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  • 201.
    Gemzöe, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Every minute out there: Creating ritual among Swedish pilgrims on their way to Compostela2014In: Journal of Ritual Studies, ISSN 0890-1112, Vol. 28, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 202.
    Gemzöe, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies.
    Feminine Matters. Women’s Religious Practices in a Portuguese Town.2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book explores the religious lives of Catholic women in Vila Branca (a pseudonym), a small town on the north coast of Portugal. The study deals with various facets of Catholic religious life, such as the cult of the saints and the Virgin Mary; death-related practices; the material culture of Catholicism; pilgrimage journeys; and the ambiguous relationship between women and priests. The author argues that in order to understand the processes that underlie these religious phenomena, it is crucial to understand the actual role of women.

  • 203.
    Gemzöe, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Nature, health and healing: gendered ritual in Swedish pilgrimage2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 204.
    Gerholm, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Market, mosque and mafraj: social inequality in a Yemeni town1977Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 205. Gil Araujo, Sandra
    et al.
    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    International migration, public policies and domestic work Latin American migrant women in the Spanish domestic work sector2014In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, Vol. 46, p. 13-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the Spanish case, in this article we explore the connection between migration policies, family policies, gender regimes and the insertion of Latin American migrant women into the domestic work sector. Over the first decade of the twenty-first century, Latin America became the main region of origin of migrants who had settled in Spain, being women the first link in these migration chains. The main factors that have affected the configuration of this feminization are linked to migration policies and patterns of migration, the features of the welfare state, the characteristics of the labor market and the way in which gender organizes and stratifies migration and domestic work. The achievement of national middle class women's rights to conciliate their professional and family life through outsourcing domestic work to non-national women also brings with it a deep inequality in terms of citizenship.

  • 206.
    González Fernández, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Globally Interdependent Households: Irregular Migrants Employed in Domestic and Care Work in Spain2013In: Irregular Migrant Domestic Workers in Europe: Who Cares? / [ed] Anna Triandafyllidou, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, p. 187-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 207.
    González, Tania
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Gil Araujo, Sandra
    Montañés Sánchez, Virginia
    Política migratoria y derechos humanos en el Mediterráneo español: El impacto del control migratorio en los tránsitos de la migración africana hacia Europa2013In: Revista de Derecho Migratorio y Extranjería, ISSN 1695-3509, no 33, p. 245-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the entrance of Spain into the EU, the Mediterranean became the southern border of Europe and a focal point of the migratory pressure from Africa to Europe. Since then, the fight against irregular immigration, the increased surveillance and migration control, and the cooperation with countries of migration transit and origin have become core elements of the Spanish migration policy. The imposition of visas to African countries, the border control, the reinforcement of the fence in Ceuta and Melilla, the Frontex development, EUROSUR, SIVE, the Seahorse Project, the return agreements, the joint surveillance patrols at the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, and the inclusion of migration as a theme in Spanish external relations with emigration countries are instruments of externalization and Europeanization of Spanish migration policy.In this article, we focus our attention on the effects of migration control on the Spanish maritime border on the transit of migrants coming from Africa. The experiences of migrants who arrived irregularly in the Andalusian coast between 2010 and 2011 are taken as a case study. In particular, we are interested in exploring the violation offundamental rights throughout the different stages that make up the migration process: starting at the place of origin and the journey experience on land, the situation of migrants at sea, the interception of vessels, landing and retention. We will discuss in more detail the processes of identification, treatment, and protection of particularly vulnerable groups, as well as the gender relations that are embedded within these practices.

  • 208.
    González-Fernández, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Baldassar, Loretta and Merla, Laura (eds.) (2014). Transnational Families, Migration and the Circulation of Care. Understanding Mobility and Absence in Family Life. London and New York: Routledge2014In: Papeles del CEIC, ISSN 1695-6494, Vol. 2, p. 1-8Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 209.
    González-Fernández, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Entre nodos y nudos: ambivalencias emocionales en la migración transnacional: Una aproximación etnográfica a las emociones a partir de familias transnacionales entre Bolivia y España2016In: Odisea. Revista de Estudios Migratorios, ISSN 2408-445X, no 3, p. 99-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork carried out in Bolivia and Spain, this article explores the reconfiguration of family relations maintained by middle-aged migrant women in a context of transnational migration. Indeed, transnational migration triggers contradictory feelings for those leaving and for those who stay behind. The individuals interviewed repeatedly express mixed feelings of guilt, pride, sadness and satisfaction, often interwoven with meaningful silences, demands, and expectations. In this particular instance, the aim is to visibilize the emotional dimension inherent in family relations at a distance to demonstrate how migration is also affected by the weight of care responsibilities, the family life course, gender roles, or intergenerational relations.

