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  • 201.
    Glete, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    The Swedish fiscal-military state in transition and decline, 1650-18152007In: War, State and Development: Fiscal-Military States in the Eighteenth Century, 2007, p. 87-108Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 202.
    Gratzer, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Småföretagandets villkor: automatrestauranger under 1900-talet1996Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 203.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Agrarian change and commercialisation in colonial Malawi2005In: South African Journal of Economic History, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 18-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 204.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Agrarian Populism and African cash crop production in Malawi 1920-1980, a tentative discussion2010In: African Studies Association in UK Biennal Conference, Oxford Univeristy, 16-19 September, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 205.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Agricultural practices and agrarian relations in Thyolo and Mzimba, 1930s2004In: History Department Seminar Series, University of Malawi, 6th July, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 206.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Bra med ny Afrikapolitik2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 207.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Colonial intervention and peasant agriculture: the case of Malawi2003In: Economic History Meeting, Lund, 17-19 October, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Contradictions and Constraints of land intensification : Agrarian Change in Colonial Malawi, 1930-19602005In: Structures and Vulnerability, Stockholm University, 11-14 November, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 209.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Explanations of the agrarian question in Malawi : A critical discussion2004In: African Studies Association 46th Annual Meeting, New Orleans, 11-14 November, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 210.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Factor Endowments and institutions: Explaining the failed support of ‘progressive’ farmers in colonial Malawi: A tentative discussion2009In: Technology and Science in Africa, Texas University, 27-29 March, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 211.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    From form to content : The development of Agricultural extension services in Malawi, 1930-20002006In: History Department Seminar Series, University of Malawi, 14 September, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 212.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    From slavery to free labour: Critical reflections on the agrarian transition in the Cape Colony, c. 1750-18502010In: African Studies Association’s annual meeting, San Fransisco, 17-20 November, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 213.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Gareth Austin, Labour, land and capital in Ghana: from slavery to free labour in Asante, 1807–1956, Woodbridge: University of Rochester Press, 2005. 589 s.2007In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 127, no 2, p. 388-390Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 214.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Income diversification, labour and processes of agrarian change in southern and northern Malawi, 1930-19502006In: African Economic History Workshop, London School of Economics and Political Science, 4 May, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 215.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Income diversification, labour and processes of agrarian change in southern and northern Malawi, 1930-19502008In: Agricultural History, ISSN 0002-1482, E-ISSN 1533-8290, ISSN 0002-1482, Vol. 82, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 216.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Labor costs and the failed support of progressive farmers in colonial Malawi: A tentative discussion2011In: The Technological Pastoral : Landscape and Environment in Colonial and Post-Colonial Africa / [ed] Falola Toyin and Emily Brownell, London: Routledge , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 217.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Limits to intensification : The Lilongwe Land Development Programme, 1968-19812007In: African Economic History Workshop, London School of Economics and Political Science, 26 April, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 218.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Master Farmers’ Scheme and Agricultural Transformation in Colonial Malawi2003In: African Studies Association 45th Annual Meeting, Boston October 30 – November 3, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 219.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Modern Agricultural History in Malawi: Perspectives on Policy Choices2007In: African Studies Review, ISSN 0002-0206, E-ISSN 1555-2462, ISSN 0002-0206, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 115-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development research is often associated with issues of policy. Researchers aim to increase our contextual and theoretical knowledge to enhance the creation of "good" development policies. One way of doing this is to identify and learn from harmful policies of the past. The objective of this article is to examine such policy-choice explanations by looking at the dominant understandings of the modern history of agriculture in Malawi. These perspectives share the view that the high level of rural poverty is, to a great extent, an outcome of the agricultural policies implemented by the colonial and postcolonial governments. Of crucial importance are the mechanisms whereby the state actively tried to transfer resources from the smallholder sector to the state or to the estate sector. This had a negative impact on the production capacity of the smallholder sector. This article notes that the focus on policies alone is not a sufficient approach to understand the dynamics and limitations of the smallholder sector. The article also points to some methodological weaknesses with policy-choice explanations that are relevant for development research in general.

  • 220.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Productive resources, markets and agrarian change in Nyasaland : The case of Mzimba district2002In: African Studies Association, 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 221.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Productive resources, markets and agrarian change in Nyasaland revisisted2003In: Fattiga och rika Aktuell utvecklingsforskning och dess villkor i Sverige, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 222.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Recension av Land, Labour and Capital in Ghana – From Slavery to Free Labour in Asante, 1807-1956 (Gareth Austin)2007In: Historisk Tidskrift, no 2Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 223.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    State-led Agricultural Intensification and Labour Relations: The Case of Lilongwe Land Development Program in Malawi, 1968-19812010In: International Review of Social History, ISSN 0020-8590, E-ISSN 1469-512X, ISSN 0020-8590, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 413-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with cash crop production and its impact on labour relations in postcolonial African peasant agriculture. The focus is on the Lilongwe Land Development Programme (1968–1981) in Malawi. The aim of the programme was to enable African farmers to increase yields and make them shift from the cultivation of tobacco and local maize to groundnuts and high-yielding varieties of maize. The programme failed to meet its goals, because of contradictory forces set in motion by the programme itself. The LLDP enabled a larger segment of farmers to engage in commercial agriculture, which caused a decline in supplies of local labourers ready to be employed on a casual or permanent basis. Increased commercial production was thus accompanied by a de-commercialization of labour relations, which hampered the scope for better-off farmers to increase yields by employing additional labourers. By using both written and oral sources, this article thus provides an empirical case that questions the conventional view that increased cash-crop production in twentieth-century rural Africa was accompanied by a commercialization of labour relations. It concludes that the history of rural labour relations cannot be grasped by simple linear models of historical change, but requires an understanding of local contexts, with a focus on farming systems and factors that determine the local supply of and demand for labour.

