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  • 201.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    In retrospect: the play of shadows2008In: Transparency in a New Global Order: Unveiling Organizational Visions, Edward Elgar , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 202.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introduction: examining the politics of transparency2008In: Transparency in a New Global Order: Unveiling Organizational Visions, Edward Elgar , 2008Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 203.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introduction: Exploring Cultural Processes in the Global Marketplace2004In: Market Matters: Exploring Cultural Processes in the Global Marketplace, Palgrave MacMillan, Basingstoke , 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 204.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Market Matters: Exploring Cultural Processes in the Global Marketplace2004Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 205.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The naked corporation: vizualization, veiling and the ethico-politics of organizational transparency2008In: Transparency in a New Global Order: Unveiling Organizational Visions, 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 206.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Transparency in a New Global Order: Unveiling Organizational Visions2008Book (Other academic)
  • 207.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Transparency tricks2009In: Ethical DIlemmas in Management / [ed] Christina Garsten and Tor Hernes, London: Routledge , 2009, p. 64-78Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 208.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Lindvert, JessicaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).Thedvall, RenitaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Arbetets marknad: Arbetsmarknadens nya organisering2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 209.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Lindvert, Jessica
    Thedvall, Renita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Introduction: makeshift work in a global labour market2015In: Makeshift work in a changing labour market: the Swedish model in the post-financial crisis era / [ed] Christina Garsten, Jessica Lindvert, Renita Thedvall, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 1-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 210.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Lindvert, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Thedvall, Renita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Introduktion: Den nya arbetsmarknaden2011In: Arbetets marknad: Arbetsmarkandens nya organisering / [ed] Garsten, Christina, Jessica Lindvert & Renita Thedvall, Malmö: Liber, 2011, 1:1, p. 10-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 211.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Lindvert, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Thedvall, Renita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Lära för livet? Den nya arbetsmarknadens organisering:  2009In: Resultatdialog 2009: Aktuell forskning om lärande / [ed] Vetenskapsrådet, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2009, p. 46-56Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 212.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Lindvert, JessicaThedvall, RenitaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Makeshift Work in a Changing Labour Market: the Swedish Model in the Post-Financial Crisis Era2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the aftermath of the global financial crisis, people who had never before had cause to worry about losing their jobs entered the ranks of the unemployed for the first time. In Sweden, the welfare state has been radically challenged and mass unemployment has become a reality in what used to be viewed as a model case for a full employment society. With an emphasis on Sweden in the context of transnational regulatory change, Makeshift Workin a Changing Labour Market discusses how the market mediates employment and moves on to explore the ways in which employees adjust to a new labour market. Focusing on the legibility,measurability and responsibility of jobseekers, the expert contributors of this book bring together an analysis of activation policy andnew ways of organizing the mediation of work, with implications for the individual jobseeker. Students and researchers of labour market policy, the organization of markets and work and society both in Sweden and abroad will find this book to be of interest. Policy-makers will find the empirical examples of policy processes among employees an extremely useful and insightful tool.

  • 213.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Moeran, Brian
    Letter from the editors2012In: Journal of Business Anthropology, ISSN 2245-4217, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 174-176Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 214.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Moeran, Brian
    What’s in a name?: editors’ introduction to the Journal of Business Anthropology2012In: Journal of Business Anthropology, ISSN 2245-4217, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 215.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Entries: Engaging organisational worlds2013In: Organisational anthropology: Doing ethnography in and among complex organisations / [ed] Christina Garsten and Anette Nyqvist, London: Pluto Press, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 216.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Formality in brackets: ethnographies of staged organizational worlds2013In: 22nd Nordic Academy of management conference held at University of Iceland Reykjavík, 21-23 August, 2013 Final Program and Abstracts: Nff 2013 On Practice and Knowledge Eruptions, 2013, p. 138-139Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 217.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Momentum: pushing ethnography ahead2013In: Organisational anthropology: doing ethnography in and among complex organisations / [ed] Christina Garsten and Anette Nyqvist, London: Pluto Press, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 218.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nyqvist, AnetteStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Organisational anthropology: doing ethnography in and among complex organisations2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisational Anthropology is a pioneering analysis of doing ethnographic fieldwork in different types of complex organizations. The book focuses on the process of initiating contact, establishing rapport and gaining the trust of the organization's members.The contributors work from the premise that doing fieldwork in an organization shares essential characteristics with fieldwork in more "classical" anthropological environments, but that it also poses some particular challenges to the ethnographer. These include the ideological or financial interests of the organizations, protection of resources and competition between organizations. Organisational Anthropology brings together and highlights crucial aspects of doing anthropology in contemporary complex settings, and will have wide appeal to students, researchers and academics in anthropology and organization studies.

