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  • 201. Karlander, David
    et al.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    The origin of semilingualism: Nils-Erik Hansegård and the cult of the mother tongue2023In: Journal of Sociolinguistics, ISSN 1360-6441, E-ISSN 1467-9841, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 506-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Semilingualism’ is one of the most questionable theories produced in the language sciences. Yet, little is known about its origins. We present a critical account of the history of semilingualism, tracing its roots in the work of Nils Erik Hansegård, (1918–2002), inaugural chair of Sámi at Umeå University (1975–1979), who developed a theory of semilingualism (halvspråkighet) in the 1960s. We show how Hansegård theorized semilingualism using ideas from Nazi German linguistics, producing an unforgiving theory of linguistic pathology directed at minoritized bilinguals in Sweden's far north. 

  • 202.
    Kashevarova, Yulia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Trilingual spoken word recognition: Interlingual competition from one or two non-target languages in a sentence context2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Persistent non-target language co-activation in spoken and visual language comprehension has been found both at the word-level and at the level of a sentence, although in the latter case, sentence bias has been observed to modulate the co-activation which can create lexical competition. In the case of trilingual speakers, both non-target languages may potentially compete with the third language (L3). The current study aimed to investigate how cross-linguistic (or interlingual) competition across three languages is modulated by sentence bias while listening to the L3. Of particular interest was whether top-down sentential information would modulate not only single but also double bottom-up driven cross-linguistic competition. 

    A picture-word recognition task was given to 44 L1 Russian L2 English late L3 Swedish learners, listening to Swedish sentences online while their reaction times and accuracy were collected. The results revealed shorter processing times and higher accuracy for high- compared to low-constraint sentences and overall lower accuracy (and slower reactions in high-constraint sentences) when an L1 Russian competitor’s translation phonological onset overlapped with a Swedish target word. The findings suggest that when trilinguals were processing their L3 speech, top-down information from the sentential context did not modulate the bottom-up guided L1 phonological competition. However, the effect of an L2 English L3 Swedish cognate competitor was not significant. This pattern of results is in line with BLINCS (Shook & Marian, 2013), which assumes gradual co-activation decay (i.e., a strong cross-linguistic competition effect might be observed in the end-course reaction times) and a direct visual information influence on linguistic processing. It is, however, inconsistent with the BIA+ model (Dijkstra and Van Heuven, 2002), which predicts that a high-constraint sentence context can modulate cross-linguistic competition, particularly, at later processing stages. 

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    Kashevarova.2023.Trilingual spoken word recognition
  • 203.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Foreword2022In: Handbook of Research on Teaching in Multicultural and Multilingual Contexts / [ed] Erasmos Charamba, IGI Global, 2022, p. xxiii-xivChapter in book (Other academic)
    The full text will be freely available from 2024-12-25 19:25
  • 204.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Making absences present: Language policy from below2020In: Multilingual Margins, ISSN 2221-4216, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 69-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A commentary on the Special Issue ‘Grassroots participation and agency in bilingual education processes in Mozambique’. This Special Issue continues the decolonial task of making absences present: of bringing into the frame the linguistic and other knowledges traditionally excluded from educational policy and curricula, and pointing the way to more ethical and equitable forms of knowledge exchange among community members, learners, teachers, researchers, and state actors.

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    Making absences present Kerfoot
  • 205.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Making and Shaping Participatory Spaces: Resemiotization and Citizenship Agency in South Africa2018In: The Multilingual Citizen: Towards a Politics of Language for Agency and Change / [ed] Lisa Lim, Christopher Stroud, Lionel Wee, Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters, 2018, p. 263-288Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In South Africa, democratic consolidation involves not only building a new state but also new interfaces between state and society. In order to strengthen the agency of citizens at these interfaces, recent approaches to development stress the notion of ‘participatory citizenship’ which recasts citizenship as practised rather than given. The purpose of this paper is to explore the links between such practices of participatory citizenship and possibilities for literacy and language education in state adult learning centres. It draws on an impact study of a capacity building programme for educators of adults in the Northern Cape Province and uses interviews and document analysis to explore the ways in which meaning-making unfolded in new participatory spaces. It argues that such processes can be seen as  a form of ‘linguistic citizenship’ in which individuals and groups re-shaped the multilingual representational resources available to them to validate the authority of subaltern actors and mobilise collective agency. It uses the concept of resemiotisation (Iedema 1999) to investigate how the choice of different semiotic complexes enabled or constrained participation and to offer a set of principles for reconceptualising the provision of adult basic education.

  • 206.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Speaking of, for, and with others: Some methodological considerations2016In: Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics Plus, ISSN 1726-541X, Vol. 49, p. 331-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a brief reflection on two decades of work in NGOs and with trade unions from 1982 to 2001. For most of the time covered by this research note, I worked for a non-governmental organisation (NGO), one of several small, politically committed literacy organisations that sprang up in the aftermath of Soweto 1976 as part of a broader response to increasingly repressive state policies.

