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  • 201.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Thedvall, Renita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Free commodity exchange: Skype and Spotify and the complexity of market relations2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 202.
    Webb, Jane
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Gender Diversity and the City: Softly, Softly Feminism among London's Business Leaders2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In 2011, advisors to the British government recommended against introducing a quota for women to corporate boards in the UK. The advisors instead set an aim for the UK’s 100 largest companies. They recommended company leaders take action to increase female representation on boards from just over 12 per cent in 2011, to a minimum of 25 per cent by 2015. The threat of government intervention remains. The EU Council is currently discussing the European Commission’s proposal for a minimum of 40 per cent of each sex amongst non-executive directors by 2020 across all EU member states. Using material from ten weeks of fieldwork in the City of London, I examine how a loose network of business leaders, lobbyists, journalists and researchers are shaping ideas about gender and business. This network intends to show that a quota is not needed to increase the numbers of women in business leadership. I relate my discussion to ideas of markets and marketing, and to ideas of gender differences and gender equality. I first analyse the ideas set out in the business case for gender diversity and in the term gender balance. I then explore how London’s business leaders enhance personal, employer and corporate brands by publicly demonstrating their commitment to gender balance. Through this commitment, leaders also prove themselves members of the collaboration that unites against a quota. I focus particularly on how senior businesswomen are expected to be role models for other women. I show how role models urge other women to ensure they remain recognisably feminine.

  • 203.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Global Swirl at Dupont Circle: Think Tanks, Connectivity, and the Making of “the Global”2014In: Anthropology Now and Next: essays in Honor of Ulf Hannerz / [ed] Thomas Hylland Eriksen, Christina Garsten and Shalini Randeria, Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 204.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Globala normer för arbete: Anställningsbarhet, mätbarhet och reflexivitet2014In: Det globaliserade arbetslivet / [ed] Marinette Fogde & Johanna Övling, Möklinta: Gidlunds förlag, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 205.
    Navratilova, Hana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Good Times in Buenos Aires: Being an "Expat" in the City of Foreigners2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The following discussion concerns the emergence of and interrelations between the concepts of expatriation, migration, and “othering” in present Buenos Aires. The arguments rest on my fieldwork in Argentina, as well as other studies from around the world. The research on expatriates is usually based in Asia or the UAE, and the region of Latin America is still quite understudied in this respect. Buenos Aires as the “city offoreigners” represents an anthropologically interesting fieldsite. Next to the mostly quantitative research on expatriates, anthropology can give us a better understanding of their practices and experiences. Furthermore, it challenges our ideas of these concepts weuse to describe different groups of people (e. g. expatriate, immigrant), and allows us tounderstand how they are socially constructed. Hence, my study offers a new view on expatriation in a broader context of post-colonialism and current trends in globalization.The city's historical context must be considered as well in order to understand the complexities of terms such as foreigner or immigrant.

  • 206.
    Andersson, Ruben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. London School of Economics, UK.
    Hunter and prey: Patrolling Clandestine Migration in the Euro-African Borderlands2014In: Anthropological Quarterly, ISSN 0003-5491, E-ISSN 1534-1518, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 119-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past decade, the European Union and its member states have invested heavily in a far-reaching, diffuse, and technologized border regime targeting the elusive figure of the clandestine or illegal African migrant. Taking the mismatch between these large investments and the statistically small number of overland irregular migrants as its starting point, this article explores the embodied effects of illegality engendered in the policing of the Euro-African borderlands. Based on fieldwork with West African police forces, aid organizations, and migrants, it focuses on the migration circuit between the Sahel and Spain, where a joint European response to irregular flows was first tried and tested under the umbrella of the EU border agency Frontex. By highlighting the means of detection used to apprehend illegal migrants - from bodily signs to presumed intentions to migrate - the article looks at how an increasingly reified and embodied modality of migrant illegality is produced on the circuit between West Africa and Europe's southern shores. This production of illegality crucially depends on the incentives offered to African forces for participating in European controls. Tensions among African officers over the unequal gains from such incentives and ambivalence over the rationale for controls, I argue, make the transnational policing of clandestine migration a fraught site of state investment and concern.

