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  • 201.
    Bikasha, Romiana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Hur jordbruk kan inkluderas som viktig faktor för biståndsorganisationers arbete för fredsbyggande – fallet i Sierra Leone.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Sierra Leone, ett konfliktdrabbat land, är idag en av världens fattigaste länder. Genom historien har Sierra Leone drabbats av krig, konflikt och maktskifte. Bland annat har Sierra Leone, innan dess grundande som stat år 1961, varit en brittisk koloni från år 1808. Efter att ha exploaterats på naturresurser för kolonialmaktens egna förmån, har det sierraleonska samhället genomlidit sociala, ekonomiska och politiska kriser. Detta resulterade bland annat i att landet genomgick ett tioårigt inbördeskrig som nådde sitt slut år 2002. Det var i de rurala områdena som krisen var som värst och även vart konflikten inleddes. Dessa områden har för det sierraleonska samhället alltid varit viktiga för småjordbrukare. Jordbruket har i överlag alltid varit viktigt eftersom denna sektorn tillför största delen av landets BNP. Tidigare studier visar att jordbruk och fredsbyggande samverkar, där bilaterala aktörer spelar en aktiv roll för att hjälpa Sierra Leone stabilisera landets sociala, politiska och ekonomiska system. Denna studien beskriver hur svenska biståndsorganisationen Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), och brittiska biståndsorganisationen Department for International Development (DFID), genomfört fredsbyggande insatser i Sierra Leone. Mer specifikt söker studien hur jordbruk är integrerat i det fredsbyggande arbetet. Två utvärderingsrapporter, från år 2008 av respektive biståndsorganisation, har analyserats. Det genom att söka, klassa och redovisa för hur nyckelorden ”fredsbyggande” och ”jordbruk” används och förekommer inom ramen av Sida:s och DFID:s insatser i Sierra Leone. Vartdera dokumentet, samt ett uppföljande dokument om Sidas samarbetsstrategi med Sierra Leone 2009–2013, kunde genom digital sökning se hur ofta och när nyckelorden förekom. Resultatet har visat att alla insatser utförs i fredsbyggande syfte men jordbruket är inte det huvudsakliga målet för att nå ett fredligt sierraleonskt samhälle. Dock förekommer det ofta att för att bland annat minska arbetslösheten, öka matsäkerhet samt minska fattigdom måste jordbruket spela en central roll i den sierraleonska statens arbete framöver. Analysen av resultatet visar liten inverkan av Sidas finansiella stöd till projekt genomförda av UNDP Sierra Leone. DFID kunde själva överse de insatser som genomfördes och visar därför bättre framgångar i det fredsbyggande arbetet. Studien diskuterar även varför jordbruk inte inkluderades i de direkta insatserna, efter år 2002, för fredsbyggandet i Sierra Leone. Det lämnar en undrande eftersom både Sida och DFID menar att jordbrukssektorn har en stor betydelse för Sierra Leone och dess framtida utveckling.

  • 202.
    Billebo, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Kvinnor, från dold till synlig aktör under älgjakt i Värmland2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Throughout history men and women have been given roles and obligations in the space of family and in the space of society. One of the changes when it comes to equality is that women to a larger extend take place in a male space. Elk hunt in Sweden is one of those spaces that have been dominated by men but where women now are taking part. In this qualitative interview study gender contract as well as historicity of word and language are taken into account from feministic and postcolonial theory perspectives to an analysis women’s participation and experience of elk hunt. The author points out that male connections are essential in the woman’s entry to the elk hunt. There is also a difference in how younger and older generation of women describe their participation in the elk hunt. The older women don’t describe themselves as an active part of the elk hunt even though they have the main responsibility of handling the meat while the younger women describe this as an active part of the elk hunt.  

  • 203.
    Billebo, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Re-colonization of Wolves in Sweden – Conflicting Rural Realities2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses the wolf (canis lupus) and human relations in Swedish landscapes. By addressing the change of ideas influencing land use and nature management during the time when the wolf was considered functionally extinct, two parallel realities appear that is shown to be something that the participants in this study relates and recognizes as their reality. These realities in turn can be understood against the background of environmental philosophy and the anthropocentric and eco-centric view of nature and the instrumental and intrinsic value that the nature may carry. Life story interview is used as a method to grasp these details in an individual’s perception of the wolf and nature. Since the wolf is considered to be as a division between rural and urban people, the study also analyses how people sharing the space with the wolf is referring to these dichotomies and how they identify with their surroundings. With contradictory, data a new way of conceptualize this is suggested: that urbanity and rurality is something that could be seen as performativity, something that you do rather than something that you are (Butler 2007). One might express identification with rural space but have an urban performativity i.e. working, living part-time, influenced by ideas represented in urban lifestyles. While the rural performativity is mirrored by living, working and sharing the ideas of how that landscape is used.

  • 204. Birdsall, Carolyn
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Capturing commemoration: Using mobile recordings within memory research.2018In: Mobile Media & Communication, ISSN 2050-1579, E-ISSN 2050-1587, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 266-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper details the contribution of mobile devices to capturing commemoration in action. It investigates the incorporation of audio and sound recording devices, observation, and note-taking into a mobile (auto)ethnographic research methodology, to research a large-scale commemorative event in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. On May 4, 2016, the sounds of a Silent March-through the streets of Amsterdam to Dam Square-were recorded and complemented by video grabs of the march's participants and onlookers. We discuss how the mixed method enabled a multilevel analysis across visual, textual, and aural layers of the commemorative atmosphere. Our visual data aided in our evaluation of the construction of collective spectacle, while the audio data necessitated that we venture into new analytic territory. Using Sonic Visualiser, we uncovered alternative methods of "reading" landscape by identifying different sound signatures in the acoustic environment. Together, this aural and visual representation of the May 4 events enabled the identification of spatial markers and the temporal unfolding of the Silent March and the national 2 minutes' silence in Amsterdam's Dam Square.