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    fulltext
  • 207.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Bello-Nonjengele, Basirat
    Game changers? Multilingual learners in a Cape Town primary school2016In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 451-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article engages with Bourdieu’s notion of field as a ‘space of play’ to explore what happens to the educational field and the linguistic regimes operating within it in a site in which new discourses and practices of identity, language, ‘race’, and ethnicity become entangled with local economies of meaning. The context is a primary school in a low-income neighbourhood in Cape Town, South Africa. We draw on multilingual classroom and playground data from observations, interviews, and audio-recorded peer interactions among Grade 6 learners to illuminate the strategic mobilization of linguistic repertoires in encounters across difference: as identity-building resources and as means of shaping new interaction orders, restructuring hierarchies of value, subverting indexicalities, and sometimes resignifying racial categories. We further draw attention to a set of circumstances in which local actors have the potential to change, not only the rules of the game, but the game itself.

  • 208.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bello-Nonjengele, Basirat Olayemi
    Cape Peninsula University of Technology, South Africa.
    Towards epistemic justice: Transforming relations of knowing in multilingual classrooms2022In: Working Papers in Urban Language & Literacies, no 294, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study of a postcolonial site engages with epistemic justice from the perspective of language. It understands epistemic justice as relating to issues of knowledge, understanding, and participation in communicative practices. It suggests that monoglossic language-in-education policies, often colonial in origin, constitute a form of epistemic injustice by denying learners the opportunity to learn in a familiar language and removing their ability to make epistemic contributions, a capacity central to human value. It further suggests that translanguaging in formal school settings is for the most part geared towards a monolingual outcome, that is, towards accessing knowledge in an official language. This unidirectional impetus means that translanguaging remains an affirmative rather than transformative strategy, leaving underlying hierarchies of value and relations of knowing unchanged. In contrast, this study presents linguistic ethnographic data from a three-year pilot project in Cape Town where primary school learners could choose their medium of instruction to Grade 6 and use all languages in subject classrooms. It analyses how a Grade 6 learner used laminated, multilingual, affective and epistemic stances to construct others as knowers, negotiate epistemic authority, and promote solidarity. It proposes that, in so doing, she constructed new decolonial relations of knowing and being. It further proposes that the shift from a monolingual to a multilingual episteme, which substantially improved educational performance overall, also enabled the emergence of politically fragile yet institutionally robust social, epistemic, and moral orders from below, orders that could lay the basis for greater epistemic justice. 

     

     

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    fulltext
  • 209.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, KennethStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Entangled discourses: South-North orders of visibility2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book uniquely explores the shifting structures of power and unexpected points of intersection – entanglements – at the nexus of North and South as a lens through which to examine the impact of global and local circuits of people, practices and ideas on linguistic, cultural and knowledge systems. The volume considers the entanglement of North and South on multiple levels in the contemporary and continuing effects of capitalism, colonialism, and imperialism, in the form of silenced or marginalized populations, such as refugees, immigrants, and other minoritised groups, and in the different orders of visibility that make some types of practices and knowledge more legitimate and therefore more visible. It uses a range of methodological and analytical frames to shed light on less visible histories, practices, identities, repertoires, and literacies, and offer new understandings for research and for language, health care, education, and other policies and practices.

  • 210.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Introduction: Entanglement and Order of Visibility2017In: Entangled discourses: South-North Orders of Visibility / [ed] Caroline Kerfoot; Kenneth Hyltenstam, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 1-15Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter elaborates the concepts 'entanglement' and 'orders of visibility', arguing for their potential to illuminate both absences in theory, knowledge, and representation and emergences in social and semiotic practices. It suggests that this dual focus on absences and emergences, following Santos (2014), is essential for the development of a sociolinguistics of the South. The chapter presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book seeks to build on socio- and applied linguistic work that grounds the view from nowhere through historical, ethnographic, interactionist, and discourse analytic approaches to the analysis of language in the construction of social difference and inequality. It aims to illuminate the ways in which different orders of visibility are constructed by conceptual, methodological, and analytical lenses. The book illuminates the ways in which language is used as a resource in constructing, naturalizing, or resisting inequality in everyday interactions and institutional sites.

  • 211.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Simon-Vandenbergen, Anne-Marie
    Introduction2017In: Language in Epistemic Access: Mobilizing Multilingualism and Literacy Development / [ed] Caroline Kerfoot, Anne-Marie Simon-Vandenbergen, Routledge, 2017, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 212.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Simon-Vandenbergen, Anne-Marie
    Language in epistemic access: mobilising multilingualism and literacy development2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book focuses on how to address persistent linguistically structured inequalities in education, primarily in relation to South African schools, but also in conversation with Australian work and with resonances for other multilingual contexts around the world. The book as a whole lays bare the tension between the commitment to multilingualism enshrined in the South African Constitution and language-in-education policy, and the realities of the dominance of English and the virtual absence of indigenous African languages in current educational practices. It suggests that dynamic plurilingual pedagogies can be allied with the explicit scaffolding of genre-based pedagogies to help redress asymmetries in epistemic access and to re-imagine policies, pedagogies, and practices more in tune with the realities of multilingual classrooms. The contributions to this book offer complementary insights on routes to improving access to school knowledge, especially for learners whose home language or language variety is different to that of teaching and learning at school. All subscribe to similar ideologies which include the view that multilingualism should be seen as a resource rather than a 'problem' in education. Commentaries on these chapters highlight evidence-based high-impact educational responses, and suggest that translanguaging and genre may well offer opportunities for students to expand their linguistic repertoires and to bridge epistemological differences between community and school. This book was originally published as a special issue of Language and Education.

