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  • 251.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Cuerpos de Emulación Pecuniaria: Estrellas de Hollywood como elemento homogeneizador de la femineidad e identidad nacional en los Estados Unidos2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [es]

    El fin del siglo XIX acarreó cambios sustanciales para las mujeres en los Estados Unidos. El cambio de paradigma que permitió a hombres y mujeres compartir la esfera pública, el creciente rol de la mujer en el ámbito laboral, el surgimiento del culto a la “personalidad,” y la consolidación de la industria del cine tuvieron incidencia directa en la reconfiguración de la femineidad y la búsqueda de una identidad nacional entre las jóvenes inmigrantes de la clase trabajadora de los Estados Unidos. Lentamente, las estrellas de cine ganaron prestigio como símbolos de belleza y movilidad social para miles de jóvenes mujeres gracias a la circulación de imágenes en suplementos dominicales y revistas especializadas en cine. En breve, la industria del cine Estadounidense comenzó a replicar los formatos de revistas como Photoplay y Motion Picture Magazine para los países de habla hispana, propagando su hegemonía a lo largo y a lo ancho del continente. Parte fundamental del proceso de identificación está ligado al creciente uso de estrellas de cine en publicidades de productos de belleza y moda. La agencia de publicidad J. W. Thompson fue el eje fundamental de dicha dinámica. La empresa contaba con un grupo de mujeres ejecutivas a cargo de las cuentas correspondientes as productos de belleza. Estas mujeres, en su mayoría pertenecientes al movimiento sufragista de los Estados Unidos, tuvieron un rol fundamental en el desarrollo de productos y campañas orientadas al público femenino. La presentación dará un paneo histórico sobre la transición de estos cuerpos de emulación pecuniaria con el fin de comprender el cambio cultural que llevó a las estrellas de Hollywood de símbolos la “Americanization” de la diáspora en los Estados Unidos a convertirse en sinónimo de glamour y sofisticación para mujeres alrededor del mundo.

  • 252.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Dior Salve a la Reina: Cristina Fernández's Fashionable Pleasures and her Constant War Against the Media2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is an austerity discourse compatible with ostentation? And if so, how can the contempt against the middle class be compatible with the veneration of a wealthy leader? Why is Cristina Fernandez’s indulgent luxury forgiven while the working middle class is stigmatized as privileged oligarchs? How does this relate to the controversial and iconic figure of Eva Duarte de Perón? The paper describes the dichotomy between Cristina Fernandez’s national populist discourse and her personal preference for high-end brands that had turned her into a fashion icon, capturing the attention of fashion bloggers, international newspapers, and even Vogue. Theoretically framed by O’Donell’s conceptualization of Delegative Democracies, the presentation will explore how disguised under a veneer of socialism—and pursuing Chavez’s model for Venezuela—Argentina’s president has mobilized a campaign to control the local Media leading to a confrontation with those journalists who persistently try to unmask her luxurious lifestyle, shopping preferences, and unclear finances. This contradiction between luxury and utterance is not new to the Argentine masses. The iconic figure of Evita was often under attack, accused of enjoying the same lifestyle as those she criticized. The parallelism between these two figures draws an interesting conclusion about the role of Media, performance, nostalgia, and fandom in Latin-American politics.

    *Play on words exchanging Dios (God in Spanish) for Dior as in “Dior (God) Save the Queen.”

  • 253.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Exploring Fashion as Communication: The search for a new fashion history against the grain2020In: Popular Communication, ISSN 1540-5702, E-ISSN 1540-5710, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 249-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introductory essay calls for a new fashion media history informed by truly interdisciplinary scholarship, nuanced in both fashion and media studies. It reflects upon the ways in which the study of fashion as communication and fashion journalism have been addressed, arguing that fashion studies has laid out a western backbone of this history that invites and deserves to be confirmed and contested. It encourages future authors to find those fashion media discourses, voices, and practices that brought attention to fashion and dress moving past the so-called ‘fashion bibles’ to unravel discourses reaching popular audiences, underrepresented minorities, unlisted geographies, and subcultures.

  • 254.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Exploring Fashion as Communication: The Search for a new fashion history against the grain2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 255.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Fearless Fashion: Rudi Gernreich2020In: Fashion Theory: The Journal of Dress, Body & Culture, ISSN 1362-704X, E-ISSN 1751-7419, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 783-794Article, review/survey (Refereed)
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  • 256.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    From Scarcity to Abundance: How Digitized Material Demands Academic Cooperation2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent proliferation of free-access digital archives opened a new era of research in which costs decrease as information flourishes. This abundance represents countless possibilities, but as material becomes more vast and accessible, the anxieties for publishing increase, in a profession that already dealt with a haunting “race against time” to present results. In addition, the challenge of accessing larger bulks of material builds up pressure, calling for more precision in arguments, as results derive from a larger amount of primary sources. The use of fan magazines as sources for academic research is vast in film and media studies, but its potential across newer fields—such as fashion and celebrity studies—is increasingly bringing more players into the game. 

    Moving forward with these changes without analyzing the extent of their impact would be awry. In this landscape, Carlo Ginzburg’s Microhistory and Walter Benjamin’s problematization of historical debris need to be revisited, not in metatheoretical manner, but rather in a search for answers in this new reconfiguration. My argument for this workshop is that abundance and time constrains enable a reformulation of research questions and the emergence of a more collaborative research environment; more material also requires more contextual knowledge, making the bulk of work increase exponentially. In addition, I call to not lose from sight that abundance does not imply completion, calling for awareness of the—always-tempting—illusion of historical completion.

