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  • 251.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Nordic Digraphia and Diglossia2013In: Spoken and Written Language : Relations between Latin and the Vernacular Languages in the Earlier Middle Ages / [ed] Mary Garrison, Arpad P. Orbán, Marco Mostert, Turnhout: Brepols, 2013, p. 73-85Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 252.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Några oväntade arkeobotaniska fynd2012In: Medeltida klostergrunder på Island – vegetation och flora, kultur- och relikväxter, samtida växtnamn: rapport från ett forskningsprojekt 2009–2011, Alnarp: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences , 2012, p. 76-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 253.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Producing, Using, and Keeping Records in Medieval Swedish Towns2014In: Writing and the Administration of Medieval Towns: Medieval Urban Literacy I / [ed] Marco Mostert, Anna Adamska, Turnhout: Brepols , 2014, p. 13-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 254.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Skriftliga källor och äldre isländska växtnamn2012In: Medeltida klostergrunder på Island – vegetation och flora, kultur- och relikväxter, samtida växtnamn: rapport från ett forskningsprojekt 2009–2011 / [ed] Inger Larsson, Per Arvid Åsen, Steinunn Kristjánsdottír, Kjell Lundquist, Alnarp: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences , 2012, p. 49-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 255.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Skriðuklaustur och Viðeyjarklaustur – spår av medeltida klosterträdgårdar?2012In: Medeltida klostergrunder på Island – vegetation och flora, kultur- och relikväxter, samtida växtnamn: rapport från ett forskningsprojekt 2009–2011 / [ed] Inger Larsson, Per Arvid Åsen, Steinunn Kristjánsdottír, Kjell Lundquist, Alnarp: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences , 2012, p. 81-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 256.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Syster Botilda i Vårfruberga kloster och broder Johan Petersson i Vadstena kloster: fakta eller fiktion?2014In: Källor till trädgårdsodlingens historia: Fyra tvärvetenskapliga seminarier 2010–2013 arrangerade av NordisktNätverk för Trädgårdens Arkeologi och Arkeobotanik (NTAA / [ed] Anna Andréasson, Elisabeth Gräslund Berg, Jens Heimdahl, Anna Jakobsson, Inger Larsson, Erik Persson, Alnarp: Fakulteten för landskapsarkitektur, trädgårds- och växtproduktionsvetenskap, Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet , 2014, p. 181-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 257.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The Role of the Swedish Lawman in the Spread of Lay Literacy2010In: Along the Oral-Written Continuum. Types of Texts, Relations and their Implications. / [ed] Slávica Rankovic, Turnhout: Brepols , 2010, p. 411-427Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 258.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Örta- och läkeböcker i den Bröndegaardska boksamlingen2010In: Nycklar till kunskap: Om människans bruk av naturen / [ed] Håkan Tunón och Anna Dahlström, Stockholm, Uppsala: CBM, KSLA , 2010, p. 137-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 259.
    Larsson, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Andersson, Roger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Kyrkans och klostrens texter : Inledning : Encyklopedisk litteratur2010In: Den medeltida skriftkulturen i Sverige: Genrer och texter / [ed] Inger Larsson, Rune Pal m fl, Stockholm: Runica et mediaevalia , 2010, p. 152-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 260.
    Larsson, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Kristjabsdóttir, Steinunn
    University of Iceland.
    Åsen, Per Arvid
    The Icelandic medieval monastic garden: Did it exist?2014In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 560-579Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 261.
    Larsson, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Palm, RuneStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Den medeltida skriftkulturen i Sverige: Genrer och texter2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 262.
    Larsson, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Åsen, Per Arvid
    Kristjánsdottír, Steinunn
    Lundquist, Kjell
    Medeltida klostergrunder på Island - vegetation och flora, kultur och reliktväxter, samtida växtnamn: rapport från ett forskningsprojekt 2009-20112012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Icelandic medieval monastic sites – vegetation and flora, cultural- and relict plants, contemporary plant-names The colonization of Iceland began in the late 9th century and in the year 1000 the Althing chose Christianity to replace paganism as the religion of the country. The bishopric of Skálholt was established in 1056 and Hólar in 1106. There are traces of twelve to fifteen monasteries, of which nine are recognized as having lasted for some time. Of these only Skriðuklaustur has been fully excavated, exhibiting a European building model. Viðeyjarklaustur and Kirkjubaejarklaustur have been partly excavated not revealing any specific monastic buildings as yet. Archaeobotanical investigations have only been undertaken on Viðey and at Skriðuklaustur. The exact localisation of the monastic buildings, or possible monastic cultivation. are only presumptions at all other places, as is the type of monastic building, whether traditional Icelandic farm type or continental monastery building type. The questions that this project seeks to answer are which cultivated plants on the whole, and garden plants in particular, were known and used in the medieval Icelandic monastic context, and whether it is possible to find medieval relict plants in connection with the Icelandic monastic sites. All monastic sites were surveyed for landscape and plants, and complete lists of the plants found are published in Bilaga 1. Medicinal, utility and ornamental plants, known in Iceland and abroad, have been recorded, but their status as true medieval monastic relict plants cannot be fully determined at this stage of research. The very special conditions in which a hitherto uninhabited island was colonized in some hundred years by people bringing and adapting their knowledge of farming, cultivating and using plants for both utility and pleasure led inevitably to a situation where common knowledge became integrated with the specific uses of plants and plant medicine in a monastic context. Many of the plants found today, such as Angelica, Alchemilla, Allium, Filipendula, Plantago or Sanguisorba have a medieval past as medicinal herbs. We cannot, however, establish for sure whether some of these plants’ properties were not common knowledge to the Icelanders of the Middle Ages but were specific monastic plants. The Icelandic monastic sites, as well as all Iceland, are today dominated by farming leaving little space for herbs to grow and survive. There are however traces of deliberate use and possibly cultivation of plants at Skriðuklaustur and Viðeyjarklaustur, although more archaeobotanical evidence from monastic sites is needed as well as an archeological search for traces of cultivation. This is required not only at these two sites but at all monastic sites in Iceland. Medieval plant-names tell us little since most of the medico-botanical literature are translations of the Dane Henrik Harpestræng’s works. The Icelandic laws, another source for plant-names, are heavily influenced by Norwegian law and therefore may only be used with caution for the documentation of Icelandic matters. Later historic plant-names, however, reveal many interesting details about the local use of some plants, although some of these names are loans from or translations of Scandinavian or German names and may not reveal anything about their local Icelandic use.

