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  • 251.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ethnografiction and reality in contemporary Irish literature2013In: Novel approaches to anthropology: contributions to literary anthropology / [ed] Marilyn Cohen, Lanham: Lexington Books, 2013, p. 205-226Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 252.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Evading the State Ethnicity in Northeast India through the Lens of James Scott2013In: Asian Ethnology, ISSN 1882-6865, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 321-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses ethnicity and the state in Northeast India from the vantage point of James Scott's influential works, especially his recent book The Art of Not Being Governed. Scott has over the years explored different aspects of peasant or subaltern modes of opposing dominance. The overall insistence is on the resistance and agency of the peasant. In the context of the hill societies that Scott deals with in the book, the entire societal design can be understood to be an act of resistance that aims at keeping the state away. As part of this, ethnic identities are portrayed as extremely fluid and remolded to serve political purposes. Scott's notion of Zomia opens up a new way of thinking about Northeast India. Even so, as I argue, one still ends up thinking of the hills from the perspective of the valley and in so doing we miss aspects of the hill societies and ways of being in the world that cannot be reduced to a state-effect. If one looks more closely at these other aspects, more persistent forms of identification and a sense of belonging might come to the fore. Rather than just trying to escape from the state, people in the hills also hope for another, different, state.

  • 253.
    Barker, Joshua
    et al.
    University of Toronto.
    Harms, EricYale University.Lindquist, JohanStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Figures of Southeast Asian Modernity2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of capturing recent transformations of Southeast Asia through vignettes about familiar yet idiosyncratic individuals is brilliant. The everyday experiences and aspirations of people trying to make sense of their lives and dreams convey a complex and often surprising view of contemporary cross-currents, upheavals, anxieties, and struggles in a volatile region. This volume offers a great way for students to understand and empathize with ordinary people and nations in rapid motion.

  • 254.
    Olsson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Final decisions2013In: People on the move: experiences of forced migration / [ed] Charles Westin and Sadia Hassanen, Africa World Press, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 255.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Formality in brackets: ethnographies of staged organizational worlds2013In: 22nd Nordic Academy of management conference held at University of Iceland Reykjavík, 21-23 August, 2013 Final Program and Abstracts: Nff 2013 On Practice and Knowledge Eruptions, 2013, p. 138-139Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 256.
    Viktorin, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Framtid till salu – tid och kunskap i marknadsundersökningsbranchen2013In: Antropologi och tid / [ed] Mattias Viktorin och Charlotta Widmark, Stockholm: Svenska Sällskapet för Antropologi och Geografi , 2013, p. 135-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 257.
    Thedvall, Renita
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Free commodity exchange: Skype and Spotify and the complexity of market relations2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 258.
    González Fernández, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Globally Interdependent Households: Irregular Migrants Employed in Domestic and Care Work in Spain2013In: Irregular Migrant Domestic Workers in Europe: Who Cares? / [ed] Anna Triandafyllidou, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, p. 187-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 259.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Graffiti in Tehran2013In: Anthropology Now, ISSN 1949-2901, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 260.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    His Master’s Voice? The Role of Business in the World Economic Forum2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper departs from an interest in the involvement of business leaders in the sphere of politics, in the broad sense. Many global business leaders today do much more than engage narrowly in their own corporation and its search for profit. At a general level, we are seeing a proliferation of usages of non-market corporate strategies, such as testimony, lobbying, interlocking of positions and other means to influence policymakers at all levels of government and international institutions as an adjunct to the firm’s market strategies. Conversely, there is an enhanced interest on the part of policymakers to influence firm behaviour through multi-stakeholder involvement, public – private agreements and networks forms of governance. The paper brings to the fore the role of corporations in the World Economic Forum, and how firms act through the WEF to advance their interests, financial as well as political. What is the role of business in the World Economic Forum, and how do business corporations advance their interests through the WEF?