  • 219.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Handelshögskolan i Stockholm, Sverige .
    Rothstein, Bo
    Svallfors, Stefan
    De policyprofessionella: En okänd politisk elit?2018In: Eliter i Sverige: tvärvetenskapliga perspektiv på makt, status och klass / [ed] Bengt Eriksson, Mikael Holmqvist, Lena Sohl, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 275-308Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 220.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Rothstein, Bo
    Svallfors, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Makt utan mandat: de policyprofessionella i svensk politik2015Book (Other academic)
  • 221.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Rothstein, Bo
    Svallfors, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Umeå universitet, Sverige.
    Politikproffs i kulisserna styr utan demokratiskt mandat2015In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 222.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sundman, Kerstin
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Introduktion: på spaning i samtiden2003In: Moderna människor: antropologiska perspektiv på samtiden / [ed] Christina Garsten, Kerstin Sundman, Malmö: Liber, 2003, p. 5-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 223.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sundman, KerstinGöteborgs universitet.
    Moderna människor: antropologiska perspektiv på samtiden2003Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 224.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    An organized network: World Economic Forum and the partial organizing of global agendas2019In: Organization outside organizations: The abundance of partial organization in social life / [ed] Göran Ahrne, Nils Brunsson, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2019, p. 212-234Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter answers the question of how the World Economic Fourm (WEF) constructs authority for itself in the global arena by studying the form of political action that the WEF draws upon. We argue that it constructs authority beyond itself through turning some participants from its many events into a form of members, thus partially organizing its environment. Participants at WEF activities, as well as WEF staff, would call this order a ‘network’. We acknowledge the network aspects of this order, but argue that it is foremost based on organization; it is a decided order, based on decisions taken within the WEF. Empirically, the chapter builds on interview data within Geneva staff and participants at WEF activities.

  • 225.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Discreet power: how the World Economic Forum shapes market agendas2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Discreet Power, Christina Garsten and Adrienne Sörbom undertake an ethnographic study of the World Economic Forum (WEF). Accessing one of the primary agenda-setting organizations of our day, they draw on interviews and participant observation to examine how the WEF wields its influence. They situate the WEF within an emerging system of "discretionary governance," in which actors craft ideas and entice formal authorities and top leaders in order to garner significant sway. Yet in spite of its image as a powerful, exclusive brain trust, the WEF has no formal mandate to implement its positions. It must convince others to advance chosen causes and enact suggestions, rendering its position quite fragile.

    Garsten and Sörbom argue that the WEF must be viewed relationally as a brokering organization that lives between the market and political spheres and that extends its reach through associated individuals and groups. They place the WEF in the context of a broader shift, arguing that while this type of governance opens up novel ways of dealing with urgent global problems, it challenges core democratic values.

  • 226.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study, Sweden.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Södertörn University, Sweden.
    His Master’s Voice? Conceptualizing the relationship between business and the World Economic Forum2019In: Journal of business anthropology, ISSN 2245-4217, E-ISSN 2245-4217, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 41-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commonly, the relationship between corporations and non-for profit organizations, such as foundations, think tanks and private research institutes, is analyzed in terms suggesting that when acting as funders corporations set the frames for the non-for profit organization who, in turn, not only mimics but also serves as to broadcast the views of its funder. Drawing on the case of the Swizz based foundation/think tank World Economic Forum and its corporate funders we scrutinize this relationship. We show that as an organization interested in global policy making it is of vital importance for the Forum to construct its own agency, not merely giving voice to its funder’s views, and that it will do so drawing on the resources that the funders provide. Moreover, we submit that as organizations all partaking actors will endeavor to construct their own agency, oftentimes by drawing on the resources of others. In so doing, actors may have both overlapping and divergent interests. Evoking the Lévi-Strauss concept of the bricoleur, we analyze how the various and multifaceted priorities of corporations will not only be filtered by the Form, but it will also make use of the resources at hand for organizing forth own policy messages. The result is a complex and dynamic web of actors and voices.

