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  • 251.
    Birnbaum, Simon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Sandström, Annica
    Tracing the sources of legitimacy: the impact of deliberation in participatory natural resource management2015In: Policy sciences, ISSN 0032-2687, E-ISSN 1573-0891, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 443-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is widely assumed that stakeholder participation has great potential to improve the perceived legitimacy of natural resource management (NRM) and that the deliberative-democratic qualities of participatory procedures are central to the prospects of success. However, attempts to measure the actual effects of deliberation on the perceived legitimacy of participatory NRM are rare. This article examines the links between deliberation and legitimacy in participatory NRM empirically by tracing the determinants of stakeholders' level of policy support and their views about procedural fairness. The study uses statistical methods to analyse survey data from a state-led initiative to develop new plans for ecosystem-based coastal and marine management through a participatory approach in five coastal areas in Sweden. We find that the perceived quality of deliberation had a positive impact on these aspects of legitimacy. However, both policy support and perceived procedural fairness were mainly driven by instrumental-substantive considerations rather than deliberative-democratic qualities of the process.

  • 252.
    Birnbaum, Simon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden.
    De Wispelaere, Jurgen
    Basic Income in the Capitalist Economy: The Mirage of "Exit" from Employment2016In: Basic Income Studies, ISSN 1932-0183, E-ISSN 1932-0183, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 61-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A widespread argument in the basic income debate is that the unconditional entitlement to a secure income floor improves workers’ bargaining position vis-a-vis their employers. Basic income effectively grants all (potential) workers an exit option from an employment relation that fails to take her interests into account. It gives them the “power to say no”, as argued by Karl Widerquist. Surprisingly, given its importance, the exit argument itself has not been subjected to much systematic analysis by basic income advocates. In this paper we critically examine the exit argument and suggest that, under current economic conditions, an exit strategy might end up worsening rather than strengthening the opportunity set and bargaining position of the most vulnerable workers.

  • 253.
    Bittner-Gibbs, Alyssa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Vi är verklighetens röst. (We are the voice of reality.): A critical discourse analysis of SD-Kvinnor on Facebook from 2014-20182018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Internationally recognized for and culturally self-identifying as a gender equality advocate, Sweden has seen a recent uptick in popular support among women voters for its far-right nationalist political party, the Sweden Democrats (SD). While nationalist movements are primarily distinguished by their nativist political rhetoric, academic study has consistently shown that nationalism also consistently promotes a traditional gender duality while denouncing feminism and gender equality practices. Likewise, SD also consistently opposes feminist and gender equality practices in stark contrast with mainstream Swedish political parties. This qualitative discourse analysis collected, categorized, and analyzed recent Facebook posts circulated by the Sweden Democrat Women's Association (Sverigedemokraterna kvinnoförbund) leadership to identify why women (ostensibly) served by Swedish state feminism vote for and even join SD in a leadership capacity. By utilizing constructivist theoretical frameworks of social and cultural identity with a post-structural analytical methodology focusing on problem conception, representation and dissemination, the resulting analysis shows that the dominating discursive theme is practically summarized as: "(in)security." In short, SD women perceive Sweden's (equality) feminism as unrelatable, irrelevant and/or intrusive in an "everyday" existence framed by a rapidly changing Swedish society due to record immigration, increased economic insecurity, and a weakening welfare state. In closing, three prime research areas are identified for future study: image-based content analysis of SD's political messaging, increased incorporation of security frameworks in investigative writing, as well as broadened research into how Swedish equality feminism can best include two consistently detached societal clusters: native-Swedish conservative and non-Western immigrant women.

  • 254. Bivald, Katarina
    et al.
    Hertz, Tyra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Qvist, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Soininen, Maritta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Challenges for Diversity: Migrant Participation in Political Parties in Sweden2014Report (Other academic)
  • 255. Bjarnegård, Elin
    et al.
    Kreutz, JoakimStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Debating the East Asian Peace: What it is. How it came about. Will it last?2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    East Asia used to be the world’s deadliest battleground but since the 1980s there has been a sudden and marked reduction in battle deaths. This phenomenon, which has become known as the East Asian Peace, has spurred much debate. This volume reflects on some of the most prominent of these debates. Here, it focuses more on presenting and evaluating a variety of themes in relation to each other rather than offering simplistic answers to a complex question. While the chapters of this volume obviously discuss processes and events in East Asia, its contributions also offer insights to the core general questions for understanding peace and conflict. What is peace and how can it be studied? How can we characterize the East Asian Peace? What limits and conditions are associated with this peace? Can insights from East Asia explain overall regional trends of political violence? Does the way in which peace come about impact on the quality of peace? Is the East Asian peace under threat? If so, then why is this and where is the threat coming from?