  • 205.
    Birnbaum, Simon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Sandström, Annica
    Tracing the sources of legitimacy: the impact of deliberation in participatory natural resource management2015In: Policy sciences, ISSN 0032-2687, E-ISSN 1573-0891, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 443-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is widely assumed that stakeholder participation has great potential to improve the perceived legitimacy of natural resource management (NRM) and that the deliberative-democratic qualities of participatory procedures are central to the prospects of success. However, attempts to measure the actual effects of deliberation on the perceived legitimacy of participatory NRM are rare. This article examines the links between deliberation and legitimacy in participatory NRM empirically by tracing the determinants of stakeholders' level of policy support and their views about procedural fairness. The study uses statistical methods to analyse survey data from a state-led initiative to develop new plans for ecosystem-based coastal and marine management through a participatory approach in five coastal areas in Sweden. We find that the perceived quality of deliberation had a positive impact on these aspects of legitimacy. However, both policy support and perceived procedural fairness were mainly driven by instrumental-substantive considerations rather than deliberative-democratic qualities of the process.

  • 206. Björk, Alexandra
    et al.
    Skånes, Helle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    The Need for Awareness of Semantic Plasticity in International Harmonization of Geographical Information: Seen from a Nordic Forest Classification Perspective2015In: Land Use and Land Cover Semantics: Principles, Best Practices and Prospects / [ed] Ola Ahlqvist, Dalia Varanka, Steffen Fritz, Krzysztof Janowicz, Boka Raton: CRC Press, 2015, p. 41-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this chapter is to address and clarify the important issues and challenges of semantic plasticity when it comes to forest classification and geographical information. Necessary improvements for international data harmonization and implementation are highlighted along with the need for increased awareness of the consequences for ecological modeling. We envisage a combination of thoroughly described metadata and controlled vocabularies as a means to ensure the future use of a wide range of regional and national classification systems in an ontological framework that enables crosswalks between classification systems and spatial comparisons between existing data sets. This would allow for a wide range of old, contemporary, and future data sets to be used together in landscape-related analyses.

  • 207.
    Björkander, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Lina myr - från våtmark till myrodlingslandskap: En studie om utveckling och ideologier om myrmarken med fokus på tidsperioden mellan 1920 och 19602012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie belyser maktspelet mellan konkurrerande intressen om landskapet, där olika idéer och ideologier men framförallt diskursiva maktförhållanden har en framträdande roll. Det övergripande syftet med studien är att bidra till en ökad förståelse för moderniseringen i det svenska landskapet, genom att beskriva och analysera förändringarna i markanvändning avseende våt- och myrmarker, med ett tidsfokus mellan ca. 1920-talet till 1960- talet. En fallstudie specifikt av Lina myr på Gotland avses genomföras, inklusive en diskursanalys av debatten mellan jordbruket och naturskyddet, med stöd i gotländska dagstidningar.[1]I studien ses det rationella jordbruket med ekonomiska drivkrafter tydligt dominera naturvårds-intressen, men visar också på en perspektivförskjutning mot naturskyddet över tid. Studien visar att och hur människors olika idéer och värderingar av landskapet haft stor betydelse för moderniseringens fortskridande samt att och hur det sociala landskapet kunnat ha en avgörande inverkan på det lokala utfallet i landskapet - med den diskursiva maktordningen ständigt närvarande. Studien har också resulterat i att en diskurs kunnat identifieras, diskursen om det moderna myrodlingslandskapet, vilken beskriver grunden till omvärderingar av våt- och myrlandskapen under senare delen av 1900-talet och möjligen kan bidra till en ökad förståelse kring varför debatten om våt- och myrmarker är sådan den är idag.

    [1]Gotlands Folkblad (GF), Gotlands Tidningar (GT) och Gotlands Allehanda (GA).

  • 208.
    Björklund, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Arrenden av stadsjord: exempel från 1800-talets Uppsala och Lund2014In: Att bruka men inte äga: arrende och annan nyttjanderätt till mark i svenskt jordbruk från medeltid till idag / [ed] Anders Wästfelt, Stockholm: Kungl. Skogs- och Lantbruksakademien, 2014, p. 132-150Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 209.
    Björklund, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Eating, sleeeping and dancing: Exploring the development of and function of town hotels in the 19th and 20th centuries2012In: Hotel Spaces: Urban and economic geographical perspectives on hotels and hotel developments / [ed] Lukas Smas, Stockholm: Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University , 2012, 1, p. 11-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 210.
    Björklund, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Historical Urban Agriculture: Food Production and Access to Land in Swedish Towns before 19002010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This doctoral thesis analyses the role of historical urban agriculture in a long-time perspective, through a combination of overarching surveys of Swedish towns and detailed studies of one town – Uppsala in east-central Sweden. The study shows how agricultural land – town land – of various sizes was donated to towns repeatedly during medieval times and in the 16th and 17th centuries. The study examines urban food production at three points in time, and concludes that grain production and, later, potato production as well was substantial in many towns, indicating high levels of urban self-sufficiency. This allows new perspectives concerning the interpretation of urban food provision, as urban dependency on countryside food production might have varied considerably between towns. In addition, the study shows how urban agriculture was connected to social welfare systems, in particular aiming at supporting urban widows. The results in this thesis provide an historical context to the increasing discussions about present-day urban agriculture globally, and identify a number of factors that may create or counteract opportunities for urban agriculture.  

  • 211.
    Björklund, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    I Arns landskap: om autenticitet och historiesyn i kulturarvsturismen2013In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, Vol. 2012, no 64, p. 8-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the use made by heritage tourism of fiction, authenticity and historical knowledge with a view to augmenting interest in the Västergötland heritage. It takes as its starting point Jan Guillous story of the medieval Knight Templar Arn Magnusson. The series of Arn novels was published between 1998 and 2001, and two feature films were made in 2007 and 2008. Research in recent decades has clearly shown the medieval period to have been one of extensive international contacts and influences, a point which Gulliou highlights. One might therefore expect heritage tourism surrounding Arn to have been informed by narratives concerning the multicultural society of the Middle Ages. The present article investigates this aspect, or which stories have recieved prominence in heritage tourism and which have been rejected. The article shows how authenticity has been used in these connections. The source material is based on the websites of seven tourism providers, and the marketing of Arn-related tourism has been studied at two points of time, namely 2009 and 2011/2012. The article also discusses the use of history and how historically related tourism hepls to shape out view of history.

    Marketed Arn tourism changed between 2009 and 2012, through the cutting back of experience-based authenticity in defence to a more object-based authenticity linked mainly to churches and monastic ruins. These historical remains, however, have not been used in heritage tourism as a means of describing the medieval network of international contacts, despite the pivotal role played by both churches and monasticism in these connections. As a result, the picture conveyed is founded on simplified stereotypes and affords a limited, partly inaccurate portrayal of medieval society. International influences and networks in that society could be used by heritage tourism for describing the dynamics of the medieval period, while at the same time indicating that societies have always been changed and developed under the impact of new influences.