  • 227.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Högt spel i gränslandet mellan politik och marknad2014In: Alla dessa marknader: RJ:s årsbok 2014/2015 / [ed] Jenny Björkman, Björn Fjæstad & Susanna Alexius, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2014, p. 173-184Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 228.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Magical Formulae for Market Futures: Tales from the World Economic Forum Meeting in Davos2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Magical formulae for market futures: Tales from the World Economic Forum meeting in Davos2016In: Anthropology Today, ISSN 0268-540X, E-ISSN 1467-8322, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 18-21Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Markets are often portrayed as being organized by way of rationalized knowledge, objective reasoning, and the fluctuations of demand and supply. In parallel, and often mixed with this modality of knowledge, magical beliefs and practices are prevalent. Business leaders, management consultants, and financial advisors are often savvy in the art of creatively blending the ‘objective facts’ of markets with magical formulae, rites, and imaginaries of the future. This article looks at the World Economic Forum's yearly Davos meeting as a large-scale ritual that engages senior executives of global corporations, top-level politicians, and civil society leaders to contribute to the overall aim of ‘improving the world’. The Davos gathering has become a vital part of the business calendar, just as much for the intensity of its networking as for the declarations of action from the speakers’ podiums. The presentations and performances in Davos work as ‘technologies of enchantment’ in Gell's (1992) sense, instilling a sense of agency onto participants. The ritual also contributes towards securing the acquiescence of individuals and organizations in a transnational network of politico-economic intentionalities. By invoking global and regional challenges and risks, discussing possible scenarios and solutions, presenters invoke a sense of urgency and contribute to the articulation of global ‘problems’ and ‘solutions’. It is proposed that the magic of Davos resides to a large extent in the ritualized form of interaction and the technologies of enchantment through which it is set up.

  • 230.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Secret Societies, Opaque Routes: Advancing Corporate Politics through the World Economic Forum2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    LAEMOS 2014

    Subtheme 8

    The Corporatization of Politics and the Politicization of Corporations

     

     

    The Politicization of Corporations: The Case of the World Economic Forum

    Christina Garsten and Adrienne Sörbom

     

     

    Abstract

     

    This paper departs from an interest in the involvement of business leaders in the sphere of politics, in the broad sense. At a general level, we are seeing a proliferation of usages of non-market corporate strategies, such as testimony, lobbying, interlocking of positions and other means to influence policymakers at all levels of government and international institutions as an adjunct to the firm’s market strategies. This paper brings to the fore the role of corporations in the World Economic Forum (WEF), and how firms act through the WEF to advance their interests, financial as well as political. What is the role of business in the WEF, and how do business corporations advance their interests through the WEF?

     

    Inspired by Stephen Barley's (2010) work on how corporations have systematically built an institutional field to exert greater influence on the US Federal government, we aim to enhance knowledge on how the WEF and the 1,000 corporations that are active within it influence the larger socio-cultural context in which they are embedded. Empirically we depart from ethnographic field studies of the World Economic Forum, drawing on observations from WEF-events and interviews with participants and organizers. Theoretically we will employ an organizational perspective, using the concept of "partial organization" as introduced by Göran Ahrne and Nils Brunsson (2011).

     

    The results show that corporations find a strategically positioned amplifier for their non-market interests in the WEF. The WEF functions to enhance and gain leverage for their ideas and priorities in a highly selective and resourceful environment. In the long run, both the market priorities and the political interests of business may be served by engagement in the WEF.

     

    However, the WEF cannot only be conceived as the extended voice of corporations. The WEF also makes strategic use of the corporations to organize and expand their own agency, which not necessarily coincides with the interests of multinational corporations.  By way of corporate financial resources, the tapping of knowledge and expertise, and access to vast networks of business relations, the WEF is also able to amplify its own voice. The organized network, in the format of partial organization, which is the preferred form of organization of the WEF, comes with weakened power in the form of oversight and sanctions for the member corporations, but may allow for a concentration of resources at the center. The periphery has little sanctioned insight into the core of the organization, and a weak voice in influencing the operations of the organization. Actors in the partially organized environment thus have to rely on the goodwill of the leadership. 