  • 256. Bjurulf, Bo
    et al.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Inledning: medborgarna och den kommunala verksamheten i förändring1997In: Folket och kommunerna: systemskiftet som kom av sig / [ed] Anders Håkansson, Stockholm: Statsvetenskapliga institutionen, Stockholms universitet , 1997, p. 7-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 257. Bjurulf, Bo
    et al.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Kommunalvalen 1985: en första analys av väljarnas lojaliteter och bytesbenägenheter1987In: Statsvetenskapens mångfald: festskrift till Nils Stjernquist / [ed] Lars Göran Stenelo, Lund: Lund Univ. Press , 1987Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 258.
    Bjällstrand, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    China: Friend or Foe?: Understanding the U.S Pacific Pivot to China's Confusing Confucianism2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The great strategic distrust between the two world largest economic and military powers is one of the most debated topics in contemporary international relations. This thesis question if the current hegemon view its new competitor as an offensive or defensive realist state and which policies should consequently be taken. China’s policy of peaceful coexistence and the U.S attempt of global integration may not be fully compatible and the thesis illuminates the contradicting notions of China Confucius values and how they are visible in its foreign policy rhetoric.

    The thesis conclude by stating that the China’s ambitions in not seen as following the guidelines of a defensive realist state in the eye of the United States and that China’s so called unique characteristics and values are mere rhetoric that does not seem to shape its current foreign policy. The U.S response is so far a passive containment by increasing cooperation with other actors in the region as a balancing act while simultaneously cautiously engage and try to influence China to adopt policies fitting a global player and work for peaceful solutions to international problems. Thus China is not seen as either a friend or a foe but is currently viewed as being in a grey area of competitor and cooperator.

  • 259.
    Björsne, Roland
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Populism och ekopolitik.: Utvecklandet av en ekopolitisk ideologi i Norge och dess relationer till ett mångtydigt populismbegrepp.1979Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 260.
    Blandon, Abigayil
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Daw, Tim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Haider, L. Jamila
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Stone-Jovicich, Samantha
    Conceptualisations of fisheries development in Eastern Africa over time and between actors2019In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 107, article id UNSP 103512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the late-2000s, there has been a growing discussion around development aid approaches that reflect complexity concepts, such as adaptive and iterative project management. Fisheries development interventions deal with particularly complex realities. They also illustrate the changing problems and prescribed solutions of development paradigms over time, which have yet to be systematically analysed in a fisheries context. This study analyses documents from 11 World Bank fisheries development projects from 1975 to 2017 in Eastern Africa and interviews with 13 project designers and implementers. The conceptualisation of the fisheries development system - the perceived problems, causal links and proposed solutions - was captured in each document and interview. The documents showed a clear difference in the variables and consequential links most frequently mentioned before 1995 and after 2000, moving from a narrow sectoral approach with tangible interventions such as infrastructure, to a more holistic approach pushing for softer solutions such as stakeholder engagement. While this suggests a change in the institutional World Bank paradigm, the contemporary interviews were not necessarily consistent with this shift. Interviewees' conceptualisations also differed between each other, which may have implications for project implementation. A range of concepts related to complexity thinking were found and coded in both interviews and documents, particularly documents from recent World Bank projects. While this shows some evidence of actors and institutions incorporating complexity concepts into their narrative, concepts of adaptation, unpredictability, non-comparability and feedbacks were poorly reflected, showing the current gaps if approaches such as adaptive management are to be taken up.

  • 261. Blasiak, Robert
    et al.
    Durussel, Carole
    Pittman, Jeremy
    Sénit, Carole-Anne
    Petersson, Matilda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Yagi, Nobuyuki
    The role of NGOs in negotiating the use of biodiversity in marine areas beyond national jurisdiction2017In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 81, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2004, the UN General Assembly resolved to establish a working group to consider issues pertaining to the conservation and sustainable use of marine biodiversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction (BBNJ). The group met nine times between 2006 and 2015 before concluding its mandate by recommending the development of an international legally binding instrument on BBNJ under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Based on in-depth interviews with working group participants, this research examines how NGOs contributed to the working group process. Respondents from government delegations highlighted the usefulness of workshops and side events convened by NGOs, and the role of NGOs in bringing experts on technical issues particularly marine genetic resources and the sharing of benefits into the BBNJ negotiations. Respondents from both NGOs and government delegations emphasized the importance of fostering personal relationships in order to ensure a steady and constructive information flow. Social media efforts by NGOs were considered by some government representatives to have occasionally hampered open discussion, although they noted that conditions have improved. The lengthy working group process was marked by substantial fluctuation in participation, particularly within government delegations from developing states. Of 1523 individuals who participated in at least one of the working group meetings, only 45 attended more than half of the meetings, and 80% of these were representing NGOs or highly industrialized countries. Respondents felt that this comparatively small number of individuals provided a source of continuity that was crucial for moving the discussions forward.