    This presentation explores the potentials and anxieties brought by the abundance and accessibility of digital archives, as it also intends to offer an overview of a potential reconfiguration of academic work enabled by these new research platforms. As with every workshop, I bring more questions that answer to open up for debate. How can we get pass the anxiety of abundance? Do we need to “zoom in” deeper when conducting research in this new landscape? How do research networks reconfigure as more material becomes electronically available? Is this new availability of material opening up for historical revisionisms? How do we incorporate these tools in the classroom?

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  • 257.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Hollywood, moda y la alfombra roja: El surgimiento del consultor de moda en los Oscars2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 258.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Jaws: Creating the Myth of the Man-Eating Machine2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 259.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Lo squalo, le strategie di marketing della Universal e la construzione della "Jawsmania"2015In: Cinergie, ISSN 2280-9481, Vol. 7, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Jaws (Steven Spielberg, 1975) set a new standard for Hollywood film production by introducing the concept of “summer blockbuster,” but it also changed the way in which people thought about sharks. Almost 40 years after the release of the movie, the idea of sharks as ferocious man-hunters still underpins public opinion. This conceptualization of sharks as ruthless killers is mythical rather than factual, and in this presentation I intend to track the mechanisms that rooted the idea deep into popular culture. My research addresses the problematic of media constructions through a case study of the movie Jaws by looking into the production process, and applying Barbara Klinger’s interpretation of Epiphenomena (1989). Through intensive archival work, the paper studies how cinema travels into popular culture, by following the traces of the movie into other media, and the surrounding texts linked to marketing and merchandising; underlining its position as an integral part in the construction of myths, while tying to prove the connection between the movie and the stigmatized portrayal of sharks.

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  • 260.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    No Oscar for The Oscar?: Behind Hollywood's Walk of Greed2014In: Networking Knowledge, ISSN 1755-9944, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1966 the popular interest in the Academy Awards propelled Paramount Pictures to produce The Oscar (Embassy Pictures-Paramount Pictures, 1966), a film based on the homonymous novel by Richard Sale. The Oscar tells the story of an unscrupulous actor willing to do anything in his power to obtain the golden statuette, regardless of whom he has to take down along the way. Building up on fantasies of social mobility, we see the protagonist (Frankie) display his vanity, arrogance and greed to create a less than likeable character whose only hope to put his career back on track lies in obtaining the precious statuette. 

    The movie intends to be a sneak peek behind the scenes of the biggest award ceremony, but also behind the lifestyle of the Hollywood elites, their glory and their misery as part of the Hollywood disposal machinery. Despite not being financed or officially supported by the Academy, the film intertwines elements of fiction and reality by using real footage of the event, and featuring several contemporary representatives of the movie industry such as Edith Head, Hedda Hopper, Frank and Nancy Sinatra, playing cameo roles, adding up to the inter-textual capacities of the story. Head’s participation was particularly exploited for the promotion of the film, taking advantage of her position at Paramount, her status as a multiple winner, and her role as a fashion consultant for the Academy Awards. This paper is an analytical account of the film’s production process. Through a close look to its publicity, it will unravel how the studios relied on the awards, and all possible inter-textual capacities to promote the film, despite the Academy’s distancing from the project. 

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    No Oscar for the Oscar?
  • 261.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies. Stockholm University.
    Oscar Night in Hollywood: Fashioning the Red-Carpet from the Roosevelt Hotel to International Media2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the red-carpet phenomenon from a historical perspective, seeking to understand how the Academy Awards’ red-carpet became the most prominent fashion show in media culture. The connections between Hollywood and the fashion industry predate the inception of the ceremony, and so does the role of Hollywood actresses as trendsetters. However, this pseudo-event epitomizes precisely this liaison. This research focuses on several historical constellations to account for the influence of media shifts, the public relations dynamics of the event, the changes in the fashion and film industries, and the role of key players in the dissemination of fashion discourses in relation to Hollywood. By delving into archival sources, and tracing discourses of fashion, stardom, and celebrity surrounding Hollywood and the Oscars, this dissertation shows how the red-carpet gained such status, functioning today as a marquee for celebrity endorsement of high-end fashion brands.

    Chapter 1 provides a historical overview of the event, identifying key moments in the configuration of the Oscars and its red-carpet event. Chapter 2 discusses the role of gatekeepers as mediators of cultural capital. This contextualizes the connections between Hollywood and fashion journalism, and the emergence and development of the best- and worst- dressed lists in the U.S. Chapter 3 analyzes the role of advertising and endorsement practices in the circulation of ideas that set Hollywood personalities as influencers. In addition, the legal aspects of testimonials, the notion of “red-carpet treatment” in association with the emergence of lifestyle advertising, and the coronation of “Oscar” as a celebrity in its own right are discussed. Chapter 4 focuses on the career of Edith Head, looking into her popular appeal as Hollywood’s foremost “fashion expert.” Chapter 5 explores the dynamics of fashion at the Academy Awards, Head’s crucial role as the Academy Awards’ Fashion Consultant, and what may be considered the first Academy Awards’ fashion pre-show. Chapter 6 is pivoted on the role of television networks and sponsors in the inception of the Oscarcast, and the public relations dynamics that set fashion at the forefront by branding this media event as an international fashion show free-for-all. The dissertation closes with a case study of the film The Oscar (Embassy Films, 1966), which amalgamates the kaleidoscope of ideas explored in the previous six chapters.