  • 263.
    Larsson, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Åsen, Per Arvid
    Kristjánsdóttir, Steinunn
    Lundquist, Kjell
    Medeltida klostergrunder på Island: vegetation och flora, kultur- och reliktväxter, samtida växtnamn - några tankar kring ett tvärvetenskapligt projekt2014In: Källor till trädgårdsodlingens historia: fyra tvärvetenskapliga seminarier 2010-2012 arrangerade av Nordiskt Nätverk för Trädgårdens Arkeologi och Arkeobotanik (NTAA) / [ed] Anna Andréasson, Elisabeth Gräslund Berg, Jens Heimdahl, Anna Jakobsson, Inger Larsson, Erik Persson, Alnarp: Fakulteten för landskapsarkitektur, trädgårds- och växtproduktionsvetenskap, Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet , 2014, p. 47-53Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 264. Mace, Amber
    et al.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    Charpentier Ljungqvist, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Postdoktoral karriär vid Stockholms universitet ur ett jämställdhetsperspektiv2015Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Several previous studies indicate that among newly graduated PhDs, women tend to continue with a postdoctoral academic career to a lesser extent than men do. The Central PhD Student Council (CDR) has investigated to what degree this is also the case for Stockholm University. Using various sources, the relative change of the gender balance of PhD students compared to researchers at a postdoctoral level has been assessed at the four faculties of Stockholm University.

