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  • 2101.
    Waltman, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Harvard University, USA.
    Appraising the Impact of Toward a Feminist Theory of the State: Consciousness-Raising, Hierarchy Theory, and Substantive Equality Laws2017In: Law & Inequality, ISSN 0737-089X, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 353-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The philosophical, political, and legal impact of Catharine MacKinnon's groundbreaking work Toward a Feminist Theory of the State (1989) is discussed, specifically the merging of consciousness-raising of subordinated groups with critically informed scholarship, producing a problem-driven approach engaging in informed policy-making. As a comprehensive political theory of the relationship between male dominance and the state, one of Toward's central features was to draw from consciousness-raising as a feminist research method to further ground its approach to equality, particularly in its prescription for substantive equality laws. The article illustrates how such central concepts have influenced real changes in the world, specifically using legal challenges to pornography and prostitution as examples.

    Parts I and II demonstrates how Toward departed from conventional epistemologies, in part explaining its revolutionary appeal to students, practitioners, and scholars. Part III continues the analysis by using real world applications of its approach to pornography and prostitution, beginning with the anti-pornography civil rights ordinances drafted by Catharine A. MacKinnon and writer Andrea Dworkin in 1983, six years before the publication of Toward. Part III illustrates how the ordinances mobilized MacKinnon’s same cutting-edge approach to advancing women’s legal substantive equality about which she later theorized. A similar approach was instrumental in grounding a substantive equality prostitution law, proposed by MacKinnon in a public speech in Stockholm, Sweden, November 2, 1990, situating that law within her broader approach to equality. The Swedish national umbrella organization for women’s shelters, ROKS, lobbied for the law and rallied other actors to support it, precipitating its passing in Parliament in 1998, with the law taking effect in 1999. Similar laws have now been adopted by many more countries (attesting to MacKinnon’s extraordinary influence as a legal and social theorist), although not until ten years or more after Sweden’s law, which makes Sweden’s unique data availability a “revelatory case.” Part III concludes by analyzing its comparative impact in terms of reducing sexual exploitation and abuse and offering an exit for people in prostitution, thus promoting substantive equality.

  • 2102.
    Waltman, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    End Demand’ Works, Evidence Shows2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2103.
    Waltman, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Prohibiting Purchase of Sex in Sweden: Impact, Obstacles, Potential, and Supporting Escape2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes the core reasons for the Swedish law from 1999 which criminalizes purchase of sex and decriminalizes the prostituted person, passed as part of an omnibus bill against violence against women and recognizing prostitution as a form of it. Further, it documents the law’s impact by comparing data from several recent Swedish studies with the situation in other relevant countries, concluding the law has significantly reduced the occurrence of prostitution manifolds compared to its neighboring countries. Crucial obstacles to effective implementation are also addressed, particularly in current case law. Some of the critique against the law and disinformation about the law’s effects are also commented. Finally, to realize its full potential to support escape from prostitution more efficiently, it is argued that the civil rights of prostituted persons under current law should be strengthened to get damages paid for directly by the tricks/johns for the harm they have contributed to. An additional consideration is for individual states to extend the use of the Palermo Protocol (international law acknowledging connections between prostitution and sex trafficking) to charge tricks for trafficking when they “receive” persons who are effectively pimped.

  • 2104.
    Waltman, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Prohibiting Sex Purchasing and Ending Trafficking: The Swedish Prostitution Law2011In: Michigan Journal of International Law, ISSN 1052-2867, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 133-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish prostitution law from 1999, now followed by Norway and Iceland, criminalized the purchaser and decriminalized the prostituted person. This is analyzed as a cogent state response under international trafficking law, particularly to the obligations set forth in the United Nation’s Trafficking Protocol from 2000. The Protocol states that a person is regarded a trafficking victim when, e.g., someone abuses her “position of vulnerability” in order to exploit her. International jurisprudence and social evidence strongly suggest that prostitution, as practiced in the world, usually satisfies this definition. Further, the Protocol urges states to reduce the demand for prostitution and to protect and assist victims, for instance by adopting laws deterring purchasers of sex, and by supporting those exploited in prostitution. Policy makers, such as the U.S. Department of State, are criticized for taking an inadequate position in face of the growing evidence from the Swedish law's impact.The article shows that Sweden has significantly reduced the occurrence of trafficking in Sweden compared to neighboring countries. It also scrutinizes some misinformation of the law's impact, showing for instance that claims alleging a more dangerous situation for those still in prostitution after 1999 were unfounded. In addition, the article addresses remaining obstacles to the law's effective implementation, arguing that in order to realize the law's full potential to support escape from trafficking, the civil rights of prostituted persons under current law should be strengthened to enable them to claim damages directly from the purchasers for the harm to which they have contributed, and for the violation of the prostituted persons' equality and dignity - a position now recognized by the government to some extent by clarifying amendments made in 2011.

  • 2105.
    Waltman, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sweden’s prohibition of purchase of sex: the law's reasons, impact, and potential2011In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 449-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1999, Sweden passed a law criminalizing the purchase of sex and decriminalizing the prosti­tuted person. The law was part of an omnibus bill against violence against women, recognizing prostitution as related to such violence. This article analyzes the reasons for the Swedish law and documents the law’s impact, concluding that the law has significantly reduced the occur­rence of prostitution in Sweden compared to neighboring countries. In addition, it addresses some important remaining obstacles to the law’s effective implementation and responds to vari­ous common critiques of (and misinformation about) the law and its effects. Finally, this article argues that, in order to realize the law’s full potential to support escape from prostitution, the civil rights of prostituted persons under current law should be strengthened to enable them to claim damages directly from the tricks/johns for the harm to which they have contributed.