    This transdisciplinary study concludes that WWII marked a turning point in the history of the Academy Awards. The postwar culture was characterized by the power-shift towards television, the emergence of celebrity culture, the expansion of consumer culture, the reactivation of transatlantic trade, the growth of fashion journalism, and an increasing circulation of national and international designer names in the media. In this context, promotional practices that put Hollywood designers and stars at the forefront turned into an optimal platform for the proliferation of fashion discourses around the Oscars. This has been momentous for the conceptualization of the Oscarcast as a fashion show since its inception in 1953. 

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  • 262.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Oscar Night in Hollywood: the Emergence of the Academy Awards' Fashion Pre-Show2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 263.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Reporting fashion: Fashioning moving images from newsreels to web series2022In: Insights on Fashion Journalism / [ed] Rosie Findlay, Johannes Reponen, London: Routledge, 2022, p. 69-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fashion has historically relied on visual culture for representation and promotion. Since the early days of film, moving images mediated culture, functioning as entertainment and style guides for working-class women. The fashion and media industries have crossed paths ever since. Far from stopping this dynamic, the advent of the Internet garnered new opportunities to produce and disseminate fashion-related audio-visual content. In recent years, media companies targeting younger audiences began producing short Web series for free streaming on company websites and platforms such as YouTube. This chapter locates fashion newsfilms and Web series within journalistic discourse through their connection to broadcasting and the printed press. Departing from archival sources and resting on the notion of glocalisation, it argues for the historical role of fashion newsfilms as key to a geopolitical reconfiguration that demarcated the centre and periphery, positioning the West at the centre of an imagined global fashion and beauty culture. In so doing, this chapter situates fashion Web series as the materialisation of early aspirations to expand modern consumer culture within a complex matrix of emerging, dominant, and residual cultural flows, co-opting countercultural discourses of fashion, dress, and beauty and reducing them to branding tags for corporate media products.

  • 264.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Spectacular Costume Design: The Dialectics of Above-the-Line Recognition and Below-the-Line Labor2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 265.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    The Case of Lux Flakes: The Costume Designers as Fashion Experts and Endorsers during the Studio Era2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 266.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    The Future in the Past: Exploring Barbarella’s Intergalactic Catwalk2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its controversial reception in 1968, Barbarella (Dino De Laurentiis Cinematografica, 1968) looms large in popular culture. Disguised under its sartorial splendor, the film’s narrative clearly negotiates social anxieties of the late ‘60s. Similarly, its production design incorporates contemporary elements present in art, architecture and fashion that stand today as a symbol of the space age design. Arguably, these elements of style, along with its camp representation of the future, played a key role in catapulting the film to its cult status. Spanish designer Paco Rabanne is frequently credited for the creation of Jane Fonda’s onscreen parade of highly stylized costumes. Moreover, fashion magazines oftentimes associate the overall aesthetic of his brand to his past contrubution in the film, which has served for framing runway shows and inspiring collections to date. However, the man responsible for creating fashion for Roger Vadim's vision of the year 40,000 was French costume designer Jacques Fonteray. The case of Paco Rabanne and Barbarella serves as an interesting example of how popular culture appropriates history, contributing to the construction of myths through media. Grounded on archival research, this article explores the role of Jacques Fonteray in the overall creation of the Jane Fonda's costumes, debunking popular misconception regarding Paco Rabanne’s influence on the film’s overall aesthetics.

  • 267.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    What Was Your Question? Deciphering How the Digital Humanities Can Aid to the Study of Fashion2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 268.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Who Cares About the Best Dressed?: Mr. Blackwell’s Infamous List and the Art of Self-Branding2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Before Joan Rivers’s Fashion Police (E! Entertainment, 2002- ), there was a man who made a reputation in Hollywood for his outspoken criticism of celebrity style. Provocative, overopinionated, controversial, admired, hated and feared; self proclaimed fashion’s advocate Richard Blackwell achieved worldwide recognition after launching his annual 10 Worst Dresed List in 1960. His outrageous comments against celebrities catapulted him to stardom, and turned him into a popular culture icon. Yet, the articulation of his list was a clear act of Winchellism rather than a sincere call for style. But, how much did Blackwell know about fashion? How did he become an authority on how American women should dress and behave? Overlooked by the fashion industry, Mr. Blackwell achieved a status among popular audiences that his more knowledgable detractors could not outshine. This paper looks at historical reception of Mr. Blackwell as a victimizer, but also a victim of celebrity culture. A master of performance and self branding rather than a fashion conoceur. A man seeking fame and recognition, who cleverly found a nische in the enterteinment industry through his controversial statements about stars, style and fashion, propelling a skyrocketing career in Hollywood he so longed for, and becoming a symbol for “all publicity is good publicity.”

