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  • 251.
    Höjdestrand, Tova
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Needed by Nobody: Homelessness, Humiliation, and Homelessness in Post-Socialist Russia2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Homelessness became a conspicuous facet of Russian metropolitan cityscapes only in the 1990s, when the Soviet criminalization of ‘vagrancy’ and similar offences was abolished. This study investigates homelessness as a sociostructural phenomenon as well as an individually experienced life condition, with a focus on homeless people in St. Petersburg in 1999 and during the successive years (when anthropological fieldwork was conducted).

    To these men and women, homelessness can be concluded with the Russian expression nikomu ne nuzhen, ‘needed by nobody’ – a dilemma that in their case is twofold. They are ‘not needed’ as citizens since a permanent address in Russia is the precondition for all civil rights and social benefits (including the permission to work). In addition they have lost, or never had, the intimate social networks that constitute the ultimate social ‘safety net’ in Russia, and which is the most important context for a sense of ‘being needed’. The study investigates processes of social exclusion as well as the sustenance strategies of these ‘human leftovers’ – or the remaining ‘world of waste’ of things, tasks, and places that nobody else wants.

    The main focus of the study is, however, human worth. Being ‘not needed’, homeless people are subjected to a forceful social stigmatization, but their situation also deprives them of the social and material prerequisites for acting and relating to others in ways they consider to be ‘decent’. This study asks how human dignity is negotiated in the absence of its very preconditions. Which dimensions take precedence, and which cultural resources are employed to restore at least a makeshift sense of being a worthy human?

  • 252.
    Høyer Leivestad, Hege
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Beyond Informality: Intimacy and Commerce at the Caravanning Trade Fair2017In: Ethnographies of Conferences and Trade Fairs: Shaping Industries, Creating Professionals / [ed] Hege Høyer Leivestad, Anette Nyqvist, Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 129-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the geographical peripheries of European cities, trade fairs gather thousands of caravan- and motorhome enthusiasts every year; chasing the latest news from the so-called “mobile living” industry. These trade fairs are also spectacular social events, sporting temporary trade fair campsites, as well as a wide range of entertainment and activities. This chapter asks how we can understand the caravanning trade fair as a market space that challenges the dichotomy between the formal and informal economy. By ethnographically approaching a specific Swedish trade fair, Elmia Caravan and Motorhome, Leivestad looks at how the fair becomes a sphere where the selling of dwellings take place through a continuous reproduction of “like-mindedness” in an environment characterized by close connections between retailers, manufacturers and customers.

  • 253.
    Høyer Leivestad, Hege
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Motility2016In: Keywords of mobility: Critical Engagements / [ed] Noel B. Salazar, Kiran Jayaram, New York: Berghahn Books, 2016, p. 133-151Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 254.
    Høyer Leivestad, Hege
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Anette, Nyqvist
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Tunestad, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Individuals and Industries: Large-Scale Professional Gatherings as Ethnographic Fields2017In: Ethnographies of Conferences and Trade Fairs: Shaping Industries, Creating Professionals / [ed] Hege Høyer Leivestad, Anette Nyqvist, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 1-21Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conferences and trade fairs have during the past decades become a significant global industry in and of itself. Here the authors of this volume claim that such large-scale professional gatherings have become key sites for the making and negotiation of both industries and professions. The anthology is an attempt to make sense of conferences and trade fairs as phenomena in contemporary society. Large-scale professional gatherings are here understood as organized and particular events, bound by place and time, where a large number of professionals within defined industries assemble to network and to exchange information.

  • 255.
    Høyer Leivestad, Hege
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nyqvist, AnetteStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ethnographies of Conferences and Trade Fairs: Shaping Industries, Creating Professionals2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 256.
    Jennische, Ulrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Small-Small: Moral Economy and the Marketspace in Northern Ghana2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past decade, the Ghanaian government has tried to include and accommodate the many people working in the so-called informal economy. This formalization process is in line with a global market-driven development discourse. The small-scale traders selling their goods from marketplaces and along the streets in major cities have been of particular interest.

    While the Ghanaian government defines these actors as working in an “informal sector” and thus beyond the formal political and economic system, it simultaneously targets them with welfare services and various policies with the purpose of including them in the creation of a modern welfare state and shaping them into moral and entrepreneurial citizens.

    In Tamale in northern Ghana, years of political neglect, violence, and structural adjustment have led to small-scale traders taking over streets, sidewalks, and infrastructure, which has created a boundless and dynamic marketspace that far exceeds the delimited and politically defined marketplaces. For the state, therefore, much of the formalization process is about restoring the control and power of public space through evictions and relocations of traders. In conjunction with the inclusive welfare services, this demonstrates the contradictions entailed in the politics of informality.

