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  • 201.
    Hellqvist Fjällman, Mathilda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Uppdragsarkeologi och samhällsplanering: En kvalitativ studie om kommunikationen mellan samhällsaktörer2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the relationship between field archaeology and society planning projects. The aim of the research is to investigate possible errors in planning processes and how the communication between societal stakeholders affects the results. The cooperation of the exploiter and communal directors is determined by the involvement of historical and economical perspectives, as well as knowledge and competence of heritage organisations. Through the case study of a recent train rail project in Lund the different opportunities of improvement are easily pointed out. Time schedule, earlier joint planning, knowledge about the relics and decentralisations of decisions are the most common observed communicative problems. This indicates a disorientation of the Swedish urban-regional exploration processes in terms of cultural heritage and future sustainable city planning.

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  • 202. Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Archaeology and the present2018In: The Encyclopedia of Archaeological Sciences / [ed] Sandra L. López Varela, John Wiley & Sons, 2018, p. 68-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeology is not only the disinterested study of the human past and its remains but also a way of making a positive impact on present society. Archaeology tells a variety of powerful stories about past and present and offers suggestive metaphors to contemporary society; archaeological methods and approaches can be applied to learn more about contemporary society and to trigger in people existential thoughts and emotions; archaeological expertise can be applied to help solve challenges in contemporary society. It is important for future generations of archaeologists to be aware of these dimensions and to explore and apply them critically in professional practice.

  • 203.
    Isaksson, Sven
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Lipid residue analyses of Early Neolithic funnel-beaker pottery from Skogsmossen, eastern Central Sweden, and the earliest evidence of dairying in Sweden2012In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 39, no 12, p. 3600-3609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study address the question of the use and function of Early Neolithic (4000-3000 cal. BC) funnel-beaker pots from Malardalen in eastern Central Sweden. The material studied is pottery from a wetland offering at the site Skogsmossen in the province of Vastmanland. While deposited under ritual circumstances in a fen, the pots were likely used in a domestic domain on the settlement adjacent to the offering fen, prior to final deposition. The lipid analysis indicate a varied vessel use, there are traces of aquatic resources, plants, terrestrial animals and milk. The identification of milk residue is the oldest so far from Sweden.

  • 204.
    Jansson, Ingmar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Korolevskie/knjazeskie centry epochi vikingov v Skandindinavii i na Rusi2009In: Historyja i archealohija Polacka i Polackaj zjamli. Materyjaly V Miznarodnaj navukovaj kanferencii (24-25 kastrycnika 2007 g.): History and Archaeology of Polotsk and Polotsk land. Scientific articles and materials of the 5th International Conference / [ed] T.A. Dzumantaeva, Polack, Belarus: Polotsk National Historical and Cultural Museum-Reserve , 2009, p. 208-232Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 205. Jennings, Justin
    et al.
    Berg, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Capriata Estrada, Camila
    Alvarado Sánchez, Elina
    Gavilán Vargas, Alcides
    Vallejo, Irela
    Excavation in the Ceremonial/Residential Zone2015In: Tenahaha and the Wari State: A View of the Middle Horizon from the Cotahuasi Valley / [ed] Justin Jennings, Willy Yépez Álvarez, Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press , 2015, p. 70-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 206.
    Jernetz, Anton
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Runstensvägen mellan Ösmo ochhamnen vid Djursnäs på Södertörn –en bygdeanalys2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay analyses the road Runstensvägen that connects the locality of Ösmo withDjursnäs where, which I argue, there would have been a harbour during the Viking age. Theessay deals with the roads connection to rune stones on the road and nearby, burial groundsfrom different time periods, and the names of nearby farms and plots in order to establish thenecessity and vitality of the road for the nearby settlements. Ultimately the essay discussesthe area around Djursnäs and the reasons why a harbour would be built in Djursnäs.

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  • 207.
    Johansson, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Relationen mellan den arkeologiska vetenskapens teorier och hur arkeologin förmedlas för allmänheten: Uddby, Alby och Tyresö2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     

    Why is it so often a gap between science and general opinion? And how authentic is the monuments when they has been moved or damaged. This paper deals with the question of how the archaeological science interpret things and places from prehistoric times, and how it is presented for a general public. Under what circumstances is there a gap between archaeological science and general opinion and why?