  • 212.
    Björnsson, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Tillgänglighet i det offentliga rummet: - Om hur behovet hos personer med ADHD och autismspektrumtillstånd tillgodoses i kommunal fysisk planering2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Människor är olika, och har olika behov och intressen som måste vägas mot varandra i ett gemensamt samhälle. Syftet med uppsatsen är att undersöka om den kommunala fysiska planeringen av det offentliga rummet tar hänsyn till de neuropsykiatriska funktionsnedsättningarna ADHD och autismspektrumtillstånd, samt även hur planprocessen skulle kunna förändras för att öka tillgängligheten för nämnda grupp. Genom en fallstudie har utformningen av Täby torg undersökts utifrån hur tillgänglighet för personer med funktionsnedsättning beaktas i den kommunala planprocessen. Genom att granska styrdokument och planer som behandlar tillgänglighet och planering, samt även genom en enkätundersökning, kvalitativa intervjuer och en tillgänglighetsvandring har planprocessen undersökts. Tillgänglighet och funktionsnedsättning i allmänhet får litet utrymme i den kommunala planprocessen, och ADHD och autismspektrumtillstånd får i princip inget utrymme. Planprocessen måste tydliggöras och tillgänglighet måste föras in tidigt i processen, redan i översiktsplanen. Dessutom måste kunskapen om tillgänglighet öka hos tjänstemän och politiker som är involverade i den fysiska planeringen.

  • 213.
    Blandon, Abigayil
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Daw, Tim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Haider, L. Jamila
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Stone-Jovicich, Samantha
    Conceptualisations of fisheries development in Eastern Africa over time and between actors2019In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 107, article id UNSP 103512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the late-2000s, there has been a growing discussion around development aid approaches that reflect complexity concepts, such as adaptive and iterative project management. Fisheries development interventions deal with particularly complex realities. They also illustrate the changing problems and prescribed solutions of development paradigms over time, which have yet to be systematically analysed in a fisheries context. This study analyses documents from 11 World Bank fisheries development projects from 1975 to 2017 in Eastern Africa and interviews with 13 project designers and implementers. The conceptualisation of the fisheries development system - the perceived problems, causal links and proposed solutions - was captured in each document and interview. The documents showed a clear difference in the variables and consequential links most frequently mentioned before 1995 and after 2000, moving from a narrow sectoral approach with tangible interventions such as infrastructure, to a more holistic approach pushing for softer solutions such as stakeholder engagement. While this suggests a change in the institutional World Bank paradigm, the contemporary interviews were not necessarily consistent with this shift. Interviewees' conceptualisations also differed between each other, which may have implications for project implementation. A range of concepts related to complexity thinking were found and coded in both interviews and documents, particularly documents from recent World Bank projects. While this shows some evidence of actors and institutions incorporating complexity concepts into their narrative, concepts of adaptation, unpredictability, non-comparability and feedbacks were poorly reflected, showing the current gaps if approaches such as adaptive management are to be taken up.

  • 214. Blasiak, Robert
    et al.
    Durussel, Carole
    Pittman, Jeremy
    Sénit, Carole-Anne
    Petersson, Matilda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Yagi, Nobuyuki
    The role of NGOs in negotiating the use of biodiversity in marine areas beyond national jurisdiction2017In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 81, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2004, the UN General Assembly resolved to establish a working group to consider issues pertaining to the conservation and sustainable use of marine biodiversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction (BBNJ). The group met nine times between 2006 and 2015 before concluding its mandate by recommending the development of an international legally binding instrument on BBNJ under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Based on in-depth interviews with working group participants, this research examines how NGOs contributed to the working group process. Respondents from government delegations highlighted the usefulness of workshops and side events convened by NGOs, and the role of NGOs in bringing experts on technical issues particularly marine genetic resources and the sharing of benefits into the BBNJ negotiations. Respondents from both NGOs and government delegations emphasized the importance of fostering personal relationships in order to ensure a steady and constructive information flow. Social media efforts by NGOs were considered by some government representatives to have occasionally hampered open discussion, although they noted that conditions have improved. The lengthy working group process was marked by substantial fluctuation in participation, particularly within government delegations from developing states. Of 1523 individuals who participated in at least one of the working group meetings, only 45 attended more than half of the meetings, and 80% of these were representing NGOs or highly industrialized countries. Respondents felt that this comparatively small number of individuals provided a source of continuity that was crucial for moving the discussions forward.

  • 215.
    Blasiak, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Huang, Julia Hsiang-Wen
    Ishihara, Hiroe
    Kelling, Ingrid
    Lieng, Sopha
    Lindoff, Hannah
    Macfarlane, Alastair
    Minohara, Akane
    Miyakoshi, Yasuyulti
    Wisse, Herman
    Yagi, Nobuyuki
    Promoting diversity and inclusiveness in seafood certification and ecolabelling: Prospects for Asia2017In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 85, p. 42-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on the inputs by a range of experts who participated in the February 2017 international symposium on Designing the Future for Fisheries Certification Schemes at the University of Tokyo, this manuscript traces the origins of fisheries certification schemes, relevant developments, and remaining challenges from an Asian perspective. Over the past 20 years, seafood certification has emerged as a powerful tool for meeting growing demands for sustainable fisheries and aquaculture products. Despite broad consensus among countries regarding what constitute responsible fishing practices, the fisheries certification landscape remains uneven. A plethora of certification schemes has generated confusion among consumers and retailers, and capital-intensive certification schemes may be out-of-reach or impractical for some small-scale fisheries, particularly within the developing world. A recent initiative by the Global Sustainable Seafood Initiative (GSSI) is aiming to address the diversity within the certification landscape by creating a tool to benchmark certification schemes that are in line with the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and other relevant agreed FAO guidelines on fisheries, ecolabelling and aquaculture. Countries in Asia are among the world's top consumers and exporters of seafood, yet have faced some particular challenges with regard to seafood certification, underscoring the need for certification schemes that account for regional and local conditions and management practices, particularly with regard to small-scale fisheries.