    The study is based on an ethnographic fieldwork among small-scale traders in northern Ghana with a specific interest in the events that occur at the intersection where state, market, and citizenship meet. By asking what it means to be a trader in this contradictory process of formalization, the dissertation aims to understand this transformative moment in Ghana’s political and economic history.

    In this study the emic notion of small-small is used to frame the norms of gradual progress and letting others in that define the moral economy of small-scale trade. Norms, values, and obligations generate trust and solidarity within the marketspace. But more than that, small-small produces a form of politics against an obstructive and unreliable state and it guides traders into the future by shaping dreams, aspirations, and possibilities. Situated in traders’ daily lives, work, and relationships, and through the small-small lens, this thesis investigates the underlying moralities of formalization. It describes the politics of the Ghanaian state, which in its attempt to create an inclusive welfare society, struggles to both protect the moral dynamics of small-scale trade while adhering to the norms and standards of an open liberalized economy.

  • 257.
    Jennische, Ulrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Traders, Drivers and the National Health Insurance Scheme in Small Town Ghana2012In: Urban Forum, ISSN 1015-3802, E-ISSN 1874-6330, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 467-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on anthropological fieldwork in the central market and taxi station of Koforidua, Ghana, this paper aims to improve our understanding of the social dynamics in the informal economy of a Ghanaian small town in relation to state policies. It strives to describe the way processes of formalization and informalization may coexist and interact during the implementation of the recent National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS). The ethnographic approach helps us to better understand how attitudes on NHIS are formed and the way information and values are disseminated.

    Closely examining the social infrastructure of this setting contributes further to this understanding. In the marketplace, it is important to develop networks of personal relations with fellow traders, customers, and suppliers. At the taxi station, on the other hand, the most important strategy is to join the powerful local union. These strategies are ways for actors to gain security and protection against economic vulnerability in a competitive liberalized economy. In this regard, the NHIS has also provided opportunities for actors. While the NHIS is a way for the state to increase control over the informal economy, and gradually formalizing it, it simultaneously indirectly reinforces and confirms the existing informal strategies of networking.

  • 258.
    Jezierski, Wojtek
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Monasterium panopticum: On Surveillance in a Medieval Cloister - the Case of St. Gall2006In: Frühmittelalterliche Studien, ISSN 0071-9706, E-ISSN 1613-0812, Vol. 40, p. 167-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to explore the practice of surveillance of monks in the early medieval monasteries on the example of St. Gall as described in Ekkehard IV's . Based on Erving Goffman's concept of total institution the study presents the available disciplinary measures of social control. Discussing with the restrictive methods and absolute attitude towards supervision that emerge from the normative sources of that time it is argued that in the everyday monastic life uses and importance attached to the apparatus of surveillance were far more nuanced and adjustable to circumstances.

  • 259.
    Jezierski, Wojtek
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Paranoia sangallensis: A Micro-Study in the Etiquette of Monastic Persecution2008In: Frühmittelalterliche Studien, ISSN 0071-9706, E-ISSN 1613-0812, Vol. 42, p. 147-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Can we use contemporary sociological models of exclusion of paranoiacs to account for the miscarried visitation of a monastic reformer in the tenth century? This article, by offering a thick description of an incident from Ekkehard IV’s 'Casus sancti Galli', explores early medieval mechanisms of social control and the collective manufacturing of scapegoats and deviants in the monastic milieu.

  • 260.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    A Different Story of Coal: The Power of Power in Northeast India2016In: Industrialising Rural India: Land, policy and resistance / [ed] Kenneth Bo Nielsen, Patrik Oskarsson, Routledge, 2016, p. 107-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter points to the critical role energy and energy infrastructures plays in modern societies. It is argued that the ways in which different sources of energy are extracted, produced, refined, transported and consumed enable or produce certain social arrangements and eventually condition the very structure of society. Power, in other words, is loaded with power. Here I am interested in coal and then the small-scale, unregulated coal mining that takes place on indigenous lands in Northeast India. The story told revolves around the intervention by the National Green Tribunal putting a ban on what is termed as “un-scientific mining”. While this intervention is highly condemned by certain local actors, there are also those that hope this eventually will break the spell of coal.   

