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  • 201.
    Graham, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Anthropological Explorations in Queer Theory2014Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The book many of us have been waiting for somebody to write: anthropology meets contemporary theory, with summaries and overviews ranging from Lacan to process philosophy and more. Anthropological Explorations in Queer Theory is helpful for researchers wanting to update themselves, and also for classroom use. Ethnographic discussion of exciting themes such as perfume and species thinking weave in with contributions to current debate, including an excellent critique of intersectionality.

  • 202.
    Graham, Mark
    Stockholm University.
    Classifications, Persons and Policies: Refugees and Swedish Welfare Bureaucracy1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 203.
    Graham, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Official optimism in the face of an uncertain future Swedish reactions to climate change threats2016In: Environmental Change and the World's Futures: Ecologies, Ontologies and Mythologies / [ed] Jonathan Paul Marshall, Linda H. Connor, Routledge, 2016, p. 233-246Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 204.
    Gullberg, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Republic of Difference: Feminism and anti-racism in the Parisian banlieues2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis is an ethnographic study of three political groups in the Parisian banlieues: Ni putes ni soumises, AFRICA and Mouvement des indigènes de la République. These groups espouse both feminist and antiracist politics in theory, yet in practice tend to privilege either a feminist or  antiracist position and end up in opposition to each other. To explain why, the thesis locates their respective politics within French colonial heritage, French secularism (laïcité), and current politics surrounding Muslims in France, especially Muslim women in the banlieues. The thesis draws on anthropological theory, feminist theory, intersectionality, and post-colonial studies. 

  • 205.
    Gustafson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    "We Are Not Welcome": The Life and Experinces of Female Migrants in Cape Town2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is an ethnographic study of the life of female migrants in Cape Town. The thesis is based on material gathered through informal conversations, semi-structured interviews and participant observation conducted among female migrants in Cape Town.

    South Africa is today the strongest economy in the Southern African region which attracts people from other poorer African countries. They migrate to South Africa for a chance to a better life or an opportunity to support themselves and their families. However, South Africa´s restrictive immigration policies make it difficult for many migrants to obtain the right documents and be able to ‘legally’ cross the South African border. Even if migrants get an asylum-seekers permit they are not allowed to legally work in the country. They are included and excluded at the same time. The constant ‘criminalization’ of migrants´ acts makes it hard for migrants to access any human rights and protection in general, which makes them more vulnerable to exploitation.

    More and more women are crossing the borders to South Africa to get work and physical security as a part of the global ‘feminization’ of migration. Women´s movement therefore questions the picture of the man as the sole breadwinner. Even though this is the reality women are excluded from the discourse about migration and existing immigration policies in South Africa. Female migrants are not acknowledged as important actors and are even more vulnerable in the forced and marginalized position of ‘illegality’, then male migrants.

    This study explores the female migrants´ own experiences of struggles like getting documented, work, secure housing and being exposed to xenophobia. The women have also developed different strategies to handle these difficulties. This thesis criticizes the ‘victimization’ of female migrants, which ascribes them with powerlessness and being without agency, and shows that they are active in seeking solutions and creating strategies to increase their scope of action.

  • 206.
    Haaland Pers, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    I gränslandet mellan statsrepresentant och privatperson: En etnografisk studie av svenska privat-twittrande poliser2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna masteruppsats behandlar gruppen privat-twittrande poliser – individer som i egenskap av privatpersoner skildrar sitt förhållningssätt och sina åsikter kring sitt yrke som polis genom sociala medie-forumet Twitter. Studien är baserad på etnografiskt fältarbete utfört under hösten 2014. Sedan den svenska Polisens officiella intåg på sociala medier under början av 2010-talet har fler och fler yrkesverksamma poliser börjat använda digitala plattformar såsom Twitter, Facebook och Instagram för att skildra en egen syn på den polisiära yrkesrollen samt diskutera Polisens samhällsfunktion och verksamhetsförfarande. Till skillnad från officiella myndighetsrepresentanter på Twitter står de privat-twittrande poliserna fria från det direkta representativa ansvar som det innebär att professionellt företräda staten och behöver således inte enbart handla i enlighet med den officiella verksamhetsagendan. Trots friheten från direkt ansvar upplevs dock många av individerna, av allmänheten, som polisrepresentanter i och med deras primärt yrkesrelaterade kommunikation. I gränslandet mellan statsrepresentant och privatperson upprättas en säregen maktposition vilken, med hjälp av Twitter som socialt verktyg, förstärker de privat-twittrande polisernas möjligheter att prägla och nyansera den samhälleliga föreställningen om det polisiära varandet.