  • 216.
    Blasiak, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Wabnitz, Colette C. C.
    Aligning fisheries aid with international development targets and goals2018In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 88, p. 86-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Official development assistance (ODA) is intended to spur progress and increase security among recipient countries. Billions in ODA have been allocated to fisheries to support nutrition and livelihoods worldwide. Yet, from 2010 to 2015, fisheries allocations decreased by > 30%, while grants for non-fisheries sectors increased by > 13%. Globally, grants for climate change adaptation and mitigation fell for fisheries, while rapidly increasing in sectors like agriculture and forestry. In Oceania, a region highly dependent on fisheries for food security and particularly vulnerable to climate change, disbursements fell by 44%. Grants for fisheries research, education and training fell in absolute numbers, and as a proportion of total ODA to fisheries. These findings are out of alignment with recent international commitments, including the Sustainable Development Goals (2015), The Future We Want (2012), and relevant Aichi Targets (2010). Risk aversion among donors; redirection of climate finance into other sectors; and allocation decisions based on factors unrelated to fisheries are identified as contributing to observed findings. Increasing the volume of fisheries-related ODA and better aligning it with international commitments could bring substantial co-benefits and contribute to the sustainable use of marine ecosystems, support sustainable trade and economic opportunities, increase adaptive capacity, and foster human well-being.

  • 217.
    Blasiak, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Wabnitz, Colette C. C.
    Daw, Tim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Univ, SRC, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berger, Michael
    Blandon, Abigayil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Carneiro, Goncalo
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Sweden.
    Davidson, Mary Frances
    Guggisberg, Solene
    Hills, Jeremy
    Mallin, Felix
    McManus, Edmund
    Ould-Chih, Karim
    Pittman, Jeremy
    Santos, Xose
    Westlund, Lena
    Wetterstrand, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Wiegler, Kai
    Towards greater transparency and coherence in funding for sustainable marine fisheries and healthy oceans2019In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 107, article id UNSP 103508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This final manuscript in the special issue on Funding for ocean conservation and sustainable fisheries is the result of a dialogue aimed at connecting lead authors of the special issue manuscripts with relevant policymakers and practitioners. The dialogue took place over the course of a two-day workshop in December 2018, and this coda manuscript seeks to distil thinking around a series of key recurring topics raised throughout the workshop. These topics are collected into three broad categories, or needs: 1) a need for transparency, 2) a need for coherence, and 3) a need for improved monitoring of project impacts. While the special issue sought to collect new research into the latest trends and developments in the rapidly evolving world of funding for ocean conservation and sustainable fisheries, the insights collected during the workshop have helped to highlight remaining knowledge gaps. Therefore, each of the three needs identified within this manuscript is followed by a series of questions that the workshop participants identified as warranting further attention as part of a future research agenda. The crosscutting nature of many of the issues raised as well as the rapid pace of change that characterizes this funding landscape both pointed to a broader need for continued dialogue and study that reaches across the communities of research, policy and practice.

  • 218.
    Blommé, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Förändrade behov på en bostad: Icke-normativa hushålls behov2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna uppsats syftar till att få en ökad förståelse kring vad olika boendekonstellationer anser vara viktig i dess boendesituation, för att vidare sedan diskutera hur väl dessa avspeglar sig på dagens bostäder. Studiens frågeställning formulerades enligt följande, vilka behov finner icke-normativa boendekonstellationer i sin bostad och hur väl avspeglas dessa i bostäder idag? Det empiriska materialet är insamlat genom kvalitativa intervjuer, gjorda med personer boendes i kollektiv, som inneboende samt ensamma. Gällande studiens resultat kan det konstateras att aspekterna av privatliv och socialt liv kan ses som två grundpelare kring behoven. Varpå personer boendes i kollektiv finner dem bägge som viktiga, medan man som inneboende kan konstateras finna privatlivet som viktigt, något som man som ensamboende inte anser lika betydande utan uttrycker istället ett större behov av ett socialt liv. 

  • 219.
    Blommé, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Hållbar stadsutveckling: Studier av de projekt som beviljats stöd från Delegation för hållbara städer mellan åren 2008-20122014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 220. Blythe, Jessica
    et al.
    Silver, Jennifer
    Evans, Louisa
    Armitage, Derek
    Bennett, Nathan J.
    Moore, Michele-Lee
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Victoria, Canada.
    Morrison, Tiffany H.
    Brown, Katrina
    The Dark Side of Transformation: Latent Risks in Contemporary Sustainability Discourse2018In: Antipode, ISSN 0066-4812, E-ISSN 1467-8330, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 1206-1223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of transformation is gaining traction in contemporary sustainability debates. New ways of theorising and supporting transformations are emerging and, so the argument goes, opening exciting spaces to (re)imagine and (re)structure radically different futures. Yet, questions remain about how the term is being translated from an academic concept into an assemblage of normative policies and practices, and how this process might shape social, political, and environmental change. Motivated by these questions, we identify five latent risks associated with discourse that frames transformation as apolitical and/or inevitable. We refer to these risks as the dark side of transformation. While we cannot predict the future of radical transformations towards sustainability, we suggest that scientists, policymakers, and practitioners need to consider such change in more inherently plural and political ways.

  • 221.
    Bodelsson, Sarah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    "Real choice" as a path to 'reproductive justice'?: Exploring asylum-seeking and migrant m/others' visibility and representation within the Irish 'pro-choice' movement2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    I have explored, from a feminist postcolonial standpoint, the approaches of six ‘pro-choice’ and ‘reproductive rights’ groups in Dublin in Ireland. Through interviews, participatory observations, and studying their websites, I have sought to discover the dominant discourses, a ‘reproductive choice’ or a ‘reproductive justice’ approach, within these organisations’ work. Furthermore, I have sought to investigate the visibility and representation of migrant and asylum-seeking women’s bodies and experiences within the movement. My findings show a continued focus on ‘choice’ and abortion rights, and a general absence of difference and diversity, in particular around ‘race’, on the organisations’ websites and in terms of representation. Yet, the interviews show an ambition for further collaboration with migrant and anti-racist organisations, and attempts to broaden their approach, making it more inclusive and encapsulating, not through a “justice” approach, but rather through talking about “real choice” and the importance of “solidarity” with marginalised women. 

  • 222.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. The Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Wulff, Cornelia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    The relation between office type and workplace conflict: A gender and noise perspective2015In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 42, p. 161-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This exploratory study aimed to investigate the impact of the office design on workplace conflicts, with a special attention to noise in the office. A gender perspective was applied. The sample consisted of 5229 employees from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health 2010 (SLOSH), working in different office types. In the multivariate analysis office type was used as the explanatory variable with adjustments for age, supervisory position and labour market sector. Analysis stratified for gender was used. Among women a significant impact of office type per se on workplace conflicts was found, but not among men. For women several office types differed significantly from the cell-office with regard to prevalence of conflicts during the past two years, but for men only the combi-office differed from the cell-office. Noise had an impact on workplace conflicts, but is not the only explanatory factor since the effect of office type remained also after adjustment for noise in multivariate analyses. Other environmental factors inherent in the office type might thus explain the occurrence of conflicts.