  • 269.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Who Cares About the Best-Dressed?: Mr. Blackwell's Infamous List and the Art of Self-Branding2014In: : Mr. Blackwell's Infamous List and the Art of Self-Branding, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Before Joan Rivers’s Fashion Police (E! Entertainment, 2002- ), there was a man who made a reputation in Hollywood for his outspoken criticism of celebrity style. Provocative, overopinionated, controversial, admired, hated and feared; self proclaimed fashion’s advocate Richard Blackwell achieved worldwide recognition after launching his annual 10 Worst Dresed List in 1960. His outrageous comments against celebrities catapulted him to stardom, and turned him into a popular culture icon. Yet, the articulation of his list was a clear act of Winchellism rather than a sincere call for style. But, how much did Blackwell know about fashion? How did he become an authority on how American women should dress and behave? Overlooked by the fashion industry, Mr. Blackwell achieved a status among popular audiences that his more knowledgable detractors could not outshine. This paper looks at historical reception of Mr. Blackwell as a victimizer, but also a victim of celebrity culture. A master of performance and self branding rather than a fashion conoceur. A man seeking fame and recognition, who cleverly found a nische in the enterteinment industry through his controversial statements about stars, style and fashion, propelling a skyrocketing career in Hollywood he so longed for, and becoming a symbol for “all publicity is good publicity.”

  • 270.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Faggella, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Editorial Foreword2019In: Film Fashion and Consumption, ISSN 2044-2823, E-ISSN 2044-2831, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 3-8Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 271.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Faggella, ChiaraStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Fashion and the Moving Image2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 272.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Jeffers McDonald, Tamar
    Romero, Jenny
    Because Fashion Matters: Studying the Intersections of Fashion, Film and Media2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing interest in the study of fashion has opened up to the emergence of Fashion Studies as an independent field, with programs in several universities around the globe. However, the study of fashion should not be regarded as a new phenomenon. For decades, scholars from varied disciplines in the humanities and the social sciences have immersed themselves in the study of fashion, particularly in relation to film and media. Since the early days of cinema, the film industry played a key role in the promotion and representation of fashion. Likewise, its mediated character through newsreels, television, newspapers, magazines, photography and even paintings has facilitated the study of costume and dress history. Film scholars like Jane Gaines, Stella Bruzzi, and Pamela Church Gibson—among others—have vastly contributed to the interdisciplinary study of these intersections. Furthermore, in order to explore the specificities of these areas, Church Gibson launched the journal Fashion Film and Consumption, though the publishing house Intellect Books in 2011.

    In this contemporary setting, a pertinent and necessary topic to explore is the demands on interdisciplinary approaches, both from the side of Fashion Studies scholars with a purist point of view, and from their counterpoints in Film and Media more likely to envelop fashion in visual culture as a whole.

    As discussions regarding delimitations and canons take place behind close doors in fashion programsthe need to open up such debate to Film and Media scholars is vital to the future of a field that has seen a great part of its development through these neighboring contributions. 

    The workshop will explore the study of Film, Media and Fashion in coexistence with the emergence of Fashion Studies as an independent field, focusing on questions of methodology, theory and practice through the experience of different film and media scholars working with fashion and film. Before opening up the floor for discussion, a brief set of presentations will serve as a framework to address the debate, engaging the audience in reflections surrounding the following questions: 

     

    • What are the challenges and advantages of film and media scholars engaging in fashion research? 
    • Is Fashion Studies an exclusive realm for fashion scholars? 
    • Is there one singular way to study and teach fashion independently from its neighboring disciplines? 
    • What can different approaches used in Film and Media Studies contribute to the study of fashion? 
    • To what extent can Fashion Studies exist as a totally independent field, avoiding connections with Film and Media? 
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  • 273.
    Castelblanco-Pérez, Stefanía
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Crafting Textile Knowledges: A decolonial study of the Iku/Arhuaco material culture in the archives of the National Museum of World Cultures in Gothenburg (Världskulturmuseet)2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The return of objects that belong to ethnographic collections to their places of origin is one of the topics of discussion that, despite not being new, has been gaining more and more relevance today. Taking the Iku indigenous craft collection in the archives of the National Museum of World Cultures in Gothenburg as a case study, I pursue to develop an object-based methodology that increases and deepens the understanding of the notion of ethical stewardship, while joining current debates on indigenous heritage and decoloniality. This work aims to reveal material and immaterial aspects embedded in textile objects. The methodology included field visits to the museum archive, material culture analysis, and semi-structured interviews. The work evokes a decolonial discussion regarding the need to engage with epistemologies from the “South” and with methodologies not fully recognized by the dominant western-modern educational frameworks in order to achieve a more inclusive and assertive production of knowledge. 

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  • 274.
    Cavazzana, Francesca Angelica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Yoga and the Wardrobe: Centre Stage2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses specifically on yoga clothing to explore the wardrobes of individuals who practice yoga within Northern Europe. This study explores yoga as an embodied practice connected to dress, uncovering the relationship between clothing and the body based on online ethnographic research. Wardrobe studies were carried out remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic producing a new approach to the field through remote wardrobe studies. The theoretical perspective of Erving Goffman analyses the participants and their wardrobes through the lens of dramaturgy. This perspective allows for the investigation into the behaviour of individuals practising online and in- person yoga classes compared to yoga at home. Viewing social life as a theatre performance to explore individual’s wardrobes and yoga clothing is a vital component of the study. The research demonstrates how individuals in a society constantly perform and how a wardrobe is an object that also performs. The findings suggest that yoga clothing, the body, and the wardrobe are intrinsically connected, providing rich information contributing to fashion studies.