    For the Faculty of Science, the four different sections have been analysed as well. CDR finds that it is first and foremost at this faculty that a clear change in the gender balance between PhD students and postdoctoral researchers is discerned. Even though the variations between the individual departments and sections at the faculty are large, as a whole the relative decrease of the proportion of women is between 11 % and 21 %, depending on what metric is used. The dropoff of female researchers takes place primarily in already male-dominated areas of research.

    Unlike at the other faculties, we also find that the proportion of female senior lecturers at the Faculty of Science is lower than what could be expected. The proportion of female professors, even among new recruits, is still lower than the population of hypothetical recruits at all faculties – except at the Faculty of Humanities. We do, however, note that the proportion of female professors at the Faculty of Science is currently increasing and approaching that of the population of hypothetical recruits. At the Faculty of Social Sciences we see that, compared to the rest of the faculty, the proportion of women within the educational sciences is considerably higher and when excluding these subjects the trend towards more female professors disappears.

    CDR concludes that it is important to increase the directed efforts to encourage support to newly graduated female PhDs within male-dominated areas to stay in academia. Furthermore, it is crucial to study the reasons for a larger female drop-off within certain areas of research in the transition from PhD studies to a postdoctoral level. We further consider it important to ensure that women are given the same possibilities as men to qualify themselves scientifically and not be burdened with teaching and administrative duties to a larger extent than men are.

  • 265.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Bishops and Pastoral Obligations2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 266.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Bishops and Pastoral Obligations: Ælfric’s Pastoral Letters and Preaching in the 11th and 12th Centuries2018In: Dominus Episcopus: Medieval Bishops between Diocese and Court / [ed] Anthony John Lappin, Elena Balzamo, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2018, p. 53-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 267.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Correct Knowledge and the Aftermath of the Benedictine Reform in Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman England2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 268.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Hagiography, Historiography and the Patterns of Sanctity: The Saga of Edward the Confessor and its European Contexts2015In: Medieval Nordic literature in its European context / [ed] Else Mundal, Oslo: Dreyer Forlag A/S, 2015, p. 126-151Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 269.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Latin and Vernacular Homilies of Anglo-Saxon England: Preaching and Perceptions of Society2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The advances in the study of homiletic writing of Anglo-Saxon England in the past few decades have made it possible to situate many seemingly formulaic and conventional texts in their specific historical contexts, and to perceive in them certain participation in and commentary on the contemporary social and political situation. This pertains especially to homilies written in Old English – the long-term primary interest of Anglo-Saxon scholarship – which may at times seem to overshadow the coexistent Latin culture. This paper pays attention to this division and explores both Latin and vernacular homiletic writing from the perspective of preaching and social perception. It examines the features of Latin and Old English as languages of teaching, and then discusses Archbishop Wulfstan’s (ca. 950-1023) Latin sermons as a case study, especially those in one of his own ‘Commonplace Books’, Copenhagen Kongelige Bibliotek, Gl. Kgs. Sam. 1595. From the outset, the linguistic division appears to have many fundamental implications for both composition and delivery: the Latin sermons and homilies were for the most part meant to be used in the monastic office, whereas the vernacular ones are thought to have served the needs of lay preaching or private devotion. In terms of social perception, therefore, preaching on social order, vices and virtues, or rules and responsibilities would have found its audiences in different social categories, at least in theory. In practice, the boundaries between these categories were much more fluid, and the language of a text in itself does not always denote a certain audience. The act of preaching as a potentially infuential type of medium in circulating ideas and conceptions on social order makes the two corpora essential sources for studying social ideas, their implementation and authorization. Consequently, the paper contributes to the discussion of both oral and literary as well as the Latin and vernacular communication in the Middle Ages.