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  • 208.
    Jonsson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    AEthelred the Unready's Second Hand type and the claim for power2022In: Interpreting Early Medieval coinage: essays in memory of Stewart Lyon / [ed] Martin Allen; Rory Naismith; Hugh Pagan, London: Spink , 2022, p. 123-147Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detailed analysis of the coinge in England during the Hand issue c. 979-89. It shows that the development was far more complex than previously believed. The Second Hand type is connected with the desire by AEthelred II to control the coinage.

  • 209.
    Jonsson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Eastern contacts based on the coin finds2009In: Situne Dei, ISSN 1653-8498, p. 57-67Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the help of coin finds from the Viking Age contacts between Sweden and East Europe are discussed

  • 210.
    Jonsson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Myntfynd i Sverige2009In: Myntstudier, ISSN 1652-2303, no 2, p. 25-28Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Short summary of coin finds in Sweden 0-1800 AD (679.669 pcs) including distribution maps for the middle ages and the modern period

  • 211.
    Jonsson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Östervålafyndet i Uppsala universitets myntkabinett2009In: Opus mixtum / [ed] Harald Nilsson, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet , 2009, p. 127-131Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Three Swedish coins found in a church yard in Östervåla are listed and discussed. They can be regarded as the content of pocket money deposited in the mid-15th c. Comparisons are made with similar finds.

  • 212.
    Jonsson, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Suchodolski, Stanislaw
    A new coin type of Boleslaw the Brave found in Sweden2009In: Wiadomosci Numizmatyczne, ISSN 0043-5155, Vol. LIII, no 187, p. 29-39Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new coin type of Boleslaw the Brave 992-1025 found in a hoard on Gotland and other contemporary coins are discussed

  • 213.
    Jonsson, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Dangerous Death and Dangerous Dead: Examples from Scandinavian burial practices from the Middle Ages to the Early Modern Period2009In: Döda personers sällskap/On the threshold: Gravmaterialens identiteter och kulturella uttryck/burial archaeology in the twenty-first century / [ed] Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie, Stockholm: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Stockholms universitet , 2009, p. 173-186Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 214.
    Jonsson, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gravskick och gravseder från medeltid till 1800-tal2009In: Arkeologi i Södra Råda, Stockholm: Riksantikvarieämbetet , 2009, p. 139-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 215.
    Jonsson, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Kyrkogården och kyrkan i Västerhus – en arkeologisk tillbakablick2009In: Västerhus: Kapell, kyrkogård och befolkning, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets historie och antikvitets akademien , 2009, p. 9-25Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 216.
    Jonsson, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Tills döden skiljer oss åt...: Sociala markörer i medeltida gravskick i Västerhus på Frösön, Löddeköpinge i Skåne och Peterskyrkan i Tønsberg2009In: Västerhus: Kapell, kyrkogård och befolkning, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets historie och antikvitets akademien , 2009, p. 40-73Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 217. Karlsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Los rastros de una crisis mundial: Descubrimientos arqueológicos y antropológicos de las antiguas bases de misiles nucleares soviéticos en Cuba2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a photo essay in Spanish presenting a research project within contemporary archaeology studying Soviet nuclear missile sites in Cuba from the 1962 world crisis.

  • 218.
    Karlsson, Madeleine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Kvinnan bakom det mäktiga spännet: Vikingatida ryggknappspännen i östra Mellansverige2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 219.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Abandon Ship! Digging out the Dead from the Vendel Boat-Graves2015In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The boat-grave cemetery at Vendel, Uppland, is one of the iconic sites of first-millennium Sweden. The high-status grave-goods and weaponry have been widely displayed and studied since their discovery over 130 years ago. Yet it is rarely mentioned that the burial ground had been almost completely ransacked long before archaeologists stepped in. The celebrated finds are only a fraction of the wealth that was originally buried at the site.