  • 207.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    A detective story writer: exploring Stockholm as it once was2013In: City & Society, ISSN 0893-0465, E-ISSN 1548-744X, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 260-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a change in the typical setting of detective fiction, from small, closed, tranquil communities to urban contexts of greater opacity and diversity. Its hero/heroine is thus now a recurrent figure in a global genre of urban fiction; and the actual detective story writer is a connoisseur of life in the big city. In this article I point to a certain affinity between detective stories and urban ethnography, and proceed to suggest some contrasts between Swedish writers who have recently achieved international fame and a writer of an earlier generation whom I knew personally. This is a way of demonstrating changes in the urban scene of Stockholm, and transformations in Swedish national society.

  • 208.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Afterword: the long march of anthropology.2009In: Multi-sited ethnography: theory, praxis and locality in contemporary research / [ed] Mark-Anthony Falzon, Farnham: Ashgate, 2009, p. 271-281Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A discussion of historical forerunners of the contemporary wave of multi-site, or translocal, field studies in anthropology

  • 209.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Anthropologists everywhere: getting to know your colleagues2012In: Anthropology News, ISSN 1541-6151, E-ISSN 1556-3502, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 20-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 210.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Anthropology's world: life in a twenty-first-century discipline2010Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What, in these times, in is anthropology for? How do anthropologists want to be understood? For whom do they write, and in what language? And can we use anthropology's past as a resource for thinking about challenges past and future? In his new book, Ulf Hannerz cements his reputation as one of anthropology's finest writers, showing how anthropology came to be a central intellectual discipline and why it is vital that it remains so in an increasingly globalized world. "Anthropology's world" refers, on the one hand, to the discipline as a social world in itself, as a community stretching across national boundaries. It also refers to the wider outside world to which it must relate in various ways. This book deals with the world of anthropology through a broad and revealing historical analysis, questioning the way anthropologists approach their work now, and speculating how they will do so in the future. Turning the toolkit of the anthropologist upon the discipline itself and asking searching questions of the purpose, ethics and future of the subject, Anthropology's World will be required reading for all students and practitioners of anthropology.

  • 211.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Confessions of a Hoosier Anthropologist2014In: American Anthropologist, ISSN 0002-7294, E-ISSN 1548-1433, Vol. 116, no 1, p. 169-172Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 212.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Degisen Avrupa, Degisen Antropoloji2013In: Sinirlar, Imajlar ve Kültürler / [ed] Hande Birkalan Gedik, Ankara: Dipnot Yayinlari , 2013, p. 104-121Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 213.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Diversity Is Our Business2010In: American Anthropologist, ISSN 0002-7294, E-ISSN 1548-1433, Vol. 112, no 4, p. 539-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropologists have tended to portray their discipline as in crisis and ask whether "the end of anthropology" is near. I offer indicators to suggest that the discipline is alive and well as far as its internal activities are concerned. I then turn to the more worrying question of its external image, understandings and stereotypes more or less common among a wider public: the anthropologist as antiquarian and insensitive, slightly lost in real life. Anthropologists have been ineffective in offering a simple, coherent view of what the discipline is and what holds it together. I propose that a consistent emphasis on "diversity" as what anthropology is about best matches our combined interests and practices. To have a strong "brand" is essential under present-day cultural and political conditions, in and out of academic life. The foregrounding of "diversity" goes with the anthropological concern with ethnography, comparison, and cultural critique.

