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  • 251.
    Blid, Jesper
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Classical, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine wall-building techniques in Labraunda2010In: Mylasa Labraunda: archaeology and rural architecture in the southern Aegean region / [ed] Figen Kuzucu, Murat Ural, Istanbul: Milli Reasürans , 2010, p. 107-120Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 252.
    Blid, Jesper
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Henry, Olivier
    Labraunda 2004-2007:  A preliminary report on the Swedish excavations2008In: Istanbuler Mitteilungen, ISSN 0341-9142, no 58, p. 122-128Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 253.
    Blid, Jesper
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Henry, Olivier
    Labraunda 2008. A preliminary report on the Swedish excavations with contributions by J. Blid & O. Henry: The Tetraconchos excavation2009In: Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, Vol. 2, p. 67-79Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 254.
    Blid, Jesper
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Henry, Olivier
    Labraunda 2009. A preliminary report on the Swedish excavations with contributions by J. Blid & O. Henry: Research on Labraunda in Late Antiquity2010In: Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, Vol. 3, p. 80-88Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 255.
    Blid Kullberg, Jesper
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Building a New Rome: The Imperial Colony of Pisidian Antioch (25 BC–AD 700)2013In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, no 6, p. 339-340Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 256.
    Blid Kullberg, Jesper
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Flowers and garlands of the alsos: Verdant themes in the architectural sculpture of Labraunda2014In: Labrys: Studies presented to Pontus Hellström / [ed] Lars Karlsson, Susanne Carlsson, Jesper Blid Kullberg, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2014, p. 19-42Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 257.
    Blid Kullberg, Jesper
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Från podiumtempel till centralkyrka: Om den senantika kyrkoarkitekturens utveckling i dagens Armenien2013In: Patristica Nordica Annuaria, ISSN 2001-2365, Vol. 28, p. 59-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 258. Bläuer, Auli
    et al.
    Arppe, Laura
    Niemi, Marianna
    Oinonen, Markku
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Taavitsainen, Jussi-Pekka
    Kantanen, Juha
    Inferring Prehistorical and Historical Feeding Practices from δ15N and δ13C Isotope Analysis on Finnish Archaeological Domesticated Ruminant Bones and Teeth2016In: Fennoscandia Archaeologica, ISSN 0781-7126, Vol. XXXIV, p. 38-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 259. Boethius, Adam
    et al.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Hongslo Vala, Cecilie
    Apel, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory. Lund University, Sweden.
    The importance of freshwater fish in Early Holocene subsistence: Exemplified with the human colonization of the island of Gotland in the Baltic basin2017In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 13, p. 625-634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore the subsistence economy of the Mesolithic pioneers on the island of Gotland in the Baltic basin, in order to evaluate the importance of freshwater fish to the Early Holocene human population. By analysing faunal remains, the distribution of 14C dates and the location of the settlement sites, we argue that earlier assumptions concerning the importance of marine mammals to the early human populations should be reconsidered. We suggest that the pioneering settlers of Gotland relied on fish to a significant extent. Radiocarbon dates taken from human bones are skewed by a freshwater reservoir effect, which can be used as an indirect indication of the significance of freshwater fish. The numerous, overgrowing lakes on the island, with their extensive biomass production and large amounts of freshwater fish, provided an important subsistence base. Even if the faunal assemblages that have survived are dominated by seal bones, the hunting season for seals was limited and the hunters mostly targeted young seals. Thus, the importance of seal have previously been overestimated and it appears that the human use of marine resources on Gotland was more limited and related to raw material needs rather than dietary necessity or specialization. Although presented as a case study; the results highlight the need to identify a freshwater fish diet among ancient foragers on a larger scale, as implications thereof can fundamentally change how foraging societies are perceived.

