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  • 251.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Disquieting Gifts: Humanitarianism in New Delhi Erica Bornstein (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2012)2014In: Political and Legal Anthropology Review (PoLAR), ISSN 1081-6976, E-ISSN 1555-2934, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 198-200Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 252.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ecodevelopment in crisis: Buxa Tiger Reserve and Forest People1999In: Economic and Political Weekly, ISSN 0012-9976, Vol. 34, no 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Rabhas who live in the Buxa tiger reserve buffer zone must see some irony in their officially acknowledged status of partner's in wildlife conservation. The tiger project has so far meant only curtailed employment and access to the forest for them, for the concept of popular participation in conservation is still only a concept. What is wanting is an effort to address appropriately the question of indigenous peoples rights.

  • 253.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Entering into the Christian Dharma: Contemporary ' tribal' conversions in India2002In: Christians, cultural interactions: and Indias's religious traditions / [ed] J.M Brown, R.E Frykenberg (eds), Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans publishing company , 2002, p. 133-153Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 254.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Evading the State: Ethnicity in Northeast India through the Lens of James Scott2013In: Asian Ethnology, ISSN 1882-6865, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 321-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses ethnicity and the state in Northeast India from the vantage point of James Scott’s influential works, especially his recent book The Art of Not Being Governed. Scott has over the years explored different aspects of peasant or subaltern modes of opposing dominance. The overall insistence is on the resistance and agency of the peasant. In the context of the hill societies that Scott deals with in the book, the entire societal design can be understood to be an act of resistance that aims at keeping the state away. As part of this, ethnic identities are portrayed as extremely fluid and remolded to serve political purposes. Scott’s notion of Zomia opens up a new way of thinking about Northeast India. Even so, as I argue, one still ends up thinking of the hills from the perspective of the valley and in so doing we miss aspects of the hill societies and ways of being in the world that cannot be reduced to a state-effect. If one looks more closely at these other aspects, more persistent forms of identification and a sense of belonging might come to the fore. Rather than just trying to escape from the state, people in the hills also hope for another, different, state.

  • 255.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Forskningsöversikt: Humaniora- och samhällsvetenskapsområdet, Vetenskapsrådet2014Other (Other academic)
  • 256.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Greener pastures2000In: American Ethnologist, ISSN 0094-0496, E-ISSN 1548-1425, ISSN 0094-0496, Vol. 28, no 1Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 257.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology, Uppsala University.
    India against itself2002In: The Journal of Peasant Studies, ISSN 0306-6150, E-ISSN 1743-9361, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 164-167Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 258.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Indigenous natures: forest and community dynamics in Meghalaya, North-East India2006In: Ecological nationalisms: nature, livelihoods, and identities in South Asia / [ed] Gunnel Cederlöf, K. Sivaramakrishnan, Seattle: University of Washington Press , 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 259.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Indigenous politics: commmunity formation and indigenous peoples' struggle for self-deterrmination in North-East India2001In: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, ISSN 1070-289X, E-ISSN 1547-3384, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 7-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with a number of questions relating to politics based on “ethnicity” or community belonging among “tribal” or indigenous peoples in India's northeastern region. In particular, I probe the complex question of indigenous peoples’ right to self‐determination, a right that most indigenous organizations in the world regard as crucial and that is central to the UN draft Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Autonomy or self‐determination, in one form or another, is on the agenda of more or less all mobilized communities in Northeast India. In multi‐ethnic contexts, however, it is not easy to translate such demands into viable political solutions. By discussing several different cases, the contemporary Bodoland movement, the Naga struggle for sovereignty, and the mobilization of the Rabha people, the paper brings the issue of indigenous politics in India into focus.