  • 270.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Law, Learning, and the Networks of Knowledge: Archbishop Wulfstan and the Worcester Manuscripts in Context2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The fundamental interconnections between homiletics, religious instruction, legislation and political theory are apparent in the works of Wulfstan, Bishop of London and Worcester and Archbishop of York (d. 1023). When assessing the impact of Wulfstan’s own background on his religious-political discourse, however, we are forced to rely mainly on conjectures. His life before the appointment to the see of London in 996 remains unknown, and he rarely mentions his sources or quotes them verbatim. Wulfstan’s position in the politics of the day was nonetheless important, and it is clear that his monastic education played a crucial role in it. This paper explores this interconnectedness of learning, teaching and political engagement, focusing on manuscripts that can be connected to Wulfstan himself, as well as those connected to the cathedral monastery of Worcester. The purpose of the paper is, firstly, to shed light on Wulfstan’s own educational background and networks, and thus to elucidate his choices in transferring knowledge of the ’holy society’ into the political and legal discourse. Secondly, the paper also emphasizes the role of Worcester itself, as a node of learning through which these notions were further circulated by means of lay education, pastoral care, and secular legislation.

  • 271.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The Concept of the Three Orders of Society and Social Mobility in Eleventh-Century England2016In: English Historical Review, ISSN 0013-8266, E-ISSN 1477-4534, Vol. 131, no 553, p. 1331-1352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the concept of the three orders of society (oratoresbellatoreslaboratores) in the works of Ælfric of Eynsham (d. c.1010) and Wulfstan of York (d. 1023). Paying attention to the immediate contexts in which Ælfric and Wulfstan formulated their views on social order, the article contrasts the varying uses of the metaphor with the discussion on social change and social mobility current around the turn of the first millennium. The reiteration of these categories seems to have surfaced in situations of particular political turbulence, as a means of convincing audiences that contemporary society was in a state of disorder which had to be remedied. The article incorporates analysis of a text previously excluded from discussions of the concept, Napier 50, and reviews some interpretations according to which the three orders functioned as part of criticism of extensive upward social mobility at the beginning of the eleventh century.

  • 272.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Thom Mertens, Maria Sherwood-Smith,
 Michael Mecklenburg & Hans-Jochen Schiewer (red.), The Last Judgement in Medieval Preaching
. Sermo: Studies on Patristic, Medieval, and Reformation Sermons and Preaching 3. Turnhout: Brepols, 20132015In: Svenskt gudtjänstliv, ISSN 0280-9133, Vol. 90, p. 224-229Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 273.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Virtues, Vices, and Vectors: Digital Tools and the Study of Medieval Sermons2019Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In May 2018, a workshop was held at Malmö University on the subject of Digital History, bringing together Scandinavian scholars from a number of history disciplines. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss ontologies of digital history from different perspectives and can be seen as a first step taken in order to engage critically with this growing field and to create an inter-Scandinavian network. These scholars are active within, for instance, digital pedagogy, public history, history, and literary history.

    In order to share the results of this workshop with a wider audience, a series of academic blog posts will be published every Friday for the next six weeks. These posts all engage with various aspects of the ontology of the digital and the “digital turn”: from a more general overview of the opportunities it provides, to its potential to bridge divides between disciplines and promote further understanding, and examples of practical applications in terms of new research methodologies. Questions are raised such as: how can digital media enable other forms of research communication than the book or article? How is the way scholars communicate their research shifting in response to new forms of digital media? Can digital methods promote cooperation between academic disciplines?

    This text focuses on the methodological, theoretical and critical aspects of using digital tools in the study of medieval source material. With the increase of digitized historical texts, databases with user-friendly search functions, and digital projects (or TRCs, Thematic Research Collections) with a mixture of research tools and a variety of archival material, the possibilities for historians have multiplied. That so many medieval texts have been transferred into digital formats in the past few years is an obvious advantage for medieval studies. Everyone is grateful that we can now find critical editions and high-resolution manuscript images straight from our own computer screens, and do the time-consuming research right at home, instead of travelling to different libraries and archives across the world. Not only can we now download a text and do the traditional close reading (often) for free, but we can now also manipulate the data that would have been near impossible with printed texts. This is what brings us to using digital databases as tools in the study of medieval sermons – not just as a deposit for texts in an electronic format.