  • 213.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Simon-Vandenbergen, Anne-Marie
    Language in epistemic access: mobilising multilingualism and literacy development for more equitable education in South Africa2015In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 177-185Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is the guest editors’ introduction to the special issue ‘Language in Epistemic Access: Mobilising Multilingualism and Literacy Development for More Equitable Education in South Africa’. The issue offers complementary perspectives on improving epistemic access for all learners but especially those whose home language does not match the language of learning. Plüddemann examines the complex configurations of ideological and structural factors in South African language policy processes and the diverse positions taken up by teachers in response. Makalela argues that a methodology that encourages translanguaging can overcome historical separations between groups and promote transformative pedagogies. Probyn points to the importance of principled ‘pedagogical translanguaging’ in the mediation of secondary school science knowledge. Kerfoot and Van Heerden illustrate the substantial benefits of Systemic Functional Linguistic genre-based pedagogies for second or additional language writing in the middle years. White, Mammone and Caldwell in Australia offer evidence that similar benefits were maintained over six years for learners who faced both socio-economic and linguistic disadvantage in schools. Finally, Cummins and Heugh offer expansive perspectives on the issue. The editors argue that dynamic plurilingual pedagogies can be allied with the explicit scaffolding of genre-based pedagogies to help redress asymmetries in epistemic access.

  • 214.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Simon-Vandenbergen, Anne-Marie
    Language in Epistemic Access: Mobilising Multilingualism and Literacy Development for More Equitable Education in South Africa’2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 215.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Stroud, ChristopherStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    ‘Spaces of otherwise’? Towards a sociolinguistics of potentiality2024Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In writing of the economies of abandonment of late liberal globalization, Povinelli (2012: 454) also points to the potential for spaces of otherwise, those spaces of “curiosity and risk, potentiality and exhaustion” which open possibilities for more ethical becoming and the emergence of new forms of sociality and social life. This Special Issue aims to contribute to an expanded, southernized sociology of language and sociolinguistics by exploring what role sociolinguistics can play in thinking through and with these spaces. It brings together a set of papers from southern contexts rarely represented in sociolinguistic research (Crimea, Mozambique, Palestine) spaces of grim endurance where suffering is chronic rather than catastrophic, and a study of the metaphorical south in the north, where migration imperatives land people in situations of precarity, in this case, Sweden. An illuminating invited commentary offers a novel perspective on the key theme quasi-event threading across all the papers. In  exploring the construction of spaces of otherwise, authors use the southern concept of Linguistic Citizenship that construes language as a site of political struggle. This framing offers an alternative approach to a politics of language where potentialities for otherwise can be attended to.  The papers show how, through acts of linguistic citizenship, participants bring potential worlds into existence, however fleetingly. From the chronicling of these ‘quasi-events’ emerges a sociolinguistics of potentiality, one which contributes to an understanding of what enables some emergent forms of life to endure and others not. 

    The sociolinguistics of potentiality is an invitation to listen beyond and within ‘noise’ to those who inhabit discounted bodies and speak unvalued languages, to move beyond ‘community’ and ‘selfhood’ to becoming otherwise with others in projects of world-building, simultaneously prompting research which seeks to be ‘ethically otherwise’.

     

  • 216.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Centre for Research on Bilingualism , 7675 Stockholm University , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Centre for Multilingualism and Diversities Research , University of the Western Cape , Bellville , South Africa;Centre for Research on Bilingualism , Stockholm University , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Towards a sociolinguistics of potentiality: Linguistic citizenship, quasi-events, and contingent becomings in spaces of otherwise2024In: International Journal of the Sociology of Language, ISSN 0165-2516, E-ISSN 1613-3668, Vol. 2024, no 287, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
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    Kerfoot & Stroud 2024 Towards a sociolinguistics of potentiality:
  • 217.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Tatah, Gwendoline
    Constructing invisibility: An immigrant learner in South Africa2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to contribute to an epistemology of the global South (Santos 2012) by pointing to invisibilized processes of social production as a necessary starting point for greater ethical engagement and mutual intelligibility. It builds on research on the co-construction of micro-interactional identities and macro-social categories to analyse the gradual invisibilisation of the linguistic and epistemic resources of a 13-year-old Cameroonian immigrant in diasporic and educational sites in Cape Town, South Africa. Invisibilisation is understood as an interdiscursive process achieved through a set of indexical phenomena including the operation of dual indexicality (Kulick 2003), tied into circulating discourses of belonging and constrained by institutional frameworks. Drawing on a four year linguistic ethnography, the chapter draws attention to the ways in which discursive processes construct orders of visibility, both momentary and of longer duration, which in turn rework local orders of indexicality and associated hierarchies of ‘race’, language, and ethnicity.