  • 260.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Into the Grid: Hydropower and Subaltern Politics in Northeast India2016In: Staking Claims: The Politics of Social Movements in Contemporary Rural India / [ed] Uday Cahndra, Daniel Taghioff, Oxford University Press, 2016, p. 64-83Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 261.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introduction:  2011In: Power to the people?: (Con-)tested civil society in search of democracy / [ed] Heidi Moksnes and Mia Melin, Uppsala: Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development , 2011, p. 201-204Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 262.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introduction: Northeastern research entanglements2018In: Geographies of difference: Explorations in Northeast India / [ed] Mélanie Vandenhelsken, Meenaxi Barkataki-Ruscheweyh, Bengt G. Karlsson, London: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter I seek to take stock of the present context of research on and in Northeast India.

  • 263.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Jorden vi ägde: Resursanvändning, genus och privatisering av mark i nordöstra Indien2016In: Kungliga Vitterhetsakademiens Årsbok 2016, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2016, p. 77-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 264.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Märkligt tyst om kärnvapnens ´fredliga´näringskedja2017In: Dagens arena, no 11 novemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    »Diskussionen om kärnvapen förbiser ofta helt den nukleära kedjan, den infrastruktur som ytterst möjliggör dessa vapens framställning.«, Bengt G. Karlsson, professor i socialantropologi vid Stockholms universitet gör här en resa i det nukleära västerländska landskapet, där strålningen från kärnkraftshaveriet i Tjernobyl  från 1986 förrädiskt göms i idyllisk natur.

  • 265.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Political Ecology: anthropological Perspectives2015In: International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences / [ed] James D.Wright, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2015, 2, p. 350-355Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Political ecology is a transdisciplinary research field addressing nature – society interrelations, often with a focus on contentions and struggles over land and natural resources. Power asymmetries and social inequalities are critical points of departure, and many scholars in the field pursue a kind of emancipatory engagement with subalterns or marginalized people whose liveli- hoods depend on the local resource base. Capital accumulation and political economy more generally provide the overall framework for understanding such instances of dispossession and displacement of local communities by global forces of state and market. Political ecology has from its very inception remained a rather loosely defined research field. During the last two decades, the field has expanded rapidly. From an earlier largely rural focus, recent work increasingly engages environmental politics in urban settings and addresses contemporary questions such as climate modeling, genetically modified organisms, food industries, pollution, city planning and infrastructure development. The way ahead is for political ecology is to enter into new conversations with related strands of scholarship, like, for example, with science and technology studies, with studies that concern human – animal relations, and recent work in anthropology on ontology and radical alterity. This article aims to give a short introduction to central aspects of contemporary political ecology and its emergence.

  • 266.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Projekt tiger: ursprungsfolk och naturvård i Indien1997In: Att kräva livet åter: ursprungsfolk i kamp för sin miljö och kultur / [ed] Ulf Johansson Dahre, Lund: Agora , 1997, 1. uppl., p. 76-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 267.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Review  of Globalization, the state and violence2004In: The Living beyond conflict seminar, ISSN 1651-0526, Vol. 4, no 5Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 268.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Shillong: tribal urbanity in the Northeast Indian borderland2017In: IIAS newsletter / International Institute for Asian Studies, ISSN 0929-8738, Vol. 77, p. 32-33Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this short essay, I will try to outline a few key traits or characteristics of present-day Shillong, a city I have come to love and feel at home in.

  • 269.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Stolen harvest2001In: Chicago south Asia newsletter, Vol. 25, no 2Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 270.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    "The eco-killer canal": large-scale water projects in India1998In: Water: the taming of a scarce resource / [ed] Gunnel Cederlöf, Uppsala: Forum for Development Studies, Uppsala University , 1998, p. 85-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 271.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Forest of Our Lives: In and Out of Political Ecology2016In: Conservation and Society, ISSN 0972-4923, E-ISSN 0975-3133, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 380-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I seek to bring together a number of environmental histories to think about the place of forest in our lives. It is partly autobiographical in the sense that it concerns forest issues that 1, for various reasons, have been entangled with recently. These are the making of carbon (REDD+) forests in Northeast India, preservation of the urban forests and planting of indigenous trees in Karura forests in Nairobi, Kenya, and the transformation of Swedish forests into vast industrial plantations. I come to these issues with little knowledge about the forest ecology or the flora and fauna, as such, but rather as a scholar with earlier experience of analysis of the social and political dynamics involved in conflicts over forests, that is, how differently powered actors seek to appropriate, stake claims to or control the forest. Hence, my point of departure and analytical framework is largely that of political ecology. In a conversation about the work of the anthropologist Brian Morris, I will point to the thinness of such an approach and open up aspects that are critical to Morris' way of engaging with the interactions of people, plants, insects, and animals. This, I will argue, is a truly grounded environmental anthropology.

