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  • 201.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stressforskningsinstitutet.
    Perski, Aleksander
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stressforskningsinstitutet.
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stressforskningsinstitutet.
    Sleep, Occupational Stress, and Burnout2016Inngår i: Principles and Practise of Sleep Medicine / [ed] Meir H. Kryger, Thomas Roth, William C. Dement, Philadelphia: Elsevier, 2016, 6, s. 736-741Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 202.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stressforskningsinstitutet. Karolinska Institutet.
    Philip, Pierre
    Capelli, Aurore
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stressforskningsinstitutet. Karolinska Institutet.
    Sleep loss and accidents: Work hours, life style, and sleep pathology2011Inngår i: Human Sleep and Cognition Part II: Clinical and Applied Research / [ed] Hans P. A. Van Dongen and Gerard A. Kerkhof, Elsevier Science , 2011, Vol. 190, s. 169-188Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A very important outcome of reduced sleep is accidents. The present chapter will attempt to bring together some of the present knowledge in this area. We will focus on the driving situation, for which the evidence of the link between sleep loss and accidents is quite well established, but we will also bring up working life in general where evidence is more sparse. It should be emphasized that reduced sleep as a cause of accidents implies that the mediating factor is sleepiness (or fatigue). This link is discussed elsewhere in this volume, but here we will bring in sleepiness (subjective or physiological) as an explanatory factor of accidents. Another central observation is that many real life accident studies do not link accidents to reduced sleep, but infer reduced sleep and/or sleepiness from the context, like, for example, from work schedules, life styles, or sleep pathology. Reduced sleep is mainly due to suboptimal work schedules (or to a suboptimal life style) or to sleep pathology. We have divided the present chapter into two areas.

  • 203.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Psykologiska institutionen, Stressforskningsinstitutet. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sallinen, Mikael
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Psykologiska institutionen, Stressforskningsinstitutet. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Shiftworkers’ attitude to their work hours, positive or negative, and why?2022Inngår i: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 95, nr 6, s. 1267-1277Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Shift work is associated with impaired health and safety but there is a lack of systematic knowledge of shift workers attitude to their shift systems. This may be important for the ability to retain valuable personnel in the company/organization, and to attract new employees. The purpose of the present study was to investigate: the prevalence of shift characteristics (nights, long shifts, short rest, etc.) in traditional shift systems, the workers’ attitude to their shift systems, if combinations of problematic shift characteristics are associated with the workers’ attitude, and if work stress and poor sleep, fatigue, or social difficulties are associated with attitudes to shift systems.

    Methods A representative sample of 3,500 individuals with non-day work in the general population of Sweden were asked to participate in the study. A total of 1965 workers remained after drop-outs. The material was analyzed by Chi2 analysis and hierarchical multiple regression.

    Results The results showed that traditional shift systems included many more shift characteristics than those constituting the core of the systems. All included day work, for example. 90.2% of those with roster work had shifts > 10 h at least once a month. 66.9% of those with roster work without nights had < 11 h rest between shifts at least once a month. Less than 25% of the respondents had a rather or very negative attitude to their shift system, with the lowest level for those who work either fixed days or nights (7.6 and 5.7%, respectively) and highest for three-shift work (21.2%) and roster work without night work (24.4%). Shiftwork or roster work with nights had highest levels (> 50%) of sleep problems and fatigue. The difference across shift systems was significant at p < .001 in all cases. Combinations of the most problematic shift characteristics were associated with some increase in negative attitude to the shift schedule. Among schedule characteristics, only long weeks turned out significant in the multivariable regression. The strongest predictor of negative attitude to work hours were social difficulties due to work schedule [ß = 4.98 (95% Confidence interval (Ci) = 3.41, 7.27; p < .001], fatigue caused by schedule (ß = 3.20 Ci = 2.03, 5.05; p < .001), sleep problems caused by schedule (ß = 2.10 Ci = 1.46, 3.01; p = .01), and stressful work (ß = 1.52 Ci = 1.10, 2.11; p < .05).

    Conclusion It was concluded that shift systems often included many different shift characteristics, that night shift systems had a large proportion of long shifts, and that split shifts mainly occurred in roster day work. Furthermore, it was concluded that the attitude to the worker’s present shift systems seems to be positive for the majority, with the highest level for those who work either fixed days or nights, compared to those who work alternating shifts (including night shifts). Negative attitude to shift systems was more linked to social difficulties, fatigue or sleep problems due to the shift schedule, than to schedule characteristics per se.