  • 207.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Högt spel i gränslandet mellan politik och marknad2014In: Alla dessa marknader: RJ:s årsbok 2014/2015 / [ed] Jenny Björkman, Björn Fjæstad & Susanna Alexius, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2014, p. 173-184Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Imagining the South Seas in Mid-Twentieth Century Sweden2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this paper is on the mediated lives of two Swedish men who for different reasons and at different times ended up living in the Pacific. One was Carl-Emil Pettersson, 1875-1937, the real-life person behind the absent, geographically remote, father of Pippi Longstocking, the popular fictional character created in a number of childen’s books by Astrid Lindgren. The other was the explorer, ethnographer, author and journalist Bengt Danielsson, “Resare-Bengt” (“Traveller-Bengt”), 1921-1997. Together they shaped the notion of life in the South Seas for generations of Swedes.

    The cosmopolitan literary genre of travel writing translates, mediates and circulates accounts from and of the world – from one local setting to another, and over time. Frequently it has been more influential in shaping perceptions of people and places than scholarly ethnographic publications. For 250 years, Western writers have travelled to the South Seas, found it to be ‘Paradise on Earth’ and written home about it. With this study of both a genre and a profession, I seek to understand how the discourse about this most romanticized area on earth is constructed and what makes it so resilient. In this instance, during one extended period, Pippi Longstocking’s father and Resare- Bengt as Swedish sojourners far away from a largely sedentary home milieu reached into the imagination of both children and adults, and could thereby also support each other.    

  • 209.
    Lindquist, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Barker, Joshua
    Indonesia2014In: Figures of Southeast Asian modernity / [ed] Joshua Barker, Erik Harms and Johan Lindquist, Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press , 2014, p. 130-133Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 210. Gil Araujo, Sandra
    et al.
    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    International migration, public policies and domestic work Latin American migrant women in the Spanish domestic work sector2014In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, Vol. 46, p. 13-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the Spanish case, in this article we explore the connection between migration policies, family policies, gender regimes and the insertion of Latin American migrant women into the domestic work sector. Over the first decade of the twenty-first century, Latin America became the main region of origin of migrants who had settled in Spain, being women the first link in these migration chains. The main factors that have affected the configuration of this feminization are linked to migration policies and patterns of migration, the features of the welfare state, the characteristics of the labor market and the way in which gender organizes and stratifies migration and domestic work. The achievement of national middle class women's rights to conciliate their professional and family life through outsourcing domestic work to non-national women also brings with it a deep inequality in terms of citizenship.