  • 272.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The politics of deforestetaion: Indigenous assertain in India2004In: CENICES, OKD Institute of social change and developmentArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 273.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The social life of categories: affirmative action and trajectories of the indigenous2013In: Focaal: European Journal of Anthropology, ISSN 0920-1297, E-ISSN 1558-5263, Vol. 2013, no 65, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I examine the ways in which the term “indigenous peoples“ is reworked in a specific South Asian context. I focus on the new, hybrid category of “indigenous tribe“ in the Indian state of Meghalaya. I argue that we can think of the indigenous tribe category as a strategic conflation of two different regimes of rights or political assertions. The first relates to the existing nation-state framework for affirmative action as expressed in the Scheduled Tribe (ST) status, while the second relates to the emerging global framework for asserting the rights of indigenous peoples. While the benefits of asserting the status of indigenous tribes is obvious, for example, preventing other, nonindigenous tribes from owning land in the state, the long-term gains seems more doubtful. Both affirmative action programs and indigenous peoples frameworks are motivated by a moral imperative to redress historical injustices and contemporary social inequalities. To evoke them for other ends might eventually backfire. The larger point I seek to make, however, is that political categories tend to take on a life of their own, escaping their intended purposes and hence applied by people in novel and surprising ways.

  • 274.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Uncivil attachments2010In: Power to the People? (Con-)tested Civil Society in Search of Democracy / [ed] Heide Moksnes and Mia Melin, Uppsala: Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development (CSD), Uppsala University , 2010, p. 201-205Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 275.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Writing development2013In: Anthropology Today, ISSN 0268-540X, E-ISSN 1467-8322, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 4-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development professionals spend a lot of time writing and the aid industry has a vast production of texts. The author argues here that anthropology of development needs to look anew at how these texts are being produced, circulated and the purposes they serve. I have briefly identified six features of development writing: 1. Institutional ownership, 2. multiple authorship, 3. impersonal style, 4. terminology, 5. Communicable simplifications and 6. temporality. The more general point is to call for a more sophisticated engagement with development texts. There might be more going on in these documents than immediately meets the eye. More than anything else, these texts grant legitimacy and presence to the actors involved in development. Writing development is more about the production process, the language and what it ultimately bring in terms of aid flows, rather than the substance of the text itself.

  • 276.
    Karlsson, Sandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Försoningsprocessen i Rwanda och Sydafrika ur ett antropologiskt perspektiv2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 277.
    Karsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nuclear Lives: Uranium mining, indigenous peoples, and development in India2009In: Economic and Political Weekly, ISSN 0012-9976, Vol. 44, no 34, p. 43-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    India's nuclear programme has suffered from a shortage of uranium. As elsewhere in the world, the main uranium deposits are located on lands belonging to indigenous or tribal peoples. This paper discusses the unfolding controversy relating to uranium mining in the West Khasi Hills of Meghalaya. The government-owned Uranium Corporation of India has for long been trying to get access to the deposits of uranium, but has failed due to local opposition. During the past two years the government has stepped up its efforts to allow mining in Meghalaya and seeks to win over local people with promises of development. Although a reasonable proposition for some, there is also a strong opposition to this, usually citing either health reasons or issues having to do with ethnic sovereignty and indigenous rights. Allowing uranium mining, it is argued, would lead to the loss of indigenous lands and open the region to a large-scale influx of non-tribal people.