  • 223.
    Bodin, Örjan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Duke University, USA.
    Nohrstedt, D.
    Formation and performance of collaborative disaster management networks: Evidence from a Swedish wildfire response2016In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 41, p. 183-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural disasters present a multitude of entangled societal challenges beyond the realms and capacities of single actors. Prior research confirms that effective collaboration is of critical significance to address such complex collective action problems. Yet, studies rarely investigate if patterns of collaboration are appropriately aligned ('fit') with how different challenges (tasks) are interdependent, or how levels of fit influence collective action performance. We develop a set of hypotheses specifying what constitutes a good fit between collaborative networks and task interdependency. Using unique empirical data from the response to a major wildfire in Sweden, we examine how individual actors select collaboration partners and tasks during the formation the collaborative crisis response network. Then we test if levels of fit in the established network influence performance. We show that patterns of actor and task interdependency influence the formation of collaborative networks and that a good fit seems to be associated with more effective collaboration. Our data even suggest that a good fit is more important for performance than actors' prior crisis management experience and level of professionalization. Further, we show that actors only partially engage in actor-task configurations conducive to high performance. Our study probes the limitations of simplified accounts of collaborative disaster management by enabling more precise and theoretically informed empirical inquiries regarding the mechanisms that shape the structure and performance of collaborative networks.

  • 224.
    Bodin, Örjan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Duke University, USA.
    Robins, Garry
    McAllister, Ryan R. J.
    Guerrero, Angela M.
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Tengö, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Lubell, Mark
    Theorizing benefits and constraints in collaborative environmental governance: a transdisciplinary social-ecological network approach for empirical investigations2016In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When environmental processes cut across socioeconomic boundaries, traditional top-down government approaches struggle to effectively manage and conserve ecosystems. In such cases, governance arrangements that foster multiactor collaboration are needed. The effectiveness of such arrangements, however, depends on how well any ecological interdependencies across governed ecosystems are aligned with patterns of collaboration. This inherent interdisciplinary and complex problem has impeded progress in developing a better understanding of how to govern ecosystems for conservation in an increasingly interconnected world. We argue for the development of empirically informed theories, which are not only able to transcend disciplinary boundaries, but are also explicit in taking these complex social-ecological interdependences into account. We show how this emerging research frontier can be significantly improved by incorporating recent advances in stochastic modeling of multilevel social networks. An empirical case study from an agricultural landscape in Madagascar is reanalyzed to demonstrate these improvements.

  • 225.
    Bodström, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Albybygd2006In: NoBo – Boken om Norra Botkyrka, Mångkulturellt centrum, Tumba , 2006, p. 93-105Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 226.
    Bodström, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    (Effects of Public Land Leasing on Housing): (Stockholm – A Pattern of Welfare?)2006In: (A Review on Public Land Leasing System and its Feasibility in Korea), Housing & Urban Research Institute, Soeul , 2006, p. 314-348Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 227.
    Bodström, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences.
    Marken, makten och bostäderna: markanvisning inom mark- och bostadspolitiken i Stockholm1994Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Markanvisning för bostäder i Stockholm efter 1980. Markanvisningarna har analyserats mot bakgrund av de hundraåriga traditionella målen i ideologin bakom samhälleligt markinnehav. Översiktligt vidgas också perspektivet geografiskt mot andra urbana områden och historiskt mot sekelskiftet.

  • 228.
    Bohman, Brita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law. University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Åbo Akademi University, Finlande.
    Lessons from the regulatory approaches to combat eutrophication in the Baltic Sea region2018In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 98, p. 227-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ever since the problem of eutrophication emerged, many approaches have been tested within the Helsinki Convention regime to reduce the discharges of nutrients to the sea. Despite important reductions in the levels of discharge since the 1970s, the nutrient loads to the sea are still significant and need to be further reduced. At the same time, it has become increasingly difficult to reduce the pollution that causes eutrophication. This difficulty is due to the complex nature of most pollution sources currently and the diffuse releases mainly related to agricultural activities and animal production. The regulatory structure for eutrophication in the Baltic Sea region has, however, adjusted rather well to these circumstances. The development over the past decade, since the introduction of the MSFD and the BSAP, progressed in adjusting the whole HELCOM regime to an ecosystem approach. Structures were created that embrace the new demands on the regulation through this approach. These structures put additional challenges on the perception of law, the general functions of the legal system, and how to assess and enforce compliance. The new structures not only create a kind of flexibility and openness to new regulatory approaches and soft law measures, but also combine law with governance and bridge the area of strict legal regulation with voluntary measures and projects. This combination of law with governance completes the overall picture of measures and approaches, but makes the line between law, extra-legal measures and non-governmental actors or organizations difficult to detect.

  • 229. Bokhorst, Stef
    et al.
    Pedersen, Stine Hojlund
    Brucker, Ludovic
    Anisimov, Oleg
    Bjerke, Jarle W.
    Brown, Ross D.
    Ehrich, Dorothee
    Essery, Richard L. H.
    Heilig, Achim
    Ingvander, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Johansson, Cecilia
    Johansson, Margareta
    Jonsdottir, Ingibjorg Svala
    Inga, Niila
    Luojus, Kari
    Macelloni, Giovanni
    Mariash, Heather
    McLennan, Donald
    Rosqvist, Gunhild Ninis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. University of Bergen, Norway.
    Sato, Atsushi
    Savela, Hannele
    Schneebeli, Martin
    Sokolov, Aleksandr
    Sokratov, Sergey A.
    Terzago, Silvia
    Vikhamar-Schuler, Dagrun
    Williamson, Scott
    Qiu, Yubao
    Callaghan, Terry V.
    Changing Arctic snow cover: A review of recent developments and assessment of future needs for observations, modelling, and impacts2016In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 516-537Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Snow is a critically important and rapidly changing feature of the Arctic. However, snow-cover and snowpack conditions change through time pose challenges for measuring and prediction of snow. Plausible scenarios of how Arctic snow cover will respond to changing Arctic climate are important for impact assessments and adaptation strategies. Although much progress has been made in understanding and predicting snow-cover changes and their multiple consequences, many uncertainties remain. In this paper, we review advances in snow monitoring and modelling, and the impact of snow changes on ecosystems and society in Arctic regions. Interdisciplinary activities are required to resolve the current limitations on measuring and modelling snow characteristics through the cold season and at different spatial scales to assure human well-being, economic stability, and improve the ability to predict manage and adapt to natural hazards in the Arctic region.