  • 210.
    González-Fernández, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Feeling Across Distance: Transnational Migration, Emotions, and Family Life Between Bolivia and Spain2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the relational dynamics of family life as it is lived across vast distances and over time? What underpins these relations, practices, and experiences of being apart and yet together? Based on a long-term multi-sited fieldwork carried out in Spain and Bolivia from 2013 to 2015, this study sets out to address these questions by investigating caring practices, mediated connections, (non)material exchanges, and lived experiences of “doing” and “feeling” family across borders. It conveys the story of ten families divided between Madrid and the Bolivian urban areas of Cochabamba, Sucre, and Santa Cruz de la Sierra. Taking as a point of departure the encounters with middle-aged women who migrated to Spain in the early 2000s, the thesis moves back and forth between “here” and “there” to provide a polyphonic account of family relationships as they are sustained, enacted, and experienced by both those who leave and those who stay. It does so by exploring the transnational provision of care, the routines of keeping in touch, the exchange of remittances and material goods, as well as the interplay of these practices with the management of emotions and the circulation of affects. The term “affective maps” is employed here as a concept to capture the myriad of relatives taking part in these connections, in that it points out how these are strongly interdependent relationships through which people have the capacity to affect and to be affected by one another across distance. More specifically, this study demonstrates how the various ways of dealing with transnational family life are constantly shaped by migration regimes, restrictive policies, and global inequalities, on the one hand, and by power social relations, gender and generational roles, and life-course stages, on the other. To illuminate the dynamics at play, the notion of “feel-work” is introduced as a tuned-in ethnographic practice that simultaneously engages the body and the mind, reasoning and feeling. This study is thus a multi-sited ethnography contributing further knowledge into emotions and affects in human mobility, while it consistently uses emotions and affects as methodological and epistemological tools. The thesis argues that family members recreate a sense of “closeness” and maintain their emotional connection despite not being physically together nor seeing each other over long periods of absence. Ultimately, in grappling with the affective dimension of family relationships in the distinct context of current Bolivia-to-Spain migration, this thesis aims to shed some light on the emotional and the corporeal as constitutive aspects of the ethnographic endeavor.

  • 211.
    Graham, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Anthropological Explorations in Queer Theory2014Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The book many of us have been waiting for somebody to write: anthropology meets contemporary theory, with summaries and overviews ranging from Lacan to process philosophy and more. Anthropological Explorations in Queer Theory is helpful for researchers wanting to update themselves, and also for classroom use. Ethnographic discussion of exciting themes such as perfume and species thinking weave in with contributions to current debate, including an excellent critique of intersectionality.

  • 212.
    Graham, Mark
    Stockholm University.
    Classifications, Persons and Policies: Refugees and Swedish Welfare Bureaucracy1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 213.
    Graham, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Official optimism in the face of an uncertain future Swedish reactions to climate change threats2016In: Environmental Change and the World's Futures: Ecologies, Ontologies and Mythologies / [ed] Jonathan Paul Marshall, Linda H. Connor, Routledge, 2016, p. 233-246Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 214.
    Gullberg, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Republic of Difference: Feminism and anti-racism in the Parisian banlieues2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis is an ethnographic study of three political groups in the Parisian banlieues: Ni putes ni soumises, AFRICA and Mouvement des indigènes de la République. These groups espouse both feminist and antiracist politics in theory, yet in practice tend to privilege either a feminist or  antiracist position and end up in opposition to each other. To explain why, the thesis locates their respective politics within French colonial heritage, French secularism (laïcité), and current politics surrounding Muslims in France, especially Muslim women in the banlieues. The thesis draws on anthropological theory, feminist theory, intersectionality, and post-colonial studies. 

