, cultural values and the agency of humans and objects. In the formative period of archaeology in the 19th century the study of coins played an important role in the development of new methods and concepts. Today, numismatics is viewed as a field apart. The mutual benefits of our approach to the fields of archaeology and numismatics highlight the need for a new and constructive dialogue between the disciplines.

  • 204.
    Nilsson, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Hijacked by the Bronze Age discourse? A discussion of rock art and ownership2015In: Own and be owned: Archaeological approaches to the concept of possessions / [ed] Alison Klevnäs, Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University , 2015, p. 109-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 205.
    Nilsson, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Sörman, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    En gjutform av täljsten från den yngre bronsåldern: Spår av bronshantverk vid Rambodal i Norrköping2015In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 110, no 2, p. 84-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The excavation of a Late Bronze Age settlement at Rambodal, just outside the city of Norrköping, has provided interesting evidence for Bronze Age metalworking, including the third Bronze Age stone casting mould found to date in the county of Östergötland. The settlement consisted of a single farm with dates from Per. V of the Bronze Age to the earliest Iron Age. In addition to high-quality ceramics, the settlement yielded several traces of bronze casting, such as a copper melt and part of a soapstone mould for a small socketed axe, probably dating to Per.VI. Soapstone moulds are rarely found at settlement sites. The find provides interesting data for discussions of the molds’ use contexts. The evidence for small-scale household metalworking at a minor farmstead like Rambodal holds significant potential for future research on the spread and organisation of this craft.

  • 206.
    Nyberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    A Peaceful Sleep and Heavenly Celebration for the Pure and Innocent: The Sensory Experience of Death during the Long Eighteenth Century2010In: Making Sense of Things: Archaeologies of Sensory Perception / [ed] Fahlander, Fredrik & Kjellström, Anna, Stockholm: Stockholm University , 2010, p. 15-33Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 207.
    Oehrl, Sigmund
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Re-Interpretations of Gotlandic Picture Stones Based on the Reflectance Transformation Imaging Method (RTI): Some Examples2019In: Myth, Materiality and Lived Religion: In Merovingian and Viking Scandinavia / [ed] Klas Wikström af Edholm, Peter Jackson Rova, Andreas Nordberg, Olof Sundqvist, Torun Zachrisson, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2019, p. 141-185Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 208.
    Ohlsson, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Varför ligger du i rännan?: Fallstudier av tidigmedeltida bengömmor i kantrännor till gravhögar från yngre järnålder i Dalarna2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Early medieval burials in ditches surrounding grave mounds from the Vendel Period and Viking Age are analyzed through three case studies from Dalarna in Sweden. The historical context during the late Iron Age and early Medieval Period is discussed to create an understanding of these graves. By making use of the theories constructed by Catherine Bell about ritualization as a strategic mode of practice to produce relationships of power, the early medieval graves are interpreted as an archaistic social strategy to justify the farm as the superior social unit during a time of change in Dalarna.

  • 209.
    Palmqvist, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Domarringarnas placering i landskapet: En studie av nordligaste Smålands järnåldersbygd2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this essay I analyze the stone circles known as domarringar in northern Småland. In order to understand the stone circles, one must understand the society that built them, I argue. Therefore I first date them so I can put them in a context. After dating them to late Roman Iron Age and Migration period, I discuss hill forts, gold bracteates and rotary querns as a starting point for understanding the society and ideology that built the stone circles. I argue that the stone circles are a product of the midgård-ideology and that they have to be understood in that light. The stone circles are always found close to a road and often relatively high in the landscape. They manifest boundaries in the landscape.

  • 210.
    Petré, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gravfältet Raä 13 Söderby, Lovö SN, Uppland: Ett gravfält med två familjer från yngre järnålder. Rapport, analys, tolkning.1999Book (Other academic)
  • 211.
    Rahm, Annabell
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Jordbruk och järnproduktion i Jämtland: Två näringar i södra Storsjöbygden under folkvandringstid2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay is about two areas called Hackås and Myrviken, situated in the middle of Sweden around the lake Storsjön. In Hackås we can see traces after an early agrarian settlement, and in Myrviken we find Jämtlands largest concentration of ironmaking sites from around 400 AD. There are no clear evidence of the agrarian settlement in Myrviken, and only two ironmaking sites in Hackås. These two economies functioned at the same time, but were clearly separated. My purpose is to discuss if it was the farmers of Hackås who made iron in Myrviken, or if it was somebody else.