  • 262.
    Blasiak, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Huang, Julia Hsiang-Wen
    Ishihara, Hiroe
    Kelling, Ingrid
    Lieng, Sopha
    Lindoff, Hannah
    Macfarlane, Alastair
    Minohara, Akane
    Miyakoshi, Yasuyulti
    Wisse, Herman
    Yagi, Nobuyuki
    Promoting diversity and inclusiveness in seafood certification and ecolabelling: Prospects for Asia2017In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 85, p. 42-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on the inputs by a range of experts who participated in the February 2017 international symposium on Designing the Future for Fisheries Certification Schemes at the University of Tokyo, this manuscript traces the origins of fisheries certification schemes, relevant developments, and remaining challenges from an Asian perspective. Over the past 20 years, seafood certification has emerged as a powerful tool for meeting growing demands for sustainable fisheries and aquaculture products. Despite broad consensus among countries regarding what constitute responsible fishing practices, the fisheries certification landscape remains uneven. A plethora of certification schemes has generated confusion among consumers and retailers, and capital-intensive certification schemes may be out-of-reach or impractical for some small-scale fisheries, particularly within the developing world. A recent initiative by the Global Sustainable Seafood Initiative (GSSI) is aiming to address the diversity within the certification landscape by creating a tool to benchmark certification schemes that are in line with the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and other relevant agreed FAO guidelines on fisheries, ecolabelling and aquaculture. Countries in Asia are among the world's top consumers and exporters of seafood, yet have faced some particular challenges with regard to seafood certification, underscoring the need for certification schemes that account for regional and local conditions and management practices, particularly with regard to small-scale fisheries.

  • 263.
    Blasiak, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Wabnitz, Colette C. C.
    Aligning fisheries aid with international development targets and goals2018In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 88, p. 86-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Official development assistance (ODA) is intended to spur progress and increase security among recipient countries. Billions in ODA have been allocated to fisheries to support nutrition and livelihoods worldwide. Yet, from 2010 to 2015, fisheries allocations decreased by > 30%, while grants for non-fisheries sectors increased by > 13%. Globally, grants for climate change adaptation and mitigation fell for fisheries, while rapidly increasing in sectors like agriculture and forestry. In Oceania, a region highly dependent on fisheries for food security and particularly vulnerable to climate change, disbursements fell by 44%. Grants for fisheries research, education and training fell in absolute numbers, and as a proportion of total ODA to fisheries. These findings are out of alignment with recent international commitments, including the Sustainable Development Goals (2015), The Future We Want (2012), and relevant Aichi Targets (2010). Risk aversion among donors; redirection of climate finance into other sectors; and allocation decisions based on factors unrelated to fisheries are identified as contributing to observed findings. Increasing the volume of fisheries-related ODA and better aligning it with international commitments could bring substantial co-benefits and contribute to the sustainable use of marine ecosystems, support sustainable trade and economic opportunities, increase adaptive capacity, and foster human well-being.

  • 264.
    Blasiak, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Wabnitz, Colette C. C.
    Daw, Tim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Univ, SRC, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berger, Michael
    Blandon, Abigayil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Carneiro, Goncalo
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Sweden.
    Davidson, Mary Frances
    Guggisberg, Solene
    Hills, Jeremy
    Mallin, Felix
    McManus, Edmund
    Ould-Chih, Karim
    Pittman, Jeremy
    Santos, Xose
    Westlund, Lena
    Wetterstrand, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Wiegler, Kai
    Towards greater transparency and coherence in funding for sustainable marine fisheries and healthy oceans2019In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 107, article id UNSP 103508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This final manuscript in the special issue on Funding for ocean conservation and sustainable fisheries is the result of a dialogue aimed at connecting lead authors of the special issue manuscripts with relevant policymakers and practitioners. The dialogue took place over the course of a two-day workshop in December 2018, and this coda manuscript seeks to distil thinking around a series of key recurring topics raised throughout the workshop. These topics are collected into three broad categories, or needs: 1) a need for transparency, 2) a need for coherence, and 3) a need for improved monitoring of project impacts. While the special issue sought to collect new research into the latest trends and developments in the rapidly evolving world of funding for ocean conservation and sustainable fisheries, the insights collected during the workshop have helped to highlight remaining knowledge gaps. Therefore, each of the three needs identified within this manuscript is followed by a series of questions that the workshop participants identified as warranting further attention as part of a future research agenda. The crosscutting nature of many of the issues raised as well as the rapid pace of change that characterizes this funding landscape both pointed to a broader need for continued dialogue and study that reaches across the communities of research, policy and practice.