  • 215.
    Gustafson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    "We Are Not Welcome": The Life and Experinces of Female Migrants in Cape Town2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is an ethnographic study of the life of female migrants in Cape Town. The thesis is based on material gathered through informal conversations, semi-structured interviews and participant observation conducted among female migrants in Cape Town.

    South Africa is today the strongest economy in the Southern African region which attracts people from other poorer African countries. They migrate to South Africa for a chance to a better life or an opportunity to support themselves and their families. However, South Africa´s restrictive immigration policies make it difficult for many migrants to obtain the right documents and be able to ‘legally’ cross the South African border. Even if migrants get an asylum-seekers permit they are not allowed to legally work in the country. They are included and excluded at the same time. The constant ‘criminalization’ of migrants´ acts makes it hard for migrants to access any human rights and protection in general, which makes them more vulnerable to exploitation.

    More and more women are crossing the borders to South Africa to get work and physical security as a part of the global ‘feminization’ of migration. Women´s movement therefore questions the picture of the man as the sole breadwinner. Even though this is the reality women are excluded from the discourse about migration and existing immigration policies in South Africa. Female migrants are not acknowledged as important actors and are even more vulnerable in the forced and marginalized position of ‘illegality’, then male migrants.

    This study explores the female migrants´ own experiences of struggles like getting documented, work, secure housing and being exposed to xenophobia. The women have also developed different strategies to handle these difficulties. This thesis criticizes the ‘victimization’ of female migrants, which ascribes them with powerlessness and being without agency, and shows that they are active in seeking solutions and creating strategies to increase their scope of action.

  • 216.
    Haaland Pers, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    I gränslandet mellan statsrepresentant och privatperson: En etnografisk studie av svenska privat-twittrande poliser2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna masteruppsats behandlar gruppen privat-twittrande poliser – individer som i egenskap av privatpersoner skildrar sitt förhållningssätt och sina åsikter kring sitt yrke som polis genom sociala medie-forumet Twitter. Studien är baserad på etnografiskt fältarbete utfört under hösten 2014. Sedan den svenska Polisens officiella intåg på sociala medier under början av 2010-talet har fler och fler yrkesverksamma poliser börjat använda digitala plattformar såsom Twitter, Facebook och Instagram för att skildra en egen syn på den polisiära yrkesrollen samt diskutera Polisens samhällsfunktion och verksamhetsförfarande. Till skillnad från officiella myndighetsrepresentanter på Twitter står de privat-twittrande poliserna fria från det direkta representativa ansvar som det innebär att professionellt företräda staten och behöver således inte enbart handla i enlighet med den officiella verksamhetsagendan. Trots friheten från direkt ansvar upplevs dock många av individerna, av allmänheten, som polisrepresentanter i och med deras primärt yrkesrelaterade kommunikation. I gränslandet mellan statsrepresentant och privatperson upprättas en säregen maktposition vilken, med hjälp av Twitter som socialt verktyg, förstärker de privat-twittrande polisernas möjligheter att prägla och nyansera den samhälleliga föreställningen om det polisiära varandet.

  • 217.
    Hallgren, Claes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Morally united and politically divided: the Chinese community of Penang1986Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 218.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    A detective story writer: exploring Stockholm as it once was2013In: City & Society, ISSN 0893-0465, E-ISSN 1548-744X, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 260-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a change in the typical setting of detective fiction, from small, closed, tranquil communities to urban contexts of greater opacity and diversity. Its hero/heroine is thus now a recurrent figure in a global genre of urban fiction; and the actual detective story writer is a connoisseur of life in the big city. In this article I point to a certain affinity between detective stories and urban ethnography, and proceed to suggest some contrasts between Swedish writers who have recently achieved international fame and a writer of an earlier generation whom I knew personally. This is a way of demonstrating changes in the urban scene of Stockholm, and transformations in Swedish national society.