  • 260.
    Boman, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Aska och Pimpsten. En katastrof i Neapelbukten 79 e.Kr2010In: Medusa, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 2, p. 6-12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 261.
    Boman, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Flyktingarna vid stranden2010In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 2, p. 46-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 262.
    Boman, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Antikens kultur och samhällsliv.
    The interaction between street and house in the North-West corner of insula V 1, Pompeii.2008In: Nuove ricerche archeologiche nell'area vesuviana, scavi 2003-2006: atti del convegno internazionale, Roma, 1-3 febbraio 2007, 2008, p. 87-92Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 263.
    Boman, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    White light – white heat.: The use of fire as light and heat source in an atrium house in Roman Pompeii’2005In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 13, p. 59-75Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 264.
    Boman, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Upptäck Neapelbukten2013In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 265.
    Boman, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Nilsson, Monica
    The commercial establishments: Pompeii V 1,13; V 1,14-16; V 1,20-21.: Preliminary report 2001-20042008In: Opuscula Romana, ISSN 0471-7309, Vol. 31-32, p. 139-154Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 266.
    Boman, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Nilsson, Monica
    The early street and the prehistoric finds in Vicolo delle Nozze d'Argento, Pompeii2008In: Opuscula Romana, ISSN 0471-7309, Vol. 31-32, p. 161-165Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 267.
    Bonnier, Anton
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Epinea kai limenes: The relationship between harbours and cities in ancient Greek texts2008In: Opuscula. Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 1, p. 47-61Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 268.
    Bonnier, Anton
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Harbours and Hinterlands: Landscape, Site Patterns and Coast-Hinterland Interconnections by the Corinthian Gulf, c. 600-300 B.C.2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis examines interconnections between the Corinthian Gulf and its surrounding hinterlands during the Archaic and Classical-Early Hellenistic period, c. 600 to 300 B.C. Interconnections have been studied through site patterns in the surrounding regions. The distribution of sites shows that significant clusters of habitation and localities interpreted as central place sites can be recognised along a series of natural routes connecting the coastal zone with inland areas.

    These routes often consist of river valleys, which often form a series of interconnected valley systems, though in many areas the upland environments also present recognisable paths between the coast and the hinterland. Imports in the archaeological record further point to the movement of goods along these routes and can be associated with patterns of trade.

    The movement of goods may also be correlated with developing regional economies and connectivity. The hinterlands contain multiple environments which stimulated different subsistence and production strategies, suggesting that coastal areas would have acted as connection points within exchange systems linked to these economies, especially those of upland landscapes. Pastoral production seems, in particular, to have played an important part and harbours by the Gulf presented possible outlets for the export of products such as wool and hides, as well as opportunities for the import of staples that could not be produced in sufficient quantities. The identified coast-hinterland routes can furthermore be linked with developing political landscapes, and the incorporation of coastal zones and routes into the territories of specific states. Remains of fortification walls indicate the development of a military infrastructure, which can be correlated with the development of state territories and which points to concerns over the military control of coast-hinterland routes.

  • 269. Bonsall, Clive
    et al.
    Boroneant, Adina
    Evatt, Anna
    Soficaru, Andrei
    Nica, Cristina
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Cook, Gordon Thomas
    Higham, Thomas F. G
    Pickard, Catriona
    The ‘Clisurean’ finds from Climente II cave, Iron Gates, Romania2016In: Quaternary International, ISSN 1040-6182, E-ISSN 1873-4553, Vol. 423, p. 303-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climente II cave, Iron Gates, Romania was excavated in 1968-9. Human remains were recovered from contexts identified as 'Clisurean' (Final Epigravettian), along with ca 6000 chipped stone artifacts, bone tools including awls, arrowheads and a fragment of a harpoon, and shell and animal tooth ornaments. This article presents a re-evaluation of the archaeological finds from Climente II. Osteological analysis of the human remains confirms at least three individuals: a robust, young adult male aged between 18 and 28 years, a second (older) adult, and a neonate. Single-entity C-14 dating of human bone and humanly modified animal bones suggests the Clisurean occupation occurred during the BollingeAllerod warm period. Carbon (delta C-13) and nitrogen (delta N-15) stable isotope analyses highlight the importance of fish in human diet at Climente II. Comparison of the Climente II archaeological inventory with that from later, fisher-hunter-gatherer settlements in the Iron Gates indicates continuity of mortuary ritual, lithic tradition and subsistence practices from the Lateglacial into the Early Holocene.