  • 231.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Small places, big stakes : "Meetings" as moments of ethnographic momentum2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnographic fieldwork in organizations – such as corporations, state agencies, and international organizations – often entails that the ethnographer has to rely to a large extent on meetings as the primary point of access. Oftentimes, this involves doing fieldwork in workshops, at ceremonies, and at other staged, formal events. In addition, such fieldwork tends to be both multilocal, mobile, and discontinuous. It may not provide as much of a flavour of the different local sites and a sense of ‘being there' as one would wish for. The tendency in anthropology to favour the informal, the ‘genuine' or ‘authentic' as well as the spontaneous, may leave one with a lingering feeling of having to make do with second-rate material, i.e. the formal, the superficial, and the organized. To a large extent, the staged character of the social events that are accessible to the ethnographer suggests that s/he has been left of much of ‘what is really going on', and ‘what people are really up to.' Meetings, however, as organized and ritualized social events, may provide the ethnographer with a loupe through which key tenets of larger social groups and organizations, and big issues, may be carefully observed. In formal meetings, political priorities, economic values, and social priorities are often condensed, played out and negotiated, turning meetings into strategic sites from which to observe the organization at large. The paper is based on experiences from fieldwork in corporations, think thanks, and international organizations.

  • 232.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Södertörn University College, Sweden.
    Small places, big stakes: "Meetings" as moments of ethnographic momentum2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Economic Forum is essentially a world of meetings: staged, circumvented, formal, organized meetings to which access is tightly restricted. The annual Davos meeting, the WEF show case meeting, is also a microcosm of the organization, set up in a small place but speaking to bigger issues. Ethnographic fieldwork in organizations such as the WEF – and more broadly incorporations, state agencies, and international organizations – often involves doing fieldwork in workshops, at ceremonies, and at other staged, formal events. In addition, such fieldwork tends to be multilocal, mobile, and discontinuous. What, if anything, can we learn from doing ethnography in such small, temporary meeting places, where we may not even have full access?

    The paper shows that researching an organization such as the WEF is as methodologically and theoretical challenging as it is rewarding. It is argued that to understand the practices constituting meetings we need to broaden the perspective of the meeting as a phenomenon. The meeting as research locus should not be seen as a given entity, but as a contingent and continually constructed social arena. In the WEF case the meeting is both a continuous organizing effort, and a social arena, temporarily bounded in time and space.

  • 233.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Södertörn University College, Sweden.
    Small places, big stakes: "Meetings’" as moments of ethnographic momentum2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Davos summit is surrounded by air of seriousness and hype, but it is also something like a huge cocktail party. The Davos meeting is, in essence, a kind of human beehive, attracting and organizing a multitude of actors around its core, each contributing to the existence of the beehive community, and each disseminating its ideas and perspectives to the world at large. The WEF is essentially a social world of meetings – staged, circumvented, formal, organized meetings – and meetings to which access is tightly restricted. The annual Davos meeting, which is the showcase meeting of the WEF, is also a microcosm of the organization, set up in a small place and speaking to bigger issues: market regulations, financial crises, environmental risks, armed conflicts, and the like. The kinds of questions that arise out offieldwork in organizations such as this, but also more broadly, are to do with access, representation, validity, and the predicaments of doing ethnography in organized settings.

    At a more general level, ethnographic fieldwork in organizations – such as corporations, state agencies, and international organizations – often entails that the ethnographer has to rely on meetings as the primary point of access. Oftentimes, this involves doing fieldwork in workshops, at ceremonies, and at other staged, formal events. In addition, such fieldwork tends to be multilocal, mobile, and discontinuous. It may not provide as much of a flavour of the different local sites and a sense of ‘being there’ as one would wish for. The tendency in anthropology to favour the informal, the ‘genuine’ or ‘authentic’ as well as the spontaneous, may leave one with a lingering feeling of having to make do with second- rate material, i.e. the formal, the superficial, and the organized. Fieldwork in meetings, and in meetings to which one may not get full access, may, from that angle, be problematic.