  • 212. Riede, Felix
    et al.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Anthropology, weather and climate change2016In: The European Archaeologist, ISSN 1022-0135, Vol. 49, p. 24-27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 213.
    Röst, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Tydlig gravgömma saknas?: Stenkonstruktioner och depositioner av kremerade ben på två gravfältslokaler från yngre bronsålder i Södermanland2014In: I skuggan av solen: Nya perspektiv på bronsåldersarkeologier och bronsålderns arkeologiska källmaterial / [ed] Magnus Ljunge, Anna Röst, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag, 2014, p. 117-147Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 214.
    Röst, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ljunge, MagnusStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    I skuggan av solen: Nya perspektiv på bronsåldersarkeologier och bronsålderns arkeologiska källmaterial2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 215. Saag, Lehti
    et al.
    Laneman, Margot
    Varul, Liivi
    Malve, Martin
    Valk, Heiki
    Razzak, Maria A.
    Shirobokov, Ivan G.
    Khartanovich, Valeri I.
    Mikhaylova, Elena R.
    Kushniarevich, Alena
    Scheib, Christiana Lyn
    Solnik, Anu
    Reisberg, Tuuli
    Parik, Juri
    Saag, Lauri
    Metspalu, Ene
    Rootsi, Siiri
    Montinaro, Francesco
    Remm, Maido
    Magi, Reedik
    D'Atanasio, Eugenia
    Crema, Enrico Ryunosuke
    Diez-del-Molino, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Thomas, Mark G.
    Kriiska, Aivar
    Kivisild, Toomas
    Villems, Richard
    Lang, Valter
    Metspalu, Mait
    Tambets, Kristiina
    The Arrival of Siberian Ancestry Connecting the Eastern Baltic to Uralic Speakers further East2019In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 1701-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we compare the genetic ancestry of individuals from two as yet genetically unstudied cultural traditions in Estonia in the context of available modern and ancient datasets: 15 from the Late Bronze Age stone-cist graves (1200-400 BC) (EstBA) and 6 from the Pre-Roman Iron Age tarand cemeteries (800/500 BC-50 AD) (EstIA). We also included 5 Pre-Roman to Roman Iron Age Ingrian (500 BC450 AD) (IngIA) and 7 Middle Age Estonian (1200-1600 AD) (EstMA) individuals to build a dataset for studying the demographic history of the northern parts of the Eastern Baltic from the earliest layer of Mesolithic to modern times. Our findings are consistent with EstBA receiving gene flow from regions with strong Western hunter-gatherer (WHG) affinities and EstIA from populations related to modern Siberians. The latter inference is in accordance with Y chromosome (chrY) distributions in present day populations of the Eastern Baltic, as well as patterns of autosomal variation in the majority of the westernmost Uralic speakers [1-5]. This ancestry reached the coasts of the Baltic Sea no later than the mid-first millennium BC; i.e., in the same time window as the diversification of west Uralic (Finnic) languages [6]. Furthermore, phenotypic traits often associated with modern Northern Europeans, like light eyes, hair, and skin, as well as lactose tolerance, can be traced back to the Bronze Age in the Eastern Baltic.

  • 216.
    Sandberg, Nina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Offerträdet.: Spår av offer, blot och kult under vikingatiden på Frösön, Jämtland.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 217.
    Schultzén, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    I Europas utmark: Sigtunas handelsvägar och kulturkontakter i äldsta medeltid2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the eastern silver crisisin the mid 10th century on the cultural connections and trade routes of the Late VikingAge Sveonic realm. By studying status symbols, such as weapons, glassand the decorative parts of the male and female dress, I expected to find that eastern influencesdeclined in favour of more western elements. This proved to beproblematic. The material indicates a continued strong cultural exchange between the Sveonic realmand theSlavic regions, even though trade clearly shifted westward. My explanation for this is thateven though, and perhaps because of, king and church favoured a shift towards west, the demand for western goods other than silverremained low during the late 10th and 11th century.In addition to this,even though the direction of trade shifted, it was still largely conducted within the Slavic cultural sphere. There is also very little indicating the presence of foreign merchantsother than Slavicand probablyFrisianin early Sigtuna. My explanation for this is that the Sveonsmainly went overseasto sell their merchandise, and that they were forced to do so since Sigtuna,as opposed to Birka, could offer no unique goods which wouldattract foreign merchants.