    This is the first evaluation of the evidence of disturbance from Vendel since the excavations in the late 19th century. The ancient re-opening of the graves is reconstructed through the letters and diaries of the excavator, Hjalmar Stolpe, as well as the various preliminary and final reports. Evidence is presented that the main parts of the burials, notably the human bones, were systematically dug out of nearly every grave and removed from the site. The reopening probably took place during the Christianization period, before or during the construction of the nearby church in the 13th century. This is an example of the widespread reworking of monuments at this time, specifically highlighting the significance accorded to buried human remains.

  • 220.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Deaths matter2016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, p. 49-56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 221.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Give and take: grave goods and grave robbery in the early middle ages2015In: Own and be owned: archaeological approaches to the concept of possession / [ed] Alison Klevnäs, Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies , 2015, p. 157-189Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 222.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    ‘Imbued with the Essence of the Owner’: Personhood and Possessions in the Reopening and Reworking of Viking-Age Burials2016In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 456-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the wide range of grave disturbance practices seen in Viking-age burials across Scandinavia. It argues that the much-debated reopenings at high-profile sites, notably the Norwegian royal' mounds, should be seen against a background of widespread and varied evidence for burial reworking in Scandinavia throughout the first-millennium ad and into the Middle Ages. Interventions into Viking-age graves are interpreted as disruptive, intended to derail practices of memory-creation set in motion by funerary displays and monuments. However, the reopening and reworking of burials were also mnemonic citations in their own right, using a recurrent set of practices to make heroic, mythological, and genealogical allusions. The retrieval of portable artefacts was a key element in this repertoire, and in this article I use archaeological and written sources to explore the particular concepts of ownership which enabled certain possessions to work as material citations appropriating attributes of dead persons for living claimants.

  • 223.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Introduction: the nature of belongings2015In: Own and be owned: archaeological approaches to the concept of possession / [ed] Alison Klevnäs, Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies , 2015, p. 1-22Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 224.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Overkill: reopening graves to maim the dead in Anglo-Saxon England2015In: Kończyny, kości i wtórnie otwarte groby w dawnych kulturach [Limbs, bones, and reopened graves in past societies] / [ed] Leszek Gardeła, Kamil Kajkowski, Bytów: Muzeum Zachodniokaszubskie w Bytowie , 2015, p. 177-213Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 225.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    ‘Robbed in antiquity’: grave opening in seventh-century East Kent – stimulated by cross-channel influences?2020In: Archaeologia Cantiana, ISSN 0066-5894, Vol. 140, p. 1-24Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 226.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Surely every live man fades among the dead: Fear and desire in the afterlife of Viking Age graves2023In: The Norse sorceress: mind and materiality in the Viking world / [ed] Leszek Gardeła; Sophie Bønding; Peter Pentz, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2023, p. 147-159Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 227.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Whodunnit? Grave robbery in Anglo-Saxon England and the Merovingian kingdoms2013Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Grave robbery is widely recorded in the cemeteries of early medieval Europe, but this research is the first systematic regional study. Critically assesses all that is currently known of grave disturbance in the Merovingian kingdoms, and shows that there is significant evidence for the same practice in Anglo-Saxon England. Investigates in detail an intensive outbreak in 6th-7th century Kent. Aims to advance the debate about early medieval disturbance from general discussion of explanatory possibilities to evaluation of specific interpretations and their compatibility with the archaeological evidence. The conclusions have significant implications for the interpretation of grave robbery across early medieval Europe, and for recognizing and understanding grave disturbance more widely.

  • 228.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Aspöck, Edeltraud
    Noterman, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Centre d’études supérieures de civilisation médiévale, France.
    Van Haperen, Martine
    Zintl, Stephanie
    Reopening graves in the early Middle Ages: from local practice to European phenomenon2021In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 95, no 382, p. 1005-1026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Across Europe early medieval archaeologists have long recognised significant numbers of graves displaying evidence for the intentional post-burial disturbance of skeletons and artefacts. The practice of reopening and manipulating graves soon after burial, traditionally described—and dismissed—as ‘robbing’, is documented at cemeteries from Transylvania to southern England. This article presents a synthesis of five recent regional studies to investigate the evidence of and the motivations for the reopening of early medieval graves. From the later sixth century AD, the reopening of individual graves and removal of selected artefact types rapidly became part of the shared treatment of the dead across this wide area.