  • 265.
    Blomdahl, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Changing the Conversation in Washington? An Illustrative Case Study of President Trump's Air Strikes on Syria, 20172019In: Diplomacy & Statecraft, ISSN 0959-2296, E-ISSN 1557-301X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 536-555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This analysis uses case study methodology to further the understanding of the diversionary theory of war in specific cases. It employs a model consisting of five propositions that build upon existing qualitative research on diversionary war theory. The synthesised framework examines one possible case of American diversionary military actions: President Donald Trump ' s decision to launch missile strikes against Syrian airfields on 7 April 2017. The study tests the descriptive accuracy and further develops the diversionary theory of war, in essence, generally suggesting that empirical support for the diversionary logic in this case is mixed.

  • 266.
    Blomdahl, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Interacting Interests: Explaining President Obama ' s Libyan Decision2018In: European Journal of American Studies, ISSN 1991-9336, E-ISSN 1991-9336, Vol. 13, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates why President Obama in 2011 ordered US air and naval forces to launch Operation Odyssey Dawn in Libya. The president's decision was the result of a combination of factors, including feelings of altruism, the legal basis for the operation, international support, domestic political constraints and the possibility to limit U.S. participation. The case study attempt to trace the process by which Obama came to the decision to use force in Libya by relying on a multitude of different sources, such as government reports, speeches and remarks, parliamentary records, media coverage, secondary sources.

  • 267.
    Blomdahl, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The Political Use of Force: Beyond National Security Considerations as a Source of American Foreign Policy2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In addressing the question of what explains the tendency of the presidents of the United States to use military force on many occasions to solve international problems the realist perspective has been strongly dominant in political science. This study sets out to address and challenge whether what may be called realist privilege still qualifies as an understanding of this American phenomenon. The key research question is to investigate whether or not the understanding of the U.S. use of force can be reduced to international factors solely. This study presents the argument that perspectives or theories that do not consider and cover domestic political processes and factors in their explanations must be regarded as incomplete. Two frameworks based on realism and domestic politics are developed and used in order to answer why U.S. presidents use military force at the international level. The author applies a decision-making approach derived from foreign policy analysis in order to compare and examine the U.S. missile actions against Libya in 1986, Iraq in 1993 and Sudan and Afghanistan in 1998. This study finds clear support for the significance of domestic political factors for the understanding of the U.S. use of force. This work concludes that since domestic political factors matter, even at times of heightened concern about national security, this contradicts and poses a serious challenge to realists’ assumptions regarding the motives of states. When using a decision-making approach that opens the so-called black box, the book demonstrates that domestic political factors, such as the U.S. Congress and American public constrain presidents when authorizing the use of force. To reduce the understanding of the U.S. use of force to international factors solely is, therefore, to overlook significant contributions from the U.S. domestic political context as a source of the presidential use of force.

  • 268.
    Blomgren, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. 1995.
    Sverigedemokraterna, radikala högerpopulister? : En studie av åsiktsförändringar hos Sverigedemokraterna.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to understand whether the Sweden Democrats has been and is a radical right-wing populist party. Both quantitative content analysis and ideal type analysis is used as methods to fulfil the study’s purpose. A second objective with this study is also to investigate if the Sweden Democrats have changed their policy positions over time. The material that will be used is party programs, election manifestos and speeches from the party leader.

    The results of the study research were that the Sweden Democrats can, and all through its history, be defined as a radical right-wing populist party. This is because of the party’s timeless focus on nativism, populism and authoritarianism. However, there has been a clear switch in the radicalness of the policy positions from the 1990ies to the new millennium. For example, in 1996 the Sweden Democrats wanted to send out all immigrants from Sweden who came outside of Europe after 1970 while today they are talking about “responsible and limited immigration”. The result of the study is that the Sweden Democrats has not gone although with a mainstreaming process, hence they have started becoming more mainstream than before. Although they cannot be classified as a mainstream party considering there resistant against immigration and other radical positions.