    The digitized text itself allows for a re-evaluation of how we pose our research questions and calls for a critical discussion of the nature of our sources and the knowledge we gain from them. Although the process of making medieval texts available in a digital format is not complete (will it ever be?), [1] great accomplishments have been achieved in recent times that have made it possible to shift from the phase of reassembling and collation to one where scholars can use this new material in analyses that differ from ‘traditional’ methods of close-reading. In this respect, the methods that have been developed within Digital Humanities (reaching back to 1960s humanities computing, with its roots in the late 1940s) offer new and promising prospects for historians.

  • 274.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    A Study of Punctuality: Using typo-chronology as Barthes’ studium and punctum2012In: Matters of Scale: Processes and courses of events in the past and the present / [ed] Nanouschka Myrberg Burström, Fredrik Fahlander, Stockholm: Department of archaeology and classical studies, Stockholm university , 2012, p. 75-89Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 275.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    A tale of buried treasure, some good estimations, and golden unicorns: The numismatic connections of Alan Turing.2015In: Myntstudier: Festskrift till Kenneth Jonsson. / [ed] Talvio, Tuukka and Wijk, Magnus, Stockholm: Svenska Numismatiska Föreningen , 2015, p. 226-230Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1940 a man decided to take some precautionary measures to protect his savings against the imminent threat of the Battle of Britain. To avoid being left without means in the event of a German invasion, prevent devaluation of his savings and possibly also to speculate in rising silver prices he bought two large silver ingots, worth £250 and weighing about 90 kilograms, loaded them into a pram, and went out to bury them in a small wood nearby. The man was Alan Turing (1912–1954), famous for his wartime success in breaking the German Enigma code with his team, and for his groundbreaking work on electric machines which were to develop into the first real computers. Turing is also well-known to many who work with coins as one of the scholars behind the Good-Turing frequency estimation formula, used within numismatics to calculate the number of coins of a specific type produced from an identified number of dies. This paper meanders from Alan Turing's hidden treasure on to his scientific work and to his various connections with numismatics: the Good-Turing formula, Joan Clarke, and commemorative coins.

  • 276.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Brita Ingrid Maria Malmer2018In: Svenskt kvinnobiografiskt lexikon, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 277.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Divina Moneta: coin finds in religious contexts2017In: XV International Numismatic Congress, Taormina, 2015, volume 2: proceedings / [ed] Maria Caccamo Cantalbiano, Roma: Arbor Sapientae , 2017, p. 1309-1316Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coin finds in religious contexts raised a significant number of questions concerning the conception and use of coins and money in different geographical and temporal settings. Votive offerings, ritual minting and donations are but a few examples of how coins were, and still are, used as material mediators between humans and gods. In the Divina Moneta Round Table, the use of coins and money for religious purposes was discussed from an understanding of the particular material qualities of coins (such as metal, size or iconography) in combination with their connotations in the light of different socio-cultural phenomena (such as abundance, kingship or protection). These material and ideological aspects were related to patterns of deposition in religious contexts and to detailed numismatic evidence, drawing on cases of coins from various historical, geographical and numismatic contexts.

  • 278.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Divina Moneta: Coin finds in religious contexts2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 279.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Elina Screen, Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles, Nor­wegian Collections, part I (vol. 65) & II (vol. 66), Oxford 2013 & 20152016In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 66-68Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 280.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Eva Marie Ulla Margareta Ehrensvärd2018In: Svenskt kvinnobiografiskt lexikon, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 281.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Florent Audy har disputerat2018In: Nordisk Numismatisk Unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 282.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Florent Audy har disputerat2018In: Svensk numismatisk tidskrift, ISSN 0283-071X, no 5, p. 121-121Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 283.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Händelser vid vatten: Maritima studier med allmänarkeologisk relevans2012In: Marinarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1100-9632, no 3, p. 11-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Är den maritima arkeologin fast i ”specialiseringens dilemma”? På vilket kulturhistoriskt område kan maritim arkeologi säga något väsentligt som inte kan belysas utifrån andra premisser? Här föreslås en ökad, snarare än minskad, närhet till det empiriska materialet, men även till allmänarkeologisk teori och problemformuleringar. I skärningspunkten mellan människa, vatten och ting finns den maritima arkeologins särskilda förutsättningar och unika kvalitéer att förvalta och utveckla.