  • 270. Bonsall, Clive
    et al.
    Cook, Gordon
    Pickard, Catriona
    McSweeney, Kathleen
    Sayle, Kerry
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Radovanovic, Ivana
    Higham, Thomas
    Soficaru, Andrei
    Boroneant, Adina
    Food for Thought: Re-Assessing Mesolithic Diets in the Iron Gates2015In: Radiocarbon, ISSN 0033-8222, E-ISSN 1945-5755, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 689-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur in human bone collagen are used routinely to aid in the reconstruction of ancient diets. Isotopic analysis of human remains from sites in the Iron Gates section of the Lower Danube Valley has led to conflicting interpretations of Mesolithic diets in this key region of southeast Europe. One view (Bonsall et al. 1997, 2004) is that diets were based mainly on riverine resources throughout the Mesolithic. A competing hypothesis (Nehlich et al. 2010) argues that Mesolithic diets were more varied with at least one Early Mesolithic site showing an emphasis on terrestrial resources, and riverine resources only becoming dominant in the Later Mesolithic. The present article revisits this issue, discussing the stable isotope data in relation to archaeozoological and radiocarbon evidence.

  • 271. Bonsall, Clive
    et al.
    Macklin, Mark
    Boronean, Adina
    Pickard, Catriona
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Cook, Gordon
    Higham, Thomas
    Rapid climate change and radiocarbon discontinuities in the Mesolithic-Early Neolithic settlement record of the Iron Gates: cause or coincidence?2016In: Climate and cultural change in prehistoric Europe and the Near East / [ed] Peter F. Biehl, Olivier P. Nieuwenhuyse, Albany: State University of New York, 2016, p. 195-210Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 272.
    Borelius Simon, Nikolai
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ätt, kyrka, och ättens kyrka: Runstenar och tidigkristna gravmonument inmurade i kyrkor i västra Östergötland2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis the author - based on case studies on the now demolished old Högby church in Högby parish outside of Mjölby, and the crypt church ruin of Sverkersgården in Västra Tollstad parish at the slopes of mount Omberg – proposes that rune stones and early Christian grave monuments were bricked into Romanesque church buildings during the 12th and 13th century in western Östergötland as a way for the landed elite families to include the churches into their odal right of land ownership, as well as a way to manifest the patron of the church in the sacral space equivalent to portraits of church patrons.

  • 273.
    Bornholm, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Egyptens balsameringsteknik: en kemisk analys av organiska lämningar2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the embalming process in ancient Egypt. Samples were collected from six objects from Medelhavsmuseet in Stockholm. The objects were one supposed ladle and five different contents from pottery. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and gas- chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to characterize the components of the materials. The result was then correlated with previously made analysis of embalming materials to discover similarities. The results show complex mixtures mainly consisting of resin from Pinaceae origin, also beeswax, vegetable oil and Castor oil. Some samples show differences in the mixture, one dominated by cholesterylacetat. The results of the ladle samples is comparable to previous samples from other analysis and can therefore be confirmed as an embalming ladle.

  • 274.
    Bratt, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Makt uttryckt i jord och sten: Stora högar och maktstrukturer i Mälardalen under järnåldern2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on power structures in the Mälaren basin during the Iron Age, and how these structures change over time. In the viewpoint of the author, constructing large mounds was an important way for the elite in the Mälaren basin to distinguish themselves from other groups in the region during the relevant period. By studying how the mounds differ in size and contents in relation to the norm, at least two different social strata can be discerned. The lower stratum was more similar to warriors than heads of power, and vice versa. The burial mounds from the Late Iron Age are almost always located in burial-grounds which belong to villages and farms, and which often extend back to the transition between the Roman Iron Age and the Migration period. It was not until the early Vendel period that cremation and mound building became the standard burial practice for the elite in the Mälaren basin. The analysis also reveals that large mounds were built mainly in the early Vendel period (AD 550–700) and the late Viking Age (tenth century).

    To find out how the elite used the large mounds in their social strategies, the author conducts a landscape-archaeological analysis in which the locations and visual effects of the mounds in the landscape are described and interpreted. The landscape analysis clearly shows that the mound-building elite in the Mälaren basin preferred to have their farms situated close to major communication routes, especially at important junctions in the landscape. The analysis further shows that some of the great mounds served as meeting places for the Thing. On the other hand, the mounds seldom coincide with cult places. The latter are often situated on the periphery of settlement complexes with mounds rather than at the sites of the mounds themselves.

    Finally, the author sets the results of the landscape analysis in a culture-historical context. The discussion centres on when and why large mounds were built in the Mälaren basin during the Iron Age. In addition, the author discusses the role of the mound-building elite and their relationship to other elite groups in the political development, which ranged from small local dominions in the Migration period to the early medieval Christian kingdom.