  • 261.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Atoms: nuclear estrangement from Chernobyl to India2012In: Ecology and power: struggles over land and material resources in the past, present, and future / [ed] Alf Hornborg, Brett Clark and Kenneth Hermele, Abingdon, Oxon; Routledge: Routledge, 2012, p. 239-249Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 262.
    karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Beyond Integration: indigenous assertion in India2004In: IIAS Newsletter, no 35, p. 8-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2004 the Ministry for Tribal Affairs in India proposed a new ‘National Policy on Scheduled

    Tribes’, a venture that has not been undertaken since Independence. The document is still a

    draft; the Ministry has posted it on its homepage for feedback from interested parties. The

    policy, the Ministry states, ‘seeks to bring Scheduled Tribes into the mainstream of society

    through a multi-pronged approach for their all-round development’. Judging from the

    massive critique by tribal or indigenous peoples’ organisations, much of the problem stems

    from this very aspiration

  • 263.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Book Review: Arupjyoti Saikia, Forests and Ecological History of Assam, 1826–20002012In: Contributions to Indian sociology, ISSN 0069-9667, E-ISSN 0973-0648, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 424-427Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 264.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Book review: Environment & ethnicity in India: 1200-19912002In: Asian Ethnicity, ISSN 1463-1369, E-ISSN 1469-2953, ISSN 1463-1369, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 263-274Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 265.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Comment on article1998In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, ISSN 0011-3204, Vol. 39, no 2Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 266.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Disquieting Gifts: Humanitarianism in New Delhi Erica Bornstein (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2012)2014In: Political and Legal Anthropology Review (PoLAR), ISSN 1081-6976, E-ISSN 1555-2934, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 198-200Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 267.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ecodevelopment in crisis: Buxa Tiger Reserve and Forest People1999In: Economic and Political Weekly, ISSN 0012-9976, Vol. 34, no 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Rabhas who live in the Buxa tiger reserve buffer zone must see some irony in their officially acknowledged status of partner's in wildlife conservation. The tiger project has so far meant only curtailed employment and access to the forest for them, for the concept of popular participation in conservation is still only a concept. What is wanting is an effort to address appropriately the question of indigenous peoples rights.

  • 268.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Entering into the Christian Dharma: Contemporary ' tribal' conversions in India2002In: Christians, cultural interactions: and Indias's religious traditions / [ed] J.M Brown, R.E Frykenberg (eds), Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans publishing company , 2002, p. 133-153Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 269.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Forskningsöversikt: Humaniora- och samhällsvetenskapsområdet, Vetenskapsrådet2014Other (Other academic)
  • 270.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Greener pastures2000In: American Ethnologist, ISSN 0094-0496, E-ISSN 1548-1425, ISSN 0094-0496, Vol. 28, no 1Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 271.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology, Uppsala University.
    India against itself2002In: The Journal of Peasant Studies, ISSN 0306-6150, E-ISSN 1743-9361, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 164-167Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 272.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Indigenous natures: forest and community dynamics in Meghalaya, North-East India2006In: Ecological nationalisms: nature, livelihoods, and identities in South Asia / [ed] Gunnel Cederlöf, K. Sivaramakrishnan, Seattle: University of Washington Press , 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 273.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Indigenous politics: commmunity formation and indigenous peoples' struggle for self-deterrmination in North-East India2001In: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, ISSN 1070-289X, E-ISSN 1547-3384, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 7-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with a number of questions relating to politics based on “ethnicity” or community belonging among “tribal” or indigenous peoples in India's northeastern region. In particular, I probe the complex question of indigenous peoples’ right to self‐determination, a right that most indigenous organizations in the world regard as crucial and that is central to the UN draft Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Autonomy or self‐determination, in one form or another, is on the agenda of more or less all mobilized communities in Northeast India. In multi‐ethnic contexts, however, it is not easy to translate such demands into viable political solutions. By discussing several different cases, the contemporary Bodoland movement, the Naga struggle for sovereignty, and the mobilization of the Rabha people, the paper brings the issue of indigenous politics in India into focus.

  • 274.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Into the Grid: Hydropower and Subaltern Politics in Northeast India2016In: Staking Claims: The Politics of Social Movements in Contemporary Rural India / [ed] Uday Cahndra, Daniel Taghioff, Oxford University Press, 2016, p. 64-83Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 275.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introduction:  2011In: Power to the people?: (Con-)tested civil society in search of democracy / [ed] Heidi Moksnes and Mia Melin, Uppsala: Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development , 2011, p. 201-204Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 276.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introduction: Northeastern research entanglements2018In: Geographies of difference: Explorations in Northeast India / [ed] Mélanie Vandenhelsken, Meenaxi Barkataki-Ruscheweyh, Bengt G. Karlsson, London: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter I seek to take stock of the present context of research on and in Northeast India.