  • 284.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Imitation as citation: coin imitation as rhetoric and discourse2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coinage began to be used from around AD 995 in Scandinavia. These early coins imitated contemporary Anglo-Saxon coins but not in a passive or unquestioning way, but as part of complex chain of citations by which imported artefacts were adapted and re-contextualized. For more than thirty years the English and Scandinavian coinages were closely connected through a network of humans and objects that moved, physically and conceptually, between mints and kingdoms. Different iconographical models were used in a strategic/rhetorical way by commissioners and artisans to create relations between cognitive nodes through association, referencing, paraphrasing and appropriation. When circulating, the coins linked users to an official and shared discourse, and maintained the created relations through the impact of their materiality. While many re-contextualizing practices in the Viking Age seem to deal with reconnection with the past, the coin-imitation practice apparently worked mainly within a contemporary conceptual framework, although there are components of ‘ancientness’ as well. Object agency and the hybrid, creative, characters of these coins provide starting points for a deeper understanding of the coins’ wider connotations and meanings, as well as for the imitative practice itself.

  • 285.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Introduction: Faith and Ritual Materialised: Coin Finds in Religious Contexts2018In: Divina Moneta: Coins in Religion and Ritual / [ed] Nanouschka Myrberg Burström, Gitte Tarnew Ingvardson, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coins have played an important role in religious and ritual practice ever since they started to be produced. The claim is sustained by numerous sources: coin finds in archaeological contexts,written sources and images. Why people deposit coins is therefore a fundamental question for understanding both the use of the material object and the conceptual framework within which ritual activity occurred.

  • 286.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Jonathan Lindström, Biskopen och korståget 1206. Om krig, kolonisation och Guds man i Norden (Stockholm: Norstedts 2015)2017In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 137, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 287.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Linn Eikje Ramberg har disputerat2018In: Svensk numismatisk tidskrift, ISSN 0283-071X, no 1, p. 21-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 288.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Linn Eikje Ramberg har disputerat2018In: Nordisk Numismatisk Unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 289.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Money, Coins and Archaeology2018In: Money and Coinage in the Middle Ages / [ed] Rory Naismith, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2018, p. 231-263Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter focuses on three themes: conceptions of "money" and "coins" within archaeology, coins as archaeological material, and coins as part of archaeological research history. The argument builds on many illuminating cases and examples from old and recent research within archaeology and numismatics, and theory and method are emphasised.

  • 290.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Shared Values: Links and hybridity in the Anglo-Scandinavian coin-web2017In: 18th Viking Congress, Denmark, 6–12 August 2017: Abstracts – Papers and Posters, 2017, p. 13-13Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In present-day Scandinavia a coinage was initiated about AD 995, which imitated contemporary Anglo-Saxon coins. For more than thirty years the English and Scandinavian coinages were closely connected through a network of humans and objects that moved, physically and conceptually, between mints and kingdoms. Coinage is often seen as articulating sovereign rights in a certain area, but the Anglo-Scandinavian coinage network instead cut across kingdoms from west to east. Despite ongoing state-formation processes, key valuables like artisans and dies were shared in the network, causing change in power relations and conceptions of value.