  • 2106.
    Waltman, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    성구매 금지와 인신매매 척결: 스웨덴의 성매매 관련법2012In: Women's Human Rights [South Korea], ISSN 2093-5714, Vol. 7, p. 88-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish prostitution law from 1999, now followed by Norway and Iceland, criminalized the purchaser and decriminalized the prostituted person. This is analyzed as a cogent state response under international trafficking law, particularly to the obligations set forth in the United Nation’s Trafficking Protocol from 2000. The Protocol states that a person is regarded a trafficking victim when, e.g., someone abuses her “position of vulnerability” in order to exploit her. International jurisprudence and social evidence strongly suggest that prostitution, as practiced in the world, usually satisfies this definition. Further, the Protocol urges states to reduce the demand for prostitution and to protect and assist victims, for instance by adopting laws deterring purchasers of sex, and by supporting those exploited in prostitution. Policy makers, such as the U.S. Department of State, are criticized for taking an inadequate position in face of the growing evidence from the Swedish law's impact.The article shows that Sweden has significantly reduced the occurrence of trafficking in Sweden compared to neighboring countries. It also scrutinizes some misinformation of the law's impact, showing for instance that claims alleging a more dangerous situation for those still in prostitution after 1999 were unfounded. In addition, the article addresses remaining obstacles to the law's effective implementation, arguing that in order to realize the law's full potential to support escape from trafficking, the civil rights of prostituted persons under current law should be strengthened to enable them to claim damages directly from the purchasers for the harm to which they have contributed, and for the violation of the prostituted persons' equality and dignity - a position now recognized by the government to some extent by clarifying amendments made in 2011.

  • 2107.
    Warnqvist, Åsa
    et al.
    Centrum för genusvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Ragnerstam, Petra
    Limitation and Liberation: Women Writers and the Politics of Genre2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 2108.
    Wassénius, Emmy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    A spatiotemporal analysis of coral reef regimes and fish herbivory across the Hawaiian Archipelago2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Coral reefs can undergo shifts to alternative ecological regimes (or states) when exposed to stress. Acquiring a deeper understanding of when coral reefs become increasingly vulnerable to such shifts (i.e. regime shifts), and the stability of alternative regimes once unfolded, has important societal consequences as associated ecosystem services may change or be lost. Herbivory has been advocated as a key process that determines reef regimes. Here I show the co-occurrence of three distinct reef regimes across the Hawaiian archipelago from 2010-2015, providing empirical evidence for the existence of alternate regimes on a large spatiotemporal scale. I investigate the linkages between benthic regimes and the herbivory function, breaking down the taxonomic and functional diversity of the herbivore community through a trait-based functional space approach. This approach highlights a pattern of varying functional redundancy within herbivore communities across the regimes. A better understanding of these types of regime differences is integral for fully grasping where, when and how these shifts occur.

  • 2109. Watson, Nick
    et al.
    Vehmas, Simo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Disability studies: Into the multidisciplinary future2020In: Routledge handbook of disability studies / [ed] Nick Watson, Simo Vehmas, London: Routledge, 2020, 2, p. 3-13Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2110. Watson, Nick
    et al.
    Vehmas, SimoStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Routledge handbook of disability studies2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 2111.
    Wattar, Hiba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Låg självkänsla är lika med minimal delaktighet?: En studie om funktionsnedsättningen ADD utifrån ett delaktighetsperspektiv.2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 2112.
    Webster, Natasha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Hübinette, Tobias, Hörnfeldt, Helena, Farahani, Fataneh & Rosales, René León (eds.) (2012) Om ras och vithet i det samtida Sverige, Botkyrka: Mångkulturellt centrum. 239 pp.2014In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 49-50Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2113.
    Webster, Natasha
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Thai women in Sweden: Victims or participants?2014Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Migration from Thailand to Sweden is a rapidly growing phenomenon with a threefold increase over the last ten years, with the majority of migrants being female marriage migrants. In the media and popular culture, stereotyping of Thai-Swedish couples is commonplace; focusing on unequal power relations, sex tourism and other social problems which often position Thai women ‘as both materialist rural women and ignorant victims’ (Sunanta 2013, 193). Our paper positions and explores the status of this unique group of migrants through a power and agency lens and by adopting a multi-methods approach. Using register data, we are able to give a detailed picture of the migration and socio-demographic features of Thais in Sweden, while in-depth interviews with Thai women provide nuanced understandings of Thai-Sweden migration. We find a complex narrative of migration, where Thai women are active agents in their migration process but still face many inequalities in Sweden. A diversified picture of these women is revealed, giving an inside view into their lives that goes beyond and break common stereotypes.

  • 2114.
    Weidenstedt, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    A Sociology of Empowerment: The Relevance of Communicative Contexts for Workplace Change2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Empowerment has been a popular concept in management and leadership practice and research for more than forty years. The intentions behind empowerment at the workplace are positive: empowered employees should experience a greater degree of influence, decision-making latitude, and meaningfulness. This is achieved through transfers of power, such as increases in autonomy and responsibility. Although empowerment efforts have often been shown to successfully result in empowered and highly involved employees, there has also been research that shows the opposite: the so-called paradox of empowerment is a well-known problem that refers to failed empowerment efforts through which beneficiaries feel disempowered rather than empowered.

    This thesis comprises three papers intended to contribute to empowerment research and practice within a sociological framework that offers a better understanding of implicit assumptions between employer and employee and the unintended consequences these can have on the outcome of empowerment change efforts. The analyses utilize a communicative approach in line with sociological and social-psychological theories of communication and interaction.

    The first two papers are theoretical analyses, one examining the general concept of empowerment (Paper I), the other focusing more specifically on empowerment in workplace contexts (Paper II). Paper III is an empirical analysis that investigates some of the theoretical assumptions made in Papers I and II.