  • 211. Krause-Jensen, Jakob
    et al.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introduction: neoliberal turns in higher education2014In: Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1755-2273, E-ISSN 1755-2281, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 212.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Eriksen Hylland, Thomas
    Randeria, Shalini
    Introduction: Ulf Hannerz and the Militant Middle Ground2014In: Anthropology now and next: essays in honor of Ulf Hannerz / [ed] Thomas Eriksen Hylland, Christina Garsten and Shalini Randeria, New York: Berghahn Books, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 213.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    "It has all been planned": Talking about us and powerful others in contemporary Syria2014In: Conspiracy theories in the United States and the Middle East: A comparative approach / [ed] Butter, Michael; Reinkowski, Maurus, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2014, p. 212-227Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 214.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Kvinnor tar makt över sitt huvud2014In: Årsbok / Garde Robe ; 2013, Stockholm: Garde Robe , 2014, , p. 5Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 215. Koene, Bas
    et al.
    Galais, Nathalie
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Management and Organization of Temporary Agency Work Foreword2014In: Management and Organization of Temporary Agency Work / [ed] Koene, B; Garsten, C; Galais, N, LONDON: Routledge, 2014, Vol. 27, p. xi-XIIChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 216. Koene, Bas
    et al.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Copenhagen Business School, Denmark; Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Galais, Nathalie
    Management and organization of temporary work2014In: Management and organization of temporary agency work / [ed] Bas Koene, Christina Garsten and Nathalie Galais, London: Routledge, 2014, Vol. 27, p. 1-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 217. Xiang, Biao
    et al.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Migration Infrastructure2014In: The international migration review, ISSN 0197-9183, E-ISSN 1747-7379, Vol. 48, p. s122-S148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the authors' long-term field research on low-skilled labor migration from China and Indonesia, this article establishes that more than ever labor migration is intensively mediated. Migration infrastructure - the systematically interlinked technologies, institutions, and actors that facilitate and condition mobility - serves as a concept to unpack the process of mediation. Migration can be more clearly conceptualized through a focus on infrastructure rather than on state policies, the labor market, or migrant social networks alone. The article also points to a trend of infrastructural involution, in which the interplay between different dimensions of migration infrastructure make it self-perpetuating and self-serving, and impedes rather than enhances people's migratory capability. This explains why labor migration has become both more accessible and more cumbersome in many parts of Asia since the late 1990s. The notion of migration infrastructure calls for research that is less fixated on migration as behavior or migrants as the primary subject, and more concerned with broader societal transformations.

  • 218. Gruber, Sabine
    et al.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Multiculturalism Swedish style: shifts and sediments in educational policies and textbooks2014In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 56-66Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 219.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Multi-Sited Ethnography: Problems and Possibilities in the Translocation of Research Methods2014In: American Anthropologist, ISSN 0002-7294, E-ISSN 1548-1433, Vol. 116, no 1, p. 198-199Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 220.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Thedvall, Renita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Polarization and convergence of values at the intermediary position2014In: Configuring Value Conflicts in Markets / [ed] Susanna Alexius, Kristina Tamm Hallström, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, p. 145-158Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 221.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    På spaning i staten: antropologiska utblickar2014In: Demokrati och förvaltning: en festskrift till Rune Premfors / [ed] Bengt Jacobsson & Göran Sundström, Stockholm: Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research , 2014, p. 37-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 222.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Reflections in and on the Hall of Mirrors2014In: Anthropology now and next: essays in honor of Ulf Hannerz / [ed] Thomas Hylland Eriksen, Christina Garsten, and Shalini Randeria, New York: Berghahn Books, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 223.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Secret Societies, Opaque Routes: Advancing Corporate Politics through the World Economic Forum2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    LAEMOS 2014

    Subtheme 8

    The Corporatization of Politics and the Politicization of Corporations

     

     

    The Politicization of Corporations: The Case of the World Economic Forum

    Christina Garsten and Adrienne Sörbom

     

     

    Abstract

     

    This paper departs from an interest in the involvement of business leaders in the sphere of politics, in the broad sense. At a general level, we are seeing a proliferation of usages of non-market corporate strategies, such as testimony, lobbying, interlocking of positions and other means to influence policymakers at all levels of government and international institutions as an adjunct to the firm’s market strategies. This paper brings to the fore the role of corporations in the World Economic Forum (WEF), and how firms act through the WEF to advance their interests, financial as well as political. What is the role of business in the WEF, and how do business corporations advance their interests through the WEF?

     

    Inspired by Stephen Barley's (2010) work on how corporations have systematically built an institutional field to exert greater influence on the US Federal government, we aim to enhance knowledge on how the WEF and the 1,000 corporations that are active within it influence the larger socio-cultural context in which they are embedded. Empirically we depart from ethnographic field studies of the World Economic Forum, drawing on observations from WEF-events and interviews with participants and organizers. Theoretically we will employ an organizational perspective, using the concept of "partial organization" as introduced by Göran Ahrne and Nils Brunsson (2011).