    The results show that corporations find a strategically positioned amplifier for their non-market interests in the WEF. The WEF functions to enhance and gain leverage for their ideas and priorities in a highly selective and resourceful environment. In the long run, both the market priorities and the political interests of business may be served by engagement in the WEF.

    However, the WEF cannot only be conceived as the extended voice of corporations. The WEF also makes use of the corporations to organize and expand their own agency, which not necessarily coincides with the interests of multinational corporations. By way of corporate financial resources, the tapping of knowledge and expertise, and access to vast networks of business relations, the WEF is also able to amplify its own voice.

  • 261.
    Wulff, helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Imagining landscapes: past, present and future, edited by Janowski, Monica and Tim Ingold2013In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 585-586Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 262.
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Thedvall, Renita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    In search for empowerment: A qualitative study of a state agency and a municipal district introducing lean.2013In: 22nd Nordic Academy of management conference held at University of Iceland, Reykjavik, 21-23 August 2013: Final Program and Abstracts : NFF 2013 On Practice and Knowledge Eruptions, 2013, p. 131-131Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 263. Fleming, Peter
    et al.
    Roberts, John
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    In search of corporate social responsibility: introduction to special issue2013In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 337-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction to the special issue aims to contextualize and critically comment on the current trajectory of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in both scholarly inquiry and business practice. It suggests that we must place it within the milieu of the ongoing economic crisis and the failure of a number of important opportunities to make business ethical (e.g.   the 2012 Rio + 20 Earth Summit). It then suggests possible future terrain for tenable CSR research (and practice), especially in the context of widespread cynicism and disbelief regarding the claims of business ethicists in industry and the academy.

  • 264.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Incorporation of children of immigrants: the case of descendants of immigrants from Turkey in Sweden2013In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 2141-2159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigatehh ow children of immigrants fromTurkey are integrated into Swedish society. The educational achievements and labour market outcomes of this group are compared with the performance  of the offspring of native.born parents. The aim of the study is to explore whether we can observe a tendency towards 'downwards mobility' among young people of immigrant background in Sweden and thereby provide reflections on the existing fomulationof the 'segmented assimilation' theory.Findings show that descendants of immigrants seem not to be in the process of downward assimilation, that is social exclusion and therefore formation of a distinct' underclassin Sweden. The concept of 'subordinate inclusion' is a more appropriate description of the experiences of children of immigrants.

  • 265. Barker, Joshua
    et al.
    Harms, Erik
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introduction to Special Issue: Figures of Urban Transformation2013In: City & Society, ISSN 0893-0465, E-ISSN 1548-744X, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 159-172Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 266.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Kulturens hastigheter2013In: Antropologi och tid / [ed] Mattias Viktorin och Charlotta Widmark, Stockholm: Svenska Sällskapet för Antropologi och Geografi , 2013, p. 25-42Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 267.
    Lalander, Rickard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Velásquez-Atehortúa, Juan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    ¿La Revolución tiene cara de mujer?: La feminización de la participación democrática en Venezuela2013In: Ecuador Debate, ISSN 1012-1498, no 88, p. 147-168Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [es]

    El objetivo del presente artículo es examinar el creciente protagonismo de mujeres en las nuevas estructuras participativas dentro del esquema de transformación de la democracia venezolana en tiempos de la administración del Presidente Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías, particularmente a partir de 2006. Si bien es cierto que se ha acentuado el grado de personalismo político durante la era chavista, al mismo tiempo el sistema político ha cambiado de carácter, con más participación popular e inclusión social en las bases locales. Particularmente se enfatizan los mecanismos para animar a la participación política vecinal e inclusión social. Especialmente se enfatizarán los cambios en cuanto al surgimiento de mujeres en las estructuras políticas locales y su protagonismo en la emergente democracia participativa. Para lograr visibilizar eso se analizan dos modelos participativos de la llamada Revolución Bolivariana: los Consejos Comunales y las Salas de Batalla Social. Dentro de estos esquemas una gran cantidad de mujeres de los sectores populares han encontrado su propio espacio de empoderamiento. Teóricamente, el estudio se vincula con los debates de democracia radical y participativa, relaciones Estado-ciudadanía y el empoderamiento de las mujeres que anteriormente estaban excluidas de las esferas públicas.