  • 219.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Afterword: the long march of anthropology.2009In: Multi-sited ethnography: theory, praxis and locality in contemporary research / [ed] Mark-Anthony Falzon, Farnham: Ashgate, 2009, p. 271-281Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A discussion of historical forerunners of the contemporary wave of multi-site, or translocal, field studies in anthropology

  • 220.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Anthropologists everywhere: getting to know your colleagues2012In: Anthropology News, ISSN 1541-6151, E-ISSN 1556-3502, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 20-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 221.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Anthropology's world: life in a twenty-first-century discipline2010Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What, in these times, in is anthropology for? How do anthropologists want to be understood? For whom do they write, and in what language? And can we use anthropology's past as a resource for thinking about challenges past and future? In his new book, Ulf Hannerz cements his reputation as one of anthropology's finest writers, showing how anthropology came to be a central intellectual discipline and why it is vital that it remains so in an increasingly globalized world. "Anthropology's world" refers, on the one hand, to the discipline as a social world in itself, as a community stretching across national boundaries. It also refers to the wider outside world to which it must relate in various ways. This book deals with the world of anthropology through a broad and revealing historical analysis, questioning the way anthropologists approach their work now, and speculating how they will do so in the future. Turning the toolkit of the anthropologist upon the discipline itself and asking searching questions of the purpose, ethics and future of the subject, Anthropology's World will be required reading for all students and practitioners of anthropology.

  • 222.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Confessions of a Hoosier Anthropologist2014In: American Anthropologist, ISSN 0002-7294, E-ISSN 1548-1433, Vol. 116, no 1, p. 169-172Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 223.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Degisen Avrupa, Degisen Antropoloji2013In: Sinirlar, Imajlar ve Kültürler / [ed] Hande Birkalan Gedik, Ankara: Dipnot Yayinlari , 2013, p. 104-121Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 224.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Diversity Is Our Business2010In: American Anthropologist, ISSN 0002-7294, E-ISSN 1548-1433, Vol. 112, no 4, p. 539-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropologists have tended to portray their discipline as in crisis and ask whether "the end of anthropology" is near. I offer indicators to suggest that the discipline is alive and well as far as its internal activities are concerned. I then turn to the more worrying question of its external image, understandings and stereotypes more or less common among a wider public: the anthropologist as antiquarian and insensitive, slightly lost in real life. Anthropologists have been ineffective in offering a simple, coherent view of what the discipline is and what holds it together. I propose that a consistent emphasis on "diversity" as what anthropology is about best matches our combined interests and practices. To have a strong "brand" is essential under present-day cultural and political conditions, in and out of academic life. The foregrounding of "diversity" goes with the anthropological concern with ethnography, comparison, and cultural critique.

  • 225.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Foreword: Creolisation on the Move2012In: Shifting Borders: European Perspectives on Creolisation / [ed] Tommaso Sbriccoli and Stefano Jacoviello, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012, p. vii-xiChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 226.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Geocultural scenarios2009In: Frontiers of sociology / [ed] Peter Hedström, Björn Wittrock, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2009, p. 267-288Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A discussion of the genre of global scenarios, developing after the end of the Cold War and exemplified by such authors as Samuel Huntington, Francis Fukuyama and Thomas Friedman

  • 227.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Il mondo dell'antropologia2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [it]

    Al libro cui sembra affidare il senso ultimo della propria esperienza di vita e di lavoro Hannerz ha dato un titolo che allude a un duplice mondo. Da una parte, il mondo "interno" dell'antropologia. L'autore guarda qui alle vicende di una disciplina che, avendo per oggetto addirittura la specie umana, si è trovata a occupare la posizione non sempre confortevole del crocevia, e a svolgere la funzione non sempre commendevole dell'ingrediente universale. Dall'altra parte, il mondo "esterno" che l'antropologia si sforza di conoscere e decifrare nelle sue continue trasformazioni. E dunque, di che cosa devono occuparsi nel nostro tempo gli antropologi? A chi si rivolgono? Come viene inteso, e magari frainteso, ciò che dicono? Si condensa in queste pagine, che rimandano a quelle di Clifford Geertz e di Mary Douglas, la convinzione che mai come oggi della prospettiva antropologica abbiamo bisogno, perché meglio di ogni altra può aiutarci a capire - a interpretare - un mondo globale dove i mondi locali rifiutano tenacemente la sottomissione.