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  • 275.
    Ceder, Madeleine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Från läderbögar till färgglad stolthet: En kritisk diskursanalys av Prideparaden i Dagens Nyheter och Aftonbladet2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Studiens syfte är att undersöka hur Stockholms Prideparad representeras i Dagens Nyheter och Aftonbladet åren 1998, 2009 och 2013. Frågor som ställs är vilka diskurser som används i rapporteringen av paraden, samt vilken kunskap om sexualitet som reproduceras och genereras i artiklarna. Studien utgår från Michel Foucaults teorier om kunskap, makt och sexualitet; Norman Faircloughs diskursteori; samt queerteori. En kritisk diskursanalys enligt Faircloughs tredimensionella modell tillämpas på materialet som utgörs av sex stycken artiklar, en för varje tidningen och utvalt år. Analysen av artiklarna visar att de dominerande diskurserna i båda tidningarna var en event-/nöjesdiskurs som sammanfattar paraden. Skillnaderna är större mellan artiklarna från olika år än mellan artiklarna från olika tidningar. Samtliga artiklar reproducerar en heteronormativ ideologi: under 1998 sker det genom exkludering enligt heteronormens första princip och tydlig åtskillnad av deltagare och åskådare. 2009 och 2013 har sexualitetsdiskursen förändrats, och reproducering sker genom assimilering av hbtq-gruppen. I slutdiskussionen betonas paradoxen kring benämningen av hbtq-personer som å ena sidan bidrar till uppfattningen av heterosexualitet som norm, men å andra sidan synliggör hbtq-gruppen.

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    Från läderbögar till färgglad stolthet
  • 276.
    Ceder, Madeleine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Storytelling techniques in protest reporting: A comparative analysis of narratives on the Ferguson unrest by AJE, BBCW and RT2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In a global media environment characterized by change and conflict, narratives are especially useful to understand how the media form and distribute shared understanding of how the world works and who the important actors are. As the borders between local and global politics are blurred in the digital media landscape, protesters are in increased rate turning their placards to global broadcasters’ cameras, especially when political movements such as the U.S.-based Black Lives Matter movement get international counterparts. The scholarship concerned with the framework through which the media report protests argue the protest paradigm offers useful variables for the study of protests, while problematizing the lack of research on global broadcasting media. Global broadcasters, International Relations scholars argue, need to be understood as resources of soft power that distribute strategic narratives, but they have yet to develop a methodology for how broadcasts can be empirically studied. With this research gap as a point of departure, the chosen case study is the unrest in Ferguson in August 2014. A quantitative mapping and a comparative narrative analysis focusing on the narrative structure were conducted on 16 days of news bulletins from Al Jazeera English, BBC World News and RT. The results show several differences in the reports, the first concerns the amount of attention that was given to Ferguson by each broadcaster, where RT gave almost twice the amount of attention as the other two broadcasters. Further differences were found in the sources each broadcaster used and how they used violence as an entry-point to what their narratives where about, which in the case of AJE was the effects violence has on a society; BBCW’s narrative was of a political issue of high importance that concerns people of color; whereas RT’s narrative was about the militarization of the U.S. police force. The results imply the global broadcasters offer distinctive narratives, which through different storytelling techniques convey different attitudes and morals.

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  • 277.
    Cederquist, Linnea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    "Vad är källkritik?": En kvantitativ studie om gymnasieelevers kunskap och förståelse för källkritiska metoder på Facebook2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna uppsats ämnar studera gymnasielevers kunskap och förståelse för källkritiska metoder på Facebook. Studien genomförs i avseende att påvisa eventuella brister i gymnasieelevers kunskap om källkritik och sättet att använda det på sociala medier. De teorier som används genomgående och som uppsatsen grundar sig i är; källkritiska principer, the imperative of sharing, instrumentell och ritualiserad medieanvändning, selektiv medieanvändning samt filterbubblan och confirmation bias. I undersökningen har en kvantitativ forskningsmetod i form av webbenkäter valts, där urvalet består av 110 respondenter. Datainsamlingen har lagt in i statistikprogrammet SPSS och analyserats. I SPSS har urvalet filtrerats för resultatredovisningen så att endast svaren från de som svarat att de studerar vid gymnasiet redovisas. Resultatet av undersökningen visar att majoriteten av respondenter har goda kunskaper om källkritik och många ser sig även som källkritiska. Dock har en övervägande del respondenter svarat att de inte använder källkritiska metoder på Facebook. Detta testas genom en mängd olika frågor som exempelvis: brukar du kontrollera en nyhet som spridits på Facebook genom att jämföra med något annat nyhetsmedium? Påverkar avsändaren hur källkritisk du är till en nyhet? Resultatet visar att det finns brister i respondenternas förmåga att tillämpa källkritiska metoder på Facebook. I studien har även variabler som utbildning undersökts, där majoriteten anser att de fått tillräckligt med utbildning i skolan för att vara källkritiska på sociala medier. Dock har många av dessa respondenter samtidigt svarat att de tror att mer utbildning skulle få dem att agera mer källkritiskt. I slutsatsdelen diskuteras skolans ansvar att se till att eleverna kan utföra källkritiska metoder i praktiken. Det ligger i skolans ansvar att eleverna inte endast muntligen kan namnge väsentliga delar av källkritiska principer, utan att de även kan lära sig att använda det i vardagen.