  • 268.
    Olsson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Living next to an airport: narratives on the return to Chile2013In: People on the move: experiences of forced migration / [ed] Charles Westin and Sadia Hassanen, Africa World Press, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 269.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Hollertz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). University of Gothenburg.
    Local worlds of activation: the diverse pathways of three Swedish municipalities2013In: ESPAnet 2013 conference papers: stream 9 - the local welfare state, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 270.
    Uimonen, Paula
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Mediated agency: music and media against corruption in Tanzania2013In: ICT for anti-corruption, democracy and education in East Africa / [ed] Katja Sarajeva, Kista: SPIDER , 2013, p. 11-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores the use of music and digital media in the Chanjo campaign against corruption in Tanzania, focusing on mediations of agency. Building on Latour (2005), I use the concept mediated agency to refer to a process in which different cultural forms (mediators) bring about social transformation (agency). In so doing I recognize the ‘agency of art,’ especially its embeddedness in networks of social relations and its ‘practical mediatory role’ in processes of social change (Gell 1998). Similarly, I appreciate media and other mediators in the broader sense of ‘social mediation,’ with an emphasis on social interaction and exchange (Boyer 2012). Thus, while understanding agency in the sense of transformative action or practice, I build on anthropological theories of mediation, focusing on social processes of intervention and interaction that include but go beyond different forms of media. In this chapter, I will argue that the Chanjo campaign creates a platform that mediates the agency of participants, empowering them to speak up against corruption. The music itself is of course an important form of mediation, but so is the method of delivery, not least the interaction with the audience, as well as the mobility of the campaign. These layers of mediation intersect in different ways, which enforces the process of social and cultural transformation. Through digital mediations and remediations (Bolter and Grusin 1999), especially through social and mobile media, the campaign expands in time and space, thus extending agency beyond the tour itself.

  • 271.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Mirroring the world: on think tanks in the U.S. and Sweden2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 272.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Momentum: pushing ethnography ahead2013In: Organisational anthropology: doing ethnography in and among complex organisations / [ed] Christina Garsten and Anette Nyqvist, London: Pluto Press, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 273.
    Tunestad, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    När är fältet? Möjligheter och problem i fältets temporala kontextualisering2013In: Antropologi och tid / [ed] Mattias Viktorin och Charlotta Widmark, Stockholm: Svenska Sällskapet för Antropologi och Geografi , 2013, p. 43-66Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 274.
    Aguirre Vidal, Gladis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Om känslor på jobbet: intimitet, omsorg och hushållstjänster i Barcelona2013In: Rena hem på smutsiga villkor? : hushållstjänster, migration och globalisering / [ed] Anna Gavanas & Catharina Calleman, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2013, p. 143-160Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 275.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nyqvist, AnetteStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Organisational anthropology: doing ethnography in and among complex organisations2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisational Anthropology is a pioneering analysis of doing ethnographic fieldwork in different types of complex organizations. The book focuses on the process of initiating contact, establishing rapport and gaining the trust of the organization's members.The contributors work from the premise that doing fieldwork in an organization shares essential characteristics with fieldwork in more "classical" anthropological environments, but that it also poses some particular challenges to the ethnographer. These include the ideological or financial interests of the organizations, protection of resources and competition between organizations. Organisational Anthropology brings together and highlights crucial aspects of doing anthropology in contemporary complex settings, and will have wide appeal to students, researchers and academics in anthropology and organization studies.