     

    The results show that corporations find a strategically positioned amplifier for their non-market interests in the WEF. The WEF functions to enhance and gain leverage for their ideas and priorities in a highly selective and resourceful environment. In the long run, both the market priorities and the political interests of business may be served by engagement in the WEF.

     

    However, the WEF cannot only be conceived as the extended voice of corporations. The WEF also makes strategic use of the corporations to organize and expand their own agency, which not necessarily coincides with the interests of multinational corporations.  By way of corporate financial resources, the tapping of knowledge and expertise, and access to vast networks of business relations, the WEF is also able to amplify its own voice. The organized network, in the format of partial organization, which is the preferred form of organization of the WEF, comes with weakened power in the form of oversight and sanctions for the member corporations, but may allow for a concentration of resources at the center. The periphery has little sanctioned insight into the core of the organization, and a weak voice in influencing the operations of the organization. Actors in the partially organized environment thus have to rely on the goodwill of the leadership. 

  • 224.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Small places, big stakes : "Meetings" as moments of ethnographic momentum2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnographic fieldwork in organizations – such as corporations, state agencies, and international organizations – often entails that the ethnographer has to rely to a large extent on meetings as the primary point of access. Oftentimes, this involves doing fieldwork in workshops, at ceremonies, and at other staged, formal events. In addition, such fieldwork tends to be both multilocal, mobile, and discontinuous. It may not provide as much of a flavour of the different local sites and a sense of ‘being there' as one would wish for. The tendency in anthropology to favour the informal, the ‘genuine' or ‘authentic' as well as the spontaneous, may leave one with a lingering feeling of having to make do with second-rate material, i.e. the formal, the superficial, and the organized. To a large extent, the staged character of the social events that are accessible to the ethnographer suggests that s/he has been left of much of ‘what is really going on', and ‘what people are really up to.' Meetings, however, as organized and ritualized social events, may provide the ethnographer with a loupe through which key tenets of larger social groups and organizations, and big issues, may be carefully observed. In formal meetings, political priorities, economic values, and social priorities are often condensed, played out and negotiated, turning meetings into strategic sites from which to observe the organization at large. The paper is based on experiences from fieldwork in corporations, think thanks, and international organizations.

  • 225.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research2014In: Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm University: 1964-2014 / [ed] Gudrun Dahl, Mats Danielson, Stockholm: Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm University , 2014, p. 389-405Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 226.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Svašek, Maruška (ed.). Moving subjects, moving objects: transnationalism, cultural productions and emotions2014In: Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, ISSN 1359-0987, E-ISSN 1467-9655, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 374-375Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 227.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Emergence of Minorities in the Middle East.: The Politics of Community in French Mandate Syria2014In: Insight Turkey, ISSN 1302-177X, Vol. 16, no 1Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 228.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Olsson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Performance of Early Age Migrants in Education and the Labour Market: a Comparison of Bosnia Herzegovinians, Chileans and Somalis in Sweden2014In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 778-795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how early age immigrants to Sweden from Bosnia-Herzegovina, Chile and Somalia perform in education and the labour market in comparison with the children of natives. As the results demonstrate, the socio-economic position of the parents, family structure and other demographic characteristics of individuals only partially explain the differences between the descendants of natives and young immigrants from these countries. A further analysis demonstrates that the socio-historical contexts into which these immigrant children arrive and settle, that is the processes of migration, are equally likely to have an impact on young immigrants' performance.