  • 214.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Foreword: Creolisation on the Move2012In: Shifting Borders: European Perspectives on Creolisation / [ed] Tommaso Sbriccoli and Stefano Jacoviello, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012, p. vii-xiChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 215.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Geocultural scenarios2009In: Frontiers of sociology / [ed] Peter Hedström, Björn Wittrock, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2009, p. 267-288Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A discussion of the genre of global scenarios, developing after the end of the Cold War and exemplified by such authors as Samuel Huntington, Francis Fukuyama and Thomas Friedman

  • 216.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Il mondo dell'antropologia2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [it]

    Al libro cui sembra affidare il senso ultimo della propria esperienza di vita e di lavoro Hannerz ha dato un titolo che allude a un duplice mondo. Da una parte, il mondo "interno" dell'antropologia. L'autore guarda qui alle vicende di una disciplina che, avendo per oggetto addirittura la specie umana, si è trovata a occupare la posizione non sempre confortevole del crocevia, e a svolgere la funzione non sempre commendevole dell'ingrediente universale. Dall'altra parte, il mondo "esterno" che l'antropologia si sforza di conoscere e decifrare nelle sue continue trasformazioni. E dunque, di che cosa devono occuparsi nel nostro tempo gli antropologi? A chi si rivolgono? Come viene inteso, e magari frainteso, ciò che dicono? Si condensa in queste pagine, che rimandano a quelle di Clifford Geertz e di Mary Douglas, la convinzione che mai come oggi della prospettiva antropologica abbiamo bisogno, perché meglio di ogni altra può aiutarci a capire - a interpretare - un mondo globale dove i mondi locali rifiutano tenacemente la sottomissione.

  • 217.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Kulturens hastigheter2013In: Antropologi och tid / [ed] Mattias Viktorin och Charlotta Widmark, Stockholm: Svenska Sällskapet för Antropologi och Geografi , 2013, p. 25-42Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 218.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Lexikon2011In: Lexikon der Globalisierung / [ed] Fernand Kreff, Eva-Maria Knoll, Andre Gingrich (eds), Bielefeld: Transcript , 2011, p. 175-178Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 219.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Operation Outreach: Anthropology and the Public in a World of Information Crowding2011In: archivio antropologico mediterraneo, ISSN 2038-3215, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 11-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 220.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Opinions: What business anthropology is, what it might become… and what, perhaps, it should not be2012In: Journal of Business Anthropology, ISSN 2245-4217, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 254-256Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 221.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Prologue2013In: Figures of Southeast Asian Modernity / [ed] Joshua Barker, Erik Harms and Johan Lindquist, Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press , 2013, p. xi-xviChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 222.
    Hardtmann, Eva-Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Daliterna i den globala rättviserörelsen: Buddhism och socialism på Internet2005In: Chakra: tidskrift för indiska religioner, ISSN 1652-0203, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 223.
    Hardtmann, Eva-Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    In touch with politics: three individuals in the midst of the Dalit movement2002In: Contesting 'good' governance: crosscultural perspectives on representation, accountability and public space / [ed] Eva Poluha, Mona Rosendahl, London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2002, p. 137-162Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 224.
    Hardtmann, Eva-Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Les Dalits Indiens sont Soudainement Partout!: La création de nouveaux réseaux internationaux alternatifs2005In: Anthropologie et Sociétés, ISSN 1703-7921, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 97-122Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 225.
    Hardtmann, Eva-Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Motståndsrörelse mot kastväsendet: glimtar från Indien och England2001In: Flera fält i ett: socialantropologer om translokala fältstudier / [ed] Ulf Hannerz, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2001, p. 65-85Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 226.
    Hardtmann, Eva-Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Our Fury is Burning: From Local Practice to Global Connections in the Dalit Movement2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 227.
    Hardtmann, Eva-Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Dalit movement in India: local practices, global connections2009Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Dalit Movement in India traces new 'practices' and discourses among Dalit activists since the 1990s and shows how these practices both shaped and changed social relations. It is an anthropological attempt to reach behind the surface of the contemporary Dalit movement. Some of the topics discussed are the kind of discourses found among Dalit activists, the organizational structure of the movement, and the local practices among activists.This study also relates the method of anthropological fieldwork to theories about social movements. It offers a historical context as a prerequisite to understanding processes in the contemporary Dalit movement. The Dalit Movement in India focuses on the heterogeneity and the geographical spread of the movement. The fieldwork moves from a small locality of Dalits in Lucknow to interaction with Dalit activists in Maharashtra to the life of Punjabi Dalit migrants in Birmingham