  • 278.
    Khosravi, Shahman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Women of Deh Koh: Lives in an Iranian village (1989) av Erika Friedl1993In: Kelk, no 40-43Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 279.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    An Ethnography of Migrant 'Illegality' in Sweden: Included yet Excepted?2011In: Human Rights and Migration: Trafficking for Forced Labour / [ed] Christien van den Anker and Ilse van Liempt, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 280.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Café2012In: Om femtio år med Arkitekturmuseet / [ed] Malin Zimm, Stockholm: Arkitekturmuseet , 2012Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 281.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Can a Khan be an Anthropologist?1996In: Antropologiska studier, ISSN 0345-0902, no 54-55Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 282.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Diaspora-ye irani: (Iranian Diaspora)2004In: Anthropology / [ed] Soheila Shahshahani, Tehran: Agah Publishers , 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 283.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Disappearing bookstores2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 284.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Displacement and Entrepreneurship: Iranian small businesses in Stockholm1999In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 493-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing unemployment in Sweden has affected non‐Western residents particularly hard. A shrinking public sector, and toughening attitudes toward migrant job‐seekers within the private sector, frequently leave self‐employment as the only option. The emergence of an ethnic economy is partly due to the opportunity structure in the host society, and partly to available ethnic resources. This article examines Iranian small businesses in Stockholm. The Swedish labour market, and the situation of Iranian migrants within it, are crucial factors in. bringing about the Iranian entry into self‐employment. Yet, ethnic resources and previous work experiences in Iran also play an important role in shaping economic activities among Iranians in Sweden. This article portrays how Iranians, whose social space has been distorted by displacement, contrive to reconstruct this in the Swedish setting.

  • 285.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    ‘Farhang-e Mosafer’ (Travelling Culture)  : Examples of cultural Exchange between Iran and other Civilizations2004In: Anthropology ArticlesArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 286.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Graffiti in Tehran2013In: Anthropology Now, ISSN 1949-2901, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 287.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Manlighet i exil: genus och etnicitet bland iranska män i Sverige2006In: Orienten i Sverige: samtida möten och gränser / [ed] Simon Ekström, Lena Gerholm, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 288.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Myth and meaning2012Other (Other academic)
  • 289.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nomad (1991) av Louis Beck1995In: Kelk, no 60Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 290.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Precarious lives: waiting and hope in Iran2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Precarious Lives, Shahram Khosravi attempts to reconcile the paradoxes of Iranians' everyday life in the first decade of the twenty-first century. On the one hand, multiple circumstances of precarity give rise to a sense of hopelessness, shared visions of a futureless tomorrow, widespread home(land)lessness, intense individualism, and a growth of incivilities. On the other, daydreaming and hope, as well as civility and solidarity in political protests, street carnivals, and social movements, continue to persist. Young Iranians describe themselves as being stuck in purposelessness and forced to endure endless waiting, and they are also aware that they are perceived as unproductive and a burden on their society. Despite the aspirations and inspiration they possess, they find themselves forced into petrifying social and spatial immobility. Uncertainty in the present, a seemingly futureless tomorrow: these are the circumstances that Khosravi explores in Precarious Lives.

    Creating an intricate and moving portrait of contemporary Iranian life, Khosravi weaves together individual stories, government reports, statistics, and cultural analysis of art and literature to depict how Iranians react to the experience of precarity and the possibility of hope. Drawing on extensive ethnographic engagement with youth in Tehran and Isfahan as well as with migrant workers in rural areas, Khosravi examines the complexities and contradictions of everyday life in Iran. Precarious Lives is a vital work of contemporary anthropology that serves as a testament to the shared hardship and hope of the Iranian people.