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    fulltext
  • 218.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Tatah, Gwendoline
    Constructing invisibility: The discursive erasure of a black immigrant learner in South Africa2017In: Entangled Discourses: South-North Orders of Visibility / [ed] Caroline Kerfoot, Kenneth Hyltenstam, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 37-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores how the discourses of 'born frees' at a tertiary institution in South Africa both reproduce and transform inherited racial identities and positions. It focuses on the points in the data when 'identities, spaces, histories—come together or find points of intersection in unexpected ways'. The chapter picks up a different thread and explores those points where different discourses intersect and commonalities emerge. It argues that despite the racial anxiety suffusing the data, the participants seek to disentangle from the apartheid past and position themselves in a postracial future. The chapter aims to draw attention to the ways in which race is reproduced in discourse and so to raise awareness about how this may shape or constrain progress towards postracial ways of thinking, speaking, and being. It explores that small stories analysis can help build this knowledge by providing a lens onto the tangled web of race and by showing how racial positions are discursively reproduced.

  • 219.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Van Heerden, Michelle
    Testing the waters: exploring the teaching of genres in a Cape Flats Primary School in South Africa2017In: Language in Epistemic Access: Mobilizing Multilingualism and Literacy Development / [ed] Caroline Kerfoot, Anne-Marie Simon-Vandenbergen, Routledge, 2017, p. 59-79Chapter in book (Refereed)
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    fulltext
  • 220. Khachaturyan, Maria
    et al.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Vetchinnikova, Svetlana
    Norrman, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Leontjev, Dmitri
    What is a language error? A discussion2022In: Apples - Journal of Applied Language Studies, ISSN 1457-9863, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 102-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why are we so afraid of making mistakes? Students in language classes, speakers of non-standard varieties, professionals working abroad – we all share the anxiety of dropping the ball. But where does this anxiety come from? Why do we perceive certain linguistic features as errors in the first place? Is there any inherent faultiness in such features, or is a language error arbitrary? And if it is arbitrary, are errors less real? In this discussion, Maria Khachaturyan, Maria Kuteeva and Svetlana Vetchinnikova zoom in on the social life of variation in language and its uneasy relationship with our normative ideas. After that, Gunnar Norrman and Dmitri Leontjev give their comments. The discussion closes with replies by the first three authors.

  • 221.
    Klagsbrun Lebenswerd, Patric Joshua
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Jewish Swedish2015In: Handbook of jewish languages / [ed] Lily Kahn, Aaron D. Rubin, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2015, p. 618-629Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 222.
    Kurnik, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bilingual Lexical Access in Reading: Analyzing the Effect of Semantic Context on Non-Selective Access in Bilingual Memory2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Recent empirical studies about the neurological executive nature of reading in bilinguals differ in their evaluations of the degree of selective manifestation in lexical access as implicated by data from early and late reading measures in the eye-tracking paradigm. Currently two scenarios are plausible: (1) Lexical access in reading is fundamentally language non-selective and top-down effects from semantic context can influence the degree of selectivity in lexical access; (2) Cross-lingual lexical activation is actuated via bottom-up processes without being affected by top-down effects from sentence context. In an attempt to test these hypotheses empirically, this study analyzed reader-text events arising when cognate facilitation and semantic constraint interact in a 22 factorially designed experiment tracking the eye movements of 26 Swedish-English bilinguals reading in their L2. Stimulus conditions consisted of high- and low-constraint sentences embedded with either a cognate or a non-cognate control word. The results showed clear signs of cognate facilitation in both early and late reading measures and in either sentence conditions. This evidence in favour of the non-selective hypothesis indicates that the manifestation of non-selective lexical access in reading is not constrained by top-down effects from semantic context.

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    Bilingual Lexical Access in Reading - MA Thesis Mattias Kurnik
  • 223.
    Kuyumcu, Eija
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    A Case Study of Bilingual Language Use: An Account of Discursive and Literacy Practices in Swedish and Turkish by a Young Person2014In: Bilig, ISSN 1301-0549, no 70, p. 181-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this small scale sociolinguistic and ethnographic case study, I explore how a young, bilingual boy with Turkish and Swedish as his two languages makes use of his bilingualism in different domains and with different interlocutors during the course of a day. The study provides an account of how this young individual employs his bilingual resources, both in his heritage language Turkish, and in Swedish, the principal language of his schooling. The final section of this paper discusses the cultural and social significance which this young person and his family have associated with the observed language practices. The discussion attempts to highlight the constraints and benefits of bilingual language use in an individual case, but it relates also to the broader societal issues of Swedish language policy, concerning the significance and value of bilingualism from different perspectives: the observed informant, the local school and the national Swedish curriculum for primary and comprehensive education.

  • 224.
    Kuyumcu, Eija
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Finlandiya’daki Göçmen öğrençilerin Eğitim Durumu ve Toplumsal Koşulları [Invandrarelevernas utbildningssituation och samhälleliga förhållanden i Finland]2017In: Türkiyeli Göçmenlerin Göç Alan Ülkelerde Eğitim Durumu ve Toplumsal Koşulları [Utbildningssituation och samhällsförhållanden för invandrare från Turkiet i länder som tar emot invandrare]: Sempozyum 25 Ekim 2014 / [ed] Yayına Hazırlayan, Zeitung PoliTeknik, Die Gaste Verlag , 2017, p. 196-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 225.
    Kuyumcu, Eija
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Genrebaserad undervisning som pedagogiskt utvecklingsarbete2013Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna artikel är att beskriva hur en skola genom ett förändrat arbetssätt med explicit undervisning – i form av genrebaserad pedagogik – lyckades höja elevernas resultat i nationella ämnesprov och öka andelen elever som nådde kravnivån. Positiva exempel på pedagogiskt utvecklingsarbete efterfrågas på många skolor där resultaten har stagnerat och ligger under riksgenomsnittet. I det avseendet kan artikeln vara inspirerande för andra skolor med motsvarande svårigheter och ge en hel del idéer till ett pedagogiskt utvecklings- och förändringsarbete.