    The first paper analyzes empowerment from a sociological point of view and identifies possible mechanisms behind the paradox of empowerment. It is argued that such paradoxes may evolve from discrepancies between approaching empowerment from a purely economic and structural perspective versus a communicative and relational one. It concludes with the observation that, although their agency may be increased on a structural level, empowerees may experience a parallel decrease of agential options on a communicative level.

    The second paper deals with empowerment at the workplace as a management or leadership technique. Focusing on relational aspects, a “basic communicative structure” is identified. This is analyzed as comprising a contractual and a communicative context that should be taken into consideration by empowerers in order to avoid misunderstandings in the recipients’ sensemaking processes. Paper II concludes by arguing that the way recipients make sense of their roles and situations as defined by employment and/or psychological contracts might not necessarily be in line with the communicative meanings they ascribe to the change agents’ actions, and vice versa.

    The third paper analyzes employees’ orientations and attitudes toward empowerment and the relevance of their attitudes for the success of empowerment efforts. These issues are explored by means of survey data from 268 employees in the Swedish retail sector. Results indicate that age and work intensity (part-time vs. full-time), as well as cohabitation status may have significant impacts on how empowerment efforts are approached and received by employees.

    The thesis as a whole provides insights into sociological issues of empowerment, both generally and particularly in management and leadership contexts and concludes that the communicative context of empowerment interactions plays a significant role in employees’ empowerment orientations.

  • 2115.
    Wendt, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Comparing ‘deep’ insider knowledge: developing analytical strategies for cross-national qualitative studies2019In: International Journal of Social Research Methodology, ISSN 1364-5579, E-ISSN 1464-5300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One overarching question in scholarly methodological discussions on qualitative comparative approaches concerns how it is possible to compare and generalise deep insider knowledge across (nationally) specific contexts. The aim of this article is to propose a research strategy that both facilitates the comparison and theorisation of such knowledge across nations and limits the risks of reproducing naturalised national ‘truths’. The strategy is developed within a feminist, cross-national, qualitative comparative analysis of how European countries addressed military deaths in connection with the ISAF mission in Afghanistan. The article underlines the importance of collective analytical work and of strategies that allow continuous movement between insider and outsider positions throughout the research process. A number of analytical strategies are presented: collective project design, alternating between analytical closeness and distance, and de-familiarising writing practices.

  • 2116.
    Wendt, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Åse, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Kön, våld och död i nya krig2017In: Politik och kön: Feministiska perspektiv på statsvetenskap / [ed] Lenita Freidenvall, Maria Jansson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, p. 239-250Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2117.
    Wendt, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Åse, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies.
    När soldater dör tystnar det demokratiska samtalet2018In: Arena, ISSN 1652-0556Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2118.
    Wesely, Julia
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Policy Outcomes on Water-Related Ecosystem Services in an Agricultural Landscape in South Africa2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Water governance in South Africa is challenged by natural as well as socially constructed water scarcity. 15 years after the transition from Apartheid to the new democratic era, this paper shows that water resources are still distributed along racial lines. Based on a case study in rural KwaZulu Natal, results indicate that outcomes of water policies which aimed at redressing historic inequalities have not yet been able to create the expected benefits for the disadvantaged black farming community. This paper uses an ecosystem service (ESS) approach to assess how those benefits that are derived from different water-related ecosystem services (WES) developed in the smallholder community and its adjacent commercial farming area. The change in the distribution of water for household use, water for irrigation, water flow regulation and water for scenic beauty is further discussed in regards to its response to water policies on local and national level. Hereby, the paper addresses the research need to provide insight into ESS responses to policy outcomes, which in turn is expected to reveal challenges and opportunities for policy makers to incorporate the complex yet important interactions between social and ecological systems into their decision making. Practically, this paper contributes by making gaps in ESS utilization between smallholder and commercial farmers explicit. Focusing on the material aspects of equality, i.e. the redistribution of water resources is argued to be neither feasible nor unequivocally desirable in the near future. Rather, I encourage capacity building to increase possibilities of the smallholder farmers to effectively use existing resources.

  • 2119.
    West, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Meaning and Action in Sustainability Science: Interpretive approaches for social-ecological systems research2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Social-ecological systems research is interventionist by nature. As a subset of sustainability science, social-ecological systems research aims to generate knowledge and introduce concepts that will bring about transformation. Yet scientific concepts diverge in innumerable ways when they are put to work in the world. Why are concepts used in quite different ways to the intended purpose? Why do some appear to fail and others succeed? What do the answers to these questions tell us about the nature of science-society engagement, and what implications do they have for social-ecological systems research and sustainability science? This thesis addresses these questions from an interpretive perspective, focusing on the meanings that shape human actions. In particular, the thesis examines how meaning, interpretation and experience shape the enactment of four action-oriented sustainability concepts: adaptive management, biosphere reserves, biodiversity corridors and planetary boundaries/reconnecting to the biosphere. In so doing, the thesis provides in-depth empirical applications of three interpretive traditions – hermeneutic, discursive and dialogical – that together articulate a broadly interpretive approach to studying social-ecological complexity. In the hermeneutic tradition, Paper I presents a ‘rich narrative’ case study of a single practitioner tasked with enacting adaptive management in an Australian land management agency, and Paper II provides a qualitative multi-case study of learning among 177 participants in 11 UNESCO biosphere reserves. In the discursive tradition, Paper III uses Q-method to explore interpretations of ‘successful’ biodiversity corridors among 20 practitioners, scientists and community representatives in the Cape Floristic Region, South Africa. In the dialogical tradition, Paper IV reworks conventional understandings of knowledge-action relationships by using three concepts from contemporary practice theory – ‘actionable understanding,’ ‘ongoing business’ and the ‘eternally unfolding present’ – to explore the enactment of adaptive management in an Australian national park. Paper V explores ideas of human-environment connection in the concepts planetary boundaries and reconnecting to the biosphere, and develops an ‘embodied connection’ where human-environment relations emerge through interactivity between mind, body and environment over time. Overall, the thesis extends the frontiers of social-ecological systems research by highlighting the meanings that shape social-ecological complexity; by contributing theories and methods that treat social-ecological change as a relational and holistic process; and by providing entry points to address knowledge, politics and power. The thesis contributes to sustainability science more broadly by introducing novel understandings of knowledge-action relationships; by providing advice on how to make sustainability interventions more useful and effective; by introducing tools that can improve co-production and outcome assessment in the global research platform Future Earth; and by helping to generate robust forms of justification for transdisciplinary knowledge production. The interventionist, actionable nature of social-ecological systems research means that interpretive approaches are an essential complement to existing structural, institutional and behavioural perspectives. Interpretive research can help build a scientifically robust, normatively committed and critically reflexive sustainability science.