     

  • 224.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    State-led intensification and de-commercialisation of labour relations: the case of the Lilongwe land development programme2007In: Swedeish Economic History Meeting, Stockholm University, 12-14 October, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 225.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Tur att Malawi trotsar Världsbanken2008Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 226.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Understanding agrarian change : Theoretical and empirical considerations from the perspective of Southern Malawi2003In: History Department Seminar Series, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 227.
    Green, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Where have all the markets gone : Liberalisation of the agricultural markets in Malawi2001In: Africa Days, 2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 228.
    Green, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Chiwona-Karltun, L
    Jordbrukskriser i Afrika går att undvika2006Other (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Green, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Hillbom, Ellen
    Ekonomisk-historia, Lunds universitet.
    Afrika : en kontinents ekonomiska och sociala historia2010Book (Other academic)
  • 230.
    Green, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    EU:s jordbrukspolitik och global fattigdomsbekämpning2007In: Internationella Studier, ISSN 0020-952X, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 231.
    Green, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    From North-South to South-South: The Changing Geographies of African Trade and its implications for liberalisation of agricultural markets2007In: Nordic Africa Days, Nordic Africa Institute, 6-7 October, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 232.
    Green, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Grova förenklingar löser inte fattigdomsproblematiken2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 233.
    Gustafson, Uno
    Stockholm University.
    Industrialismens storstad: studier rörande Stockholms sociala, ekonomiska och demografiska struktur 1860-19101976Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 234.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Den tysta lilla borgarklassen och den högljudda stora medelklassen2007In: Fronesis, ISSN 1404-2614, no 24, p. 148-163Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 235.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Från gåvoekonomi till rentierkapitalism: Pro Patrias intäkter och samlade tillgångar 1775–20122016In: För det allmänna bästa: Ett kungligt sällskap mellan stat och marknad under 250 år. Kungl. sällskapet Pro Patria 1766-2016 / [ed] Erik Amnå, Stockholm: Bokförlaget Atlantis, 2016, p. 223–268,-350–352, 377–394Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 236.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Ta vara på tiden: på resa med C. Tarras Sällfors 1920-19602009In: Kulturellt: reflektioner i Erlings Bjurströms anda / [ed] Johan Fornäs och Tobias Harding, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2009, p. 127-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 237.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The Market in the State and the State in the Market2003In: Economic Sociology : the European Electronic Newsletter, ISSN 1871-3351, E-ISSN 1871-3351, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 238.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Utbildningens lokala ekonomi: Statliga natura- och penningstöd vid Uppsala universitet 1939–19642017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 239.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Melldahl, Andreas
    The Social History of a Capitalist Class: Wealth Holders in Stockholm, 1914-20062018In: New Directions in Elite Studies / [ed] Olav Korsnes, Johan Heilbron, Johs Hjellbrekke, Felix Bühlmann, Mike Savage, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2018, p. 177-197Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 240.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Melldahl, Andreas
    The Social History of a Capitalist Class: Wealth Holders in Stockholm, 1914–20062017In: : A, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 241.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Retsö, DagStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Långa linjer och många fält: Festskrift till Johan Söderberg2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 242.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Svanström, YvonneStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Metod: Guide för historiska studier2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 243.
    Hagegård, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Opartiska rapporteringar eller ideologiska uttryck?: En studie av hur akademiska perspektiv kring bistånd återges i Dagens Nyheter under 20112012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay is a study of how different academic perspectives on international development aid is represented in one of Sweden’s most established quality newspapers – Dagens Nyheter, during the year of 2011. The study is founded in two academic disciplines: studies on aid and development, and media representations of science.

    The empirical study of Dagens Nyheter’s articles is based on a division of the academic research on aid and development into four different perspectives. This division is made in such a way that the first perspective has an essentially positive view on aid and development and the subsequent ones are each more critical than the previous.  The study finds that a large majority, 68 % of Dagens Nyheter’s articles on aid during 2011 are to be found in the first, essentially positive, perspective, and that the fourth perspective, that is critical of both aid and development as a goal, is not present in any.

    The findings of this study could be of relevance in explaining Swedish people’s views on aid which are generally uncritical. It could also serve as a starting point for further and more extended research on this subject.