  • 218.
    Smith, Martina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Källor om källor: En studie av källkult i Uppland från järnålder till modern tid2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay researches cultural behaviour and rites surrounding wells in Uppland County, Sweden. The wells examined in this paper are mainly medieval with a few exceptions from Scandinavian Iron age (550 BC – 1050 AD). The material is compared with other forms of ritual activities surrounding water from the same area, as well as excerpts from the Poetic Edda. The purpose of this study was to find patterns of ritual behaviour surrounding the wells and argues for a ritual use spanning a longer time period than what previously has been assumed.

  • 219.
    Solfeldt, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ett mesolitiskt gränsland: En GIS-baserad studie av Närkes kolonisationsprocess2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to understand the colonization process of the county Närke in relation to the surrounding archaeologically defined areas western Sweden and eastern central Sweden. By using a comparative analysis and a landscape analysis in combination with a theoretical framework that advocates for colonization as a process and not an event, I argue that Närke was colonized from within eastern central Sweden around 8 500 BC, based on the use of local raw material quartz. Further, I argue for the importance of the sea to the mesolithic people in the area around 7 500–4 500 BC as more than just an economic resource. Around 4 500 BC contact with groups in western Sweden increased which in time brought the idea of farming to the area. The late mesolithic sites in Närke show continuity into the early neolithic age, rejecting the idea of a Funnelbeaker migration in the area. 

  • 220.
    Spangen, Marte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    "It could be one thing or another" - on the construction of an archaeological category2013In: Fennoscandia Archaeologica, ISSN 0781-7126, Vol. XXX, p. 67-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the history of the archaeological category Sámi circular offering sites, which refers to certain dry wall structures in Finnmark and Troms in northern Norway. In recent years the term has been used more frequently outside this geographical area too, at times to refer to structures vastly different from those originally labelled as circular offering sites. Such interpretations may be questioned, but perhaps it is the category itself that needs to be re-evaluated; a study ofthe research history suggests that the term is a result of a mid-19th century hypothesis that was established due to a lack of other plausible explanations rather than based on indicative finds or on local traditions. This interpretation has later been adopted by key researchers and has never really been challenged by any alternative hypothesis. This article proposes that the stone structures in question could represent other cultural phenomena, and that this needs further investigation.

  • 221.
    Spangen, Marte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Kerstin Eidlitz Kuoljok, Den samiska sitan och vinterbyarna. En utmaning. Institutionen for kulturantropologioch etnologi, Uppsala universitet 2011.105 s. ISBN 978-91-506-2181-5.2015In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, no 2, p. 141-144Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 222.
    Spangen, Marte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Without a trace? The Sámi in the Swedish History Museum2015In: Nordisk Museologi, ISSN 1103-8152, no 2, p. 17-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Around 2005, the Swedish History Museum (SHM) in Stockholm reworked their Vikings exhibition, aiming to question simplistic and erroneous understandings of past group identities. In the process, all references to the Sámi were removed from the exhibition texts. This decision has been criticised by experts on Sámi pasts. In this article, it is argued that we can talk about a Sámi ethnic identity from the Early Iron Age onwards. The removal of references to the Sámi in the exhibition texts is discussed accordingly, as well as the implicit misrepresentations, stereotypes and majority attitudes that are conveyed through spatial distribution, choice of illustrations, lighting, colour schemes and the exhibition texts. Finally, some socio-political reasons for the avoidance of Sámi issues in Sweden are suggested, including an enduring colonialist relation to this minority.

  • 223.
    Spangen, Marte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Salmi, Anna-KaisaÄikäs, Tiina
    Arctic Anthropology2015Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While researchers within Sámi archaeology have dealt with issues closely related to postcolonial theory and critique since the 1970s onwards, this has rarely been done with explicit mention or coherent use of this theoretical complex. This somewhat paradoxical situation was addressed in a session at the 14th conference of the Nordic Theoretical Archaeology Group at Stockholm University in April 2014, an initiative that eventually resulted in the present collection of articles. In this introduction we briefly present the historiographical and discursive background for the debates that are outlined in the following contributions.