  • 229.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, CharlotteStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Own and be owned: archaeological approaches to the concept of possession2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
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  • 230.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Noterman, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Archeologists long believed that ancient graves were robbed all over Europe, but here’s why they’re wrong2022In: The Conversation, E-ISSN 2774-681XArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 231.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Noterman, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Raiding Graves — Not to Rob but to Remember2022In: SapiensArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    From the collapse of Roman power to the spread of Christianity, most of what we know about the lives of people across Europe comes from traces of their deaths. This is because written sources are limited, and in many areas, archaeologists have only found a few farmsteads and villages. But thousands of grave fields have been excavated, adding up to tens of thousands of burials.

    Buried along with the human remains, traces of costumes and often possessions, including knives, swords, shields, spears, and ornate brooches of bronze and silver, have been found by archaeologists. There are glass beads strung as necklaces, as well as glass and ceramic vessels. From time to time, they even find wooden boxes, buckets, chairs, and beds.

    Yet since the investigations of these cemeteries began in the 19th century, archaeologists have recognized that they have not always been the first to reenter the tombs. At least a few graves in most cemeteries are found in a disturbed state, their contents jumbled and valuables missing. Sometimes this happened before the buried bodies were fully decomposed. In some areas, whole cemeteries are found in this state.

    The disturbance has been termed grave robbery and lamented as a loss for archaeology in the removal of hoped-for finds and data. For example, the digger’s reaction to the discovery of one disturbed burial recorded in excavation notes in Kent, England, in the 1970s is typical: “The big event—and disappointment of the day.”

  • 232.
    Krzewińska, Maja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Günther, Torsten
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Omrak, Ayça
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Yaka, Reyhan
    Kılınç, Gülşah Merve
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Somel, Mehmet
    Sobrado, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Evans, Jane
    Knipper, Conine
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Genomic and Strontium Isotope Variation Reveal Immigration Patterns in a Viking Age Town2018In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 28, no 17, p. 2730-2738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of human mobility on the northern European urban populations during the Viking and Early Middle Ages and its repercussions in Scandinavia itself are still largely unexplored. Our study of the demographics in the final phase of the Viking era is the first comprehensive multidisciplinary investigation that includes genetics, isotopes, archaeology, and osteology on a larger scale. This early Christian dataset is particularly important as the earlier common pagan burial tradition during the Iron Age was cremation, hindering large-scale DNA analyses. We present genome-wide sequence data from 23 individuals from the 10th to 12th century Swedish town of Sigtuna. The data revealed high genetic diversity among the early urban residents. The observed variation exceeds the genetic diversity in distinct modern-day and Iron Age groups of central and northern Europe. Strontium isotope data suggest mixed local and non-local origin of the townspeople. Our results uncover the social system underlying the urbanization process of the Viking World of which mobility was an intricate part and was comparable between males and females. The inhabitants of Sigtuna were heterogeneous in their genetic affinities, probably reflecting both close and distant connections through an established network, confirming that early urbanization processes in northern Europe were driven by migration.

  • 233.
    Källén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Madeleine Colani och den besvärliga kroppen2014In: Med hjärta och hjärna: en vänbok till professor Elisabeth Arwill-Nordbladh / [ed] Henrik Alexandersson, Alexander Andreeff, Annika Bünz, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 234.
    Källén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Reflexion (I)2009In: Döda personers sällskap: Gravmaterialens identiteter och kulturella uttryck / [ed] Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie et. al., Stockholm: Stockholms Universitet , 2009, p. 81-84Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 235.
    Källén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Stones Standing: Archaeology, Colonialism, and Ecotourism in Northern Laos2015Book (Refereed)
  • 236.
    Källén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Artelius, Tore
    Arkeologisk Framtid: Arkeologmötet 20082009Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sedan 1994 arrangerar Svenska Arkeologiska Samfundet konferenser som kretsar kring arkeologins roll för människan och samhället. Det åttonde Arkeologmötet hölls i april 2008 på Kulturen i Lund, med temat Framtidens arkeologier - tendenser och visioner. Femton aktiva arkeologer, forskare, kulturskribenter, politiker och myndighetspersoner inviterades för att ge sin syn på den arkeologiska framtiden. I den här boken finner du deras samtidsanalyser och framtidsvisioner presenterade o tretton essäer.