  • 2120.
    West, Simon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Beilin, Ruth
    Wagenaar, Hendrik
    Embracing the primacy of experience: How a practice perspective can bring accounts of adaptive management to lifeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In complex, dynamic and uncertain environments, where the appropriate course of action is unclear, natural resource managers often pose the question, “what should I do now?” Over the past thirty years, the answer from applied ecology and the complexity sciences has generally been, “adaptive management,” or in everyday terms “learning-by-doing.” Adaptive management, rooted in pragmatism, suggests that many problems can only be solved through experience, and therefore management action should be structured as a process of scientific experimentation. While these ideas have been widely embraced by ecologists, managers and policy-makers, outcomes in practice have been disappointing to advocates. There is a widespread perception that adaptive management is a great idea that rarely works in practice. In this paper we suggest, however, that while adaptive management is certainly challenging, diagnoses of failure have been largely made within implicitly linear models of the links between knowledge, practice and context that run counter to contemporary pragmatic thought. Indeed, while adaptive management prioritizes experience and ‘doing’ as way to learn about complex ecologies, the character of experience is reduced to producing more accurate representations thought to underlie better practice. In this paper we therefore reach back to the pragmatic origins of adaptive management to develop a theoretical account of the practice of learning-by-doing that begins from a transactional conception of experience, and explains knowledge and context in terms of practical action in the present. We apply three concepts from contemporary practice theory – ‘actionable understanding,’ ‘ongoing business’ and ‘the eternally unfolding present’ – to an in-depth case study of adaptive management in the Wyperfeld National Park, Australia. We illustrate the utility of a practice perspective by highlighting implications for a) assessments of success and failure in adaptive management, b) the roles of ecologists and managers, and c) the use of ecological information by managers. The key message of the paper is that embracing the inevitable complexity and ‘mess’ of experience may lead to more realistic accounts of adaptive management in action and creative forms of practice. 

  • 2121.
    West, Simon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Cairns, Rose
    Schultz, Lisen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    What constitutes a successful biodiversity corridor?: A Q-study in the Cape Floristic Region, South Africa2016In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 198, p. 183-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Success’ is a vigorously debated concept in conservation. There is a drive to develop quantitative, comparable metrics of success to improve conservation interventions. Yet the qualitative, normative choices inherent in decisions about what to measure — emerging from fundamental philosophical commitments about what conservation is and should be — have received scant attention. We address this gap by exploring perceptions of what constitutes a successful biodiversity corridor in the Cape Floristic Region, South Africa, an area of global biodiversity significance. Biodiversity corridors are particularly illustrative because, as interventions intended to extend conservation practices from protected areas across broader landscapes, they represent prisms in which ideas of conservation success are contested and transformed. We use Q method to elicit framings of success among 20 conservation scientists, practitioners and community representatives, and find three statistically significant framings of successful corridors: ‘a last line of defence for biodiversity under threat,’ ‘a creative process to develop integrative, inclusive visions of biodiversity and human wellbeing,’ and ‘a stimulus for place-based cultural identity and economic development.’ Our results demonstrate that distinct understandings of what a corridor is — a planning tool, a process of governing, a territorialized place — produce divergent framings of ‘successful’ corridors that embody diverse, inherently contestable visions of conservation. These framings emerge from global conservation discourses and distinctly local ecologies, politics, cultures and histories. We conclude that visions of conservation success will be inherently plural, and that in inevitably contested and diverse social contexts success on any terms rests upon recognition of and negotiation with alternative visions.

  • 2122.
    West, Simon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Haider, Jamila
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Sinare, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Karpouzoglou, Tim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Beyond divides: Prospects for synergy between resilience and pathways approaches to sustainability2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of rapid social, ecological and technological change, there is rising global demand from private, public and civic interests for trans-disciplinary sustainability research. This demand is fuelled by an increasing recognition that transitions toward sustainability require new modes of knowledge production that incorporate social and natural sciences and the humanities. The Social, Technological and Environmental Pathways to Sustainability (STEPS) Centre’s ‘pathways approach’ and the Stockholm Resilience Centre’s (SRC) ‘resilience approach’ are two distinct trans-disciplinary frameworks for understanding and responding to sustainability challenges. However, the varieties of trans-disciplinarity pursued by the SRC and STEPS each have distinct origins and implications. Therefore, by selecting either the ‘resilience’ or ‘pathways’ approach, or indeed any distinct approach to sustainability, the researcher must contend with a range of foundational ontological and epistemological commitments that profoundly affect the definition of problems, generation of knowledge and prescriptions for action.