    Different iconographical models were used in a strategic/rhetorical way by commissioners and artisans to create relations between cognitive nodes through association, referencing, paraphrasing and appropriation. When circulating, the coins linked users to an official and shared discourse, and maintained the created relations through the impact of their materiality. While many re-contextualizing practices in the Viking Age seem to deal with reconnection with the past, the coin-imitation practice apparently worked mainly within a contemporary conceptual framework, although there are components of ‘ancientness’ as well. Die-link studies here provide a source of theoretical inspiration for how to study linear as well as non-linear connections and networks in the past. Through the repetitive practices of coin-making, artefact types experience gradual changes and thus new categories and articulations are created. Object agency and the hybrid character of these coins provide starting points for a deeper understanding of the coins’ wider connotations and meanings, as well as for the imitative practice itself.

  • 291.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Sture Bolin, medeltidsforskare mellan historia och arkeologi2012In: Nordisk Numismatisk Unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 4, p. 64-69Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 292.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles, British Museum Anglo-Saxon Coins. Part I: Early Anglo-Saxon Gold and Anglo-Saxon and Continental Silver Coinage of the North Sea Area, c.600–760 (Vol. 63), by Anna Gannon; Part II: Southern English Coinage from Offa to Alfred, c.760–880 (Vol. 67), by Rory Naismith2018In: English Historical Review, ISSN 0013-8266, E-ISSN 1477-4534, Vol. 133, no 564, p. 1274-1277Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The latest volume in the series Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles (Vol. 67) deals with the substantial and high-quality collections held by the British Museum. It is here reviewed jointly with the first part dedicated to the same collection (Vol. 63). The two volumes provide an important summary and update on the research on Anglo-Saxon coinage, and make it available and accessible to a general audience, collectors and scholars.

  • 293.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles, Norwegian Collections, Parts I (Vol. 65) and II (Vol. 66), by Elina Screen2017In: English Historical Review, ISSN 0013-8266, E-ISSN 1477-4534, Vol. 132, no 554, p. 102-103Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 294.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The Chair: Situating knowledge and authority in Viking and Medieval Scandinavia2019In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 153-155Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientia potentia est — knowledge is power. Few things embody this sentence better than the chair. We will explore it through an amulet from the Eketorp hoard (Närke, Sweden), deposited in a wetland in the 960s.

  • 295.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The Hatched Cross: Gotlandic Coins of the 13th century Baltic Sea area2012In: Monetary History of the Baltic in the Middle Ages (12-16th C.) / [ed] Ivar Leimus, Tallinn: Eesti Ajaloomuuseum , 2012, p. 180-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 12th century, some authority on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea started off a coinage, the first ever on Gotland and the first medieval coinage of Sweden as a whole. Quite remarkably, these and any following coins minted on the island never adjusted to the Swedish mainland royal coins in weights or iconography, but seem to have been independently administered even though the island was within Swedish power (for any period when it was not under somebody else’s control). In the 12th century and well into the 13th, Gotlandic coins had a strong impact on certain areas of the mainland, and in the 13th century they were even used as a model for new coinages in the Baltic Sea area. Interestingly, these first Gotlandic coins in several ways show where their inspiration came from, and thus perhaps who or what motivated their coming into being: trading partners and other guests from the southwestern parts of the Baltic and North Sea.

  • 296.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Ingvardson, Gitte Tarnow
    Divina moneta: Coins in Religion and Ritual2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This edited collection analyses the phenomenon of coin use for religious and ritual purposes in different cultures and across different periods of time. It proposes an engagement with the theory and interpretation of the ‘material turn’ with numismatic evidence, and an evidence-based series of discussions to offer a fuller, richer and fresh account of coin use in ritual contexts. No extensive publication has previously foregrounded coins in such a model, despite the fact that coins constitute an integrated part of the material culture of most societies today and of many in the past. Here, interdisciplinary discussions are organised around three themes: coin deposit and ritual practice, the coin as economic object and divine mediator, and the value and meaning of coin offering. Although focusing on the medieval period in Western Europe, the book includes instructive cases from the Roman period until today. The collection brings together well-established and emerging scholars from archaeology, art history, ethnology, history and numismatics, and great weight is given to material evidence which can complement and contradict the scarce written sources.