    Artikeln bygger på material som samlades in i samband med en utvärdering av implementeringen av det genrepedagogiska arbetssättet i den aktuella skolan. Olika metoder användes för de olika delarna av utvärderingen och bestod bland annat av klassrumsobservationer, en enkätstudie, intervjuer med lärare och skolledning samt analys och bedömning av elevtexter. I resultaten diskuteras vad som gjordes möjligt för eleverna att lära sig och vilka förutsättningar som var nödvändiga för att lyckas med detta pedagogiska utvecklings- och förändringsarbete.

  • 226.
    Kuyumcu, Eija
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Genrepedagogik som verktyg i språk- och kunskapsutvecklande undervisning och lärande2013In: Svenska som andraspråk: i forskning, undervisning och samhälle / [ed] Hyltenstam, Kenneth och Lindberg, Inger, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 2. uppl., p. 605-631Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 227.
    Kuyumcu, Eija
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Türkiye Kökenli ve diğer Göçmen Öğrencilerin Eğitim Durumu ve Toplumsal Koşulları - İsveç Örneği [Utbildningssituation och samhällsförhållanden för invandrarelever från Turkiet och övriga invandrarelever – exempel från Sverige]2017In: Türkiyeli Göçmenlerin Göç Alan Ülkelerde Eğitim Durumu ve Toplumsal Koşulları [Utbildningssituation och samhällsförhållanden för invandrare från Turkiet i länder som tar emot invandrare]: SEMPOZYUM 25 EKiM 2014 / [ed] Yayına Hazırlayan, Zeitung PoliTeknik, Die Gaste Verlag , 2017, p. 170-195Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 228.
    Lainio, Jarmo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Finnish. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    The art of societal ambivalence: A retrospective view on Swedish language policies for Finnish in Sweden2014In: Language policies in Finland and Sweden: Interdisciplinary and multi-sited comparisons / [ed] Mia Halonen, Pasi Ihalainen,Taina Saarinen, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2014, p. 116-144Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 229.
    Lainio, Jarmo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    When Implementation of Linguistic Human Rights Does Not Match Legislation: The Case of Sweden2022In: The Handbook of Linguistic Human Rights / [ed] Tove Skutnabb-Kangas; Robert Phillipson, Oxford: John Wiley & Sons, 2022Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter deals with the lack of fit between Sweden's ratification of international conventions on linguistic human rights for national minorities and their implementation. The author discusses two main aspects of this: recurrent attempts to prohibit the use of national minority languages in public (work, school settings), and the right to education in and of national minority languages. He uses the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages as one main starting-point, but also discusses Swedish ratifications of UN, EU, and CoE human rights conventions. In addition he contrasts these with the Swedish constitution, the Discrimination Act, in which language as a ground for discrimination is absent, the Law on National minorities and national minority languages, and the School Act. Mismatches exist both between the international conventions and Swedish adaptations of them, and between both types of legal instruments and practice.

  • 230.
    Larsson, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Ålderseffekter av en kritisk period för språkutveckling: Grammatisk intuition hos hörande infödda teckenspråkiga2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis reports on a study on the ultimate attainment of grammatical intuition in Swedish in 29 adult hearing native signers, bilingual in Swedish Sign Language and Swedish. It is reasoned that measures of such intuition in adults may indicate implicit linguistic entrenchment in Swedish during early language development. Although Sign Language Linguistics and Second Language Research on deaf signers are two established fields of research in Sweden, there is little research on hearing native signers. A few international studies have focused on early child language development in hearing native signers, showing that these children develop their two languages simultaneously from birth even if the signed language dominates the linguistic environment. However, studies focusing on older children indicate that their morphological and syntactic proficiency in the majority language resembles that of second language learners. Deductively this paper rests on neurobiological and psycholinguistic theories claiming that early language development is naturally and genetically constrained within a critical or maturational period. Grammatical intuition was measured through the use of two versions of a GJT-test (written and auditory) and a cloze test. The results showed that the average grammatical intuition of the hearing native signers was comparable to that of a group of early L2 learners of Swedish, but significantly different from that of a group of native speakers of Swedish, indicating that for some of the native signers, Swedish might have been successively learned. This thesis contributes unique data to second language research, while shedding a light on a group of bilinguals that is scarcely known to the study of linguistics.