    What does an (un)sustainable world look like? How might we ‘know’ and research (un)sustainability? How should sustainability researchers position themselves in relation to civil society, policy, business and academic communities? In this paper we explore how resilience and pathways address these questions, identifying points of overlap and friction with the aim of generating new research questions and illuminating areas of potential synergy. As a group of early-career trans-disciplinary researchers we think that exciting areas of sustainability research lie in the boundaries between emerging trans-disciplinary research communities such as the SRC and STEPS. We propose future research that draws energy from current tensions between, for instance, competing visions of reflexive and policy-relevant research, and between ‘functional’ and ‘equity’ perspectives on social- ecological change. More broadly, we aim to stimulate thinking and debate about possible research agendas for sustainability that are more reflexive about the boundaries of trans-disciplinary research and encourage greater collaboration across and between research with different ontological and epistemological starting points. 

  • 2123.
    West, Simon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Schultz, Lisen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Learning to live with social-ecological complexity: An interpretive analysis of learning in 11 UNESCO Biosphere ReservesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning is increasingly considered a means to achieve sustainability in practice and has become a prominent goal of sustainability interventions. The UNESCO World Network of Biosphere Reserves seeks to bring environmental conservation, socio-economic development and research together in ‘learning sites for sustainable development.’ The World Network is globally significant, with 669 sites in 120 countries, yet as with many paradigmatic sustainability interventions there is a widespread notion that biosphere reserves suffer from a ‘concept-reality gap.’ When assessing practical, ‘on-ground’ manifestations of the concept in accordance with UNESCO documentation and formally stated aims and ambitions, observers have often been disappointed. But while many biosphere reserves (BRs) no doubt face significant challenges, these approaches to assessing outcomes – taken alone – may not reveal the complete picture. They tend to assume that BRs are a single, standardized concept (against which local actions should be measured), and carry implicit assumptions about how learning for sustainability should take place and what it should include. In this paper, we suggest that taking the inverse approach – paying close attention to practitioners’ interpretations of BRs and their experiences of working with the BR concept – can help build a richer picture of learning for sustainability, with significant implications for the ways that BR may fulfil their role as learning sites. To this end, we provide an interpretive, multi-case analysis of learning in 11 BRs around the world. We ask: (a) How is the BR concept interpreted and enacted by people involved with BR work? (b) What kinds of learning emerge through BR work, as described by the people involved? We find that participants interpret BRs in a number of different ways, from ‘collaborative platform’ to ‘marketing label’, and that that these meanings are entangled with the institutional, political and ecological histories of each location. BR work therefore encompasses a range of activities, from clearing invasive species to arranging art-science festivals, and these activities shape and are shaped by the meaning of each BR as well as the evolving social-ecological context. Learning occurs around three broad themes across the sites – human-environment relationships; actors and governance arrangements; and skills and capacities to negotiate the ad hoc, unplanned nature of much BR work – but is expressed very differently in each BR.  While our results make identifying generic ‘lessons learned’ difficult, they illustrate the BR’s value in providing opportunities for participants to learn about the complex social-ecological processes involved in pursuing sustainability. In particular, the BR’s position ‘in the middle’ of local, regional and global forces; social, ecological and economic goals; and government, business and civil society actors, points toward a potential role for BRs as experimental arenas for sustainability, rather than replicable models per se. Our interpretive, multi-case approach provides a novel contribution to research on biosphere reserves and the broader literature on learning for sustainability.

  • 2124.
    Westberg Broström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    "Wild Scouts": Swedish scouting preparing responsible citizens for the twenty-first century2013In: Child & Youth Services, ISSN 0145-935X, E-ISSN 1545-2298, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 9-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to analyze the Swedish scout program.Socialization is used as a theoretical tool in the analysis. Themethod is inspired by critical discourse analysis. What are childrenand young people being prepared for, how is it accomplished, andby whom? The findings reveal two discourses: doing things as aninvestment for the future versus having fun. In ‘‘the scout factory,’’the movement is the initiator, the leader the performer, and theyoung person the individual who is to become the finalproduct—a responsible citizen.

  • 2125.
    Westberg Broström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Young or youthful: the Scout Movement and youth discourses2012In: Leisure/Loisir, ISSN 1492-7713, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 53-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explore the discourses surrounding the contemporary Swedish Scout Movement and young people. The method is based on discourse analysis. Newspaper articles about, and leaflets from, the movement from 2007 to 2009 were analyzed. The findings suggest that scouts are described as well-behaved, decent, sinful, “geeky,” young or youthful. The leaflets demonstrate that the organization wants to promote itself as youthful. It has trouble recruiting young people and tries to change its image by borrowing symbols from other youth cultures. Paradoxically, this approach leads to a conclusion that the Scout Movement's youth are not seen as youthful by their own organization. They cannot signal youthfulness by themselves.

  • 2126. Westberg, Gustav
    et al.
    Årman, Henning
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Common sense as extremism: the multi-semiotics of contemporary national socialism2019In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 549-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how national socialist aesthetics and semiotics are regimented within the Swedish Nazi milieu today. In order to treat fascism as contemporary ideology, the article applies intertextuality and provenance as analytical concepts in the analysis of how Nazism is re-emerging discursively. The analysis contributes unique insights, as the dataset consists of extremist discourse aimed at providing members of the most prominent Swedish Nazi movement with guidance on how to embody and express national socialism in their everyday lives. The analysis reveals that common-sense notions about 'a natural life' and mainstream aesthetics concerning an outdoor lifestyle emerge as central expressions of a 'natural' and 'healthy' embodiment of national socialism. This aesthetic finds its ideological motive in opposition to a 'sick', 'Jewish' and 'parasitical' way of living. Mainstream notions are thus turned into vehicles for political extremism.