  • 237.
    Källén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. The Swedish History Museum, Sweden.
    Hegardt, Johan
    A Cosmopolitan History of Archaeology: The Olov Janse Case2014In: Bulletin of the History of Archaeology, ISSN 1062-4740, E-ISSN 2047-6930, Vol. 24, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The life of international archaeologist Olov Janse (1892–1985) demonstrates the complexity of personal identify formation. Janse worked in Europe, Scandinavia, South East Asia and North America, spoke many different languages, controlled many collections of artefacts, changed identity or character at least five times, and nationality, three times. It is hoped the themes, elucidated through Janse’s story, will encourage comparisons with, and analyses of, the careers of other cosmopolitan archaeologists, and instigate an international history of archaeology focused on mobility, translation and networks, rather than one based on the impact of archaeology on the development of nation-states.

    A correction article relating to the abstract and author affiliation of this publication can be found here: http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/bha.248

  • 238.
    Källén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Jakobsson, Mikael
    A Hobbling Marriage: On the relationship between the collections and the societal mission of the Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm2009In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 17, p. 149-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 19th century, the new Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm was a cutting-edge institution for the presentation of ideas of a universal human development from primitive to modern – ideas that were at the heart of the European colonial project. We argue that the archaeological collections with their unaltered 19th-century structures still represent a narrative that reproduces a colonial understanding of the world, a linear arrangement of essential cultural groups according to a teleological development model. Contrary to this, the contemporary mission of the Museum, inspired by the late 20th-century postcolonial thinking, is directed towards questioning this particular narrative. This problematic relationship is thus present deep within the structure of the Museum of National Antiquities as an institution, and it points to the need for long-term strategic changes to make the collections useful for vital museum activity in accordance with the Museum’s mission.

  • 239.
    Källén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Sanner, Inga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Making Cultural History: An Introduction2013In: Making Cultural History: New Perspectives on Western Heritage / [ed] Anna Källén, Stockholm: Nordic Academic Press, 2013, p. 7-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 240.
    Körlinge, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Eskilstunakistornas bruk och återbruk: Tidigkristna gravmonument i Östergötland under medeltiden2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the fragmentation and reuse of early christian monuments ("eskilstunakistor") in churches in Östergötland during the medieval period. This is found to have been done in two stages. The first stage shows a collectivization of society. Within religion the change from ancestoral cult towards the saints' cult is important as the fragments are reused like relics. During the second stage the collectivization has been fulfilled, and the reuse is instead part of the christian churches' strategy for incorporating old powerful symbols from the landscape into their own church building.

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    MKorlinge_Eskilstunakistornas_bruk_och_aterbruk
  • 241.
    Larsson, Sabina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Heliga vatten: Vattencentrerad kult och vattnets symbolik under Skandinaviens kristnande2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay aims to explore continuity in water centric cult within the period of the Christianization of Scandinavia (ca 800-1100 AD) and to understand the changing of symbolism of water in pre-Christian cult and early Christian religion. It has previously been thought that Christian priests took over the old holy wells and renamed them after saint, all to ease the pagan people into a Christian lifestyle. But archaeological evidence shows that the cult at these wells, and other water centric sites, where almost completely abandoned a few hundred years before the Christians came to Scandinavia. The Christians should not have felt the need to transform this tradition since it was only practiced in a very small and supposedly private scale. On the contrary, religious activities at these wells seems to increase with the new religion and perhaps this is explained by Christianity itself. Water was an important element in the liturgi and especially in baptism. In early Christian Europe special chapels were built to baptize children but also grown men and women and historical sources speak of the importance of baptism in "living water". This essay discusses the possibility that these wells were used to baptize the newly converted Christians, thus receiving its sacred status. The official sping cult ended in the 16th century with the Protestant Reformation as it was prohibited but still the wells were visited and the cult was kept alive.