     

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  • 278.
    Cetinkaya, Hande
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Before and After the Wall: A Social History of German Cinema2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with the perception of the Cold War in selected German feature films. Sonnenallee (Leander Haussmann, 1999), Die Unberührbare (Oscar Roehler, 2000), Good Bye Lenin! (Wolfgang Becker, 2003), Herr Lehmann (Leander Haussmann, 2003) and Das Leben der Anderen (Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, 2006) have been selected for a comparative analysis that focusses on narratives of the Cold-War era after reunification, and for an examination of how the social impact of German unification has been addressed in these films. In terms of methodology, the thesis uses Pierre Sorlin's social history of cinema and Pierre Nora's concept of lieu de mémoire to describe the social imagination and nostalgic representation of memories. There is a research gap in previous studies concerning how the Cold War has become a topic in recent German feature film production, and this study aims to complement those earlier works. 

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  • 279.
    Chichifoi, Diana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    To Yell @ the Wind: The Everyday Making of Citizen Journalism on Twitter2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Manifestations of citizen journalism on Twitter have been mainly analyzed around trending stories, associated with public campaigns or breaking news. Microbloggers' everyday attempts to contribute to professional media coverage, however, have been scarcely addressed in the literature. This research analyzes the practice of tweeting at influential news outlets by using a mixed-method approach. Content analysis anddirected queries about users' own motivation to tweet at media explore the interactionbetween regular users and professional news networks. Results show that there is apredisposition towards negative media commentary followed closely by newsworthy topics generated by the users, which replicate to a large extent mainstream media's agenda. When asked directly in the feed 'why do you tweet at media?', users explain their motivations to address news outlets in diverging ways, from explicit citizen journalism mission, to visibility claims and coincidental tagging. The study contributesto the study of citizen journalism on social media platforms and elaborates a mixed-method approach suited for this type of online data.

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    The Everyday Making of Citizen Journalism on Twitter
  • 280.
    Chiroiu, Luiza-Silvia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Protesting Sport: A Comparative Study of Media Representations of the London Olympics, Sochi Olympics and Brazil World Cup in AJE, BBCW and RT2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Global sport competitions such as the Olympics and the World Cup were founded following universal principles of unity and peace and aiming to be celebrations of sportsmanship. Nowadays, however, they go beyond sport, being constructed as global media events in which both politics and media play an essential role. Caught in this triangle, the Olympics and the World Cup have re-emerged in the past years as sites of protests, after decades of relative calmness in this sense. This represents the point of entry into the analysis of global broadcasters, giving the chance to examine the way in which Al Jazeera English, BBC World News and Russia Today represent the protests they put in relation to sport competitions happening in different parts of the world. The chosen case studies are the London Olympics 2012, Sochi Olympics 2014 and Brazil World Cup 2014. The comparative analysis allows the drawing of similarities and differences between both the case studies and the broadcasters overall. The findings show that protests are dealt with differently according to the sport event they are related to, since some of them are legitimized and others are not. A major distinction, therefore, results in the manner in which the broadcasters use the protests in order to depict a certain version of the world. Global broadcasters offer, thus, multiple perspectives on the world as they carry what appears to be a heavy cultural baggage of the societies of origin.

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  • 281.
    Chisti, Miriam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Explaining Identities: Fashion's potential to educate people about different cultures2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 282.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    A decade of WikiLeaks: So what?2014In: International Journal of Media and Cultural Politics, ISSN 1740-8296, E-ISSN 2040-0918, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 273-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I consider how WikiLeaks has gone through a series of metamorphoses: from a small, relatively unknown website devoted to giving whistleblowers space to release their material to one of the best-known activist organizations in the world. In addition, it has gone from being an organization that began by operating as an alternative to the mainstream media, to one that worked with the mainstream, and then to a group that devoted a fair degree of energy to attacking the media. I argue that during this tumultuous period of change, WikiLeaks needs to be understood in relation to its impact upon a number of fundamental relationships central to the study of media and journalism. I use WikiLeaks to consider the importance of studying sites and organizations as cultural artefacts, and to examine the idea that 'everything which has been collected on it, becomes attached to it-like shells on a rock by the seashore forming a whole incrustation'. Academic research itself is, of course, part of this incrustation.

  • 283.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    All politics is local: anonymous and the Steubenville/Maryville rape cases2016In: The Routledge companion to social media and politics / [ed] Axel Bruns, Gunn Enli, Eli Skogerbo, Anders Larsson, Christian Christensen, Routledge, 2016, p. 153-164Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 284.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Sweden, COVID-19, and invisible immigrants2022In: Creative Resilience and COVID-19: Figuring the Everyday in a Pandemic / [ed] Irene Gammel; Jason Wang, Abingdon: Routledge, 2022, p. 92-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, international media coverage of Sweden’s infamous “light touch” COVID-19 strategy is connected to another subject that dominated coverage of Sweden: immigrants and immigration. For years, immigrants were framed—by both right-wing and supposedly “progressive” outlets—as the central issue facing Swedish society, and as a problem and threat. Stockholm has been the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak, and it is parts of the city with the highest percentage of residents with immigrant backgrounds that have been hit hardest. In other words, the very people vilified by the media when arriving as refugees are the ones now bearing the brunt of COVID-19. Coverage of this element of the impact of COVID-19 on Sweden has been striking by its absence. Ignoring this part of Sweden’s COVID-19 story erases the place of immigrants in Swedish society. This erasure, in turn, reinforces vague, stereotypical notions of Swedish social, economic, political, and ethnic homogeneity that makes real analysis impossible.