    What, if anything, can we learn from doing ethnography in such a small, temporary meeting place, where we don not even have access to much of what goes on?

     

  • 234.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Small Places, Big Stakes: Meetings as Moments of Ethnographic Momentum2017In: Meeting Ethnography: Meetings as Key Technologies of Contemporary Governance, Development, and Resistance / [ed] Jen Sandler, Renita Thedvall, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 126-142Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 235.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Think tanks as policy brokers in partially organized fields: The case of World Economic Forum2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As has been noted in research on think tanks it is difficult to describe what a think tank is, and to pinpoint what it is in think tank activities that generates powerful relationships towards other actors. This is even more the case when talking of transnational think tanks. In this report we give a theoretical account of how relationships organized by transnational think tanks may be analyzed.

    In the report we are drawing on empirical findings from the World Economic Forum (WEF), seen as a transnational think tank addressing a non-national audience. We are suggesting that think-tank experts are engaged in the brokerage of ideas and knowledge, implying anintermediary activity, wherein ideas are translated, shaped and formatted. Operating at the interfaces of various actors, think-tank experts formulate and negotiate ideas with and among actors, encouraging them to adopt and use those ideas.

    The main argument in the report is that this brokerage can be seen to generate ‘partially organized fields’. The think tank organizes other actors not by constructing a complete organization, but by establishing and maintaining a decided network, drawing upon such organizational elements as membership, monitoring and sanctions. This allows think tanks to maintain a degree of flexibility, whilst gaining control of valuable resources.

    In the case of the WEF the report show that the combination of a small core of completeorganization with a larger environment of only partial organizing essentially allows the WEF to be bigger than they actually are. The decided networks, i.e. the partnerships, the working groups, and the communities, significantly extends the reach of the WEF, allowing it to reach across organizational boundaries.

    We suggest that this form of organizing is the prime way for transnational think tanks toorganize outside themselves, thereby exerting political influence. The potential influence it may exert resides in its influence over the shaping of agendas in other organizations, the formulation of pressing political issues, and by mobilizing actors in their decided networks to carry the issues further, on other organizational platforms and with other organizational mandates.

  • 236.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Uneasy alignment: Transparency and opacity at the World Economic Forum2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 237.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Values aligned: the organization of conflicting values within the World Economic Forum2014In: Configuring Value Conflicts in Markets / [ed] Susanna Alexius, Kristina Tamm Hallström, Padstow: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, p. 159-177Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 238.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Thedvall, Renita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Free commodity exchange: Skype and Spotify and the complexity of market relations2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 239.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Thedvall, Renita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Transparency by proxy: knowledge, indicators, and legitimacy in market practice2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 240.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introduction: from people of the book to people of the screen2003In: New technologies at work: people, screens, and social virtuality / [ed] Christina Garsten, Helena Wulff, Oxford: Berg Publishers, 2003, p. 1-6Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 241.
    Gerholm, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, Comparative Religion and Gender Studies. Etnologi.
    Gerholm, Tomas
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Doktorshatten: En studie av forskarutbildningen inom sex discipliner vid Stockholms universitet1992Book (Other academic)
  • 242.
    Gerholm, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, Comparative Religion and Gender Studies. Etnologi.
    Gerholm, Tomas
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ondskans etnografi1993Book (Other academic)
  • 243.
    Gerholm, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Market, mosque and mafraj: social inequality in a Yemeni town1977Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 244. Gil Araujo, Sandra
    et al.
    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    International migration, public policies and domestic work Latin American migrant women in the Spanish domestic work sector2014In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, Vol. 46, p. 13-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the Spanish case, in this article we explore the connection between migration policies, family policies, gender regimes and the insertion of Latin American migrant women into the domestic work sector. Over the first decade of the twenty-first century, Latin America became the main region of origin of migrants who had settled in Spain, being women the first link in these migration chains. The main factors that have affected the configuration of this feminization are linked to migration policies and patterns of migration, the features of the welfare state, the characteristics of the labor market and the way in which gender organizes and stratifies migration and domestic work. The achievement of national middle class women's rights to conciliate their professional and family life through outsourcing domestic work to non-national women also brings with it a deep inequality in terms of citizenship.