  • 291.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Territorialiserad mänsklighet: irreguljära immigranter och det nakna livet2006In: Om välfärdens gränser och det villkorade medborgarskapet: rapport / av Utredningen om makt, integration och strukturell diskriminering / [ed] Paulina de los Reyes, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2006, p. 283-310Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 292.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The ‘Illegal’ Traveler: an auto-ethnography of borders2007In: Social Anthropology, Vol. 15, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 293.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Persian Escort2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 294.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Third Generation: The Islamic Order of Things and Cultural Defiance among theYoung of Tehran2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 295.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    White Masks/Muslim Names: Name Changes among Muslim Immigrants in Sweden2012In: RACE & CLASS, ISSN 0306-3968, E-ISSN 1741-3125, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 65-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Names carry strong ethnic and religious connotations and reveal an individual's affiliation to a specific group. When a religious or ethnic group is stigmatised, the relationship between names and social stigma becomes explicit. For Muslims, names and veils are the two most conspicuous signifiers of their stigmatised identity. Some believe that covering their Muslim identity with Swedish-sounding or 'neutral' European names will facilitate their individual integration into society. Based on empirical findings, examining application forms for name-changing and interviews with name-changers, this article offers an exploratory analysis of the reasons, expectations and effects of surname-changing among immigrants with Muslim names. It examines the extent to which the changes reflect the impact of social disadvantage and anti-Muslim sentiment in Sweden.

  • 296.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    www.iranian.com:an Ethnographic Approach to An Online Diaspora2000In: ISIM Newsletter, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 13-13Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While exile refers to a glamorous return to the 'real' homeland, diaspora creates an alternative homeland, an imagined one. Exile denies 'here' and mourns for 'there'. Diaspora lessens the unbearable nostalgia by constructing a community based on the networks which link the dispersed. Exile emphasizes a centralized relationship with the spatial homeland. In diaspora, through the romantization of the 'promised land', emphasis is placed on a cobweb of relations amongst the scattered. Diaspora suggests deterritorialization, which does not mean geographical displacement - as it is for exile - but refers to the collapse of a fixed link between identity, culture, existence and a single place. In other words, diaspora is a deterritorialized World Wide Web.

  • 297.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Young and Defiant in Tehran2007Book (Refereed)
  • 298.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations (CEIFO).
    Graham, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Home is Where You Make It: Repatriation and Diaspora Culture among Iranians in Sweden1997In: The Journal of Refugee Studies, ISSN 0951-6328, E-ISSN 1471-6925, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 115-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines attitudes toward returning to Iran among Iranian refugees in Sweden. Differences between Iranians are traced to various factors including economic position and political involvement The idea of a home and a homeland, as well as that of a home culture, are critically examined in the light of the creation of a diaspora culture in Sweden and elsewhere that seeks to reconstruct aspects of Iranian culture. It is argued that not only the ‘when’ of return migration must be examined, but also the ‘where’, in a situation of dynamic cultural change which redefines the meaning of the home culture and the location of home itself

  • 299.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Graham, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Reordering Public and Private in Iranian Cyberspace: Identity, Politics and Mobilization’2010In: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, ISSN 1070-289X, E-ISSN 1547-3384, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 219-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The capacity of cyberspace to bypass some of the spatial divisions that underpin social inequality endows it with political significance. This article examines some of the ways in which cyberspace has contributed to redrawing the boundaries between public and private and some of the consequences of this for people, things, and ideas in Iran and the Iranian diaspora. It shows how cyberspace influences a wide range of political phenomena including political mobilization and censorship, intergenerational communication, identity formation, sexuality, sense of belonging, and forms and location of symbolic capital. The relationship between net users in the diaspora and cyberspace involves a circuit of reorderings of one's understanding of the diaspora, one's contact with it in cyberspace, of one's own ideas on the basis of what one finds there, and of social relationships established and maintained in cyberspace. Paradoxically, the very richness and diversity of the ideas and opinions found in Iranian cyberspace may undermine the idea of there actually being a single Iranian diaspora.

  • 300.
    Khosravi, Sharam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Farhang-e Mosafer’: (TravellingCulture)2004In: Anthropology ArticlesArticle in journal (Other academic)
3456789 251 - 300 of 687
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