  • 224.
    Spangen, Marte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Salmi, Anna-Kaisa
    Äikäs, Tiina
    Sámi Archaeology and Postcolonial Theory - An Introduction2015In: Arctic Anthropology, ISSN 0066-6939, E-ISSN 1933-8139, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While researchers within Sámi archaeology have dealt with issues closely related to postcolonial theory and critique since the 1970s onwards, this has rarely been done with explicit mention or coherent use of this theoretical complex. This somewhat paradoxical situation was addressed in a session at the 14th conference of the Nordic Theoretical Archaeology Group at Stockholm University in April 2014, an initiative that eventually resulted in the present collection of articles. In this introduction we briefly present the historiographical and discursive background for the debates that are outlined in the following contributions.

  • 225.
    Sörman, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    A place for crafting? Late Bronze Age metalworking in southern Scandinavia and the issue of workshops2017In: Artisans versus nobility? Multiple identities of elites and 'commoners' viewed though the lens of crafting from the Chalcolithic to the Iron Ages in Europe and the Mediterranean / [ed] Ann Brysbaert, Alexis Gorgues, Leiden: Sidestone Press, 2017, p. 53-78Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Workshops’ and ‘workshop production’ are central to archaeological understanding of metalworking in Bronze Age societies. In this article the concept of workshops is used as a starting point to review preconceptions about the social and spatial organisation of bronze crafting, focusing particularly on how it influences expectations of crafting evidence in the archaeological record. It argues that assumptions of a permanent, customised crafting place hosting the full manufacturing process, as often implied by the term ‘workshop’, are unsuitable for understanding the nature of bronze crafting in southern Scandinavia during the Late Bronze Age. Instead, drawing on evidence from south-eastern Sweden, the craft is characterised as flexible, embedded, and multi-locational. Furthermore, differences in crafting loci between ornaments and weapons are suggested to relate to the initiations of their intended bearers and to demonstrate the heterogeneous organisation of prestige goods production. Such user-oriented production provides an interesting example of the organisation of elite-motivated crafting outside the context of centralised states.

  • 226. Thomas, Gabor
    et al.
    Pluskowski, Aleks
    Gilchrist, Roberta
    García-Contreras Ruiz, Guillermo
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Augenti, Andrea
    Astill, Grenville
    Staecker, Jörn
    Valk, Heiki
    Religious Transformations in the Middle Ages: Towards a New Archaeological Agenda2017In: Medieval Archaeology, ISSN 0076-6097, E-ISSN 1745-817X, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 300-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    This paper lays the groundwork for a fundamental rethink of archaeological approaches to medieval religions, by adopting an holistic framework that places Christian, pagan, Islamic and Jewish case studies of religious transformation in a long-term, cross-cultural perspective.

  • 227.
    Underdal, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Skifferkulturens uppkomst2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Norrlandic Slate Culture was a hunter-gatherer culture that emerged in northern Sweden during the transition from the late Mesolithic to the early Neolithic, c. 4200 BC. This paper deals with the Slate Culture’s relation to its neighbouring, contemporary cultures in Norway and Finland, and examines three types of typical finds related to the Slate Culture: enclosures of fire-cracked stones (Swe. skärvstensvall), petroglyphs and slate objects. The conclusion is that the Slate culture found inspiration to these phenomena from its neighbouring cultures and turned them into something of their own.

  • 228.
    Vajking, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Vråkulturens framträdande på Södertörn: En undersökning av relationen mellan senmesolitiska och tidigneolitiska lokaler2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 229.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Victor, Helena
    Fischer, Svante
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    A Room with a View: Archaeological Geophysical Prospection and Excavations at Sandby ringfort, Öland, SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeological investigations and clear aerial photographs have identified the presence of house foundations within several ring forts on the island of Öland, situated east of the Swedish mainland. One of them, Sandbyborg, was selected for further investigations by means of a ground-penetrating radar (GRP) and magnetometry survey. The purpose of the geophysical survey was to establish the fort’s spatial layout, to identify any internal constructions within the houses and to investigate whether the fort had multiple building phases. Targeted archaeological excavations was subsequently carried out to verify the validity of the geophysical results and to recover datable material that would enable the understanding of how Sandbyborg was chronologically related to the other ringforts of the island. This information could then be used to better understand the function of Sandbyborg. The results of the geophysical survey clearly show the presence of 36 or 37 stone foundations for houses situated radially aroundthe wall of the fort as well as 16 or 17 similar house foundations in a central building group. The geophysical results also provided information on the possible location of hearths, kilns and pits within the fort and also confirm the location of a third gate situated in the north-western part of the fort. The spatial layout and inner size of Sandbyborg is very similar to one of the other Migration Period ring forts on Öland, Eketorp II. However, there is no evidence of multiple building phases in the data from Sandbyborg. The subsequent excavations showed a very good correlation with the geophysical data. Datable finds, a 14C date from a human metatarsal found in one of the trenches and the lack of geophysical evidence of multiple building phases indicate that the ringfort was used for a limited period of time during thelate fourth century AD. Given the available evidence it is suggested that Sandbyborg primarily was used for military purposes or as a place of refuge intimes of unrest as its location in the outfields, far from arable lands, contradicts an interpretation of Sandbyborg as a fortified village, but as the evidence about the ringforts on Öland is restricted a continued use of geophysical prospection and excavations within the other forts is suggested as a means of obtaining a deeper understanding of the purpose and context of these highly interesting structures.