  • 228.
    Hardtmann, Eva-Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Thorat, Vimal
    Berättelsen på min rygg: Indiens Daliter i uppror mot kastsystemet: prosa essäer, dokument.2006Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 229.
    Hassanen, Sadia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Westin, CharlesStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.Olsson, ErikStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    People on the move: experiences of forced migration with examples from various parts of the world2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume deals with various issues of forced migration from developing countries, in some cases to neighbouring countries, in others to countries in the developed world. The forty-year period covered is from the late 1960s. In some cases the migration processes the contributors concentrate on resulted in settlement on a permanent basis in a receiving country, in their examples with strong links to diasporic communities elsewhere; in other cases the outcome is that individual families making up the diasporic cultural community go transnational themselves, living here at times, living there for periods, commuting and transcending national, cultural, political and linguistic boundaries. Chapters presenting empirical examples are guided theoretically, bringing observations in to theoretical interpretations. These chapters are interspersed with theoretical expositions of concepts such as durable solutions, nation state, citizenship and transnationalism.

  • 230.
    Hasselström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    On and Off the Trading Floor: An inquiry into the everyday fashioning of financial market knowledge2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 231.
    Hedblom, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    "The Body is Made to Move": Gym and Fitness Culture in Sweden2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ideas about "exercise" and "health" have varied over time and across cultures. With the recent Euro-American fitness trend, a growing number of Swedes now take part in some kind of physical activity at Gyms or Fitness Centers. By applying a phenomenological and constructivist approach, the aim of this ethnographic study is to examine the non-profit but also commercial culture of and around this form of exercise. The focus is on how meaning is created, transformed, embodied, and perceived by gym goers as truth, science, knowledge, or even myth. There are two central overlapping concerns in this thesis, both dealing with the interrelation between categories, and status positions. The first part of the thesis deals with the social aspects of movement, such as the definition and categorization of self and others as different types of gym-goers. Related to this are also what is termed critical norms of interpretation of aims and reasons for exercise, such as gaining strength or aesthetic improvement. The other central concern is more specifically focused on the body itself and deals with ideas about exercise, diet, substances, and physiology, that is, how to exercise and how the body works. "The body is made to move", was a common saying at Gyms and Centers, meaning that the human body is physically built to be active. But the techniques and practices of how this movement is performed vary and are sometimes even contradictory. Here sources in the distribution of ideas about the body and body movement are brought out: the Internet, informal and formal instructors in the Gym, as well as gym machines. The method has been participant observation and in-depth interviews with gym goers and instructors at Gyms and Fitness Centers in two middle size towns in Sweden mainly during a year in 2004-2005. Rather than taking sides in the debate on how to exercise, this thesis raises wider questions about the authority to define reality.

  • 232.
    Helander, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies, Centre for the study of children's culture.
    Utsikter och insikter: Barns kulturella liv2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 233.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mörte Alling, AnnikaLindqvist, YvonneStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.Wulff, HelenaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    World Literatures: Exploring the Cosmopolitan-Vernacular Exchange2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Placing itself within the burgeoning field of world literary studies, the organising principle of this book is that of an open-ended dynamic, namely the cosmopolitan-vernacular exchange.

    As an adaptable comparative fulcrum for literary studies, the notion of the cosmopolitan-vernacular exchange accommodates also highly localised literatures. In this way, it redresses what has repeatedly been identified as a weakness of the world literature paradigm, namely the one-sided focus on literature that accumulates global prestige or makes it on the Euro-American book market.

    How has the vernacular been defined historically? How is it inflected by gender? How are the poles of the vernacular and the cosmopolitan distributed spatially or stylistically in literary narratives? How are cosmopolitan domains of literature incorporated in local literary communities? What are the effects of translation on the encoding of vernacular and cosmopolitan values?

    Ranging across a dozen languages and literature from five continents, these are some of the questions that the contributions attempt to address.

  • 234.
    Helmfrid, Sigrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Thirsty Men and Thrifty Women: Gender, Power and Agency in the Rural Beer Trade in Burkina Faso2010In: Beer in Africa: Drinking Spaces, States and Selves / [ed] Steven Van Wolputte, Mattia Fumanti, Berlin: LIT Verlag , 2010, 1, p. 195-222Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of artisanal brewing throughout Africa point to the same mechanism: women brew beer for a predominantly male clientele. Hence, the beer trade makes money flow from men to women.