  • 229.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Role of Travel Literature in the Production of Paradise2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The cosmopolitan literary genre of travel writing translates, mediates and circulates accounts from and of the world from one local setting to another, and over time. This paper presents a planned study of Western travel writers’ persistent and persuasive accounts of life in the South Seas as ‘Paradise on Earth’. For 250 years, travel writers have travelled to the South Seas, found it to be ‘Paradise’ and written home about it. The forthcoming study is both of a genre and a profession in which I seek to understand how the discourse of ‘Paradise on Earth’ is constructed and also what makes it resilient. The texts analyzed will be in English and cover the genre from early accounts of British explorers through contemporary American and Australian travel literature that cater to a large readership. For comparative insight the more limited Swedish travel literature on the South Seas will also be taken into account. As a particular corpus, travel writing is one of the oldest forms of literature and has in fact been more influential in shaping perceptions of people and places than scholarly ethnographic publications. Contemporary travel literature lump together the thousands of tropical islands scattered in the South Sea and turn them into an idea rather than a geographical location.  The project will contribute to a debate on exoticism and domination through textual (mis)representation. The issue at stake is: How does Western travel literature, past and present, produce the resilient notion of the South Seas as ‘Paradise on Earth’? 

  • 230.
    Tunestad, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Therapeutization of Work: The Psychological Toolbox as Rationalization Device during the Third Industrial Revolution in Sweden2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The organization of work in the Western welfare states has made use of psychological know-how since the early twentieth century, for instance by making the practices of ‘psychotechnics’ and ‘human relations’ a part of the production apparatus. The last decades, however, have seen the development of a new economy based on information and communication technologies and with a related shift in organizational ideals from large hierarchical structures to networks of self-governing units – a change sometimes labelled the third industrial revolution. This development has meant new possibilities for the deployment of psychological knowledge in organizational management.

    The present study takes as its geographical starting point the greater Stockholm area in Sweden. Through a variant of multi-sited fieldwork it investigates the distribution of psychological know-how in and through different institutions – such as school, work life, health care – by which the average ‘worker-citizen’ is supposed to acquire a ‘psychological toolbox’, thus becoming a kind of amateur psychologist or therapist, ready and able to take responsibility for his or her own productivity, well-being and health. The study depicts this ideal of psychological self-regulation: its discourse and practices, and how it emerged as a part of the technological and organizational developments of the third industrial revolution.

  • 231.
    Nyrén, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    “The Voice of the Voiceless”: News production and journalistic practice at Al Jazeera English2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    This thesis explores how the cultural and social media environments surrounding the journalism of Al Jazeera English are shaped by and shape the channel’s news practices. Al Jazeera English has been described as a contra-flow news organization in the global media landscape and this thesis discusses the different reasons why the channel is described in this way by looking at its origins, aims, characteristics and ideals. Based on interviews with Al Jazeera English journalists, news observations and two field observations in London, I argue that Al Jazeera English brings cultural and social sensitivity to its news reports by engaging with multiple in-depth perspectives, using local reporters and integrating citizen generated material. The channel’s early adoption of online technologies and citizen journalism also contributes to a more democratic news direction and gives the channel a wider spectrum of opinions and perspectives to choose between. By applying a comparative analysis built on similar studies within anthropology of news journalism differences and similarities within the journalistic practices can be detected, comparing Al Jazeera English’s journalism with journalism at other places and news organizations. These comparisons and discussions enables new understandings for how news is produced and negotiated within the global media landscape, and this gives the global citizen an improved comprehension of why the news, which shapes our appreciation of the world, looks like it does. In conclusion, this awareness opens up for a discussion towards a societal transformation that gives space for a more multifaceted journalism distancing itself from one-sided perspectives and institutional censoring.

  • 232.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Think tanks as policy brokers in partially organized fields: The case of World Economic Forum2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As has been noted in research on think tanks it is difficult to describe what a think tank is, and to pinpoint what it is in think tank activities that generates powerful relationships towards other actors. This is even more the case when talking of transnational think tanks. In this report we give a theoretical account of how relationships organized by transnational think tanks may be analyzed.

    In the report we are drawing on empirical findings from the World Economic Forum (WEF), seen as a transnational think tank addressing a non-national audience. We are suggesting that think-tank experts are engaged in the brokerage of ideas and knowledge, implying anintermediary activity, wherein ideas are translated, shaped and formatted. Operating at the interfaces of various actors, think-tank experts formulate and negotiate ideas with and among actors, encouraging them to adopt and use those ideas.