  • 285.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    @Sweden: Curating a Nation on Twitter2013In: Popular Communication, ISSN 1540-5702, E-ISSN 1540-5710, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 30-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On December 10, 2011, the first tweet was sent out from the @Sweden Twitter account, a nation-branding project financed by the Swedish government through the Swedish Institute and VisitSweden. Trumpeted by the media both in Sweden and internationally as an exercise in “transparent” and “democratic” nation-branding via the use of Twitter, the @Sweden account is “given” to a new Swede every week, and, supposedly, these curators are given free rein to tweet what they like, when they like. The use of a popular communication channel by the Swedish government—in this case, Twitter—provides an illuminating example of the carefully planned and managed promotion and nation-branding of Sweden, presented under the guise of a “transparent” and “democratic” selection and editorial processes. The @Sweden project will be addressed in light of “liberation technology”  Diamond, L. 2010. Liberation technology. Journal of Democracy, 21(3): 69–83. and “technology discourse”         Fisher, E. 2010. perspectives, within which a correlation between access to, and use of, technology and proactive change is postulated. These theoretical perspectives are particularly valuable when heeding Kaneva's (Kaneva, N. 2011. Nation branding: Toward an agenda for critical research).  call for a more critical, communications-based understanding of nation-branding.

  • 286.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    The links that bind: WikiLeaks, Twitter, and the Julian Assange case2016In: Popular Communication, ISSN 1540-5702, E-ISSN 1540-5710, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 224-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the decade since the founding of WikiLeaks, no non-leak-related issue has dominated coverage of the organization more than the August 2010 allegations made by two women in Stockholm against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. This case has been addressed on the WikiLeaks Twitter feed on a consistent basis over the past 6 years. The tweets from WikiLeaks to millions of followers constitute a form of popular communication where a broad-albeit somewhat prefigured-audience is targeted using an open social media platform. With this audience in mind, I analyze the use of Twitter by WikiLeaks to address the 2010 rape allegations against Assange ( and the subsequent follow-on events after those allegations), with a particular focus on two issues: (a) the framing by WikiLeaks of the allegations, Sweden, rape, and feminism; and (b) how the sources (links) used in those tweets to back up claims should be seen as part of the general framing process.

  • 287.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    The Weaponization of Doubt Re-thinking Erdogan in an Era of Trumpism2019In: Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication, ISSN 1873-9857, E-ISSN 1873-9865, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 133-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    In this article, I offer a parallel reading of Erdogan and Trump in order to highlight the extent to which these two leaders have engaged-actively and effectively-in discrediting not only journalistic content (called 'fake news' or 'treason'), but also the very institutions of journalism, institutions that are key agents in international and national power geometries. The parallel reading is particularly useful because, as I argue, Trump and Erdogan can be understood as different nodes on the democratic plane, with clearly overlapping rhetorical and political strategies to meddle with power hierarchies, to reposition the role and status of their respective countries.

  • 288.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    WAVE-RIDING AND HASHTAG-JUMPING: Twitter, minority ‘third parties’ and the 2012 US elections2013In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 646-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the description of the 2012 election as the ‘most tweeted’ political event in US history in mind, considering the relative media invisibility of the so-called ‘third-party’ presidential candidates in the US election process, and utilizing the understanding of retweeting as conversational practice, the purpose of this paper is to examine the use of Twitter by the four main ‘third-party’ US presidential candidates in the run-up to the 2012 presidential election in order to better understand (1) the volume of tweets produced by the candidates; (2) the level of interaction by followers in the form of retweeting candidate/party tweets; and, (3), the subject and content of the tweets most retweeted by followers of the respective parties. The ultimate goal of the paper is to generate a broader picture of how Twitter was utilized by minority party candidates, as well as identifying the issues which led followers (and their respective followers) to engage in the ‘conversational’ act of retweeting.

  • 289.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    WikiLeaks and "Indirect" Media Reform2016In: Strategies for Media Reform: International Perspectives / [ed] Des Freedman, Jonathan Obar, Cheryl Martens, Robert W. McChesney, Fordham University Press, 2016, p. 58-71Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 290.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    WikiLeaks and the afterlife of Collateral Murder2014In: WikiLeaks: from popular culture to political economy / [ed] Christian Christensen, Los Angeles: USC Annenberg Press , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 291.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    WikiLeaks and the Afterlife of Collateral Murder2014In: International Journal of Communication, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 8, p. 2593-2602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this essay, the author considers not only what is shown in the WikiLeaks Collateral Murder video but reflects upon what the act of uploading this video symbolized and continues to symbolize and how the multifaceted symbolic value of the video has led to its steady inscription and reinscription into the public consciousness during a wide variety of popular and political debates. Apart from the disturbing content of the film, showing a potentially criminal act, the author argues that the uploading of the film was itself an act of dissent and, thus, a challenge to U.S. power. This combination of content and context makes the WikiLeaks Collateral Murder video an interesting case study that touches upon several key areas within academic study.