  • 228.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Kulturens hastigheter2013In: Antropologi och tid / [ed] Mattias Viktorin och Charlotta Widmark, Stockholm: Svenska Sällskapet för Antropologi och Geografi , 2013, p. 25-42Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Lexikon2011In: Lexikon der Globalisierung / [ed] Fernand Kreff, Eva-Maria Knoll, Andre Gingrich (eds), Bielefeld: Transcript , 2011, p. 175-178Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 230.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Operation Outreach: Anthropology and the Public in a World of Information Crowding2011In: archivio antropologico mediterraneo, ISSN 2038-3215, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 11-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 231.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Opinions: What business anthropology is, what it might become… and what, perhaps, it should not be2012In: Journal of Business Anthropology, ISSN 2245-4217, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 254-256Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 232.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Prologue2013In: Figures of Southeast Asian Modernity / [ed] Joshua Barker, Erik Harms and Johan Lindquist, Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press , 2013, p. xi-xviChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 233.
    Hardtmann, Eva-Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Daliterna i den globala rättviserörelsen: Buddhism och socialism på Internet2005In: Chakra: tidskrift för indiska religioner, ISSN 1652-0203, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 234.
    Hardtmann, Eva-Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    In touch with politics: three individuals in the midst of the Dalit movement2002In: Contesting 'good' governance: crosscultural perspectives on representation, accountability and public space / [ed] Eva Poluha, Mona Rosendahl, London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2002, p. 137-162Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 235.
    Hardtmann, Eva-Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Les Dalits Indiens sont Soudainement Partout!: La création de nouveaux réseaux internationaux alternatifs2005In: Anthropologie et Sociétés, ISSN 1703-7921, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 97-122Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 236.
    Hardtmann, Eva-Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Motståndsrörelse mot kastväsendet: glimtar från Indien och England2001In: Flera fält i ett: socialantropologer om translokala fältstudier / [ed] Ulf Hannerz, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2001, p. 65-85Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 237.
    Hardtmann, Eva-Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Our Fury is Burning: From Local Practice to Global Connections in the Dalit Movement2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 238.
    Hardtmann, Eva-Maria
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    South Asian Activists in the Global Justice Movement2016Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work is a well-researched study of the last few decades of the networks in the Global Justice Movement (GJM) and World Social Forums. It offers a more novel perspective on the traditions of protest, ethics, organizational forms, and visions among activists than is usually presented in the literature on GJM, which largely focuses on Latin America, the United States of America, and Europe. It is an ethnographically rooted account of the two conflicting discourses—one among activists in GJM and the other emanating from the World Bank—that have become intertwined locally within the same circle of activists. The author argues that local and transnational activist networks, no longer spatially and territorially limited, have become entangled with forces understood under the paradigms of ‘neoliberalism’, and relations among activists have changed in unexpected ways. Through a vivid description of transnational movements, this book aims to make evident the not-so-obvious yet intricate links between the World Bank, the United Nations, popular rock stars, and historical knowledge production among activists in South Asia and Japan in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

  • 239.
    Hardtmann, Eva-Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Dalit movement in India: local practices, global connections2009Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Dalit Movement in India traces new 'practices' and discourses among Dalit activists since the 1990s and shows how these practices both shaped and changed social relations. It is an anthropological attempt to reach behind the surface of the contemporary Dalit movement. Some of the topics discussed are the kind of discourses found among Dalit activists, the organizational structure of the movement, and the local practices among activists.This study also relates the method of anthropological fieldwork to theories about social movements. It offers a historical context as a prerequisite to understanding processes in the contemporary Dalit movement. The Dalit Movement in India focuses on the heterogeneity and the geographical spread of the movement. The fieldwork moves from a small locality of Dalits in Lucknow to interaction with Dalit activists in Maharashtra to the life of Punjabi Dalit migrants in Birmingham

  • 240.
    Hardtmann, Eva-Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Thorat, Vimal
    Berättelsen på min rygg: Indiens Daliter i uppror mot kastsystemet: prosa essäer, dokument.2006Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 241.
    Hassanen, Sadia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Westin, CharlesStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.Olsson, ErikStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    People on the move: experiences of forced migration with examples from various parts of the world2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume deals with various issues of forced migration from developing countries, in some cases to neighbouring countries, in others to countries in the developed world. The forty-year period covered is from the late 1960s. In some cases the migration processes the contributors concentrate on resulted in settlement on a permanent basis in a receiving country, in their examples with strong links to diasporic communities elsewhere; in other cases the outcome is that individual families making up the diasporic cultural community go transnational themselves, living here at times, living there for periods, commuting and transcending national, cultural, political and linguistic boundaries. Chapters presenting empirical examples are guided theoretically, bringing observations in to theoretical interpretations. These chapters are interspersed with theoretical expositions of concepts such as durable solutions, nation state, citizenship and transnationalism.