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  • 231.
    Leinonen, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Livet som andraspråkstalare i Sverige: Hur finländare upplever användning av det svenska språket i Sverige2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna studie undersöks hur relativt nyanlända finländare har upplevt användning av svenska i Sverige och hur deras identitet som andraspråkstalare har blivit påverkad av omgivningen. När det gäller finländare som andraspråkstalare är de i en speciell position när det gäller svenskinlärning, eftersom svenska är ett obligatoriskt skolämne i Finland. Studien är baserad på ett sociolingvistiskt ramverk och utgår från teorier om språkets legitimitet, foreign language anxiety och investering i ett andraspråk. Som huvudutgångspunkt för denna studie fungerar fem intervjuer med finländare som är bosatta i Stockholmsområdet och har mellan ett och fem års erfarenhet av användning av svenska i Sverige. Dessutom används resultat från en webbenkät med liknande målgrupp. Studiens resultat visar att flera olika faktorer spelar roll för om och hur svenska används. Sådana faktorer är till exempel egen drivkraft, attityd mot det svenska språket, skälet för att bo i Sverige samt erfarenheter i sociala relationer. När det gäller utmaningar förefaller muntlig interaktion vara den kontext där de flesta svårigheterna förekommer i andraspråkstalares svenskanvändning, vilket beror dels på att muntlig produktion inte övas tillräckligt mycket i undervisningen. Generellt blir det tydligt att det finns en diskrepans mellan de svenskkunskaper som Finlands svenskundervisning erbjuder och de krav som livet i Sverige ställer.

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    Livet som andraspråkstalare i Sverige
  • 232. Lim, Lisa
    et al.
    Stroud, ChristopherStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.Wee, Lionel
    The Multilingual Citizen: Towards a politics of language for agency and change2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 233.
    Lindberg, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Flerspråkiga elevers språkutbildning2013In: Symposium 2012 : lärarrollen i svenska som andraspråk / [ed] Olofsson, Mikael, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag, 2013, p. 28-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 234.
    Lindberg, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Flerspråkiga elevers språkutbildning2013In: Language Acquisition and Use in Multilingual Contexts: Theory and Practice / [ed] Anna Flyman Mattsson & Catrin Norrby, Lund: Lund University Press , 2013, p. 122-141Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 235.
    Lindberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Ungdomars attityder till svordomar ur ett andraspråksperspektiv2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna uppsats undersöks ett urval gymnasielevers attityder till i synnerhet svenska svordomar. Tonvikten ligger vid attityderna till svordomar hos dem som har svenska som ett andraspråk och huruvida dessa skiljer sig i förhållande till attityderna hos dem som har svenska som sitt modersmål.

    Grunden i undersökningen utgörs av en enkät som sedan kompletteras med ett antal intervjuer. Resultaten vilar alltså till störst del på kvantitativa data vilka i sin tur diskuteras utifrån Bourdieus (1991) begreppsapparat om kulturellt kapital, marknader och habitus, samt teorier kring språkets kopplingar till känslor.

    Undersökningen visar att det finns skillnader i attityder till svordomar mellan modersmålstalande och andraspråkstalande av svenska inom det föreliggande urvalet. Sammanfattningsvis tenderar de som har svenska som andraspråk att svära mindre och reagera kraftigare vid förekomster av svordomar än vad modersmålstalarna gör. Resultaten visar också att andraspråkstalarna har en tendens att bejaka svordomarnas kränkande funktioner, medan modersmålstalarna i högre utsträckning än andraspråkstalarna bejakar svordomar i syften som att förstärka yttranden eller avreagera sig vid smärta. Dessa skillnader antas kunna härledas ur de värderingar som återfinns inom den kultur respektive deltagare vuxit upp i.

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  • 236.
    Lindqvist, Nellie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Lärares förhållningssätt till elevers språkrepertoarer: Hur lärare i svenska som andraspråk och engelska planerar och genomför undervisning med flerspråkiga elever i svenska högstadie- och gymnasieskolor2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 237.
    Lubińska, Dorota
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Polish Migrants in Sweden: An Overview2013In: Folia Scandinavica Posnaniensia, ISSN 1230-4786, E-ISSN 2299-6885, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 73-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current Polish migrant group in Sweden is the largest in Scandinavia, and experienced a significant growth after the enlargement of the European Union in 2004. The present overview is an attempt to give a systematic picture of this group, and is based on a selection of publications from a larger bibliography. The bibliography was compiled by the author in order to survey the knowledge on Polish migrants in Sweden, and is attached to this overview. The overview is primarily confined to the period between 1940 and 1990 because this period is covered by the scholarly literature.

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  • 238.
    Maljan, Goran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Exponering för språket avgörande för hur vi tolkar sammansatta ord2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 239.
    Maljan, Goran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Undervisning i lässtrategier gynnar flerspråkiga elevers läsutveckling2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 240.
    Mannish, Scarlett
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Is mother tongue instruction culturally empowering?2024In: Educare, ISSN 1653-1868, E-ISSN 2004-5190, p. 45-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I formulate a position on the dissemination of ‘cultural empowerment’ in schools through a critical discussion of its relation to my research field, mother tongue instruction (MTI) in Sweden. In addition, I compare the ideals of the culturally empowering pedagogies and praxis of MTI, which I see as related through the underlying utopian visions of the multilingual and multicultural school. Both are forms of education which place a focus on the validity and importance of students’ individuality and their pre-existing knowledges from outside the curriculum. In discussing the marginalisation of MTI via the discourse of its threat to ‘Swedishness’, I hope to highlight some of the underlying problems inherent in cultural empowerment as an individualising practice carried out within the universalising framework that is the state education project. The implementation of MTI demonstrates a need for change targeted not only at the level of teachers and researchers but also at a level where legitimacy is granted to such change. 