  • 276.
    Bahous, Rima
    et al.
    Lebanese American University, Lebanon.
    Nabhani, Mona
    Lebanese American University, Lebanon.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Parochial education in a global world? Teaching history and civics in Lebanon2013In: Nordidactica: Journal of Humanities and Social Science Education, ISSN 2000-9879, Vol. 1, p. 57-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This exploratory article is based on a researchproject which runs 2011-2013 that examines how global processes are expressedin educational policies and pedagogical texts in Lebanon, Sweden and Turkey byfocusing on school subjects like civics, history, geography, and religion. In thistext we discuss the development ofeducation in Lebanon, the development of history and civics after the civilwar, and on opinions about these school subjects in order to make a preliminaryanalysis of how the future Lebanese citizen is depicted in policies,curricula, and textbooks. Lebanon is interesting because of its uniqueeducation system in which foreign international institutions rather thannational ones have the task of preparing individuals for a globalized world.Material for the study were collected from a sample of curricula used inprivate and public or national schools for history and civics/citizenshipeducation in grade 8 as well as interviews and conference proceedings andconversations with activists, teachers and principals. We also reviewedfindings of relevant empirical studies conducted in Lebanon. Our datacollection was guided by three questions: how is the right citizen depicted inthe Lebanese material? How is the relationship between national and globalperspectives treated in guidance documents and pedagogical texts? What civicrights and obligations are given attention and what individuals are included/excluded? Our preliminary findings imply that there is no consensus on theimportance of teaching a unified history and civics book and subjects inLebanon. Other findings indicate that private and international schools have agreater impact than national schools on preparing Lebanese students as futurecitizens.

  • 277.
    Hassanen, Sadia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Westin, CharlesStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.Olsson, ErikStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    People on the move: experiences of forced migration with examples from various parts of the world2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume deals with various issues of forced migration from developing countries, in some cases to neighbouring countries, in others to countries in the developed world. The forty-year period covered is from the late 1960s. In some cases the migration processes the contributors concentrate on resulted in settlement on a permanent basis in a receiving country, in their examples with strong links to diasporic communities elsewhere; in other cases the outcome is that individual families making up the diasporic cultural community go transnational themselves, living here at times, living there for periods, commuting and transcending national, cultural, political and linguistic boundaries. Chapters presenting empirical examples are guided theoretically, bringing observations in to theoretical interpretations. These chapters are interspersed with theoretical expositions of concepts such as durable solutions, nation state, citizenship and transnationalism.

  • 278.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Perspectives on gender and citizenship in Syria before the Arab spring2013Other (Other academic)
  • 279.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Policy brokers in partially organized fields: the case of World Economic Forum2013In: 8th International Conference in Interpretive Policy Analysis 2013 in Vienna from July 3rd- to July 5th, 2013, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As has been noted in research on think tanks it is difficult to describe what a think tank is, and to pinpoint what it is in think tank activities that generates powerful relationships towards other actors (Ricci 1993). This is even more the case when talking of international think tanks. In this paper we give a theoretical account of how these relationships organized by international think tanks may be analyzed.

    Think tanks are often established as non-profit organizations, and hence part of civil society. But because corporations and private foundations often fund them they operate across organizations and organizational spheres, as ‘boundary-spanning organizations’ (cf. Medvetz 2012). In the cross-boundary environment established by think tanks, ideas are disseminated to other actors: governments, authorities, the media and the public.

    Drawing on empirical findings from the World Economic Forum (WEF), seen as a think tank like organization, we suggest that think-tank experts are engaged in the brokerage of ideas and knowledge, implying an intermediary activity, wherein ideas are translated, shaped and formatted (c.f. Smith 1991; Ingold & Varone 2012). Operating at the interfaces of various actors, think-tank experts formulate and negotiate ideas with and among actors, encouraging them to adopt and use those ideas (cf. Mosse 1985; Wedel 2009).

    This brokerage can be seen to generate ‘partially organized fields’ (cf. Ahrne & Brunsson 2011). It organizes other actors not by constructing a complete organization, but by establishing and maintaining a decided network and drawing upon such organizational elements as membership, monitoring and resources.  This allows the think tanks to maintain a degree of flexibility, whilst gaining control of valuable resources.