    The main argument in the report is that this brokerage can be seen to generate ‘partially organized fields’. The think tank organizes other actors not by constructing a complete organization, but by establishing and maintaining a decided network, drawing upon such organizational elements as membership, monitoring and sanctions. This allows think tanks to maintain a degree of flexibility, whilst gaining control of valuable resources.

    In the case of the WEF the report show that the combination of a small core of completeorganization with a larger environment of only partial organizing essentially allows the WEF to be bigger than they actually are. The decided networks, i.e. the partnerships, the working groups, and the communities, significantly extends the reach of the WEF, allowing it to reach across organizational boundaries.

    We suggest that this form of organizing is the prime way for transnational think tanks toorganize outside themselves, thereby exerting political influence. The potential influence it may exert resides in its influence over the shaping of agendas in other organizations, the formulation of pressing political issues, and by mobilizing actors in their decided networks to carry the issues further, on other organizational platforms and with other organizational mandates.

  • 233.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Thriving dance spaces in the north: Nordic Dance Spaces: Practicing and Imagining a Region. Karen Vedel and Petri Hoppu, editors2014In: Nordic Journal of Dance, ISSN 1891-6708, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 50-51Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 234.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Tinkering with knowledge: representational practices and scaling in U.S. think tanks2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Think tanks, or policy institutes, are becoming significant ‘sites of normativity’ on the global political scene. While their primary concern often is to provide knowledge, based on which decision makers can make informed choices, they also play a part in setting organizational agendas and priorities, and in mobilizing for political action. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in think tanks in Washington DC, the paper engages with the modes representation used by policy experts as they strive to get traction and establish credibility for their ideas. The work of policy experts can be understood as a form of ‘bricolage,’ in which information and normative perspectives are tinkered with and are thus afforded truth-value. The use of distanciation and proximation techniques facilitates the continuous scale-making processes in which policy experts are involved.

  • 235.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Haunschild, Axel
    Transient and Flexible Work Lives Liminal Organizations and the Reflexive Habitus2014In: MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION OF TEMPORARY AGENCY WORK / [ed] Koene, B; Garsten, C; Galais, N, LONDON: ROUTLEDGE , 2014, Vol. 27, p. 23-37Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 236.
    Vonderau, Asta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Deutschland.
    Schmitt, Caroline
    Transnationalität und Öffentlichkeit: Interdisziplinäre Perspektiven2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 237.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Thedvall, Renita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Transparency by proxy: knowledge, indicators, and legitimacy in market practice2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 238.
    Mutgan, Selcan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Trends in Early Marriage in Shashemene, Ethiopia2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the Family Code of 2000 that raised the legal age at marriage to 18 for both sexes; early family formation is still a common practice which affect many children in Ethiopia. Previous research has shown that girls in rural areas are more disadvantaged and suffer the consequences of early marriage the most. The purpose of this thesis is to study the risk factors for early marriage for both girls and boys in an urban area, Shashemene. Also, using longitudinal data, trends in early family formation between 1973 and 2008 have been analyzed with an event history approach. The data were collected as part of the project “Changing Ethiopia: Urban livelihood, gender, and ethnicity in Shashemene after 35 years: A case study”. The discrete-time complementary log-log regression estimates have provided evidence of gender inequality in early marriage formations, showing that girls are more prone to experience early marriage than boys. While area of birth (rural-urban) has no direct impact on the risk of early marriage, it is found that living in an urban area offsets the effect of area of birth, suggesting a selection process into migration. It is also found that school attendance decreases the likelihood of early marriage, while literacy has little effect. Moreover, among people living in Shashemene, religious affiliation has more impact on early marriage risks than ethnic identity and the first language. Finally, there was little evidence on period and cohort effects for early family formation.