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  • 241.
    Mannish, Scarlett
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Tracking identity in minority language policy: a reflexive approach to hybrid concepts in the language sciences2024In: Language sciences (Oxford), ISSN 0388-0001, E-ISSN 1873-5746, Vol. 104, p. 101642-101642, article id 101642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a conceptual history of identity in Swedish minority language policy, exploring how “develop[ing] a cultural identity” became integral to the minority language curriculum. Following the methodology of Wacquant (2022), which combines Bourdieu’s sociology with the conceptual history of Koselleck, the study tracks identity through archived documents from the political, media and academic fields of the 1968–74 immi-gration inquiry in Sweden and subsequent actualisation of the so-called Home Language Reform in 1977. This reform continues to entitle children who are raised speaking a language other than Swedish to state-mandated tuition in this language via mother tongue instruction(MTI). As a space for non-hegemonic language practice, MTI struggles for political and so-cietal legitimacy and existing research has yet to explore how identity is entangled in its (de)legitimation. Following debate in the 1960s about the unsuitability of “adjustment”, the IC aimed to construct a new conceptual framework for migrant discourse. Analysis of bills, publications, minutes and media op-eds show that agents acted as brokers to jointly construct identity as a flexible framework to cover diverse needs within and across their respective fields. Within the media field, pundits argued either for the right of the individualto choose their level of engagement with established groups, or for the autonomy of migrant groups to establish their own schools and communities. Within the political field, inspiration came from the perceived successes of Canadian immigration reform, while key academics took interest in North American social psychology research. The focal point of this cross-field negotiation was a hybrid concept, a necessarily flexible frame of reference whose meaning differed slightly within each field. Given the lack of semantic precision of hybrid concepts, reflexive language science ought to consider and problematise their application in MTI research and in further academic enquiry.

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    Tracking Identity
  • 242.
    Martorana, Maria Grazia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Being Finlandssvensk: Languages, Ideologies and Identities among the Swedish-Speaking Population of Finland2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish-speaking Finns, or in Swedish Finlandssvenskar, are a protected linguistic minority group in Finland. They are Finnish citizens, born and raised in Finland, whose mother tongue is Swedish. The aim of this research is to explore how four Swedish-speaking Finns belonging to the Finlandssvensk minority perceived the role of their multilingual repertoires in constructing desired identities in different social contexts or fields. It further aims to discover how language ideologies shaped the way they construct their linguistic practices in different contexts, as well as how participants viewed the value of their repertoires as capital in these fields. Finally, it seeks to understand how these perceived values of different languages as capital influence their investment in learning the majority language, Finnish. Four adult participants from different towns and cities were selected by means of a questionnaire. The research design consisted of interviews with participants supported by body maps and examples of online linguistic practices. Findings suggest that participants’ possibilities for constructing desired identities are influenced by positive reactions to their multilingualism, positive experiences of belonging to a minority group and negative limitations of the majority language use. Moreover, the findings showed connections between investment and ideologies of language, in connection to linguistic practices valued as social, cultural, and economic capitals. The research findings contribute to understandings of how members of Finlandssvenskar minority group construct and perceive their linguistic identity on a daily basis but also to knowledge of the factors that influence the practices of minority language speakers more broadly.

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  • 243. Mattsson, Pauine
    et al.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Introduction: Universities and the Matter of Mattering2024In: Making Universities Matter: Collaboration, Engagement, Impact / [ed] Pauline Mattsson; Eugenia Perez Vico; Linus Salö, Cham: Springer Nature, 2024, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this introductory chapter, we provide insights into the debates that inspired this volume. Our aim is to extend the boundaries of the concept societal interaction and discuss the conditions for universities to undertake such endeavors. Within this context, we introduce the matter of “mattering” which serves as the central theme that runs through this volume. Mattering, we posit, can be comprehended through three key concepts: collaboration, engagement, and impact. We outline how each concept contributes to an increasing understanding of the manifold ways in which mattering can be grasped and achieved. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the coherent set of individual chapters that, separately or jointly, deal with the three concepts. Through these chapters, this volume aims to make a valuable addition to the evolving literature that explores how universities can expand their impact beyond conventional higher education missions. Collectively, these chapters cover the context of the mattering of universities and draw on various empirical data sources, mainly from Sweden but also internationally. Within this compilation of inquiries, we shed light on the multifaceted impact of universities on societies, exploring the mechanisms, contexts, and temporal dimensions of their contributions to advancing knowledge and addressing societal challenges.

  • 244. Mattsson, Pauline
    et al.
    Perez Vico, EugeniaSalö, LinusStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Making Universities Matter: Collaboration, Engagement, Impact2024Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an era of rapid change and increasing societal demands, the role of universities as knowledge producers and catalysts for change has come under scrutiny. This open access book offers a fresh perspective on the significance of universities in society, shedding light on how their knowledge can truly matter beyond academia.

    Drawing upon insightful inquiries from both the Swedish and international contexts, this volume delves into the multifaceted interactions between universities and various knowledge users, emphasizing the need for scholars to reflect on how their knowledge can become useful and applicable to wider society.