    The WEF is a not-for profit organization, based in Geneva Switzerland. It was founded in 1971 by Professor Klaus Schwab. Today the organization has approximately 500 employees, financed by the organization’s 1000 members, coming from the largest corporations in the world.  WEF is most known for its annual meeting in Davos, but it hosts a vast number of private meetings around the world, and has built a world wide network of people and organizations coming from many parts of society, such as corporations, churches, NGOs as well as national and international authorities.

  • 280.
    González, Tania
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Gil Araujo, Sandra
    Montañés Sánchez, Virginia
    Política migratoria y derechos humanos en el Mediterráneo español: El impacto del control migratorio en los tránsitos de la migración africana hacia Europa2013In: Revista de Derecho Migratorio y Extranjería, ISSN 1695-3509, no 33, p. 245-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the entrance of Spain into the EU, the Mediterranean became the southern border of Europe and a focal point of the migratory pressure from Africa to Europe. Since then, the fight against irregular immigration, the increased surveillance and migration control, and the cooperation with countries of migration transit and origin have become core elements of the Spanish migration policy. The imposition of visas to African countries, the border control, the reinforcement of the fence in Ceuta and Melilla, the Frontex development, EUROSUR, SIVE, the Seahorse Project, the return agreements, the joint surveillance patrols at the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, and the inclusion of migration as a theme in Spanish external relations with emigration countries are instruments of externalization and Europeanization of Spanish migration policy.In this article, we focus our attention on the effects of migration control on the Spanish maritime border on the transit of migrants coming from Africa. The experiences of migrants who arrived irregularly in the Andalusian coast between 2010 and 2011 are taken as a case study. In particular, we are interested in exploring the violation offundamental rights throughout the different stages that make up the migration process: starting at the place of origin and the journey experience on land, the situation of migrants at sea, the interception of vessels, landing and retention. We will discuss in more detail the processes of identification, treatment, and protection of particularly vulnerable groups, as well as the gender relations that are embedded within these practices.

  • 281.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    Post-political regulation: Soft Power and Post-Political Visions in Global Governance2013In: Critical Sociology, ISSN 0896-9205, E-ISSN 1569-1632, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 421-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The debate on global governance points to shifts in the type and nature of regulation as well as in the set of actors involved. The article introduces a novel way of conceptualizing the changes, namely a move towards post-political forms of regulation (see also Garsten and Jacobsson, 2007). Drawing on Chantal Mouffe’s notion of ‘the post-political vision’, the article argues that many contemporary forms of regulation are premised on consensual relationships as the basis for regulatory activity. These regulatory practices tend to narrow down the conflictual space, thereby exerting a form of soft power. Moreover, in the post-political forms of regulation, unequal power relations tend to be rendered invisible. The empirical cases discussed are voluntary regulatory arrangements, more specifically the Open Method of Coordination of the EU (OMC) and CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) initiatives.