  • 277.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Jorden vi ägde: Resursanvändning, genus och privatisering av mark i nordöstra Indien2016In: Kungliga Vitterhetsakademiens Årsbok 2016, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2016, p. 77-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 278.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Märkligt tyst om kärnvapnens ´fredliga´näringskedja2017In: Dagens arena, no 11 novemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    »Diskussionen om kärnvapen förbiser ofta helt den nukleära kedjan, den infrastruktur som ytterst möjliggör dessa vapens framställning.«, Bengt G. Karlsson, professor i socialantropologi vid Stockholms universitet gör här en resa i det nukleära västerländska landskapet, där strålningen från kärnkraftshaveriet i Tjernobyl  från 1986 förrädiskt göms i idyllisk natur.

  • 279.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Political Ecology: anthropological Perspectives2015In: International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences / [ed] James D.Wright, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2015, 2, p. 350-355Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Political ecology is a transdisciplinary research field addressing nature – society interrelations, often with a focus on contentions and struggles over land and natural resources. Power asymmetries and social inequalities are critical points of departure, and many scholars in the field pursue a kind of emancipatory engagement with subalterns or marginalized people whose liveli- hoods depend on the local resource base. Capital accumulation and political economy more generally provide the overall framework for understanding such instances of dispossession and displacement of local communities by global forces of state and market. Political ecology has from its very inception remained a rather loosely defined research field. During the last two decades, the field has expanded rapidly. From an earlier largely rural focus, recent work increasingly engages environmental politics in urban settings and addresses contemporary questions such as climate modeling, genetically modified organisms, food industries, pollution, city planning and infrastructure development. The way ahead is for political ecology is to enter into new conversations with related strands of scholarship, like, for example, with science and technology studies, with studies that concern human – animal relations, and recent work in anthropology on ontology and radical alterity. This article aims to give a short introduction to central aspects of contemporary political ecology and its emergence.

  • 280.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Projekt tiger: ursprungsfolk och naturvård i Indien1997In: Att kräva livet åter: ursprungsfolk i kamp för sin miljö och kultur / [ed] Ulf Johansson Dahre, Lund: Agora , 1997, 1. uppl., p. 76-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 281.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Review  of Globalization, the state and violence2004In: The Living beyond conflict seminar, ISSN 1651-0526, Vol. 4, no 5Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 282.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Shillong: tribal urbanity in the Northeast Indian borderland2017In: IIAS newsletter / International Institute for Asian Studies, ISSN 0929-8738, Vol. 77, p. 32-33Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this short essay, I will try to outline a few key traits or characteristics of present-day Shillong, a city I have come to love and feel at home in.

  • 283.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Stolen harvest2001In: Chicago south Asia newsletter, Vol. 25, no 2Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 284.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    "The eco-killer canal": large-scale water projects in India1998In: Water: the taming of a scarce resource / [ed] Gunnel Cederlöf, Uppsala: Forum for Development Studies, Uppsala University , 1998, p. 85-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 285.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Forest of Our Lives: In and Out of Political Ecology2016In: Conservation and Society, ISSN 0972-4923, E-ISSN 0975-3133, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 380-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I seek to bring together a number of environmental histories to think about the place of forest in our lives. It is partly autobiographical in the sense that it concerns forest issues that 1, for various reasons, have been entangled with recently. These are the making of carbon (REDD+) forests in Northeast India, preservation of the urban forests and planting of indigenous trees in Karura forests in Nairobi, Kenya, and the transformation of Swedish forests into vast industrial plantations. I come to these issues with little knowledge about the forest ecology or the flora and fauna, as such, but rather as a scholar with earlier experience of analysis of the social and political dynamics involved in conflicts over forests, that is, how differently powered actors seek to appropriate, stake claims to or control the forest. Hence, my point of departure and analytical framework is largely that of political ecology. In a conversation about the work of the anthropologist Brian Morris, I will point to the thinness of such an approach and open up aspects that are critical to Morris' way of engaging with the interactions of people, plants, insects, and animals. This, I will argue, is a truly grounded environmental anthropology.

  • 286.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The politics of deforestetaion: Indigenous assertain in India2004In: CENICES, OKD Institute of social change and developmentArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 287.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The social life of categories: affirmative action and trajectories of the indigenous2013In: Focaal: European Journal of Anthropology, ISSN 0920-1297, E-ISSN 1558-5263, Vol. 2013, no 65, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I examine the ways in which the term “indigenous peoples“ is reworked in a specific South Asian context. I focus on the new, hybrid category of “indigenous tribe“ in the Indian state of Meghalaya. I argue that we can think of the indigenous tribe category as a strategic conflation of two different regimes of rights or political assertions. The first relates to the existing nation-state framework for affirmative action as expressed in the Scheduled Tribe (ST) status, while the second relates to the emerging global framework for asserting the rights of indigenous peoples. While the benefits of asserting the status of indigenous tribes is obvious, for example, preventing other, nonindigenous tribes from owning land in the state, the long-term gains seems more doubtful. Both affirmative action programs and indigenous peoples frameworks are motivated by a moral imperative to redress historical injustices and contemporary social inequalities. To evoke them for other ends might eventually backfire. The larger point I seek to make, however, is that political categories tend to take on a life of their own, escaping their intended purposes and hence applied by people in novel and surprising ways.