  • 297.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Ingvardson, Gitte Tarnow
    Preface2018In: Divina Moneta: Coins in Religion and Ritual / [ed] Nanouschka Myrberg Burström, Gitte Tarnow Ingvardson, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018, p. xvii-xviiiChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 298.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Williams, Howard
    University of Chester.
    Chains of citations: Re-contextualization in the Viking Age.2013In: The European Archaeologist, ISSN 1022-0135, no 40, p. 84-88Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For Scandinavia and regions subject to Norse contact and settlement across northern and western Europe, the Viking Age heralded new patterns and processes by which material culture circulated through plunder, trade and exchange, but also through imitation, influence and adaptation. The theme of citation draws upon research into the agency and the social and mnemonic affects of material culture and monuments in instigating social change. Citation provides a useful pivot around which to consider the active reconfiguring and vocation of previous landscapes, monuments and material culture in the creation of new social and religious worlds by Viking-period communities and individuals. There are a number of reasons for adopting the original theme of citation, as an alternative to considering the cultural biography of things, monuments and landscapes, which is otherwise often investigated when approaching the phenomenon of re-contextualization. Citation helps us to think of the active roles of enmeshed networks of people and things in the emergence of creolizing cultures of the Viking Age. This network-based approach has numerous advantages in understanding socio-economic, political and religious change. Through networks linking together the Viking world, citations provided a distinctive medium for social communication, identity-creation and commemoration including how things and places were imitated, adapted, reinvented, depicted, denoted, displayed, combined, fragmented, recycled and/or deposited alongside the biographical emphasis upon curation and reuse. Thus, exploring citational strategies equips archaeologists with the conceptual tools to adequately understand the shifting and not always linear linkages between different artefact types and assemblages in the construction of identities and memories in the Viking world.

  • 299.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    A worth of their own: on Gotland in the Baltic Sea, and its 12th-century coinage2010In: Medieval Archaeology, ISSN 0076-6097, E-ISSN 1745-817X, Vol. 54, p. 158-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In about AD 1140, the island of Gotland initiated what was to become one of the most influential coinages of the medieval Baltic Sea area. This was part of a strategy to meet the impact and pressure from the world outside in a period characterised by large-scale political and ideological changes. In this situation, old and new networks were important to maintain autonomy from those aiming for dominance over the island. The coins, with an independent weight standard and an iconography inspired by NW German and Frisian coins, were one way of attracting partners to the island’s main harbour, where its inhabitants could maintain control and trading peace.

    Coins incorporate in them the dimensions of object, text and picture. A historical archaeology of coins needs not only focus on large-scale perspectives and formal power, but must also give weight to the archaeological context, the life biography of the coins and the social negotiations behind their production and use. Thus intention and reality, symbolism and social practice may be studied to find openings to the stories behind the objects. The different dimensions of the coins together with historical sources give away plenty of information on several levels: about the networks, ideological framework, artisanship and changing loyalties of this time and area.

  • 300.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    An island in the middle of an island: On cult, laws and authority in Viking Age Gotland2009In: From Ephesos to Dalecarlia: Reflections on body, space and time in medieval and early modern Europe, Stockholm: Statens historiska museum , 2009, p. 101-118Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present-day small village of Roma on Gotland in the Baltic Sea was the physical and symbolic centre of the island in the Iron Age and into Medieval times. The Cistercian monastery and the meeting place of the island’s assembly, the All-thing, two well-known features of medieval Roma, have often been taken as indications of an egalitarian and non-stratified society on Gotland during the Viking Age and Middle Ages. It is here proposed, however, that an older Iron Age cult site at Roma eventually came under the control of a chieftain or major landowner who introduced Christianity, founded a monastery and inaugurated the thing in Roma in Viking or early medieval times, just as his equals did elsewhere in Scandinavia. While the later medieval thing was probably located near the monastery, an alternative site on a small island is suggested for the older All-thing.

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