  • 230.
    Virtala, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Jämtländska reliefspännebärare: Ledande kvinnor under folkvandringstid2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with two women who wore relief brooches from Häste and Brunflo during the Migration period in Jämtland. The purpose of the essay is to investigate similarities and differences in the women’s relief brooches, graves and places in order to understand the women’s relations to each other and their time. The essay has implemented gender theory and a comparative method, complemented by a landscape analysis. The conclusion is that the women from Häste and Brunflo were leaders during their time. 

  • 231.
    Wallgren, Josef
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    De dödas öar och stränder: Fågelbacken, Äs och Bollbacken - stenålderslokaler med många kulturer2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 232. Wikström af Edholm, Klas
    et al.
    Jackson Rova, PeterStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.Nordberg, AndreasStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.Sundqvist, OlofStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.Zachrisson, TorunStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Myth, materiality, and lived religion: in Merovingian and Viking Scandinavia2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors of the present volume, Myth, Materiality, and Lived Religion, focus on the material dimension of Old Norse mythology and the role played by myths in everyday life. More broadly expressed, the collection looks at the social, ceremonial and material contexts of myths. This topic has been underexplored in previous research on Old Norse myths, despite its important theoretical implications. However, discussions around materiality, in a more general sense, have for a long time been significant for historians of religion, especially archaeologists. Myth, Materiality, and Lived Religion seeks to make the case for the relevance of materiality to literary historians and philologists as well.

    Questions relating to the theme of materiality and lived religion are posed in this book, including:

    • What do myths tell us about the material culture of the periods in which they were narrated?

    • What role did myths or mythical beings play in connection to, for instance, illnesses and remedies during the Viking Period and the Middle Ages?

    • How did ordinary people experience participation in a more formal sacrificial feast led by ritual specialists?

  • 233.
    Willfors, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Skateholmsgåtan - Kan man döma hunden efter graven?: En studie av hundgravarna vid Skateholm, Trelleborg, Skåne2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 234.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Anne-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Fornminnen. Det förflutnas roll i det förkristna och kristna Mälardalen2013In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 108, no 4, p. 288-290Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 235.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm: Fornminnen. Det förflutnas roll i det förkristna och kristna Mälardalen. Lund: Nordic Academic Press 20132014In: Namn och bygd, ISSN 0077-2704, p. 250-256Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 236.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Arkeologin bakom Rimbert: Om Hergeirs och Gautberts kyrkor och om borgen i Birka2011In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 100-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his Vita Anskarii, Rimbert describes the Christian mission to the port of the Swedes in the 830s. He mentions two churches there, one built on the family estate of the port bailiff, the other built in the seaport itself by Bishop Gautbert. The loca- tions of these churches have long been discussed. Thanks to archaeological research excavations it is now possible to offer a new suggestion regarding the church of Gautbert. It is argued that the hillfort of Birka, Borg, may be the site of this church and the bishop’s fortified precinct. This would make Birka structurally similar to a number of coeval cities on the Continent, where there was a fortified cathedral hill and a market town at its foot. 9th century finds on and around Borg open up for such a possibility. 