  • 275.
    Bretschneider, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Individuell rumslig mobilitet: En studie om hur strontiumanalys tillämpas i förståelsen av individen i Falbygden under Mellanneolitikum A2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate the strength and weaknesses of strontium analysis as a method to study spatial mobility on a local level in the area of Falbygden, Västergötland, Sweden during the Middle Neolithic, 3300-2800 BC. While former studies gave little information concerning the scale of spatial mobility and possible places of origin for the non-local immigrants, recent studies based on strontium analysis have shown that approximately 25% of the investigated human remains in Falbygden can be defined as non-local. These studies also confirm that animal remains from this area show traces of movement.

    Strontium analysis allows tracing protein based diet registered in bone and teeth tissues to specific locations and is thus a powerful means to investigate spacial mobility. It is, however, also sensitive to a variety of intervening factors like special geological circumstances, pollutions, and glacial movements in the past all leaving their imprint on the collagen from bone and teeth. Drawing on recent research this thesis shows that strontium analysis is an important tool regarding spatial mobility in the past. However, this thesis also points out the need for doing complementary analysis of other types of isotopes in order to get a more detailed and more reliable picture of spacial mobility in the area of Falbygden. The thesis also raises questions regarding the definition of ”non-local”. This study shows that 15 % of non-local people have their origin from south-west, with an approximate a range of 150-200 km. In order to get more knowledge regarding the non-local residents in Falbygden and their place of origin more research is required. 

  • 276.
    Bro-Jørgensen, Maiken Hemme
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Carøe, Christian
    Vieira, Filipe G.
    Nestor, Sofia
    Hallstrom, Ann
    Gregersen, Kristian M.
    Etting, Vivian
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Sinding, Mikkel-Holger S.
    Ancient DNA analysis of Scandinavian medieval drinking horns and the horn of the last aurochs bull2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 99, p. 47-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aurochs (Bos primigenius) was once widespread in Europe, Asia and North Africa. The aurochs was both the ancestor of domestic cattle, and co-existed alongside them for millennia post domestication, before going extinct in 1627. Several studies have suggested that admixture occurred between wild aurochs populations and domestic cattle. To contribute towards our understanding of this process, we generated near complete mitochondrial genomes (between 15063 and 16338 nucleotides) from material derived from the horn of the last aurochs bull (died in 1620) as well as five medieval period Scandinavian drinking horns that have been attributed to aurochs based on their size. Phylogenetic analysis on the data shows that three drinking horns carry European aurochs haplotype P, while two of the drinking horns and the horn of the last aurochs bull carry modern domestic taurine cattle T haplotypes. Our results therefore demonstrate that drinking horns may represent a unique source of material with which to study aurochs genetics, and that the last European aurochs likely underwent a degree of admixture with domestic cattle. We anticipate that future analysis of the nuclear DNA content of such horns will be able to shed further light into the specifics of these admixture events.

  • 277. Brorsson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Isaksson, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Stenbäck, Niklas
    Stil, gods och kärlanvändning: neolitisk keramik från E4:an undersökningarna i norra Uppland2007In: Stenålder i Uppland: Uppdragsarkeologi och eftertanke, Societas Archaeologica Upsaliensis , 2007, p. 409-438Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 278.
    Brynja, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kammar från Mälardalen AD 350-600: kammar från gravfält i Uppland, Södermanland och Västmanland : utformning, kontext och kronologi1998Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 279. Burks, Jarrod
    et al.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Bevan, Bruce
    Lightning strikes in archaeological magnetometry data: A case study from the High Bank Works site, Ohio, USA2015In: Archaeologia Polona: Special theme: Archaeological Prospection / [ed] Aleksandra Rzeszotarska-Nowakiewicz, 2015, Vol. 53, p. 256-260Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Determining whether a magnetic anomaly detected at an archaeological site has a natural or a cultural source can be quite challenging in some regions of the world because of magnetic variability related to soil development and differing rock/parent material types. Though not consistently recognized, lightning is one major source of magnetic anomalies on archaeology sites that has been consistently overlooked and misinterpreted. A case study from the high Bank Works in south-central Ohio, uSA shows the range of strike anomaly sizes, shapes, and intensities.