  • 230. Bong, Indah Waty
    et al.
    Moeliono, Moira
    Wong, Grace Yee
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Brockhaus, Maria
    What is success? Gaps and trade-offs in assessing the performance of traditional social forestry systems in Indonesia2019In: Forest and Society, ISSN 2549-4724, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the growing interest in social forestry (SF), how much do we understand the social, economic and environmental outcomes and the conditions that enable SF to perform? In this article, we use a content analysis of literature on existing traditional SF practiced throughout Indonesia. It examines the outcomes of these systems and the conditions that enabled or hindered these outcomes to understand possible causal relations and changing dynamics between these conditions and SF performance. We discuss the gaps in how SF is assessed and understood in the literature to understand the important aspects of traditional SF that are not captured or that are lost when the diverse traditional systems are converted into other land uses. It aims to understand the potential trade-offs in the State's push for formalizing SF if these aspects continue to be ignored.

  • 231.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Conceptualizing power to study social-ecological interactions2016In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    My aim is to conceptualize power using social science theory and to demonstrate why and how the concept of power can complement resilience studies and other analyses of social-ecological interaction. Social power as a scientific concept refers to the ability to influence both conduct and context. These two dimensions of power (conduct and context) can be observed by differentiating between various sources of power, including, for example, technology or mental power. The relevance of the conceptualization of power presented here is illustrated with the example of fire as a source of social-ecological power. I conclude by discussing how attention to power can help to address issues of social justice and responsibility in social-ecological interactions.

  • 232.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Ottosen, K. M.
    Ferreira, A. S. A.
    Richter, A.
    Rogers, L. A.
    Pedersen, M. W.
    Kokkalis, A.
    Bardarson, H.
    Bonanomi, S.
    Butler, W.
    Diekert, F. K.
    Fouzai, N.
    Holma, M.
    Holt, R. E.
    Kvile, K. O.
    Malanski, E.
    Macdonald, J. I.
    Nieminen, E.
    Romagnoni, G.
    Snickars, M.
    Weigel, B.
    Woods, P.
    Yletyinen, Johanna K
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Whittington, J. D.
    What are the major global threats and impacts in marine environments? Investigating the contours of a shared perception among marine scientists from the bottom-up.2015In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 60, p. 197-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine scientists broadly agree on which major processes influence the sustainability of marine environments worldwide. Recent studies argue that such shared perceptions crucially shape scientific agendas and are subject to a confirmation bias. Based on these findings a more explicit engagement with scientists' (shared) perceptions of global change in marine environments is called for. This paper takes stock of the shared understanding in marine science of the most pertinent, worldwide threats and impacts that currently affect marine environments. Using results from an email survey among leading academics in marine science this article explores if a shared research agenda in relation to global change in marine environments exists. The analysis demonstrates that marine scientists across disciplines are largely in agreement on some common features of global marine change. Nevertheless, the analysis also highlights where natural and social scientists diverge in their assessment. The article ends discussing what these findings imply for further improvement of interdisciplinary marine science.

  • 233.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Oslo, Norway.
    Valman, Matilda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Björkvik, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    A sea of many colours - How relevant is Blue Growth for capture fisheries in the Global North, and vice versa?2018In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 87, p. 340-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blue Growth is a relatively new term that is meant to realize economic growth based on the exploitation of marine resources, while at the same time preventing their degradation, overuse, and pollution. This article discusses the relevance and usefulness of this new concept for the development of capture fisheries, a sector where growth largely seems impossible without ecological devastation. An analytical distinction between intensive and extensive growth is used to argue that certain development trajectories of capture fisheries might qualify as Blue Growth. Such trajectories of growth are illustrated with the development of the Swedish bleak roe trawl fishery in the Bothnian Bay and Norwegian whitefish fishery in the Barents Sea. Comparison of the cases highlights aspects that Blue Growth advocates might want to include if they choose to consider capture fisheries as a relevant economic activity. These aspects include: a) adding value through certification; b) technological development to make more efficient use of resources used up in the fishing operation, and to upgrade their fish as commodity; and c) specialization.

  • 234.
    Borg, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Bostadspolitiken och hyressektorn i Europa2013In: Fronesis, ISSN 1404-2614, no 42-43, p. 171-177Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 235.
    Borg, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Housing Deprivation in Europe: On the Role of Rental Tenure Types2015In: Housing, Theory and Society, ISSN 1403-6096, E-ISSN 1651-2278, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 73-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the link between housing tenure typesand housing deprivation in 26 European countries. Empirical analyses are based onEuropean Union Survey on Income and Living Conditions 2007, enabling comparisons ofdeprivation across a large set of countries. A multilevel framework is employed. It is hypothesizedthat the organization of the rental sector inherently produces different housing marketdynamics, which is likely to affect housing deprivation rates. An integrated rental sector coveringbroader parts of the population is expected to reduce the risk of housing deprivation.Housing deprivation is measured in terms of experiencing overcrowding and while also sufferingany of the following accommodation problems: a leaking roof; no bath/shower; no indoortoilet; or a dwelling considered too dark. The findings indicate a negative association betweenthe size of the rental sector and the prevalence of housing deprivation. The organization of therental sector appears crucial and only an integrated rental sector encompassing broader partsof the population significantly reduces the prevalence of housing deprivation and its components.This association is robust in terms of confounding factors at the individual-level andcentral country-level contextual variables.

  • 236.
    Borg, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Housing, poverty and the welfare state: Spatial distribution of tenure types and its effects on housing deprivation, unemployment and residualisation2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An important question that has caused much academic debate is how to best organise the welfare state system to combat poverty and social exclusion. Much such research is focused on how to combat income poverty through core areas in the welfare state. This dissertation widens the perspective to include housing as a part of the welfare state and it represents an attempt to study poverty outcomes beyond income measures. In doing this, the dissertation uses power resource theory to understand welfare state change and the design of institutions in terms of housing tenures, and shows how this design might affect individual outcomes. Thus, the overall aim of this dissertation is to gain knowledge of the principles that underpin the design and organisation of the housing market in terms of tenure types and to understand the ways in which this design might affect the well-being of individuals and the society as a whole. The dissertation consists of an introductory essay and four papers. The introductory essay presents my theoretical approach and methodology. It also summarises the papers and discusses my main findings.