  • 237.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Barneskallene ved Tviodlo2016In: Møt mennesket: Til jord skal vi bli? Skjeletters liv etter døden: Rogaland gjennom 11.000 år / [ed] Elna Siv Kristoffersen, Stavanger: Arkeologisk museum, Universitetet i Stavanger , 2016, p. 45-48Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kraniedelar av minst 4 spädbarn hittades på Bø på Jæren, västra Norge i en myr i samband med nyodling. I myren fanns en tvillingkälla med rödfärgat vatten och spädbarnsskallarna hade deponerats i en av dem någon gång under perioden år 1–400 e.Kr. Fyndet är unikt i ett nordiskt perspektiv, men har beröringspunkter med fynd från andra samtida våtmarker. Detta, liksom fyndets landskaps- och bebyggelsemässiga sammanhang, diskuteras i den korta artikeln.

  • 238.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    De heliga platsernas arkeologi: materiell kultur och miljöer i järnålderns Mellansverige2014In: Den heliga platsen: Handlingar från symposiet Den heliga platsen. Härnösand 15-18 september 2011 / [ed] Eva Nyman, Jörgen Magnusson & Elzbieta Strzelecka, Härnösand: Mittuniversitetet , 2014, p. 87-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett urval av järnålderns kultplatser i Mellansverige belyses. I fokus är kultplatsernas roll i den publika kulten. På vilken samhällelig nivå kan vi placera kultplatsen, hur många människor kan den ha betjänat och vilken karaktär har den haft?

  • 239.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Depositional Traditions in Iron Age Kormt2017In: Avaldsnes: A Sea-Kings' Manor in First-Millenium Western Scandinavia / [ed] Dagfinn Skre, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2017, p. 687-720Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores Iron Age depositions in wetlands and on dry ground in Kormt. The types of objects deposited and their contexts are discussed from a longterm perspective, and the emerging patterns are interpreted in cultural-historical terms.

    The early Iron Age depositions cluster on northeastern and southwestern Kormt, especially in the Avaldsnes and Ferkingstad areas. They indicate the presence of men of military rank and are placed at strategic maritime sites: Ferkingstad and northern Kormt. The depositional traditions of the early Iron Age resemble those of nearby Jæren and southernmost Hordaland, and indeed those of northern Jylland, Denmark. No depositions are known from the period AD 550–700. In the Viking Period, the depositional tradition in Kormt society seems to have played a more limited and less aristocratic role than previously. The depositional traditions differ from neighbouring as well as distant regions with which there formerly were similarities.

  • 240.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Fjärran ting: Exotiska föremål och nya seder under mellersta järnåldern2011In: Förmodern globalitet: Essäer om rörelse, möten och fjärran ting under 10 000 år / [ed] Anders Andrén, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2011, p. 109-129Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Samhällsförändringen i Mellansverige under tiden 550-700 skisseras och diskuteras med hjälp av exotiska föremål, nya seder som jakten med dresserad rovfågel liksom utmarkernas betydelse i denna process.

  • 241.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Fullerö: Roman reflections in the rural countryside of Uppland2017In: Interaktionen ohne Grenzen/Interaction without borders: Beispiele archeologischer Forschungen am Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts/Exemplary archaeological research at the beginning of the 21st century. Festschrift für Claus von Carnap-Bornheim zum 60. Geburtstag / [ed] Berit Valentin Eriksen, Angelika Abegg-Wigg, Ralf Bleile & Ulf Ickerodt, Schleswig: Wachholtz Verlag Neumünster , 2017, p. 239-248Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 242.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gamla Uppsala: på nytt2013In: Gamla Uppsala i ny belysning / [ed] Olof Sundqvist, Per Vikstrand, Uppsala: Swedish Science Press , 2013, p. 161-205Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Gamla Uppsalas historia och landskapet ikring rymmer många svar på varför Uppsala i äldsta vendeltid blev ett ryktbart säte med monumentala gravhögar och höga imposanta hallar. Yngre järnålderns kungsgårdsmiljö med sina äldre historiska rötter är en av de mest komplexa som går att finna i Norden, komplex i avseendet att den avtecknar sig i så många olika typer av källmaterial, något som diskuteras i artikeln.