  • 239.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Uneasy alignment: Transparency and opacity at the World Economic Forum2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 240.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Values aligned: the organization of conflicting values within the World Economic Forum2014In: Configuring Value Conflicts in Markets / [ed] Susanna Alexius, Kristina Tamm Hallström, Padstow: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, p. 159-177Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 241.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    “Without our church we will disappear”: Syrian Orthodox Christians in diaspora and the family law of the church2014In: Family, religion and law: cultural encounters in Europe / [ed] Prakash Shah, Marie-Claire Foblets and Mathias Rohe, Farnham: Ashgate, 2014, p. 181-194Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 242. Schmitt, Caroline
    et al.
    Vonderau, Asta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Öffentlichkeiten in Bewegung2014In: Transnationalität und Öffentlichkeit: Interdisziplinäre Perspektiven / [ed] Schmitt Caroline, Vonderau Asta, Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag, 2014, p. 7-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 243.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    A detective story writer: exploring Stockholm as it once was2013In: City & Society, ISSN 0893-0465, E-ISSN 1548-744X, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 260-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a change in the typical setting of detective fiction, from small, closed, tranquil communities to urban contexts of greater opacity and diversity. Its hero/heroine is thus now a recurrent figure in a global genre of urban fiction; and the actual detective story writer is a connoisseur of life in the big city. In this article I point to a certain affinity between detective stories and urban ethnography, and proceed to suggest some contrasts between Swedish writers who have recently achieved international fame and a writer of an earlier generation whom I knew personally. This is a way of demonstrating changes in the urban scene of Stockholm, and transformations in Swedish national society.

  • 244.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Access to all stages?: studying through policy in a culture of accessibility2013In: Organisational anthropology: doing ethnography in and among complex organisations / [ed] Christina Garsten, Anette Nyqvist, London: Pluto Press, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, I describe and discuss access as an ongoing situational and relational process of ethnographic fieldwork. I have two interrelated goals for this chapter, both concerning processual aspects of accessibility. Based on various research projects on the performativity of policy in such diverse fields as national social insurance politics and the financial market, I begin by proposing a contextualised view of access. I argue that a culture of accessibility has evolved within the Swedish public administration system, such that access has become the norm and that access policies are organising principles that shape the way ‘we live, act and think’ (Shore & Wright 1997:i) – and not least do they affect the civil servants working within government authorities. I then discuss how a problematising perspective on access processes can help shed light on methodological aspects concerning forms of engagement with and within formal organisations. In doing this, I hope to contribute to a more complex and nuanced conceptualisation of access, a key concern of any ethnographic inquiry. After describing accessibility as a culture and organising principle, I stop to ask four questions. Access of what? Where? To whom? For what purpose? As we all know, access is not merely a matter of getting through the door. 

  • 245.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    All about ties: Think tanks and the economy of connections2013In: Organisational anthropology: doing ethnography in and among complex organisations / [ed] Christina Garsten and Anette Nyqvist, London: Pluto Press, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 246.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    An Interview with James Siegel2013In: Public culture, ISSN 0899-2363, E-ISSN 1527-8018, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 559-573Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 247.
    Viktorin, Mattias
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Widmark, CharlottaUppsala universitet.
    Antropologi och tid2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 248.
    Viktorin, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Antropologi och tid—en inledning2013In: Antropologi och tid / [ed] Mattias Viktorin och Charlotta Widmark, Stockholm: Svenska Sällskapet för Antropologi och Geografi , 2013, p. 7-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 249.
    Tunestad, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Arbetslivets terapeutisering2013In: TAM-revy, ISSN 1654-6997, no 2, p. 6-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 250.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Beyond Anti-Anti Trafficking2013In: Dialectical Anthropology, ISSN 0304-4092, E-ISSN 1573-0786, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 319-323Article in journal (Refereed)
2345678 201 - 250 of 840
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