    In this study from a Bobo village in the cotton zone of western Burkina Faso, I explore the strategies women employ to earn money by brewing: I am interested in how gender intersects with other social structures, creating different spaces for women to act strategically. Based on a detailed description of the brewing process and of the commercialization of beer, I highlight the choices women make in order to succeed with their trade. Indeed, even if the structures of authority within which women make their choices are male-dominated, women in Bala are not powerless, on the contrary. I show that women differ in their ability to make a profit from brewing depending on their ability to manoeuvre within and between, on the one hand, their position within the intersecting structures of gender, age and generation (within the household), and, on the other hand, gender, kinship, alliance, class and ethnicity (outside the household).

  • 235.
    Henning, Annette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ambiguous artefacts: solar collectors in Swedish contexts : on processes of cultural modification2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 236.
    Hentati, Jannete
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    En lektion i gemenskap: Ordning och (o)reda bland lärare i Malmö och Marseille2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This ethnographic study is based on comparative fieldwork among teachers at secondary schools in two southern situated cities in Europe: Malmö in Sweden and Marseille in France. The focus of the study is on how teachers make sense of and grapple with their mission to build and foster “good” citizens, which is intended to promote national community and unity. Exploring how the teachers strive and struggle to fulfil this mission provides a better insight into the ideas and practices that permeate their work. At the same time, the everyday tensions that occasionally complicate this task are highlighted. A crucial observation in this study is that teachers in both Sweden and France often find themselves confined to a kind of cross-pressure. Enclosed within it, teachers are torn between, on the one hand, endeavouring to reach certain visions and goals regarding how to instil a sense of national community in their pupils and, on the other, being confronted with an irregular and often far from pliable reality. This study shows how teachers are dealing with this cross-pressure, how – in case of hurdles and friction in their work – they try to maintain order in what they perceive and experience as being a state of great disorder in relation to their educational mission. The thesis contributes to increased knowledge of teachers’ lived professional experiences and situated practices in their day-to-day work. It also brings to light a problematising discussion about the role and importance that teachers expect themselves to play in relation to an overall idea of national community and unity in Sweden and France respectively.

  • 237.
    Holmqvist, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    "The hospital is a uterus": western discourses of childbirth in late modernity : a case study from northern Italy2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The medicalisation of Western childbirth that was initiated in the seventeenth century has resulted in healthier women and infants, but it has also changed the cultural definition of birth as a restricted female experience. There is an increasing insistence among experts to define birth as a heterosexual couple's experience and to regard the woman and the foetus as two separate 'patients.' This development potentially implies a marginalisation of women from birthgiving and changed ways of experiencing pregnancy and childbirth.

    This thesis aims at analysing the transition to motherhood in contemporary Western societies as an asymmetrical discursive space in which first-time expectant mothers meet with professional experts. At hospitals, prenatal clinics, birth preparation courses, at the actual birth site and in paediatric clinics the women are socialised into an expert-defined cultural model of maternity care. However, they do not just accept the presented model passively: there is a continuing negotiation between the agents of the local birthing system over what is considered to be authoritative knowledge and practice in this area.

    The study is based on anthropological fieldwork in 1993/94 in a northern Italian town, Borgo. It focuses on how the experts provide models of and for important birthgiving issues such as what birth is and how pregnancy and birth should be managed, defining women's agency in birthing, and prescribing what is a proper experience of birth.

  • 238. Håkansson, N. Thomas
    et al.
    Widgren, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Labour and landscapes: The political economy of landesque capital in 19th century Tanganyika.2007In: Geografiska Annaler Ser B, Human Geography, Vol. 89B, no 3, p. 233-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a long-term and global perspective irrigated and terraced landscapes, landesque capital, have often been assumed to be closely associated with hierarchical political systems. However, research is accumulating that shows how kinship-based societies (including small chiefdoms) have also been responsible for constructing landesque capital without population pressure. We examine the political economy of landesque capital through the intersections of decentralized politics and regional economies. A crucial question guiding our research is why some kinship based societies chose to invest their labour in landesque capital while others did not. Our analysis is based on a detailed examination of four relatively densely populated communities in late precolonial and early colonial Tanzania. By analysing labour processes as contingent and separate from political types of generalized economic systems over time we can identify the causal factors that direct labour and thus landscape formation as a process. The general conclusion of our investigation is that landesque investments occurred in cases where agriculture was the main source of long-term wealth flow irrespective of whether or not hierarchical political systems were present. However, while this factor may be a necessary condition it is not a sufficient cause. In the cases we examined the configurations of world-systems connections and local social and economic circumstances combined to either produce investments in landesque capital or to pursue short-term strategies of extraction.