  • 243.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Helgö: mer än ett vi2011In: Makt, kult, plats: Högstatusmiljöer under den äldre järnåldern. Kultplatser / [ed] Peter Bratt & Richard Grönwall, Stockholm: Stockholms länsmuseum , 2011, p. 69-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Helgö i Mälaren bär många spår av religiösa ritualer inom- och utomhus. Här jämförs dessa jämförs med materiella lämningar från järnålderns kultplatser i Mellansverige 

  • 244.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Händelser vid vatten: om näcken vid Lutbron och de förkristna dödsoffren i sjön Bokaren, Uppland2014In: Saga och sed: Kungl. Gustav Adolfs akademiens årsbok. 2014 / [ed] Maj Reinhammar, Uppsala: Kungliga Gustav Adolfs Akadmien , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The oral traditions and the archaeological context of the lake Bokaren are in focus in this article. During the Late Iron Age a cultic site where humans and animals were ritually killed was placed in the lake. Nearby was a contemporaneous elite settlement called Hov, marked by a concentration of large burial mounds. Many hundreds of years later a master fiddler was born and bred by the lake. He learnt his extraordinary musical skills from näcken. This occurred at the stream running out of lake and thus by the waters that had passed through platform in the lake with the remains of human and animals. This is viewed as no coincidence, instead it is argued that the oral traditions of näcken can be understood in a deeper time perspective than has formerly been applied.

  • 245.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Håkon Jarl Ivarsson and Rodr: 2009In: Á austrvega.: Saga and East Scandinavia. Preprint papers of The 14th International Saga Conference. Uppsala 9-15th August 2009. / [ed] Agneta Ney, Henrik Williams & Fredrik Charpentier-Ljungqvist, Gävle: University of Gävle , 2009, p. 1072-1073Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 246.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    I vendelkrigarnas gravkammare Krigarna från Valsgärde: Glimtar från en guld- och granatskimrande forntidKent Andersson2017In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 4, p. 32-34Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 247.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    II: 31 Sites2019In: Handbook of Pre-Modern Nordic Memory Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches / [ed] Jürg Glauser, Pernille Hermann, Stephen A. Mitchell, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2019, p. 620-626Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study demonstrates how the great mounds and halls in Old Uppsala in central Sweden, erected AD 550–650, were used for expressing cultural memory. By the construction of monumental halls, rulers created arenas for expressing both power and authority, as well as for memory production. The halls left material traces, which makes possible consideration of whether they were also maintained and used in the Viking Age, or if they were abandoned and either remembered or forgotten.

  • 248.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Kungsämnen i Söderby och kungens Sigtuna: Om den materiella kulturen i och kring Söderby i Danmarks socken2010In: Situne Dei, ISSN 1653-8498, Vol. 5, p. 163-174Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 249.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Property and Honour: Social Change in Cemtral Sweden 200-700 Mirrired in the Area around Old Uppsala2011In: Det 61. Internationale Sachsensymposion 2010 Haderslev, Danmark: Arkeologi i Slesvig / [ed] Linda Boye, Per Ethelberg, Lene Heidemann-Lutz, Sunhild Kleingärtner, Pernille Kruse, Lilian Mathers, Anne Birgitte Sørensen, Neumünster: Wachholtz Verlag Neumünster , 2011, p. 141-156Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social change in Midsweden is mirrored against the development of agrarian landscape around Old Uppsala and the establishment of the royal manor

  • 250.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Rotary querns and bread: A social history of Sweden2014In: Seen through a millstone / [ed] Lotte Sellsing, Stavanger: Arkeologisk museum, Universitetet i Stavanger , 2014, p. 181-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rotary querns were introduced at the same as the oldest known bread appeared in the Nordic countries, c. AD 200. Since these type of querns were very efficient, bread could have been baked and consumed in most social milieus. But this was not the case. The rotary querns first appear at elite settlements, so-called central places, were the cultic dimensions are marked. Altogether the social acceptance for bread in Iron Age Sweden seems to have been slow.

    Kvarnberget in Sala, Västmanland in the region north of Mälaren, is a millstone quarry mountain known from a written source from AD 1490. The quarry was located on the grounds of a lost settlement called Onsala, later split into the villages Ösby and Åby. Onsala might be interptreted as the god Odin's hall or sal. The lost settlement is situated next to a settlement called Hov, a place name that can be interpreted as a settlement where cultic rituals took place. A quarry mountain on the grounds of a Late Iron Age settlement bearing a name connected with the god Odin is an unexpected combination in this region of Sweden, where the plains transitions into the wooded area Bergslagen, renowned for its production of silver, copper, iron and other minerals. Kvarnberget is poorly known but can contribute to a general discussion on the social contexts for the production sites for rotary querns, as well as reflect on the milieus were bread was eaten.

23456 201 - 250 of 261
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