    Nyckelord

    Sverigedemokraterna, radikal högerpopulism, mainstreaming, exkluderande nationalism, populism, auktoritära värderingar 

  • 269.
    Blomstrand, Rickard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    En strid om verkligheten och Nato: En studie av Natoförespråkare i Sveriges riksdag2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 270.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Alan Mikhail, Under Osman’s Tree: The Ottoman Empire, Egypt, and Environmental History2017In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 54, no 12, p. 212-213Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 271.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Battles of Nostalgic Proportion: The Transformations of Islam-as-Historical-Force in the Ideological Matrix of a Self-Affirming ‘West’2016In: Althusser and Theology: Religion, Politics, and Philosophy / [ed] Agon Hamza, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2016, p. 182-197Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 272.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Destroying Yemen: What Chaos in Arabia Tells Us About the World2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since March 2015, a Saudi-led international coalition of forces—supported by Britain and the United States—has waged devastating war in Yemen. Largely ignored by the world’s media, the resulting humanitarian disaster and full-scale famine threatens millions. Destroying Yemen offers the first in-depth historical account of the transnational origins of this war, placing it in the illuminating context of Yemen’s relationship with major powers since the Cold War. Bringing new sources and a deep understanding to bear on Yemen’s profound, unwitting implication in international affairs, this explosive book ultimately tells an even larger story of today’s political economy of global capitalism, development, and the war on terror as disparate actors intersect in Arabia.

  • 273.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Europe’s Balkan Muslims: A New History By Nathalie Clayer and Xavier Bougarel, translated by Andrew Kirby2018In: Journal of Islamic Studies, ISSN 0955-2340, E-ISSN 1471-6917, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 289-291Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 274.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Heather J. Sharkey, A History of Muslims, Christians, and Jews in the Middle East2017In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 145-146Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 275.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Max Bergholz, Violence as a Generative Force: Identity, Nationalism, and Memory in a Balkan Community2017In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 234-235Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 276.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Roger Hardy, The Poisoned Well: Empire and its Legacy in the Middle East2017In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 54, no 9, p. 132-133Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 277.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Veremis, Thanos. A modern history of the Balkans: nationalism and identity in Southeast Europe2018In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 55, no 10, p. 1252-1252Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 278.
    Bodin, Per-Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Slavic Languages.
    Russian Geopolitical Discourse: On pseudomorphosis, phantom pains and simulacra2016In: Eurasia 2.0: Russian geopolitics in the age of new media / [ed] Mark Bassin, Mikhail Suslov, Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books, 2016, p. 167-184Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 279.
    Bodin, Per-Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic Languages.
    Rysslands gränser i politiken, kyrkan och fantasin2009In: Östbulletinen, Vol. 3, p. 7-19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 280.
    Bodin, Per-Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
    Hedlund, StefanNamli, Elena
    Power and Legitimacy - Challenges from Russia2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book sheds new light on the continuing debate within political thought as to what constitutes power, and what distinguishes legitimate from illegitimate power. It does so by considering the experience of Russia, a polity where experiences of the legitimacy of power and the collapse of power offer a contrast to Western experiences on which most political theory, formulated in the West, is based. The book considers power in a range of contexts – philosophy and discourse; the rule of law and its importance for economic development; the use of culture and religion as means to legitimate power; and liberalism and the reasons for its weakness in Russia. The book concludes by arguing that the Russian experience provides a useful lens through which ideas of power and legitimacy can be re-evaluated and re-interpreted, and through which the idea of "the West" as the ideal model can be questioned.

  • 281.
    Bodin, Örjan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Sandström, Annica
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Collaborative Networks for Effective Ecosystem-Based Management: A Set of Working Hypotheses2017In: Policy Studies Journal, ISSN 0190-292X, E-ISSN 1541-0072, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 289-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecosystem-based management (EBM) represents a comprehensive approach to better govern the environment that also illustrates the collaborative trend in policy and public administration. The need for stakeholder involvement and collaboration is strongly articulated, yet how and for what purposes collaboration would be effective remains largely untested. We address this gap by developing and evaluating a set of hypotheses specifying how certain patterns of collaborations among actors affect their joint ability to accomplish EBM. Content analyses of management plans drawn from five EBM planning processes in Sweden are combined with analyses of the collaborative networks through which these plans have been developed. Our results indicate that system thinking and the ability to integrate across different management phases are favored by collaborations between different kinds of actors, and by project leaders being centrally located in the networks. We also find that dense substructures of collaboration increase the level of specificity in the plans in regards to explicating constraints on human activities. Having many collaborative ties does however not enhance the overall level of specificity. Our results also show that different network characteristics can give rise to similar EBM outcomes. This observed equifinality suggests there is no single blueprint for well-performing collaborative networks.