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    Heliga vatten
  • 242.
    Lavér, Robbin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Graffiti: En studie kring platsers egenskaper och erbjudanden som inbjuder till graffiti2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master thesis studies the qualities and affordances that a place with graffiti offers to the graffiti artist. Graffiti as a contemporary cultural phenomenon is a well-researched topic but the place in which the graffiti is situated has not been studied. This thesis aims to gather anunderstanding what the qualities of a place or a spot with graffiti offers. Against the theoretical perspectives of Marc Augé (1995) as well as Jeff Farrell & Robert D. Weide (2010) among others, the result of this study shows that the two graffiti sites examined can be labelled as nonplace; a place that has no relational ties to individuals or groups in society. The interaction between the sites’ physical materiality and the graffiti is influenced by what the site offers. The material properties of the site can, for example, be the area that offers a canvas for graffiti. This surface of the canvas is affected by surrounding elements and is used differently by the graffiti artist depending on, for example, visibility as the graffiti need to adapt to the site’s offers ofvisibility and/or the material. This can be done through colour selection, placement and size ofthe graffiti. Further, the context of the site can offer an audience; a visibility. 

  • 243.
    Lavér, Robbin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    I Gapet på Gribshunden: Skulpturer och deras bildspråk under medeltiden2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay deals with the subliminal message commuinicated through pictoral artforms duringthe middle ages. A ship figure head from a shipwreck, Gribshunden (1495) found outside ofBlekinge in the south of Sweden will serve as the focal point of this investigation. Analysis ofcontemporary medieval art and texts in comparison to the figure head will be used tounderstand what the figure head communicated to the common medieval man. 

  • 244.
    Lehtilä, Juuso
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Runstenarna i Sollentuna härad: Om släkt och samhälle under sen vikingatid2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Uppland is the most runestone dense region in Scandinavia and Sollentuna is no exception to this.The goal of this paper is to analyse the inscriptions on the runestones found in Sollentuna härad andthrough them discuss society and familial relationships at the time. Comparisons of the material in Sollentuna to research done on runestones in other areas are done. As runestones are generally Christian monuments they also provide information on the spread of Christianity in the late Vikingage. Their positioning may also provide hints regarding the locations of the earliest churches in the area. They are also considered a tool to assert rights of inheritance and thus also provide informationon the rules of inheritance at the time they were made. Finally, a few of them mention expeditions abroad and provide some information regarding the destinations of these travels as well. Considering the large number of runestones in the area, it is likely that the erection of runestones was popular among most land owning people. Some runic inscriptions are much larger than the others and it is likely that their sponsors wished this to reflect their wealth, prestige and power.

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  • 245.
    Leonardsson, Sasha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Norrby stenar - ett domarringsgravfält i Närke och dess bygdeanknytning2018Student paper second term, 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this essay I will analyze Norrby stenar stone circles in Närke in order to understand the stone circles in relation to the society and landscape around them. I will also compare older with newer reasearch in order to understand how archaeologists have seen the stone circles over time. To do so, I will put the stone circles in relation to the norse mythology and the ideology about Midgård.

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  • 246.
    Leonardsson, Sasha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Smålandsstenar och Närkes Norrby stenar: Domarringsgravfält och folkvandringstida bygder2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay is about the stone circles Norrby Stenar and Smålandsstenar. I will discuss them and their meaning from different angles. By doing that, I hope to understand the stone circles in relation to the society and landscape that surrounds them. These places are unique because there are only stone circles as a burial form there. It is also more then four stone circles on both grave sites. In order to understand these places I will compare them with each other and by others research. I will interpret the monuments through an identity perspective, in relation with the norse mythology. 

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  • 247.
    Li, Cairong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    The Western Philosophical View of Contemporary Chinese Archaeoogical Research and Historiography2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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    fulltext
  • 248.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Prehistoric diet transitions: an archaeological perspective1995Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a study of prehistoric diet transitions within the Baltic area during the Stone Age. More specific the changes in diet expected to be found when hunter-gatherer subsistence is changed into a farming subsistence. This transition should be able to detect in the bone material as changes in trace element amounts and changes in stable isotopes.