  • 2127.
    Westling Allodi, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Child care and pre-school in Sweden: An overview of practices, tendencies and research2007In: Rivista di Pedagogia e Didattica, Vol. 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The system and policy for child care and pre-school education in Sweden are overviewed: its structure and goals in the context of the Swedish society and its general welfare system are described. New challenges and actual problematic tendencies revealed by national evaluations and research are identified: the increasing quality variation, the broader attendance, the lack of qualified teachers, a narrowly interpretation of the curriculum, the rising numbers of children identified as having special educational needs. Some interpretations of the relationships among these emerging factors are suggested.

  • 2128.
    Westling Allodi, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Children's experiences of school:: narratives of Swedish children with and without learning difficulties2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 181-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The content of texts written by Swedish school children is analysed in order to gain a picture of their experiences of school and these experiences are put in relation to the democratic goals of integration and practices of selection and segregation which are emerging in the Swedish school systems with the increase in pupils enrolled in special units. In a project concerning educational organizations and children receiving special support, 185 children living in 10 Swedish municipalities and attending 16 different schools wrote a text about their school situation. Ninety of these children received special support at school because of learning disabilities/difficulties. The 185 texts have been analysed using narrative approaches. The children experienced school as a place where they are protagonists and pointed out those activities that are meaningful to them. Social relations, ethical issues and learning are areas pertaining to school. Problems at school are mainly due to a lack of stimulation, adult control and influence. The children with support at school were not a homogeneous group. Several of these children, however, treat situations concerning personal rights and justice in their narratives, themes that were not common in the texts of the other children. The perspectives of children with different experiences are thus important in understanding the characteristics and the deficits of educational environments.

  • 2129.
    Westling Allodi, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Gränser i skolan.: Vilka funktioner har differentierade grupper?2002In: Locus: tidskrift för forskning om barn och ungdomar, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 4-19Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sedan 1990-talet ökar antalet elever i särskolan dramatiskt. Detta trots att den centralt uttalade intentionen är att skolan ska vara ”en skola för alla” och att segregeringen av elever med funktionshinder ska minska. Hur kan denna motsägelse förklaras? I denna artikel utgår Mara Westling Allodi från intervjuer med specialpedagoger i tre segregerade grupper och diskuterar de förändringar som inträffat i grundskolan under de senaste tio åren.

  • 2130.
    Westling Allodi, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Pojkars och flickors psykiska hälsa i skolan: en kunskapsöversikt2010Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport är en kunskapsöversikt över forskning om skolfaktorers inverkan på flickors och pojkars psykosociala hälsa. Det är vanligare att flickor i skolan är oroliga, stressade och deprimerade, från de tidiga tonåren. Pojkar har i stället fler uppmärksamhetsstörningar, koncentrationssvårigheter och skolsvårigheter redan från tidig ålder.

  • 2131.
    Westling Allodi, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Self concept in children receiving special support at school2000In: European Journal of special needs education, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 69-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate the variations of self-concept in pupils attending basic compulsory schools and special units. It also examines self-concept in pupils receiving support according to different models. The study involved 183 pupils aged nine to 13 years, attending basic compulsory schools or special programme units in Sweden. Seventy-seven pupils were receiving support from special educators, who have completed a supplementary programme in special education. A comparison was made between pupils receiving support and pupils receiving no support and between pupils in different organization models of support. Global self-concept at school does not seem to be related to the model of special support. Pupils at compulsory schools who are receiving support differ from pupils who receive no support, in that peer relations appear to be more important for their self-concept at school. This could be interpreted as being a compensatory strategy to maintain a good self-concept in spite of difficulties at school. Some implications for educational strategies are discussed.

  • 2132.
    Westling Allodi, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Specialpedagogik i en skola för alla: Granskning av specialpedagogiska verksamheter i en svensk kommun2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kommunerna har en stor frihet i utformningen av stödet till de elever som har rätt till det. Den specialpedagogiska verksamheten får olika skepnader: den kan vara knuten till arbetslag, kan omfatta grupper och klasser tänkta för elever med specifika funktionshinder och som finns i vanliga grundskolor, men den kan även bestå av fristående enheter. Särskoleklasser utgör en verksamhet som ingår i vissa grundskolor, medan ett växand eantal av elever som är berättigade till särskolan väljer att gå i en grundskoleklass. Finansieringen av dessa verksamheter kan ske på olika sätt: med central anslag från utbildningsnämnden eller via skolornas ordinarie budget, eller genom att den ursprungliga skolan köper en plats för en elev på en specialenhet.

    Dessa verksamheter förväntas samverka och samarbeta med den övriga skolorgansiationen, med andra lokala och statliga myndigheter, samt vara lyhörda för föräldrar och elever, i sysftet att tillförsäkra varje elevs rätt till en utbildning som stärker ens känsla av värdighet och integritet.

    Dessa verksamheter behöver hantera kontrasterande målsättningar. Hänsyn till lagar förordningar och politiska styrdokument - både internationella och nationella - ekonomisk effektivitet, kvalité etiska överväganden och individens rättigheter ska vägas samma i verksamheter av olika slag. Om en av dessa målsättninga rblir dominerande kan den motarbeta uppnåendet av de andra målsättningarna.

    Vilka målsättningar styr och vilka krafter påverkar utformningen av specialpedagogiska verksamheter på kommun- och skolnivå?

    Vilka blir konsekvenserna av olika organisatoriska modeller? vilka möjligheter och hinder upplevs i dessa verksamheter? Denna rapport försöker svara på dessa frågor genom att granska specialpedagogiska verksamheter i en kommun.