  • 282.
    Bohman, Brita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law. University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Åbo Akademi University, Finlande.
    Lessons from the regulatory approaches to combat eutrophication in the Baltic Sea region2018In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 98, p. 227-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ever since the problem of eutrophication emerged, many approaches have been tested within the Helsinki Convention regime to reduce the discharges of nutrients to the sea. Despite important reductions in the levels of discharge since the 1970s, the nutrient loads to the sea are still significant and need to be further reduced. At the same time, it has become increasingly difficult to reduce the pollution that causes eutrophication. This difficulty is due to the complex nature of most pollution sources currently and the diffuse releases mainly related to agricultural activities and animal production. The regulatory structure for eutrophication in the Baltic Sea region has, however, adjusted rather well to these circumstances. The development over the past decade, since the introduction of the MSFD and the BSAP, progressed in adjusting the whole HELCOM regime to an ecosystem approach. Structures were created that embrace the new demands on the regulation through this approach. These structures put additional challenges on the perception of law, the general functions of the legal system, and how to assess and enforce compliance. The new structures not only create a kind of flexibility and openness to new regulatory approaches and soft law measures, but also combine law with governance and bridge the area of strict legal regulation with voluntary measures and projects. This combination of law with governance completes the overall picture of measures and approaches, but makes the line between law, extra-legal measures and non-governmental actors or organizations difficult to detect.

  • 283. Boin, Arjen
    et al.
    Ekengren, Magnus
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Making Sense of Sense-Making: the EU’s Role in Collecting, Analysing, and Disseminating Information in Times of Crisis2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In an era of transboundary crises, Europe faces the daunting challenge of coordinating joint responses in an effective and timely way. Recent transboundary crises such as the Icelandic Ash Cloud (2010), food contamination incidents and the financial breakdown revealed a key part of that challenge: sifting through relevant information, building an accurate picture of what is happening, and communicating that analysis to political decision-makers. Academic researchers refer to this process in terms of ‘sense-making’. To create joint capacity for sense-making is one of the prominent elements of the EU’s ambitions to play a role in the management of transboundary crises. The number of early-warning, rapid-alert, and common communication platforms in the EU has multiplied in recent years but with little central guidance or overall rationale. This report tries to ‘make sense of sense-making’ tools in the EU by providing the most comprehensive overview to date. We ask what sense-making tools are available at the EU level, document what they are intended to do, and explore what these tools offer in terms of ‘added-value’ to European states. Using official documents, secondary literature and interviews with policy officials, this report maps the sense-making landscape of the EU. After drawing out key patterns and offering an inventory of tools relevant to sense-making, we conclude by discussing the problems and prospects of the EU’s role.

  • 284. Boin, Arjen
    et al.
    Ekengren, Magnus
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History. Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Sensemaking in crises: What role for the EU?2014In: Crisis rooms: Towards a global network? / [ed] Patryk Pawlak, Andrea Ricci, EU Institute for Security Studies , 2014, p. 118-128Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 285. Boin, Arjen
    et al.
    Ekengren, Magnus
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The European Union as crisis manager: patterns and prospects2013Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Union is increasingly being asked to manage crises inside and outside the Union. From terrorist attacks to financial crises, and natural disasters to international conflicts, many crises today generate pressures to collaborate across geographical and functional boundaries. What capacities does the EU have to manage such crises? Why and how have these capacities evolved? How do they work and are they effective? This book offers an holistic perspective on EU crisis management. It defines the crisis concept broadly and examines EU capacities across policy sectors, institutions and agencies. The authors describe the full range of EU crisis management capacities that can be used for internal and external crises. Using an institutionalization perspective, they explain how these different capacities evolved and have become institutionalized. This highly accessible volume illuminates a rarely examined and increasingly important area of European cooperation.