  • 242.
    Hasselström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    On and Off the Trading Floor: An inquiry into the everyday fashioning of financial market knowledge2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 243.
    Hedblom, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    "The Body is Made to Move": Gym and Fitness Culture in Sweden2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ideas about "exercise" and "health" have varied over time and across cultures. With the recent Euro-American fitness trend, a growing number of Swedes now take part in some kind of physical activity at Gyms or Fitness Centers. By applying a phenomenological and constructivist approach, the aim of this ethnographic study is to examine the non-profit but also commercial culture of and around this form of exercise. The focus is on how meaning is created, transformed, embodied, and perceived by gym goers as truth, science, knowledge, or even myth. There are two central overlapping concerns in this thesis, both dealing with the interrelation between categories, and status positions. The first part of the thesis deals with the social aspects of movement, such as the definition and categorization of self and others as different types of gym-goers. Related to this are also what is termed critical norms of interpretation of aims and reasons for exercise, such as gaining strength or aesthetic improvement. The other central concern is more specifically focused on the body itself and deals with ideas about exercise, diet, substances, and physiology, that is, how to exercise and how the body works. "The body is made to move", was a common saying at Gyms and Centers, meaning that the human body is physically built to be active. But the techniques and practices of how this movement is performed vary and are sometimes even contradictory. Here sources in the distribution of ideas about the body and body movement are brought out: the Internet, informal and formal instructors in the Gym, as well as gym machines. The method has been participant observation and in-depth interviews with gym goers and instructors at Gyms and Fitness Centers in two middle size towns in Sweden mainly during a year in 2004-2005. Rather than taking sides in the debate on how to exercise, this thesis raises wider questions about the authority to define reality.

  • 244.
    Helander, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies, Centre for the study of children's culture.
    Utsikter och insikter: Barns kulturella liv2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 245.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mörte Alling, AnnikaLindqvist, YvonneStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.Wulff, HelenaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    World Literatures: Exploring the Cosmopolitan-Vernacular Exchange2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Placing itself within the burgeoning field of world literary studies, the organising principle of this book is that of an open-ended dynamic, namely the cosmopolitan-vernacular exchange.

    As an adaptable comparative fulcrum for literary studies, the notion of the cosmopolitan-vernacular exchange accommodates also highly localised literatures. In this way, it redresses what has repeatedly been identified as a weakness of the world literature paradigm, namely the one-sided focus on literature that accumulates global prestige or makes it on the Euro-American book market.

    How has the vernacular been defined historically? How is it inflected by gender? How are the poles of the vernacular and the cosmopolitan distributed spatially or stylistically in literary narratives? How are cosmopolitan domains of literature incorporated in local literary communities? What are the effects of translation on the encoding of vernacular and cosmopolitan values?

    Ranging across a dozen languages and literature from five continents, these are some of the questions that the contributions attempt to address.

  • 246.
    Helmfrid, Sigrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Thirsty Men and Thrifty Women: Gender, Power and Agency in the Rural Beer Trade in Burkina Faso2010In: Beer in Africa: Drinking Spaces, States and Selves / [ed] Steven Van Wolputte, Mattia Fumanti, Berlin: LIT Verlag , 2010, 1, p. 195-222Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of artisanal brewing throughout Africa point to the same mechanism: women brew beer for a predominantly male clientele. Hence, the beer trade makes money flow from men to women.

    In this study from a Bobo village in the cotton zone of western Burkina Faso, I explore the strategies women employ to earn money by brewing: I am interested in how gender intersects with other social structures, creating different spaces for women to act strategically. Based on a detailed description of the brewing process and of the commercialization of beer, I highlight the choices women make in order to succeed with their trade. Indeed, even if the structures of authority within which women make their choices are male-dominated, women in Bala are not powerless, on the contrary. I show that women differ in their ability to make a profit from brewing depending on their ability to manoeuvre within and between, on the one hand, their position within the intersecting structures of gender, age and generation (within the household), and, on the other hand, gender, kinship, alliance, class and ethnicity (outside the household).