  • 239.
    Höjdestrand, Tova
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Needed by Nobody: Homelessness, Humiliation, and Homelessness in Post-Socialist Russia2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Homelessness became a conspicuous facet of Russian metropolitan cityscapes only in the 1990s, when the Soviet criminalization of ‘vagrancy’ and similar offences was abolished. This study investigates homelessness as a sociostructural phenomenon as well as an individually experienced life condition, with a focus on homeless people in St. Petersburg in 1999 and during the successive years (when anthropological fieldwork was conducted).

    To these men and women, homelessness can be concluded with the Russian expression nikomu ne nuzhen, ‘needed by nobody’ – a dilemma that in their case is twofold. They are ‘not needed’ as citizens since a permanent address in Russia is the precondition for all civil rights and social benefits (including the permission to work). In addition they have lost, or never had, the intimate social networks that constitute the ultimate social ‘safety net’ in Russia, and which is the most important context for a sense of ‘being needed’. The study investigates processes of social exclusion as well as the sustenance strategies of these ‘human leftovers’ – or the remaining ‘world of waste’ of things, tasks, and places that nobody else wants.

    The main focus of the study is, however, human worth. Being ‘not needed’, homeless people are subjected to a forceful social stigmatization, but their situation also deprives them of the social and material prerequisites for acting and relating to others in ways they consider to be ‘decent’. This study asks how human dignity is negotiated in the absence of its very preconditions. Which dimensions take precedence, and which cultural resources are employed to restore at least a makeshift sense of being a worthy human?

  • 240.
    Høyer Leivestad, Hege
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Motility2016In: Keywords of mobility: Critical Engagements / [ed] Noel B. Salazar, Kiran Jayaram, New York: Berghahn Books, 2016, p. 133-151Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 241.
    Jennische, Ulrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Small-Small: Moral Economy and the Marketspace in Northern Ghana2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past decade, the Ghanaian government has tried to include and accommodate the many people working in the so-called informal economy. This formalization process is in line with a global market-driven development discourse. The small-scale traders selling their goods from marketplaces and along the streets in major cities have been of particular interest.

    While the Ghanaian government defines these actors as working in an “informal sector” and thus beyond the formal political and economic system, it simultaneously targets them with welfare services and various policies with the purpose of including them in the creation of a modern welfare state and shaping them into moral and entrepreneurial citizens.

    In Tamale in northern Ghana, years of political neglect, violence, and structural adjustment have led to small-scale traders taking over streets, sidewalks, and infrastructure, which has created a boundless and dynamic marketspace that far exceeds the delimited and politically defined marketplaces. For the state, therefore, much of the formalization process is about restoring the control and power of public space through evictions and relocations of traders. In conjunction with the inclusive welfare services, this demonstrates the contradictions entailed in the politics of informality.

    The study is based on an ethnographic fieldwork among small-scale traders in northern Ghana with a specific interest in the events that occur at the intersection where state, market, and citizenship meet. By asking what it means to be a trader in this contradictory process of formalization, the dissertation aims to understand this transformative moment in Ghana’s political and economic history.

    In this study the emic notion of small-small is used to frame the norms of gradual progress and letting others in that define the moral economy of small-scale trade. Norms, values, and obligations generate trust and solidarity within the marketspace. But more than that, small-small produces a form of politics against an obstructive and unreliable state and it guides traders into the future by shaping dreams, aspirations, and possibilities. Situated in traders’ daily lives, work, and relationships, and through the small-small lens, this thesis investigates the underlying moralities of formalization. It describes the politics of the Ghanaian state, which in its attempt to create an inclusive welfare society, struggles to both protect the moral dynamics of small-scale trade while adhering to the norms and standards of an open liberalized economy.

  • 242.
    Jennische, Ulrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Traders, Drivers and the National Health Insurance Scheme in Small Town Ghana2012In: Urban Forum, ISSN 1015-3802, E-ISSN 1874-6330, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 467-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on anthropological fieldwork in the central market and taxi station of Koforidua, Ghana, this paper aims to improve our understanding of the social dynamics in the informal economy of a Ghanaian small town in relation to state policies. It strives to describe the way processes of formalization and informalization may coexist and interact during the implementation of the recent National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS). The ethnographic approach helps us to better understand how attitudes on NHIS are formed and the way information and values are disseminated.