    Paper I analyses the extent to which the organisation of the rental sector may explain cross-national differences in the prevalence of housing deprivation. Using a multilevel framework on survey data covering 26 European countries, I find that a large and integrated rental sector significantly reduces the prevalence of housing deprivation across EU countries. The organisation of the rental sector appears to be crucial when it comes to reducing poverty and social exclusion in terms of housing insufficiencies.

    Paper II continues the quest to find explanations of the variations in the prevalence of housing deprivation in Europe. Our results develop the findings of Paper I. We find that a high proportion of outright owners is positively associated with housing deprivation. This is suggested to reflect the historical and political processes that affect the housing markets in eastern and southern European housing regimes.

    Paper III investigates a puzzle regarding the relationship between the extent of home-ownership and unemployment. At the macro level, more home-owners indicate higher unemployment rates, while home-owners in general are less unemployed. What can explain this? In this paper, we show that regions with high home-ownership also tend to be regions with small labour markets, which affects the efficiency of matching on the labour market.

    Paper IV turns to the process of residualisation, a process which can be described as when the public or social rental sectors become dominated by low-income households. For Sweden, this process is of key interest since the public housing sector aims to be universal and is not directed towards any specific income group. The results indicate a clear trend towards increasing residualisation. The trend is most pronounced in sparsely populated municipalities, while the public rental sector is quite mixed in larger cities and municipalities near larger cities.

    This dissertation offers a contribution to the field of housing by showing that power resource theory may be used to understand institutional design in terms of tenure types, and that this design also affects individual outcomes. Moreover, power resource theory is presented as a viable theory to understand geographical variation in institutional design across and within countries.

     

  • 237.
    Borg, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Universalism lost? The magnitude and spatial pattern of residualisation in the public housing sector in Sweden 1993–20122019In: Journal of Housing and the Built Environment, ISSN 1566-4910, E-ISSN 1573-7772, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 405-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important feature of the Swedish housing system is universalism, meaning that housing provision should encompass broad income groups and thus not only be directed towards poor households. Considering the recent decades of marketization and liberalisation of the Swedish housing system, concerns have been raised whether universalism remains as a key feature of the Swedish housing system. The aim of this paper is to improve our understanding of processes of residualisation in Sweden. This is a process whereby the public housing sector is becoming dominated by low income households. To describe, analyse and understand processes of residualisation in Sweden and across regions, I use a novel Index of Residualisation and longitudinal register data covering the period 1993–2012. The results indicate that the rental sector as a whole is undergoing a process of residualisation, but that there are clear variations in the magnitude of residualisation across regions. The process of residualisation is most pronounced in sparsely populated regions. The relative size of the public rental sector is a key factor to consider in order to understand the diverging trends. Regions with smaller rental sectors are associated with higher levels of residualisation, indicating that public housing may have the function of social housing in these regions.

  • 238.
    Borg, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Where to house the poor? The role of public housing in Sweden 1993-2012Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing concerns have been raised about the tendency for the public housing sector in Sweden to become dominated by low-income households, thus undergoing a process of residualisation. If this is happening, the universal character of municipal housing companies offering decent housing for all income groups is challenged. The aim of this paper is to describe and analyse the magnitude of residualisation and to discuss possible implications for the Swedish housing model using a novel Index of Residualisation and longitudinal register data covering the period 1993-2012. The results indicate that the rental sector as a whole is undergoing a process of residualisation, but that there are clear variations in the magnitude of residualisation across types of municipalities. This might suggest that well-off households have turned to private ownership. The process of residualisation is most pronounced in sparsely populated regions. The relative size of the public rental sector is a key factor to consider in order to understand the diverging trends. Regions with smaller rental sectors are associated with higher levels of residualisation, indicating that public housing may have the function of social housing in these regions.

  • 239.
    Borg, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Brandén, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Do high levels of home-ownership create unemployment? Introducing the missing link between housing tenure and unemployment2018In: Housing Studies, ISSN 0267-3037, E-ISSN 1466-1810, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 501-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that the proportion of home-owners in a region tend to be positively associated with the unemployment levels in that region. In this paper, we introduce a missing piece of explaining this commonly found pattern. By analysing individual-level population register data on Sweden, we jointly examine the effects of micro- and macro-level home-ownership on individuals’ unemployment. The findings indicate that even though home-owners have a lower probability of being unemployed, there is a penalty for both renters and home-owners on unemployment in regions with high home-ownership rates. Differences in mobility patterns cannot explain this pattern. However, when labour market size is considered, the higher probability of unemployment in high home-owning regions is drastically reduced. This suggests that high home-ownership regions tend to coincide with small labour markets, affecting the job matching process negatively.

  • 240.
    Borg, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Guio, Anne-Catherine
    Poor housing conditions in the European Union: Micro and macro level determinantsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this paper was to study the variations in prevalence of housing deprivation, overcrowding and housing cost overburden between EU countries and to examine to what extent these between-country differences could be explained by measurable factors, either at the individual level or at the country level. We applied a multilevel framework on EU-SILC survey data, to be able to test the explanatory power of both micro level determinants (low income, household type, tenure status, education, joblessness etc.) and of macro level factors, such as national income, structure of housing market, welfare system, etc. Our results regarding the micro level indicated that factors related to permanent income, high costs/needs, and household size/type influenced the risk of facing poor housing conditions in a similar way as has been found for social and material deprivation. Moreover, there was a consistency among micro level risk factors across all dimensions of poor housing conditions. Our results regarding the macro level pointed to the importance of the historical and institutional factors that affect the availability and quality of housing in Eastern and Southern regimes, notably with a large proportion of outright home-ownership. Our results also shed new light on the impact of national wealth on housing deprivation. Despite a clear negative relationship between macro-economic affluence and housing deprivation, GDP or median income did not significantly impact housing deprivation once differences in micro drivers, notably household income, were taken into account.