  • 282.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Prologue2013In: Figures of Southeast Asian Modernity / [ed] Joshua Barker, Erik Harms and Johan Lindquist, Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press , 2013, p. xi-xviChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 283.
    Thedvall, Renita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Punctuated entries: doing fieldwork in policy meetings in the European Union2013In: Organisational anthropology: doing ethnography in and among complex organisations / [ed] Christina Garsten and Anette Nyqvist, London: Pluto Press, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 284.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Jonsson, Stefan
    Rasism: särskiljandets och rangordningens praktik2013In: Migrationens och etnicitetens epok: kritiska perspektiv i etnicitets- och migrationsstudier / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt, Anders Neergarard, Stockholm: Liber, 2013, 1, p. 168-198Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 285.
    Salim, Degla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Reading Islamic Fashion Imagery in Sweden2013In: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion: New Perspectives from Europe and North America / [ed] Emma Tarlo and Annelies Moors, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 286.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Rescue, return, in place: deportees, "victims", and the regulation of Indonesian migration2013In: Return: nationalizing transnational mobility in Asia / [ed] Biao Xiang, Brenda S. A. Yeoh, Mika Toyota, Durham: Duke University Press, 2013, p. 122-140Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 287. Öborn, Ingrid
    et al.
    Bengtsson, Jan
    Hedenus, Fredrik
    Rydhmer, Lotta
    Stenström, Maria
    Vrede, Katarina
    Westin, Charles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Magnusson, Ulf
    Scenario Development as a Basis for Formulating a Research Program on Future Agriculture: A Methodological Approach2013In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 823-839Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To increase the awareness of society to the challenges of global food security, we developed five contrasting global and European scenarios for 2050 and used these to identify important issues for future agricultural research. Using a scenario development method known as morphological analysis, scenarios were constructed that took economic, political, technical, and environmental factors into account. With the scenarios as a starting point future challenges were discussed and research issues and questions were identified in an interactive process with stakeholders and researchers. Based on the outcome of this process, six socioeconomic and biophysical overarching challenges for future agricultural were formulated and related research issues identified. The outcome was compared with research priorities generated in five other research programs. In comparison, our research questions focus more on societal values and the role of consumers in influencing agricultural production, as well as on policy formulation and resolving conflicting goals, areas that are presently under-represented in agricultural research. The partly new and more interdisciplinary research priorities identified in Future Agriculture compared to other programs analyzed are likely a result of the methodological approach used, combining scenarios and interaction between stakeholders and researchers.

  • 288.
    Olsson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sedentary decisions: the representation of migration in Swedish repatriation practice2013In: People on the move : experiences of forced migration with examples from various parts of the world / [ed] Sadia Hassanen, Charles Westin, Erik Olsson, Trenton: The Red Sea Press Inc., 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 289.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Social Capital and Stratification of Young People2013In: Journal of Social Inclusion, ISSN 1836-8808, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 46-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the impact of social capital on the status attainment process of young people at the start of their careers and examines how social class, gender and ethnicity affect the accumulation of social capital and thereby labour market stratification of young people. A sample of young Swedes graduating from vocational schools and universities between 2005 and 2006, was surveyed via the telephone about their experiences acquiring jobs. Two re­search questions are posed: (i) Which characteristics (class, gender and ethnicity) affect young people's access to more social capital? (ii) How is social capital rewarded in the labour market? The results show that being female, coming from the lower social classes and being a member of a stigmatized immigrant groupare associated with a substantial social capital deficit. When socioeconomic and demographic backgrounds as well as the human capital of respondents are controlled, social capital is positively associated with salary level. The results indicate that social capital is a significant factor in the stratification process of young people.

  • 290.
    Velasquez, Juan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Socialistisk politik mot klyftor2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett svar till Bertil Egerö och Elsa Grips artikelserie om Kuba 'vid vägs ände?'.

  • 291.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    Sorting people in and out: The plasticity of the categories of employability, work capacity and disability as technologies of government2013In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 825-850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ‘employable individual’ is today a powerful normative category, saturated with assumptions about what it takes to be attractive in the labour market. What happens to people who cannot meet those expectations? For some, the way to employability and employment goes through a process of detecting and coding of disability at the Public Employment Service (PES). Based on interviews with staff at a rehabilitation unit in the Swedish Public Employment Service, the article analyses processes of evaluating work capacity for marginally employable people as part of the Employability Rehabilitation Programme. By studying the classification procedures, the article analyses how administrative categories work as ‘technologies of government’ that ‘make legible’ desirable traits in the individual. The analysis shows that employability is mediated, or enabled, by classificatory procedures that spring out of a template for what is considered acceptable and desirable individual characteristics, hence reinforcing standards of normalcy. Moreover, the categories through which the individual moves are plastic and pliable in relation to political predicates and labour market fluctuations. In this process, to be non-employable becomes a disability and conversely, to be disabled can make one employable.