    Closely examining the social infrastructure of this setting contributes further to this understanding. In the marketplace, it is important to develop networks of personal relations with fellow traders, customers, and suppliers. At the taxi station, on the other hand, the most important strategy is to join the powerful local union. These strategies are ways for actors to gain security and protection against economic vulnerability in a competitive liberalized economy. In this regard, the NHIS has also provided opportunities for actors. While the NHIS is a way for the state to increase control over the informal economy, and gradually formalizing it, it simultaneously indirectly reinforces and confirms the existing informal strategies of networking.

  • 243.
    Jezierski, Wojtek
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Monasterium panopticum: On Surveillance in a Medieval Cloister - the Case of St. Gall2006In: Frühmittelalterliche Studien, ISSN 0071-9706, E-ISSN 1613-0812, Vol. 40, p. 167-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to explore the practice of surveillance of monks in the early medieval monasteries on the example of St. Gall as described in Ekkehard IV's . Based on Erving Goffman's concept of total institution the study presents the available disciplinary measures of social control. Discussing with the restrictive methods and absolute attitude towards supervision that emerge from the normative sources of that time it is argued that in the everyday monastic life uses and importance attached to the apparatus of surveillance were far more nuanced and adjustable to circumstances.

  • 244.
    Jezierski, Wojtek
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Paranoia sangallensis: A Micro-Study in the Etiquette of Monastic Persecution2008In: Frühmittelalterliche Studien, ISSN 0071-9706, E-ISSN 1613-0812, Vol. 42, p. 147-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Can we use contemporary sociological models of exclusion of paranoiacs to account for the miscarried visitation of a monastic reformer in the tenth century? This article, by offering a thick description of an incident from Ekkehard IV’s 'Casus sancti Galli', explores early medieval mechanisms of social control and the collective manufacturing of scapegoats and deviants in the monastic milieu.

  • 245.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    A Different Story of Coal: The Power of Power in Northeast India2016In: Industrialising Rural India: Land, policy and resistance / [ed] Kenneth Bo Nielsen, Patrik Oskarsson, Routledge, 2016, p. 107-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter points to the critical role energy and energy infrastructures plays in modern societies. It is argued that the ways in which different sources of energy are extracted, produced, refined, transported and consumed enable or produce certain social arrangements and eventually condition the very structure of society. Power, in other words, is loaded with power. Here I am interested in coal and then the small-scale, unregulated coal mining that takes place on indigenous lands in Northeast India. The story told revolves around the intervention by the National Green Tribunal putting a ban on what is termed as “un-scientific mining”. While this intervention is highly condemned by certain local actors, there are also those that hope this eventually will break the spell of coal.   

  • 246.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Atoms: nuclear estrangement from Chernobyl to India2012In: Ecology and power: struggles over land and material resources in the past, present, and future / [ed] Alf Hornborg, Brett Clark and Kenneth Hermele, Abingdon, Oxon; Routledge: Routledge, 2012, p. 239-249Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 247.
    karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Beyond Integration: indigenous assertion in India2004In: IIAS Newsletter, no 35, p. 8-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2004 the Ministry for Tribal Affairs in India proposed a new ‘National Policy on Scheduled

    Tribes’, a venture that has not been undertaken since Independence. The document is still a

    draft; the Ministry has posted it on its homepage for feedback from interested parties. The

    policy, the Ministry states, ‘seeks to bring Scheduled Tribes into the mainstream of society

    through a multi-pronged approach for their all-round development’. Judging from the

    massive critique by tribal or indigenous peoples’ organisations, much of the problem stems

    from this very aspiration

  • 248.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Book Review: Arupjyoti Saikia, Forests and Ecological History of Assam, 1826–20002012In: Contributions to Indian sociology, ISSN 0069-9667, E-ISSN 0973-0648, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 424-427Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 249.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Book review: Environment & ethnicity in India: 1200-19912002In: Asian Ethnicity, ISSN 1463-1369, E-ISSN 1469-2953, ISSN 1463-1369, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 263-274Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 250.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Comment on article1998In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, ISSN 0011-3204, Vol. 39, no 2Article, book review (Refereed)
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