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  • 292.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    WikiLeaks: From Popular Culture to Political Economy2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 293.
    Christensen, Christian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Jónsdóttir, Birgitta
    WikiLeaks, Transparency, and Privacy: A Discussion with Birgitta Jónsdóttir2014In: International Journal of Communication, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 8, p. 2558-2566Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Birgitta Jónsdóttir is currently a member of the Icelandic Parliament, where she represents the Pirate Party. Jónsdóttir was an early WikiLeaks volunteer and was one of the key members of the team in Iceland that put together the famous Collateral Murder video. In this wide-ranging discussion with Christian Christensen, Jónsdóttir talks about her work with WikiLeaks, politics, and her ideas about technology, transparency, and privacy. She also discusses how she has been placed under surveillance because of her work with WikiLeaks and other organizations.

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  • 294.
    Christensen, Christian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Jónsdóttir, Birgitta
    WikiLeaks, transparency and privacy: a discussion with Birgitta Jónsdóttir2014In: WikiLeaks: from popular culture to political economy / [ed] Christian Christensen, Los Angeles: USC Annenberg Press , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 295.
    Christensen, Miyase
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    New Media Geographies and the Middle East2013In: Television and New Media, ISSN 1527-4764, E-ISSN 1552-8316, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 267-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue of Television & New Media brings together current research on media technologies, society, and culture in the Middle East from diverse methodological and analytical perspectives. The topics addressed cover a wide spectrum: circulation of Arab music videos and public discourse; Lebanese bloggers and mediated public spheres; transnational television audiences and ontological security; social media, TV talk shows, and political change in Egypt; youth-generated Arab media and cultural politics; and the Arab Spring as an ephemeral communicative space. Together, the articles provide a panorama of how today's multimodal media geographies and engaged actors reinscribe public cultures and politics in the Middle East.

  • 296.
    Christensen, Miyase
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    On mediations and the environment: Material, spatial and epistemic considerations2023In: International journal of cultural studies, ISSN 1367-8779, E-ISSN 1460-356X, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 365-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thinking behind this special issue was to move beyond the representation of the environment in news media and large-scale popular culture, and consider other informational outlets and spaces where environmental change is mediated and communicated. While mediatization has been an influential paradigm in media and communication studies, it has not addressed issues of, for example, materiality in relation to the excavation, use, construction and discarding of communication technologies. Thus, this special issue addresses the mediation of the environment on a broadened level, taking it beyond the ways in which media content alone represents environmental issues.

  • 297.
    Christensen, Miyase
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Postnormative cosmopolitanism: Voice, space and politics2017In: International Communication Gazette, ISSN 1748-0485, E-ISSN 1748-0493, Vol. 79, no 6-7, p. 555-563Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 298.
    Christensen, Miyase
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Technology, Place and Mediatized Cosmopolitanism2014In: Mediatized Worlds: Culture and Society in a Media Age / [ed] Andreas Hepp; Friedrich Krotz, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, p. 159-173Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The past two decades of media and communication studies have been dominated by a research agenda marked by an overwhelming attention paid to two phenomena: technological change and globalization. The study of digitalization and personalization of technology, particularly in its earlier phase, focused primarily on the emancipatory potential of information and communication technologies, or ICTs (e.g., Plant, 1997; Splender, 1995). While later research incorporated a more down-to-earth appreciation of technology, technological determinism continues to be reinvoked by way of casting new media tools as powerful agents of social change. This leads to the production of reductionist visions, particularly during times of perceived technological breakthrough (such as the Arab Spring and the case of Wikileaks), and a narrow conception of the mediatized worlds, which we find ourselves in today. Likewise, earlier theories of globalization foregrounded mediated and imagined dimensions (e.g., Appadurai, 1996; Beck, 2004; Castells, 2012; Rantanen, 2005) as well as cultural fusion and flows, with material aspects and complexities of ‘the everyday’ often overlooked or underplayed. One reason for this is cookie-cutter approaches to both globalization and technological change. Another is lack of empirical studies to support grand theoretical claims.

  • 299.
    Christensen, Miyase
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    TransNational Media Flows: Some Key Questions and Debates2013In: International Journal of Communication, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 7, p. 2400-2418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization and media flows have been scrutinized extensively in media and communication studies. Compared to the totalizing discourse of globalization, the scope of transnationalism offers a more tangible entry point for studying both the cohesive elements brought about by virtual and material flows and the social and cultural tension fields that arise between the varied scales of the national and the transnational. Departing from the theme of this special issue, and based upon both geopolitical and cultural considerations concerning mediation, this article aims to survey some of the material and symbolic implications of contemporary media flows. Theoretically, it draws upon two tropes, geopolitics and cosmopolitanism, which provide paradigmatic tools to reflect upon technological, spatial, and cultural dimensions of flows.

  • 300.
    Christensen, Miyase
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    From the Gezi Park Protests to the Akbelen Forest: Care in the Context of Democracy and Political Dissent2024In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 18, no 1-2, p. 173-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this essay, a brief history of environmental protests in Turkey will be followed by a discussion connected to two central frameworks: the logic of extractivism and care. Specifically, we argue that analysis of events such as the recent protests in the Akbelen Forest, just as the Gezi Park protests over a decade ago, need to account for the fact that a great deal of environmentalism and environmental activism is linked to broader social and political critique, particularly in countries such as Turkey with what is described as a “neo-authoritarian” or “new authoritarian” administration. We argue that these events and the ways in which they have materialized point to the need to pay further attention to intersections such as narrated space and spaces of narrativity, in this particular case, vis-à-vis care, democracy and political dissent.

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