  • 247.
    Henning, Annette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ambiguous artefacts: solar collectors in Swedish contexts : on processes of cultural modification2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 248.
    Hentati, Jannete
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    En lektion i gemenskap: Ordning och (o)reda bland lärare i Malmö och Marseille2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This ethnographic study is based on comparative fieldwork among teachers at secondary schools in two southern situated cities in Europe: Malmö in Sweden and Marseille in France. The focus of the study is on how teachers make sense of and grapple with their mission to build and foster “good” citizens, which is intended to promote national community and unity. Exploring how the teachers strive and struggle to fulfil this mission provides a better insight into the ideas and practices that permeate their work. At the same time, the everyday tensions that occasionally complicate this task are highlighted. A crucial observation in this study is that teachers in both Sweden and France often find themselves confined to a kind of cross-pressure. Enclosed within it, teachers are torn between, on the one hand, endeavouring to reach certain visions and goals regarding how to instil a sense of national community in their pupils and, on the other, being confronted with an irregular and often far from pliable reality. This study shows how teachers are dealing with this cross-pressure, how – in case of hurdles and friction in their work – they try to maintain order in what they perceive and experience as being a state of great disorder in relation to their educational mission. The thesis contributes to increased knowledge of teachers’ lived professional experiences and situated practices in their day-to-day work. It also brings to light a problematising discussion about the role and importance that teachers expect themselves to play in relation to an overall idea of national community and unity in Sweden and France respectively.

  • 249.
    Holmqvist, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    "The hospital is a uterus": western discourses of childbirth in late modernity : a case study from northern Italy2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The medicalisation of Western childbirth that was initiated in the seventeenth century has resulted in healthier women and infants, but it has also changed the cultural definition of birth as a restricted female experience. There is an increasing insistence among experts to define birth as a heterosexual couple's experience and to regard the woman and the foetus as two separate 'patients.' This development potentially implies a marginalisation of women from birthgiving and changed ways of experiencing pregnancy and childbirth.

    This thesis aims at analysing the transition to motherhood in contemporary Western societies as an asymmetrical discursive space in which first-time expectant mothers meet with professional experts. At hospitals, prenatal clinics, birth preparation courses, at the actual birth site and in paediatric clinics the women are socialised into an expert-defined cultural model of maternity care. However, they do not just accept the presented model passively: there is a continuing negotiation between the agents of the local birthing system over what is considered to be authoritative knowledge and practice in this area.

    The study is based on anthropological fieldwork in 1993/94 in a northern Italian town, Borgo. It focuses on how the experts provide models of and for important birthgiving issues such as what birth is and how pregnancy and birth should be managed, defining women's agency in birthing, and prescribing what is a proper experience of birth.

  • 250. Håkansson, N. Thomas
    et al.
    Widgren, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Labour and landscapes: The political economy of landesque capital in 19th century Tanganyika.2007In: Geografiska Annaler Ser B, Human Geography, Vol. 89B, no 3, p. 233-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a long-term and global perspective irrigated and terraced landscapes, landesque capital, have often been assumed to be closely associated with hierarchical political systems. However, research is accumulating that shows how kinship-based societies (including small chiefdoms) have also been responsible for constructing landesque capital without population pressure. We examine the political economy of landesque capital through the intersections of decentralized politics and regional economies. A crucial question guiding our research is why some kinship based societies chose to invest their labour in landesque capital while others did not. Our analysis is based on a detailed examination of four relatively densely populated communities in late precolonial and early colonial Tanzania. By analysing labour processes as contingent and separate from political types of generalized economic systems over time we can identify the causal factors that direct labour and thus landscape formation as a process. The general conclusion of our investigation is that landesque investments occurred in cases where agriculture was the main source of long-term wealth flow irrespective of whether or not hierarchical political systems were present. However, while this factor may be a necessary condition it is not a sufficient cause. In the cases we examined the configurations of world-systems connections and local social and economic circumstances combined to either produce investments in landesque capital or to pursue short-term strategies of extraction.

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