  • 2133.
    Westling Allodi, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Undervisningsmiljö och socialt klimat2010In: Etik i specialpedagogisk verksamhet / [ed] Rolf Helldin, Birgitta Sahlin, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2010, p. 49-71Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2134.
    Wickberg Månsson, Ellen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Julin, Josefin
    Vi måste göra någonting åt det: En kvalitativ studie av Svenska skolidrottsförbundets jämställdhets- & inkluderingsarbete2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay came into existence as a result of a collaboration between us, two students in gender studies working on our bachelor thesis, and an employee at Svenska skolidrottsförbundet. The paper explores diversity and gender equality work within this organization, and the main focus is how people holding leading positions within the organization express their view on equality and diversity work. To do this, we have completed interviews with 6 different people in leading positions, as well as participant observation during the association meeting (förbundsmötet), which is the highest decision-making authority within the organization. We have analyzed our data with inspiration from feminist theory, organization theory, as well as some earlier conducted studies from the field of sports, all with a primary focus on gender and diversity questions. The conclusion shows that there is a discrepancy between the self-image some members of the organization express in regard to their equality and diversity work, the work they actually do, and the views they hold in relation to increased equality within the organization. In other words, the actions do not match the description. The reasons behind this are complex, but some possible explanations we found is the reproduction of negative masculinity norms, the homogeneity within the decision-making bodies of the organization, and dissonance in approaches to diversity and equality work between members within the organization. In our opinion, one important element for the organization to regard in future work is to make sure that knowledge concerning gender and diversity is shared with all members involved in their day-to-day activities. Especially since Svenska skolidrottsförbundet is an arena for children and youths to develop, grow and play.

  • 2135.
    Widmark, Catharina
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Sandahl, Christer
    karolinska institutet.
    Piuva, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bergman, David
    Karolinska institutet.
    Barriers to Collaboration Between Health Care, Social Services and Schools2011In: International Journal of Integrated Care, ISSN 1568-4156, E-ISSN 1568-4156, Vol. 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is essential for professionals from different organizations to collaborate when handling matters concerning children, adolescents, and their families in order to enable society to provide health care and social services from a comprehensive approach.

    Objective:

    This paper reports perceptions of obstacles to collaboration among professionals in health care (county council), social services (municipality), and schools in an administrative district of the city of Stockholm, Sweden.

    Methods:

    Data were collected in focus group interviews with unit managers and personnel.

    Results and discussion:

    Our results show that allocation of responsibilities, confidence and the professional encounter were areas where barriers to collaboration occurred, mainly depending on a lack of clarity. The responsibility for collaboration fell largely on the professionals and we found that shared responsibility of managers from different organizations is a crucial factor affecting successful collaboration. We conclude that a holding environment, as a social context that facilitates sense making, and a committed management would support these professionals in their efforts to collaborate.

  • 2136.
    Widmark, Wilhelm
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, University Library.
    Textbooks as eBooks: A Case Study from the University Library in Stockholm2005In: Against the Grain, ISSN 1043-2094, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 55-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2137.
    Wijermans, Nanda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Jorna, René
    Jager, Wander
    van Vliet, Tony
    Adang, Otto
    CROSS: Modelling Crowd Behaviour with Social-Cognitive Agents2013In: JASSS: Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, ISSN 1460-7425, E-ISSN 1460-7425, Vol. 16, no 4, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of computer simulations in crowd research is a powerful tool to describe and analyse complex social systems. This paper presents CROSS, a generic framework to model crowd simulations as a social scientific tool for understanding crowd behaviour. In CROSS, individuals are represented by social-cognitive agents that are affected by their social and physical surroundings and produce cognition-based behaviour and behaviour patterns. Understanding is sought by relating intra- and inter-individual levels of behaviour generation with behaviour pattern emergence at group level. By specifying the CROSS framework for a festival context we demonstrate how CROSS meets the need for a theory that reflects the dynamic interplay between individuals and their environment as well as the need for a method that allows for testing.

  • 2138.
    Wijk, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Om fotboll som integration och makt - och Evitra Peron - i Argentina2015In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, no 8 septemberArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 2139.
    Wiklund Abdelmoez, Joel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Middle Eastern Studies.
    Muskler, mustascher och machomän: Preliminära tankar om maskulinitet i Egyptisk media2017In: Orientaliska Studier, ISSN 0345-8997, no 151, p. 5-19Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie bygger på etnografiskt material insamlat i Kairo, under hösten 2014. Med hjälp av semi-strukturerade intervjuer och internetenkäter undersöks hur maskulinitet(er) talas om och beskrivs i vardagliga sammanhang, samt hur maskulinitet uppfattas i relation till dess medierepresentation.

  • 2140.
    Wikman, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Boganmeldelse - Vold mod offentligt ansatte: Editors: Kruize, Peter; Sorensen, David Woodrow Mattson; Lassen, David Dreyer.2009In: Nordisk Tidsskrift for Kriminalvidenskab, ISSN 0029-1528, no 3Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2141.
    Wikman, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Hot och våld i vård och omsorg - åtgärdsförslag i arbetsskadeanmälningar 1987, 1997 och 20072012In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 19, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workplace violence is a complex occupational hazard that nursing staff face in today’s health care environment. This study examines staff-recommended safety measures in the wake of violence and threat-related injuries in occupational injury reports. The results suggest that intervention measures concerning psychosocial factors and structural job aspects such as adequate staffing are far more important than surveillance, staff training and penal sanctions.

  • 2142.
    Wikman, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Hårdare tag i arbetslivet? Åtgärder mot arbetsrelaterat våld i facklig press 1978-20042011In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 51-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preventing violence at work. A study of descriptions of safety measures in Swedish trade union journals 1978-2004

    The purpose of this study is to examine if perceptions of interventions aimed at violence in the workplace have changed since the 1970s. In the beginning of the study period, structural factors are seen as the dominating explanation for workplace violence. The crime perspective rises in the 1990’s and methods of intervention becomes the control- and justice functions of larger society. The result shows search for accountability to be a salient factor for understanding the development towards an increasing use of penal sanctions.