  • 286. Boin, Arjen
    et al.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Visuri, Pekka
    Civil Security and the European Union: A survey of European civil security systems and the role of the EU in building shared crisis management capacities2014Report (Other academic)
  • 287.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Oslo, Norway.
    Birnbaum, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm.
    Björkvik, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    The quality of compliance: investigating fishers' responses towards regulation and authorities2017In: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 682-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A substantial amount of scientific effort goes into understanding and measuring compliance in fisheries. Understanding why, how and when fishers follow or violate rules is crucial for designing effective fishery policies that can halt overfishing. Non-compliance was initially explained almost exclusively with reference to economic and self-interested motivations. More recently, however, most explanations involve a combination of economic, social, political and environmental factors. Despite this recent development towards more holistic explanations, many scientists continue to frame the issue in binary terms: fishers either follow rules, or they don't. In this article we challenge this binary interpretation and focus attention on the diversity of fishers' dispositions and perceptions that underpin compliant behaviour. To this aim we construct a typology of fishers' responses towards regulation and authorities, thereby developing conceptual tools to understand different motivations and attitudes that underlie compliance outcomes. For this purpose, we identify the motivational postures of 'creativity' and 'reluctance', and then highlight their empirical relevance with an interview study of Swedish fishers. Reasons for studying the quality and diversity of fishers' motivations and responses are not purely academic. Conceptualizing and observing the quality of compliance can help policymakers and managers gauge and anticipate the potentiality of non-compliant fishing practices that may threaten the resilience of marine ecosystems.

  • 288.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Ottosen, K. M.
    Ferreira, A. S. A.
    Richter, A.
    Rogers, L. A.
    Pedersen, M. W.
    Kokkalis, A.
    Bardarson, H.
    Bonanomi, S.
    Butler, W.
    Diekert, F. K.
    Fouzai, N.
    Holma, M.
    Holt, R. E.
    Kvile, K. O.
    Malanski, E.
    Macdonald, J. I.
    Nieminen, E.
    Romagnoni, G.
    Snickars, M.
    Weigel, B.
    Woods, P.
    Yletyinen, Johanna K
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Whittington, J. D.
    What are the major global threats and impacts in marine environments? Investigating the contours of a shared perception among marine scientists from the bottom-up.2015In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 60, p. 197-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine scientists broadly agree on which major processes influence the sustainability of marine environments worldwide. Recent studies argue that such shared perceptions crucially shape scientific agendas and are subject to a confirmation bias. Based on these findings a more explicit engagement with scientists' (shared) perceptions of global change in marine environments is called for. This paper takes stock of the shared understanding in marine science of the most pertinent, worldwide threats and impacts that currently affect marine environments. Using results from an email survey among leading academics in marine science this article explores if a shared research agenda in relation to global change in marine environments exists. The analysis demonstrates that marine scientists across disciplines are largely in agreement on some common features of global marine change. Nevertheless, the analysis also highlights where natural and social scientists diverge in their assessment. The article ends discussing what these findings imply for further improvement of interdisciplinary marine science.

  • 289. Borchorst, Anette
    et al.
    Dahlerup, Drude
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Christensen, Ann-Dorte
    Ligestillingspolitik som diskurs og praksis2003Book (Other academic)
  • 290. Borchorst, Anette
    et al.
    Freidenvall, Lenita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Kantola, Johanna
    Reisel, Liza
    Teigen, Mari
    Institutionalizing Intersectionality in the Nordic Countries: Anti-Discrimination and Equality in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden2012In: INSTITUTIONALIZING INTERSECTIONALITY: THE CHANGING NATURE OF EUROPEAN EQUALITY REGIMES / [ed] Andrea Krizsan, Hege Skjeie, Judith Squires, Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, p. 59-88Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 291.
    Borg, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Genealogy as critique in International Relations: Beyond the hermeneutics of baseless suspicion2018In: Journal of International Political Theory, ISSN 1755-0882, E-ISSN 1755-1722, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 41-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article engages genealogy as a form of critique in International Relations. It demonstrates that Foucault's genealogy has had an important, albeit hitherto unexamined, impact on how critique is understood in post-structuralist International Relations. Specifically, the article argues that a genealogical disposition tends to inscribe violence as foundational to the human condition, and genealogically informed empirical applications in International Relations risk reproducing this gesture. In the first part, the article returns to the first generation of post-structuralist International Relations and also examines examples of contemporary scholarship using frameworks of governmentality and biopolitics. The second part of the article traces the problem of ontologically inscribing violence back to Foucault's genealogical phase. Drawing on the work of John Milbank, the article then contrasts a genealogical ontology of violence with one that refuses violence as foundational. The article ends by arguing that empirical scholarship drawing on governmentality and biopolitics should be careful not to read the genealogical ontology of violence into their analyses of global political life.