  • 280. Bursell, Moa
    et al.
    Jansson, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for Cultural Evolution. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Diversity preferences among employees and ethnoracial workplace segregation2018In: Social Science Research, ISSN 0049-089X, E-ISSN 1096-0317, Vol. 74, p. 62-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethno-racial workplace segregation increases already existing ethno-racial inequality. While previous research has identified discriminatory employers as drivers of workplace segregation, this study addresses the role of the employees. Sociological and social psychological theory suggest that people prefer to surround themselves with people who positively confirm their social identity or who contribute with higher group status. Through web-based surveys, we measure employee attitudes and preferences concerning ethno-racial workplace diversity, to what extent they differ by ethnicity/race, and if they contain intersectional patterns. Thereafter, we use simulation models to analyze the consequences for workplace segregation that these preferences would have, if realized. The main survey results showed that all ethno-racial groups favored their own in-group as colleagues, especially European Americans. As a secondary choice, the respondents preferred the out-group with the highest labor market status. Intersectional patterns were identified, as minority women were preferred as colleagues over minority men. Our simulation model, based on the results of two surveys on stated vs. indirectly revealed preferences, showed that employee preferences were at best not diverse enough to desegregate workplaces. When based on the most common preferences (i.e. excluding a few outliers), the simulations even suggested that these preferences can cause segregation. We relate these findings to Schelling's model of segregation.

  • 281.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Arkeologer sätter spaden i tidig robotålder2011In: Svenska Dagbladet, Vol. 14, no november, p. 10-10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 282.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Arkeologi i förorten: berättelser från norra Botkyrka2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 283.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ballast: Laden with history2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For centuries ships were ballasted with sand, gravel, stone, or rubble to give them stability, and when they no longer needed the extra weight, it was dumped. The result was that huge quantities of ballast were shipped to new places and new continents.

    In Ballast the archaeologist Mats Burström charts how ship ballast helped to shape the world we live in. Ballast was often reused, sometimes in surprising ways. With the ballast went animal and plant life of all sorts, inadvertently spread to places where they are now so well established that they are thought of as native species. And it was not unknown for ancient artefacts to be found in the ballast too, turning up in the most unexpected places.

    This is the first comprehensive account of ship ballast, so long overlooked, and now finally recognized for its diverse and exciting history.

  • 284.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Barlast i fokus2017In: Marinarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1100-9632, no 4, p. 4-8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Barlast är ett arkeologiskt massmaterial som trots sin myckenhet inte tilldragit sig något större intresse. Den har dock avsatt många och ibland också överraskande spår. Såväl fornsaker som djur- och växtarter har genom sjöfarten med barlast oavsiktligt förflyttats mellan kontinenter.

  • 285.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Barlast: Massor med historia2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Barlast är den tyngd som håller fartygen stabila i sjön. Under lång tid användes sand, grus, sten och rivningsmassor för syftet. När den extra vikten inte längre behövdes dumpades den och på så sätt förflyttades enorma mängder material till nya platser och nya kontinenter. Där kom massorna ofta till användning på andra och ibland överraskande sätt.

    Arkeologen Mats Burström visar i ord och bild hur forna tiders barlast bidragit till att forma den värld vi lever i. Både djur och växter följde oavsiktligt med fartygen och spreds till nya områden. I dag är många av dessa arter så väletablerade att de betraktas som inhemska. Även fornsaker råkade ibland finnas med i barlasten och har därför dykt upp på helt oväntade platser.

    Detta är den första samlade framställningen om barlast och de spår den lämnat genom århundraden av omfattande sjöfart. Denna förbisedda extralast visar sig rymma massor av tankeväckande historia.

  • 286.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Bergtagna - om kriget kom2014In: Axess, ISSN 1651-0941, no 2, p. 28-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Bergrummet Elefanten, byggt i allra största hemlighet, skulle vara ledningscentral för civilförsvaret i händelse av krig. Det är ett fascinerande monument över det kalla kriget och svensk 1970-talsinredning.