  • 2143.
    Wikman, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Joel, P. E., Mad-doctors in the dock: Defending the diagnosis, 1760–1913, Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins University Press, 20162017In: International Criminal Justice Review, ISSN 1057-5677, E-ISSN 1556-3855, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 222-223Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2144.
    Wikman, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Mer personal -TACK!: En studie över åtgärder som hot och våldsutsatta vård- och omsorgsanställda anger i arbetsskadeanmälningar 1987, 1997 och 20072011In: NSfKs 53 Forskerseminar Balingsholm, Sverige 2011: Kriminalpolitik och Højrepopulism, Prostitution och aktuel forskning / [ed] Ragnheiður Bragadóttir, Háskólaprent ehf., 2011, p. 77-94Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Workplace violence is a complex occupational hazard that nurses are facing working in today's health care environment. Workplace safety is also undergoing a process of ‘responsibilization’. The purpose of this study is to examine the character of the incidents reported as occupational injuries due to violence and threats, over time and what safety measures that are recommended by the staff. The result suggest interventions measures concerning psychosocial factors and structural job aspects such as adequate staffing to be far more important than surveillance, staff training and penal sanctions.

  • 2145.
    Wikman, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Mer personal, TACK!: En studie över åtgärder som hot och våldsutsatta vård- och omsorgsanställda anger i arbetsskadeanmälningar år 1987, 1997 och 2007.2011In: The Scandinavian Research Council for Criminology 53th Research Seminar. : Kriminalpolitik och Högerpopulism / [ed] Ragnheiður Bragadóttir, Islands Universitet / Det juridiske fakultet, Reykjavik: Nordisk Samarbejdsråd for Kriminologi , 2011, p. 77-94Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2146.
    Wikman, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    The Scandinavian Research Council for Criminology (NSfK) 49th Research Seminar: Våld med eller utan mening. Violence2006In: Våld i arbetslivet — ett samhällsproblems uppkomst / [ed] Nordiska Samarbetsrådet för Kriminologi (Nsfk)/Mia Söderbärj, Scandinavian Research Council for Criminology, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2147.
    Wikman, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Violence in Healthcare: A Study of Occupational Injury Incidents in Sweden 1987, 1997 and 20072011In: 68th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workplace violence is a complex occupational hazard that nurses are facing working in today's health care environment. Workplace safety is also said to be undergoing a process of ‘responsibilization’. The purpose of this study is to examine the character of the incidents reported as occupational injuries due to violence and threats, over time and what safety measures that are recommended by the staff. The result suggest interventions measures concerning psychosocial factors and structural job aspects such as adequate staffing to be far more important than surveillance, staff training and penal sanctions.

  • 2148.
    Wikman, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Våld i arbetslivet: Utveckling, uppmärksamhet och åtgärder2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past two decades, violence at work has become the object of an increasing level of attention. The objective of the thesis is to analyse how the development of violence at work as a social problem might be understood. The studies in the thesis examine trends in exposure to violence at work among different occupational groups (I), the attention focused on violence at work in trade journals (II), the measures proposed to combat the problem in trade journal articles (III) and in the occupational injury reports made by the victims themselves (IV).

    The first study shows that, according to victim surveys, levels of exposure to work-related violence have increased since the beginning of the 1980s. The increases are greatest in relation to the female-dominated occupations found in the care provision sectors. Study II presents a quantitative content analysis of trade journals from the period 1978–2004. The results show that there has been an increase in the amount of attention focused on violence at work. The results indicate that definitions of violence have expanded and that attention has become focused on new groups of victims and perpetrators. Study III examines the ways in which trade journals describe measures to combat violence at work. The results indicate that there has been a shift from viewing violence as a problem that should be resolved at the workplace as a health-and-safety issue, to increasingly viewing it as a problem that should be resolved externally with the help of the justice system. Study IV is based on an analysis of occupational injury reports from staff in the care sector who have been exposed to violence at work. Irrespective of the nature of the risk situation that preceded the violent incident, the staff who have been exposed to violence at work would prefer to see the problem resolved internally at the workplace.

  • 2149.
    Wikman, Sofia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Tiby, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Heber, Anita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Inledning2012In: Viktimologisk forskning: brottsoffer i teori och metod / [ed] Anita Heber, Eva Tiby & Sofia Wikman, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 1, p. 17-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2150.
    Wikström, Solveig
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    L'Espoir Decosta, Patrick
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    A clash of modernities: Developing a new value-based framework to understand the mismatch between production and consumption2016In: Journal of Consumer Culture, ISSN 1469-5405, E-ISSN 1741-2900, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 824-851Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the enduring problem of the mismatch between firms' offerings and consumers' desires. It combines the general framework of modernity theory with the concept of regimes and uses the food area as the empirical context. Our cultural analytical study of consumers' and firms' articulation of values of food and meal demonstrates that firms are largely entrenched in the modern era, characterized by rationality, resource efficiency, and progress as means to improve human lives by providing more and better products. The consumers, on the other hand, have shifted to the late modern era, identified by risk aversion, local production, naturalism, hedonism, and a focus on identity and everyday life. The study concludes that the dichotomy in values and the structural constraints inherent within the contemporary food system explain much of the mismatch between firms and consumers in the Swedish food market. Another reason is that firms have difficulties to respond to new consumer demands. Our results are summarized in a conceptual model of differences in values between firms and consumers. They provide guidelines on how firms can rethink the present structure and better understand consumers.

4041424344 2101 - 2150 of 2190
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