  • 292.
    Borg, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The politics of universal rights claiming: Secular and sacred rights claiming in post-revolutionary Tunisia2017In: Review of International Studies, ISSN 0260-2105, E-ISSN 1469-9044, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 453-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to a theoretical understanding of rights claiming as a specific form of political practice. The article develops and defends a post-foundationalist understanding of rights discourse as a way of making a claim to social change through appealing to a universal and illustrates such an understanding with the contestation over women's rights in post-revolutionary Tunisia. To develop this argument, the article draws on Jacques Ranciere's notion of political subjectification and Ernesto Laclau's engagement with the relation between the universal and the particular. To examine the relevance of such conceptualisation, the article turns to the struggle over women's rights in post-revolutionary Tunisia, where secular and sacred understandings of the universal have been invoked frequently through rights discourse. In this context it is shown that claims to the universal give rhetorical force to rights discourse, and instead of depoliticising social relations, which rights discourse is often charged with, such claims are vital for political efficacy. However, whereas Laclau's position helps us to understand rights as a language of resistance, a more robust defence of the universal is needed to defend rights in terms of emancipatory political change. To pursue this argument, the article turns to Ranciere's defence of axiomatic equality.

  • 293.
    Boréus, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Discursive Discrimination: A Typology2006In: European Journal of Social Theory, ISSN 1368-4310, E-ISSN 1461-7137, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 405-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a typology of discursive discrimination, discrimination carried out through the use of language. It is argued that such a typology should fulfil certin criteria in order to be useful for empirical research. The proposed typology consists of four main concepts: (1) exclusion from discourse; (2) negative other-presentation; (3) objectification; and (4) proposals pointing towards unfavourable non-linguistic treatment. The related concept of othering - the creation of a psychological distance to people understood to belong to groups others than 'us' - is also presented. The manner in which the different forms of discursive discrimination and othering can be operationalised is demonstrated through examples from empirical studies of discourses of people categorized as mentally deficient, as deaf, and as immigrants in public debate in Sweden in the past 75 years.

  • 294.
    Boréus, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Discursive discrimination of the 'mentally deficient' in interwar Sweden2006In: Disability & Society, Vol. 22, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article shows, firstly, one way in which discrimination in discourse, that is, discrimination performed through the use of language, can be studied with the help of a set of concepts: exclusion from discourse; negative other-presentation; objectification; and proposals pointing towards unfavourable treatment. The concept of othering is also used. Secondly, an empirical study of the discursive treatment of people labelled 'mentally deficient' in interwar Sweden is presented. The parliamentary debate on a new sterilisation law, encyclopaedic entries and medical descriptions are focused. The results reveal that the group in question was blatantly discriminated against, by means of all of the forms of discursive discrimination mentioned, and was also othered. It is suggested that the set of concepts could be useful for comparative studies of discursive treatment of people categorised as 'mentally deficient' in other countries during the same period and for studies of possible contemporary discrimination.

  • 295.
    Boréus, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Diskriminering med ord2005Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Boken behandlar på ett populärvetenskapligt sätt hur man kan analysera diskriminering med språkliga medel. Den presenterar ett analysschema för olika former av diskriminering med ord och ger exempel från tre empiriska studier: en om den diskursiva behandlingen av "sinnesslöa" i svensk offentlig debatt på 1920- och 1930-talet, en om den diskursiva behandlingen av "dövstumma" och döva på 1930-talet, 1970-talet och 1990-talet, samt en om mediedebatt om invandrare och mångkultur på 2000-talet.

  • 296.
    Boréus, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Diskrimineringens retorik: En studie av svenska valrörelser 1988-20022006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I studien undersöks strukturell diskriminering med språkliga medel riktad mot den invandrade delen av befolkningen i svenska valrörelser 1988-2002.

  • 297.
    Boréus, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences.
    Högervåg: nyliberalismen och kampen om språket i svensk debatt 1969-19891994Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 298.
    Boréus, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Makt2009In: Politisk teori, Malmö: Liber , 2009, p. 114-132Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 299.
    Boréus, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Bergström, GöranStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Textens mening och makt: metodbok i samhällsvetenskaplig text- och diskursanalys2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 300.
    Boréus, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Bergström, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Textens mening och makt: Metodbok i samhällsvetenskaplig textanalys2000Book (Other academic)
3456789 251 - 300 of 1940
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