  • 292.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Southeast Asia. The perfect business? Anti-trafficking and the sex trade along the Mekong. By Sverre Molland. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 20122013In: Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, ISSN 0022-4634, E-ISSN 1474-0680, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 524-526Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 293.
    Velasquez, Juan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Stärkt samarbetet mellan EU och CELAC2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Den 26 och 27 januari 2013 möttes EU:s och CELAC:s 43 regeringsföreträdare i det första mötet mellan de båda blocken i Santiago de Chile. Juan Velasquez menas att ett stärkst samarbete mellan EU och CELAC kan leda till framsteg när det gäller deltagande demokrati, migrationspolitik och miljöfrågor.

  • 294.
    Olsson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Svenskarna i Spanien – en ny diaspora?2013In: Äldre i centrum, ISSN 1653-3585, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 295.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Talking like an institutional investor: On the gentle voices of financial giants2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Institutional investors, such as mutual funds, insurance companies and pension funds, are large shareholder organizations commissioned to manage other people’s money. They have emerged as influential front figures of the responsible investment industry claiming to make money and make a difference and positioning themselves as the ‘active’ and ‘responsible’ do-gooders of finance. These intermediary organizations have in a relatively short time grown in size and scope and now dominate corporate ownership globally. Institutional investors have, at that, emerged as front figures of the responsible investing industry. They are normative and fostering financial actors that aim to, in their view, better the way companies conduct their businesses.

    I suggest that ‘voice’ must be seen is the most important and defining feature of the large and influential new powerhouses of finance. I will, more specifically, show how institutional investors use ‘voice’, ‘dialogue’ and ‘small talk’ with the intent to (1) define and position themselves as a particular type of financial market actor, (2) foster and try to change companies that they own shares in, and (3) set new standards for the investment industry.

  • 296.
    Olsson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The blues of the ageing retornados: Narratives on the return to Chile2013In: Return migration in later life: international perspectives / [ed] John Percival, Bristol: Policy Press, 2013, p. 219-240Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 297.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Linköping University.
    The ethnic penalty: immigration, education and the labour market2013In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 915-916Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 298.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Persian Escort2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 299.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The social life of categories: affirmative action and trajectories of the indigenous2013In: Focaal: European Journal of Anthropology, ISSN 0920-1297, E-ISSN 1558-5263, Vol. 2013, no 65, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I examine the ways in which the term “indigenous peoples“ is reworked in a specific South Asian context. I focus on the new, hybrid category of “indigenous tribe“ in the Indian state of Meghalaya. I argue that we can think of the indigenous tribe category as a strategic conflation of two different regimes of rights or political assertions. The first relates to the existing nation-state framework for affirmative action as expressed in the Scheduled Tribe (ST) status, while the second relates to the emerging global framework for asserting the rights of indigenous peoples. While the benefits of asserting the status of indigenous tribes is obvious, for example, preventing other, nonindigenous tribes from owning land in the state, the long-term gains seems more doubtful. Both affirmative action programs and indigenous peoples frameworks are motivated by a moral imperative to redress historical injustices and contemporary social inequalities. To evoke them for other ends might eventually backfire. The larger point I seek to make, however, is that political categories tend to take on a life of their own, escaping their intended purposes and hence applied by people in novel and surprising ways.

  • 300.
    Lazoroska, Daniela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Suburb United Will Never Be Defeated: Youth Organization, Belonging, and Protest in a Million Program Suburb of Stockholm2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines the continually reconfiguring response of a youth organization towards a renovation project, Järvalyftet, run by the City of Stockholm in the Million Program suburbs. By analyzing this relationship, I aim to discuss how the youth organization works to mediate inclusion in political and representational spheres. More specifically, I will discuss the intersections between Järvalyftet’s development and the claims of belonging made by the youths upon the particular suburb, Husby, where they resided. My interest lies in understanding the conjuncture and disjuncture of claims that have been made to community, locality, and local knowledge in the interaction between the youth organization and the project Järvalyftet. I argue that the forms of community instigated by the youth organization, which were based on locality and “blackness”, allowed them to position themselves as key proponents of social and political change, as well as mobilize allies in others who identified with those experiences.

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