  • 204.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Psykologiska institutionen, Stressforskningsinstitutet. Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Psykologiska institutionen, Biologisk psykologi. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Schwarz, Johanna F. A.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Psykologiska institutionen, Stressforskningsinstitutet. Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Psykologiska institutionen, Biologisk psykologi. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Theorell-Haglöw, Jenny
    Lindberg, Eva
    What do women mean by poor sleep?: A large population-based sample with polysomnographical indicators, inflammation, fatigue, depression, and anxiety2023Inngår i: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 109, s. 219-225Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Survey studies indicate that reports of disturbed sleep are prevalent and may be prospectively linked to several major diseases. However, it is not clear what self-reported disturbed sleep represents, since the link with objective sleep measures (polysomnography; PSG) seems very weak. The purpose of the present study was to try to investigate what combination of variables (PSG, inflammation, fatigue, anxiety, depression) that would characterize those who complain of disturbed sleep. This has never been done before. Participants were 319 women in a population-based sample, who gave ratings of sleep quality, fatigue, depression, and anxiety, then had their sleep recorded at home, and had blood drawn the following morning for analysis of immune parameters. Correlations and hierarchical multivariable regression analyses were applied to the data. For ratings of difficulties initiating sleep, the associations in the final step were ß = .22, (p < .001) for fatigue, ß = 0.22 (p < .001) for anxiety, and ß = 0.17 (p < .01) for sleep latency, with R2 = 0.14. The rating of repeated awakenings was associated with fatigue (ß = 0.35, p < .001) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (ß = 0.12, p < .05), with R2 = 0.19. The rating of early morning awakenings was associated with fatigue (ß = 0.31, p < .001), total sleep time (TST) (ß = −0.20, p < .01), and CRP (ß = 0.15, p < .05), with R2 = 0.17. Interleukin-6 and Tumour Necrosis Factor were not associated with ratings of sleep problems. The results indicate that subjective fatigue, rather than objective sleep variables, is central in the perception of poor sleep, together with CRP.

  • 205.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stressforskningsinstitutet. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Schwarz, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stressforskningsinstitutet. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Gruber, Georg
    Lindberg, Eva
    Theorell-Haglöw, Jenny
    The relation between polysomnography and subjective sleep and its dependence on age - poor sleep may become good sleep2016Inngår i: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, nr 5, s. 565-570Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Women complain more about sleep than men, but polysomnography (PSG) seems to suggest worse sleep in men. This raises the question of how women (or men) perceive objective (PSG) sleep. The present study sought to investigate the relation between morning subjective sleep quality and PSG variables in older and younger women. A representative sample of 251 women was analysed in age groups above and below 51.5 years (median). PSG was recorded at home during one night. Perceived poor sleep was related to short total sleep time (TST), long wake within total sleep time (WTSP), low sleep efficiency and a high number of awakenings. The older women showed lower TST and sleep efficiency and higher WTSP for a rating of good sleep than did the younger women. For these PSG variables the values for good sleep in the older group were similar to the values for poor sleep in the young group. It was concluded that women perceive different levels of sleep duration, sleep efficiency and wake after sleep onset relatively well, but that older women adjust their objective criteria for good sleep downwards. It was also concluded that age is an important factor in the relation between subjective and objective sleep.

  • 206.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stressforskningsinstitutet. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Schwarz, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stressforskningsinstitutet. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Gruber, Georg
    Theorell-Haglöw, Jenny
    Lindberg, Eva
    Women with both sleep problems and snoring show objective impairment of sleep2018Inngår i: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 51, s. 80-84Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Combined insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea has been the focus of considerable research with respect to its health effects. A related issue is whether sleep disturbances in combination with snoring might exert effects on objective sleep variables in the non-clinical general population. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the polysomnographical characteristics of individuals who had sought medical help for both disturbed sleep and for snoring. No previous work of this type has been carried out. Method: For this study we used a representative set of data of 384 women with one night of in-home PSG. We identified those individuals who had sought medical help for sleep problems (SL), individuals that had sought help for snoring (SN), as well as those that had sought help for either both (Combined), or for neither (Control). Results: Our results yielded an N of 46, 16, 21, and 301 individuals, respectively. A one-factor analysis of variance showed significant main effects on N1% (F = 10.2, p < 0.001), N3% (F = 2.7, p < 0.05), AHI/h (F = 5.5, p < 0.001), and a delta power measure (F = 3.8, p < 0.05). The combined group showed significantly higher levels than the other groups for N1% (29% vs < 21%), AHI/h (19/h vs < 10/h) and lower levels for N3%, and a measure of delta power. Reported sleep quality measures did not show the same pattern, since the highest/lowest value were found for either the group presenting snoring alone or sleep problems alone. Conclusion: We concluded that individuals who had sought help for both insomnia and snoring showed impaired sleep in terms of PSG and that this was not reflected in ratings of sleep or health. This suggests that simultaneous sleep disturbances and snoring may potentiate each other to cause impaired sleep, yet the mechanism still needs to be elucidated.

  • 207.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Psykologiska institutionen, Stressforskningsinstitutet. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Trolle-Lagerros, Ylva
    Widman, Linnea
    Ye, Weimin
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Bellocco, Rino
    Sleep duration and mortality, influence of age, retirement, and occupational group2021Inngår i: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, artikkel-id e13512Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous work has shown that both long and short sleep duration is associated with increased mortality, with lowest risk around 7 hr. This has had widespread impact on views on the optimal sleep duration. However, age, being employed/retired, and blue-/white-collar status, may influence the time available for sleep and thus, confound the association. We investigated the role of these factors on the association between sleep duration and mortality. We used employed and retired participants (N = 25,430) from the Swedish National March Cohort and Cox proportional hazards regression to model the shape of the association. We found a significant U-shaped association in a multivariable model with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.24 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10, 1.39) for <5-hr sleep duration, and a HR of 1.30 (95% CI 1.12, 1.51) for >= 9-hr sleep duration, with the lowest HR for 7 hr, but with a span of low HRs from 5 to 8 hr. Unadjusted values showed a pronounced U-shape. Adjusting for age accounted for most of the attenuation in the multivariable model. Stratification into five age groups showed a significant U-shape only in those aged >60.3 years at baseline. The shape of the association did not differ between blue-/white-collar workers, nor between employed and retired groups. We conclude that the U-shaped association between sleep duration and mortality is present only in older individuals.

2345 201 - 207 of 207
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