  • 241.
    Borgström, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Zachrisson, Anna
    Eckerberg, Katarina
    Funding ecological restoration policy in practice-patterns of short-termism and regional biases2016In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 52, p. 439-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With continuous degradation of ecosystems combined with the recognition of human dependence on functioning ecosystems, global interest in ecological restoration (ER) has intensified. From being merely a nature conservation measure, it is today advanced as a way to improve ecosystem functions, mitigate biodiversity loss and climate change, as well as renew human-nature relationships. However, ER is a contested and diversified term used in research, policy and practice. Substantive public funding is allocated towards this end worldwide, but little is known about its concrete purpose and coverage, as well as what decides its allocation. With inspiration from environmental funding literature we analyze the case of Sweden to provide the first national overview of public ER funding. The understudied political context of ER is thus addressed but also regional variation in funding allocation. A database of all national government funding programs between 1995 and 2011 that included projects and sub-programs aiming at practical ER measures was created. Results show that ER activities counted for 11% (130 million USD) of the total government nature conservation funding. Water environments were highly prioritized, which can be explained by economic and recreational motives behind ER. The ER funding was unevenly distributed geographically, not related to either environmental need or population size, but rather to regional administrative capacity. It was also found to be small scale and short term, and hence part of a general trend of project proliferation of public administration which runs contrary to ecosystem based management. As ER is not yet a long-term investment in Sweden, commonly seen as an environmental lead state, we expect even less and more short-term ER funding in other countries.

  • 242.
    Bork, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Framtidens deponier: Sluttäckning och omvandling av Sveriges nedlagda soptippar i ett internationellt perspektiv2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Soptippar har funnits länge och är den vanligaste avfallshanteringsmetoden i världen. Denna metod är inte bara miljöfarlig på grund av föroreningar som utsöndras i marken, utan också föråldrad när man nu kan återvinna och förbränna avfall för att utvinna energi. Sedan 2002 respektive 2005 har lagar nu införts i Sverige för att lokalt förhindra deponering av organiskt. brännbart och farligt material och därmed minska skadlig miljöpåverkan. Det långsiktiga målet är att förhindra deponering helt och hållet som avfallshanteringsmetod i Sverige. Begreppen Sacrifice zones och Environmental justice är relevanta teoretiska perspektiv för denna uppsats. Sacrifice zones fokuserar på områden som "offras" för en viss användning, t.ex. sopor, och ger därför en kontext till varför deponier finns och hur de förhåller sig till andra områden som drar nytta av sacrifice zones. Detta hänger samman med environmental justice började som en social rörelse som fokuserar på en rättvis fördelning av miljöresurser och bördor. 

    Genom att intervjua tjänstemän från tre olika kommuner runt om i Sverige samt två personer från statliga myndigheter ska jag i den här uppsatsen diksutera vad farorna kan vara runt deponier, farorna runt att omvandla en deponi och om det finns någon typisk användning efter sanering. Jag kommer även använda mig av en dokumentstudie som bidrar till jämförelsen.

    Resultaten visar att ekonomiska resurser spelar roll då kommunen oftast har en viss ambition för området. Lokalisering och tillgänglighet är viktigt när platsen är central då det finns mer efterfrågan och behov att omvandla området. Sluttäckningen av en deponi tar lång tid, därför finns det också gott om tid att diskutera återanvändningen utifrån vad man hittar under saneringen. Deponier utgör stora miljörisker och släpper ut många föroreningar i luften och i makrne, såsom metangas och lakvatten. Men trots faran är det inte så många som vet vad deponier är och hur de utgör en risk. Därför är denna uppsats viktig, för att vara informativ och ge kunskap.      

  • 243.
    Borén, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Bonniers uppslagsbok2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I Bonniers uppslagsbok (2007) har författaren skrivit uppslagsorden inom ämnesområdet svensk geografi (från I till Ö).

  • 244.
    Borén, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Book review of Cultural Landscapes of Post-Socialist Cities: Representation of Power and Needs2009In: European Spatial Research and Policy, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 109-110Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 245.
    Borén, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Fem år med Geografiska Notiser2012In: Geografiska Notiser, ISSN 0016-724X, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 3-5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 246.
    Borén, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Hur ska vi rädda centrum?: forskare analyserar2008Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikeln ställer två platsbegrepp mot varandra och argumenterar för att planeringsfrågor som rör Hökarängens centrum med fördel kan lösas genom att arbeta i samhällsprocessernas riktning vad gäller rörlighetens utveckling i det senmoderna samhället. Argumentet tar analytisk sats i ett relationellt platsbegrepp.

  • 247.
    Borén, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Introduktion - urban utveckling och interaktion2017In: Urban utveckling och interaktion / [ed] Thomas Borén, Stockholm: Svenska sällskapet för antropologi och geografi , 2017, p. 7-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 248.
    Borén, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Kreativitet, kultur och hållbarhet i strategisk planering: en innehållsanalys av Vision 2030 i Stockholm2013In: Geografiska Notiser, ISSN 0016-724X, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 74-87Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 249.
    Borén, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Meeting-places of transformation: urban identity, spatial representations and local politics in post-Soviet St Petersburg2009Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study develops a model for understanding spatial change and the construction of space as a meeting-place, and then employs it in order to show an otherwise little-known picture of (sub-)urban Russia and its transformation from Soviet times to today. The model is based on time-geographic ideas of time-space as a limited resource in which forces of various kinds struggle for access and form space in interaction with each other. Drawing on cultural semiotics and the concepts of lifeworld and system, the study highlights the social side of these space-forming forces. Based on a long-term fieldwork (participant observation) in Ligovo/Uritsk, a high-rise residential district developed around 1970 and situated on the outskirts of Sankt-Peterburg (St Petersburg), the empirical material concerns processes of urban identity, spatial representations and local politics. The study explicates three codes used to form the image of the city that all relate to its pre-Revolutionary history, two textual strategies of juxtaposition in creating the genius loci of a place, and a discussion of what I call Soviet "stiff landscape" in relation to Soviet mental and ordinary maps of the urban landscape. Moreover, the study shows that the newly implemented self-governing municipalities have not realised their potential as political actors in forming local space, which raises questions on the democratisation of urban space. Finally, the study argues that the model that guides the research is a tool that facilitates the application of the world-view of time-geography and the epistemology of the landscape of courses in concrete research. The study ends with an attempt to generalise spatial change in four types.

  • 250.
    Borén, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Urban Geography: A Global Perspective2007In: Geografiska Annaler Series B: Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, Vol. 89B, no 1, p. 80-82Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Review of Urban Geography: A Global Perspective (2nd edition) by Michael Pacione (Routledge, New York. 2005.).

2345678 201 - 250 of 1747
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