  • 245.
    Goldmann, Kjell
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Department of Social Anthropology.
    Westin, Charles
    Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations (CEIFO).
    Introduction:: Nationalism and Internationalism in the Post-Cold War Era2000In: Nationalism and Internationalism in the post-Cold War Era, 2000, p. 1-22Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 246.
    Goldmann, Kjell
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Hannerz, UlfDepartment of Social Anthropology.Westin, CharlesCentre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations (CEIFO).
    Nationalism and Internationalism in the post-Cold War Era2000Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 247.
    González Fernández, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Globally Interdependent Households: Irregular Migrants Employed in Domestic and Care Work in Spain2013In: Irregular Migrant Domestic Workers in Europe: Who Cares? / [ed] Anna Triandafyllidou, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, p. 187-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is the result of data obtained in fieldwork carried out mainly in Madrid, Spain, between March and June 2010. Interviews were conducted with four different social organizations (The Spanish-Ecuadorian association Rumiñahui, the Association of Domestic Workers SEDOAC-Servicio Domestico Activo, the NGO Accem and the trade union Comisiones Obreras), and with seven migrant domestic workers (six female and one male). The majority of the workers interviewed were between 27 and 51 years old, had an irregular immigration status and several of them were responsible for families in their country of origin. Prior to their emigration, none of the interviewees had engaged in domestic work, and were forced to enter into the Spanish labour market through this regime – for the most part as live-ins, at least in their first job. The interviewees came from Latin America (Central and South America, and the Caribbean), and North Africa.

  • 248.
    González, Tania
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Gil Araujo, Sandra
    Montañés Sánchez, Virginia
    Política migratoria y derechos humanos en el Mediterráneo español: El impacto del control migratorio en los tránsitos de la migración africana hacia Europa2013In: Revista de Derecho Migratorio y Extranjería, ISSN 1695-3509, no 33, p. 245-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the entrance of Spain into the EU, the Mediterranean became the southern border of Europe and a focal point of the migratory pressure from Africa to Europe. Since then, the fight against irregular immigration, the increased surveillance and migration control, and the cooperation with countries of migration transit and origin have become core elements of the Spanish migration policy. The imposition of visas to African countries, the border control, the reinforcement of the fence in Ceuta and Melilla, the Frontex development, EUROSUR, SIVE, the Seahorse Project, the return agreements, the joint surveillance patrols at the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, and the inclusion of migration as a theme in Spanish external relations with emigration countries are instruments of externalization and Europeanization of Spanish migration policy.In this article, we focus our attention on the effects of migration control on the Spanish maritime border on the transit of migrants coming from Africa. The experiences of migrants who arrived irregularly in the Andalusian coast between 2010 and 2011 are taken as a case study. In particular, we are interested in exploring the violation offundamental rights throughout the different stages that make up the migration process: starting at the place of origin and the journey experience on land, the situation of migrants at sea, the interception of vessels, landing and retention. We will discuss in more detail the processes of identification, treatment, and protection of particularly vulnerable groups, as well as the gender relations that are embedded within these practices.

  • 249.
    González-Fernández, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Baldassar, Loretta and Merla, Laura (eds.) (2014). Transnational Families, Migration and the Circulation of Care. Understanding Mobility and Absence in Family Life. London and New York: Routledge2014In: Papeles del CEIC, ISSN 1695-6494, Vol. 2, p. 1-8Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 250.
    González-Fernández, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Entre nodos y nudos: ambivalencias emocionales en la migración transnacional: Una aproximación etnográfica a las emociones a partir de familias transnacionales entre Bolivia y España2016In: Odisea. Revista de Estudios Migratorios, ISSN 2408-445X, no 3, p. 99-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork carried out in Bolivia and Spain, this article explores the reconfiguration of family relations maintained by middle-aged migrant women in a context of transnational migration. Indeed, transnational migration triggers contradictory feelings for those leaving and for those who stay behind. The individuals interviewed repeatedly express mixed feelings of guilt, pride, sadness and satisfaction, often interwoven with meaningful silences, demands, and expectations. In this particular instance, the aim is to visibilize the emotional dimension inherent in family relations at a distance to demonstrate how migration is also affected by the weight of care responsibilities, the family life course, gender roles, or intergenerational relations.

2345678 201 - 250 of 840
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