    There is an advantage of using quantitative methods compared to qualitative ones when analysing diet patterns, where prehistoric bones have proven to be an excellent archive for long-term quantitatve dietary information.

    This study is based on analyses of stable isotopes and trace elements on more than 120 human bone samples originating from different geographical locations and different time periods. Collagen is the bone protein used for stable isotope analyses. The carbon in collagen originates from the proteins digested and will consequently provide dietary information. Thus it is important that the analysed carbon originates from collagen only. There are, however, other bone constituents that can confuse the measurements, e.g., lipids. They have a deviating isotope value and must be removed before isotope analysis.

    Another problem of using stable carbon isotopes as dietary indicator in the Baltic area has been the complicated natural history of the Baltic Sea. The varying marine influence has affected the isotopic signature, i.e., the marine end-value. However, as long as an end-value is determined at the specific time period of interest, the method works just as in the big oceans (but with a modified end-value).

    In this thesis the isotope studies were combined with trace element analysis of copper and zinc.

    The transition from hunter-gatherers to farmers is one of the most discussed topics in Stone Age archaeology. By using trace elements and stable isotopes it was shown that there was no general picture of the diet during the Stone Age. There was no temporal change, neither was there any correlation between diet and culture. The strongest correlation was instead between diet and geographical location, mostly coastal or inland.

    One hypotheses regarding the transition from hunter-gatherers to farmers is the stress hypothesis. This stipulates that sedentary hunter-fishing populations in northern Europe suffered from nutritional stress. Stable isotope analyses on a sedentary subneolithic Slone Age population from the Aland islands showed that they lived mainly on marine resources. However, from palaeopathological analyses on the skeletal material, it was concluded that this population did not show sufficient indications of stress to support the stress hypothesis.

    Some authors claim that high social complexity is a prerequisite for the introduction of farming. The erection of megaliths is a sign of such a high social complexity and has been suggested to have been built by a cereal cultivating population. Application of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes on two megalith populations (Rössberga, Västergötland, and Resmo, Öland) showed that the introduction of farming in this area was based on domesticated animals but with only a minor influence on cereals. A continued use of marine resources was apparent in the megalith population from coastal areas.

    Finally, a specialized utilization of crustaceans could be shown in settlements at, or nearby, a lagoon, as seen in the populations at Mesolithic Skateholm and at Neolithic Resmo.

  • 249.
    Lilja, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Medicin eller magi? En studie av völvatolkningen i relation till forntida medicin och bolmört i södra Skandinavien2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay aims to understand and analyse earlier research concerning women’s roles in the Late Iron Age through a gender perspective. This will be done by analysing the Volva theory in relation to ancient medicine in Scandinavia with the primary focus on the medicinal herb henbane. The volva theory and the interpretation of grave 4 at the fortification of Fyrkat as a “Volva grave” had an immense impact on contemporary scientific research and popular science. The essay will examine the volva grave, at Fyrkat in Jylland, Denmark because it’s unique finding of henbane seeds. For comparison the essay will look at other archeological contexts containing henbane. The Oseberg grave will also be included in this essay because of its relevance for the volva interpretation and gender discourse in earlier research.

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  • 250.
    Lind, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Fossiliserade frön för en bra Antropocen: Action-arkeologi för hållbarhet och miljö med förslag för applicering i svenska landskap2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with issues on how archaeology might participate in transdisciplinary research andwork towards sustainable development. Three main themes are explored based on sustainabilitywork mainly from Stockholm Resilience Centre and previous archaeological texts about theutilisation of archaeology for environmental benefits. The themes are nature/culture-dichotomies,deep time perspectives and heritage. Each theme is continously adding unto the next one,whereafter applicability scenarios are discussed in three Sweden-specific environmental contexts:The Baltic Sea, agricultural landscapes and the alpine environment. Implications include: thedevelopment of a heritage perspective that bridges the nature-culture divide and focuses oncontinuity rather than preservation and includes human usage of heritage, possibilities forarchaeology to be used to inform environmental management and to counter NIMBY-ism

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