  • 287.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Buried Memories: Wartime Caches and Family History in Estonia2013In: Archaeologies of Mobility and Movement / [ed] Beaudry, Mary C. & Parno, Travis G., New York: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2013, 1, p. 101-115Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the Second World War, many Estonians buried family possessions before fleeing overseas. Yet their hopes of returning soon to recover them were dashed by the postwar Soviet occupation. During the long years of exile, these possessions were transformed from everyday objects into a kind of repository for memories. One way for exiles to remember their homeland and sustain their dreams of return was to tell stories. Some managed to retrieve their belongings while in exile, others went back to find them after the fall of the Soviet Union. This chapter examines a selection of stories about underground wartime hoards in order to show how family traditions lend a human dimension to grand narratives of the recent past.

  • 288.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Creative Confusion: Modern Ruins and the Archaeology of the Present2011In: Rethinking Time: Essays on History, Memory, and Representation / [ed] Hans Ruin & Andrus Ers, Huddinge: Södertörn University , 2011, 1, p. 119-128Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ruins, understood as a cultural state in which material objects find themselves, affect people. This applies in particular to ruins of the late modern era. In contrast to how we normally perceive remains from antiquity, many of us do not seem fully mentally prepared to meet the contemporary past in state of ruin. Realizing that even the present and the familiar now are objects of archaeological concern makes you reflect upon the passing of time and your own place in history. Suddenly, the fundamental categories of past and present do not seem relevant. This confusion may indeed be creative and points towards an archaeology beyond modernity, an archaeology that recognizes no chronological borders.

  • 289.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    David och Goliat som historisk barlast2019In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 262-263Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 290.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Each thing in its right place/Var sak på sin plats:  2011In: Recollection Michael Johansson / [ed] Michael Johansson, Ystad: Ystads konstmuseum , 2011, p. 21-24Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 291.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Estlands jord fylld av gömda minnen2012In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, Vol. 12 mars, no Kultur, p. 9-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Tidskapslar. Hösten 1944 flydde 70 000 ester sina hem undan den sovjetiska ockupationen. De hoppades snart kunna återvända och gömde husgeråd, foton, dagböcker och andra ägodelar i jorden. Idag är föremålen symbolladdade minnen.

  • 292.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Fragments as something more: archaeological experience and reflection2013In: Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity / [ed] Alfredo González-Ruibal, London and New York: Routledge, 2013, p. 311-322Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 293.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Garbage or heritage: The existential dimension of a car cemetery2009In: Contemporary Archaeologies. Excavating Now / [ed] Cornelius Holtorf & Angela Piccini, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang , 2009, p. 131-143Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 294.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Heritage management and the end of history. Comments on Terje Brattli: 'Managing the Archaeological World Cutltural Heritage: Consensus or Rhetoric?'2009In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 183-186Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 295.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    How bomb debris from Bristol, England, made a road in NYC: Solid ship ballast from the age of sail tells surprising stories about history2018In: Hakai magazine, E-ISSN 2371-5790Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Just when we thought we knew everything important about the age of sail and its impact on the world, along comes research that exposes our collective myopia when gazing at the past. Ships carried all sorts of things across the oceans, including commodities, disease, and ideas. But as archaeologist and author Mats Burström shows, ships also scattered bits of their homelands—quite literally—around the world.

    Today, ships use water as ballast, in the process delivering microscopic organisms to international ports. But once upon a time, mariners relied on solids—bricks, stones, and gravel—to lend their ships stability. In four centuries of sailing, they left millions of tonnes of material around the globe from Canada to India.

    In this excerpt from his new book Ballast: Laden with History, which has its North American release this week, Burström reveals the surprising story of ballast and considers its place in archaeology. Is historical ballast an artifact or a natural object?

  • 296.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Humankind: Family and Future: Comments on Brit Solli: 'Some Reflections on Heritage and Archaeology in the Anthropocene'2011In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 54-56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 297.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Här kommer framtida arkeologer att gräva2015In: Svenska Dagbladet, E-ISSN 2001-3868, no 10 novArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    En presentation i ord och bild av ett urval 1900-tals platser som kan vara av intresse för framtidens arkeologer.

  • 298.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    If we are quiet, will things cry out?2012In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, p. 41-45Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 299.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    JCA Book Reviews: The Oxford Handbook of the Contemporary World. Edited by Paul Graves-Brown, Rodney Harrison and Angela Piccini2015In: Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, ISSN 2051-3429, E-ISSN 2051-3437, no February 23Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 300.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Känslans återkomst2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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