  • 288.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Uncivil attachments2010In: Power to the People? (Con-)tested Civil Society in Search of Democracy / [ed] Heide Moksnes and Mia Melin, Uppsala: Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development (CSD), Uppsala University , 2010, p. 201-205Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 289.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Writing development2013In: Anthropology Today, ISSN 0268-540X, E-ISSN 1467-8322, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 4-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development professionals spend a lot of time writing and the aid industry has a vast production of texts. The author argues here that anthropology of development needs to look anew at how these texts are being produced, circulated and the purposes they serve. I have briefly identified six features of development writing: 1. Institutional ownership, 2. multiple authorship, 3. impersonal style, 4. terminology, 5. Communicable simplifications and 6. temporality. The more general point is to call for a more sophisticated engagement with development texts. There might be more going on in these documents than immediately meets the eye. More than anything else, these texts grant legitimacy and presence to the actors involved in development. Writing development is more about the production process, the language and what it ultimately bring in terms of aid flows, rather than the substance of the text itself.

  • 290.
    Karlsson, Sandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Försoningsprocessen i Rwanda och Sydafrika ur ett antropologiskt perspektiv2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 291.
    Karsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nuclear Lives: Uranium mining, indigenous peoples, and development in India2009In: Economic and Political Weekly, ISSN 0012-9976, Vol. 44, no 34, p. 43-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    India's nuclear programme has suffered from a shortage of uranium. As elsewhere in the world, the main uranium deposits are located on lands belonging to indigenous or tribal peoples. This paper discusses the unfolding controversy relating to uranium mining in the West Khasi Hills of Meghalaya. The government-owned Uranium Corporation of India has for long been trying to get access to the deposits of uranium, but has failed due to local opposition. During the past two years the government has stepped up its efforts to allow mining in Meghalaya and seeks to win over local people with promises of development. Although a reasonable proposition for some, there is also a strong opposition to this, usually citing either health reasons or issues having to do with ethnic sovereignty and indigenous rights. Allowing uranium mining, it is argued, would lead to the loss of indigenous lands and open the region to a large-scale influx of non-tribal people.

  • 292.
    Khosravi, Shahman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Women of Deh Koh: Lives in an Iranian village (1989) av Erika Friedl1993In: Kelk, no 40-43Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 293.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    An Ethnography of Migrant 'Illegality' in Sweden: Included yet Excepted?2011In: Human Rights and Migration: Trafficking for Forced Labour / [ed] Christien van den Anker and Ilse van Liempt, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 294.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Café2012In: Om femtio år med Arkitekturmuseet / [ed] Malin Zimm, Stockholm: Arkitekturmuseet , 2012Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 295.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Can a Khan be an Anthropologist?1996In: Antropologiska studier, ISSN 0345-0902, no 54-55Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 296.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Diaspora-ye irani: (Iranian Diaspora)2004In: Anthropology / [ed] Soheila Shahshahani, Tehran: Agah Publishers , 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 297.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Disappearing bookstores2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 298.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Displacement and Entrepreneurship: Iranian small businesses in Stockholm1999In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 493-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing unemployment in Sweden has affected non‐Western residents particularly hard. A shrinking public sector, and toughening attitudes toward migrant job‐seekers within the private sector, frequently leave self‐employment as the only option. The emergence of an ethnic economy is partly due to the opportunity structure in the host society, and partly to available ethnic resources. This article examines Iranian small businesses in Stockholm. The Swedish labour market, and the situation of Iranian migrants within it, are crucial factors in. bringing about the Iranian entry into self‐employment. Yet, ethnic resources and previous work experiences in Iran also play an important role in shaping economic activities among Iranians in Sweden. This article portrays how Iranians, whose social space has been distorted by displacement, contrive to reconstruct this in the Swedish setting.

  • 299.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    ‘Farhang-e Mosafer’ (Travelling Culture)  : Examples of cultural Exchange between Iran and other Civilizations2004In: Anthropology ArticlesArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 300.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Graffiti in Tehran2013In: Anthropology Now, ISSN 1949-2901, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
3456789 251 - 300 of 722
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