    Organized into three compelling themes, collaboration, engagement, and impact, this book explores the concept of "mattering". Together and jointly, they point at the fluid movement of scholars and scholarly knowledge across academic, political, and public spaces, and the intentional actions of scientists to leverage their expertise for real-world impact. 

    Essential reading for social science and humanities scholars, university management professionals, and individuals keen on a critical understanding of the evolving role of universities, this volume offers a comprehensive examination of how universities have mattered, continue to matter, and can shape the future.

  • 245.
    Metreveli, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Stockholm University.
    “But it doesn't really have to do with the bilingualism”: Family language policies in transnational families of bilingual autistic children2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Family language policy (FLP) investigates family members’ language ideologies, practices, and management strategies. With the growing number of autistic children exposed to bi- or multilingual environments, there is a gap in the existing body of FLP research that has not focused before on speaking and non-speaking autistic children from transnational families. This study, therefore, aims to determine to what extent existing FLP frameworks can adequately capture the lived experiences of families with bilingual autistic children. This mixed method study uses an online parental questionnaire to investigate which language and modality policies and practices are prevalent in transnational families with bilingual autistic children. Thereafter in semi-structured interviews with eight parents, it explores other potential factors that affect parental decisions about bilingualism. The study further aims to explore other broader ideologies and discourses about autism and bilingualism in the parental accounts. The results suggest that most parents of bilingual autistic children shared positive views about bilingualism and linked language challenges to autism, not bilingualism. However, their language practices and management strategies were not always consistent with their views on bilingualism. The results of the interviews indicate that additional diagnoses, spoken language proficiency, the amount of required additional support, misrecognition of early diagnosis, professional recommendations, and access to socioeconomic resources were other factors influencing parental decisions about bilingualism. As a result, I argue that FLP as a theoretical framework fails to capture certain aspects of the families’ lived experiences and to address ableist injustices or offer any remedies against them. After examining Nancy Fraser’s theory of redistribution and recognition and Boaventura de Sousa Santos’ notion of “abyssal thinking”, this thesis highlights the importance of developing an innovative theoretical framework that can incorporate FLP, social class, other forms of difference, and the neurodiversity movement as a transformative remedy to address ableist injustices experienced by bilingual autistic children and their families. This thesis also proposes to use the terms “semiotic practices” and “semiotic management” as part of the FLP framework to incorporate other modalities than spoken language. It also introduces the term “ableist thinking” for descriptions of abyssal thinking related to autism. The proposed model can be used by practitioners working with autistic children and their families and potentially improve their lived experiences and access to bilingual resources.

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  • 246.
    Michanek, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Makt, mångfald och motstånd i genrepedagogiken?: Genrepedagogisk skrivundervisning ur ett critical literacy-perspektiv2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 247. Milani, Tommaso M.
    et al.
    Williams, Quentin
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Space/place matters2017In: Multilingual Margins, ISSN 2221-4216, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 2-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue of Multilingual Margins on the theme of “Space/place matters” has its origin in a doctoral summer school organised in December 2016 by the Department of Linguistics and the Centre for Multilingualism and Diversities Research at the University of the Western Cape as part of a collaboration with the University of Oslo and three other South African universities – Stellenbosch University, University of Cape Town and University of the Witwatersrand – and financed by Research Council of Norway’s programme International Partnerships for Excellent Education, Research and Innovation (INTPART). Doctoral students based in Norway and South Africa attended the summer school, presented their research projects, and were encouraged to submit an article to Multilingual Margins. This was with a view to training budding scholars to deal with the peer-review process of academic publishing. This special issue is the material outcome of this process and includes three articles that have a common interest in unpicking the complex relationship between language and space/place.

  • 248. Milani, Tommaso
    et al.
    Salö, LinusStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Sveriges nationella minoritetsspråk: Nya språkpolitiska perspektiv2023Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 249.
    Mollema, Anke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Typisch Frysk?: Stancetaking in the linguistic landscape of Fryslân2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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    Typisch Frysk?
  • 250. Molnar, Monika
    et al.
    Alemán Bañón, José
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Mancini, Simona
    Caffarra, Sendy
    The Processing of Spanish Article–Noun Gender Agreement by Monolingual and Bilingual Toddlers2021In: Language and Speech, ISSN 0023-8309, E-ISSN 1756-6053, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 980-990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We assessed monolingual Spanish and bilingual Spanish-Basque toddlers’ sensitivity to gender agreement in correct vs. incorrect Spanish noun phrases (definite article + noun), using a spontaneous preference listening paradigm. Monolingual Spanish-learning toddlers exhibited a tendency to listen longer to the grammatically correct phrases (e.g., la casa; “the house”), as opposed to the incorrect ones (e.g., *el casa). This listening preference toward correct phrases is in line with earlier results obtained from French monolingual 18-month-olds (van Heugten & Christophe, 2015). Bilingual toddlers in the current study, however, tended to listen longer to the incorrect phrases. Basque was not a source of interference in the bilingual toddler’s input as Basque does not instantiate grammatical gender agreement. Overall, our results suggest that both monolingual and bilingual toddlers can distinguish between the correct and incorrect phrases by 18 months of age; however, monolinguals and bilinguals allocate their attention differently when processing grammatically incorrect forms.

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