  • 244.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Linnarsson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    The quest for publicness: political conflict about the organisation of tramways and telecommunication in Sweden, c. 1900–19202017In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 70-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores political conflicts about the organisation of public services in Sweden c. 1900–1920. The authors argue that political decisions play a vital role in shaping the political economy of public services. The case studies analysed are the political debates about the communalisation of the tramway system in Stockholm, and the nationalisation of Sweden’s last private telephone company. In both cases, the transfer of the service to public organisation was a lengthy process, ending in the late 1910s. This is explained using the concept of publicness. Drawing on three discursive chains, the argument is that the political development was affected by the politicians conception of the political community, the form of organisation and by perceptions of values such as equal access and modernity. In the case of the tramways, public organisation was seen as the best option to defend the public against corruption and self-interest. In the case of the telephones, free market competition was seen as a guarantee for an efficient and cost- effective service. The reason for this difference, is argued, was that the debate on the tramways articulated a clearer notion of publicness, where equal access and public opinion carried larger weight. 

  • 245.
    Hallengren, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Den amerikanska samhällsandan1981In: Värld och vetande, ISSN 0346-4873, Vol. 30, no 12, p. 362-376Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An inquiry into the American mind.

  • 246.
    Hallengren, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas.
    Optimism & Pessimism: Föredrag inför Stockholms Humanistiska Förbund 13 maj 19921992 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 247.
    Hamberg, Eva M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Studier i internationell migration1976Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 248.
    Hedborg, Mikaela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The EU and Legitimacy: To what extentis the EU legitimate and how can we measure legitimacy?2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The European Union is a unique political organisation whose legitimacy remains under constant debate. This thesis aspires to clarify whether or not the EU consitutetes a legitimate political system, an answer the research question: to what extent is the European Union democratically legitimate?

    The chosen methodology is based upon a positivist perspective. A literature study builds an initial theoretical framwork, whereafter a quantantive case study is performed, to ensure sufficient reliability and validity. Previsous research within the field of international realations and political science has focused on formal, social, input and output legitimacy. Organisational theory promotes pragmatic, moral and cognitive perspectives. This thesis integrates the previous reasearch info a holistic legitimacy framework. The case study concludes that the European Union is legitimate to a high estent. Interdisciplinary perspectives and empirical methodologies could benefit future research,

  • 249.
    Hedenborg, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Det gåtfulla folket: Barns villkor och uppfattningar av barnet i 1700-talets Stockholm1997Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Children are the "little people" and during the childhood it may be said that the child is supposed to acquire the attributes that will enable him or her to qualify for and enter adulthood. The purpose of this thesis is to illustrate the attributes that defined a child as a "proper" child of its times with particular reference to 18th century Stockholm. The definition of children and childhood used is based upon both the prevailing social and cultural constructions and children's physical and psychological development.

    An understanding and awareness of these conceptions can be reached through studying the then expressed ideas about what a proper childhood should entail and through studying the treatment of children. In order to arrive at and define the conceptions of childhood four questions were posed:

    • Were children seen as a separate group in relation to adults?
    • Were distinctions made between the group defined as children?
    • Were children ascribed certain responsibilities?
    • What did the socialization process include?

    In order to answer the questions several different source materials have been used: laws, population registers, school books, children's literature and enrolment lists and examination papers from public schools. Children have been treated differently from adults by the legal system (criminal law and the civil law) at least since the middle ages. In some areas the age limits marking the transition from child to adult have remained the same while others were raised. Economic regulations have been subject to the greatest change. A general trend is that childhood as a period of few rights and responsibilities, has been prolonged over time.

    The conceptions of children and childhood vary considerably, even within a particular society and period. Despite the fact that distinctions (based on age, sex and social class) were made between children, at least one group in society expressed a conception of children as being alike emphasising instead differences between children and adults. Here children were defined according to their cognitive and affective capacities.

    I argue that this continuity can in part be explained by the physical and psychological differences between children and adults. The changing conceptualization is more difficult to explain. A strict economic explanation based on extended resources or an increased demand for educated labour is not plausible as Stockholm's economy was stagnating between 1750-1850. It is more likely that difficulties within the labour market together with cultural changes (particularly secularization) influenced the conceptualization of children and childhood.

  • 250.
    Hegelund, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Can capital formation explain why unemployment has increased since the 1970s in the OECD countries?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper tests to what extent the increase of unemployment in many OECD countries since the 1970s may be explained by capital formation. Using an unbalanced macro panel dataset, this study also controls for a selection of variables pointed out by earlier research such as the unemployment replacement rate and the tax wedge. Novel contributions includes an exploration of heterogeneous correlations across countries and time, and potential interaction effects between capital formation and other explanatory variables. Results indicate that unemployment primarily can be explained by a decrease in capital formation and an increase in long-term real interest rates and the tax wedge. Results do not support interaction effects between capital formation and other variables. Results indicate that capital formation and real interest rate deserves more attention in discussions on unemployment.

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