Endre søk
Begrens søket
3456789 251 - 300 of 598
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 251.
    Jansson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Modeling the Evolution of Creoles2015Inngår i: Language Dynamics and Change, ISSN 2210-5824, E-ISSN 2210-5832, Vol. 5, nr 1, s. 1-51Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Various theories have been proposed regarding the origin of creole languages. Describing a process where only the end result is documented involves several methodological difficulties. In this paper we try to address some of the issues by using a novel mathematical model together with detailed empirical data on the origin and structure of Mauritian Creole. Our main focus is on whether Mauritian Creole may have originated only from a mutual desire to communicate, without a target language or prestige bias. Our conclusions are affirmative. With a confirmation bias towards learning from successful communication, the model predicts Mauritian Creole better than any of the input languages, including the lexifier French, thus providing a compelling and specific hypothetical model of how creoles emerge. The results also show that it may be possible for a creole to develop quickly after first contact, and that it was created mostly from material found in the input languages, but without inheriting their morphology.

  • 252. Jansson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Modelling the evolution of creoles2012Inngår i: The Evolution of Language: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference (EVOLANG9) / [ed] Thomas C. Scott-Phillips et al., Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Company , 2012, s. 464-465Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 253.
    Jon-And, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Developing a pidgin corpus2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 254.
    Jon-And, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Funcke, Alexander
    Is Language Less Cumulative than Other Culture? Indicators of Breakdown and Build-up of Complexityin Pidgins, Creoles and Non-contact Languages2018Inngår i: Applications in Cultural Evolution: Arts, Languages, Technologies: Conference abstracts, 2018, s. 18-19Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In the study of cultural evolution, human culture is generally assumed to be cumulative, implying increasing complexity and diversity over time (Enquist et al. 2011, Lewis & Laland 2012). Recent studies suggest that evolutionary mechanisms operate differently in different cultural domains (Tamariz et al. 2016), but it has not been discussed whether all mechanisms result in cumulativity. Experiments have shown that compositional language structure emerge as a trade-off between learnability and expressivity (Kirby et al. 2008, 2015), but there is no evidence of languages generally becoming more compositional, or regular, over time. As all modern natural languages are expressive enough for human communicative needs and compressed enough for generational transmission, we suggest that linguistic complexity is 19 not currently cumulative but breaks down and builds up in cycles triggered by demographically determined variation in learnability and expressivity pressures. We focus on pidgins, a special case of natural languages where the expressivity pressure is presumably weaker and learnability pressure stronger than in other languages. We compare pidgins to creoles, where both expressivity and learnability pressures are presumably high, and non-contact languages where the learnability pressure is presumably lower, allowing for more complexity. We analyze compiled material from spoken and written pidgins, spoken creoles and non-contact languages and a parallel bible corpus, applying two complexity measures: the relation between word length and frequency, and pronominal morphology. We observe a smaller degree of exponentiality in the negative correlation between word length and frequency in pidgins than in their lexifiers, likely reflecting the loss of short and common grammatical words. Creoles expose a higher exponentiality in this correlation, which may reflect a newly built up analytical grammar. For pronouns, we observe expected reduced marking of person, number, case and gender in pidgins, increasing in creoles, being highest in non-contact languages.

  • 255.
    Jon-And, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Funcke, Alexander
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Word length and word frequency in pidgins and creoles2014Inngår i: Abstracts: SCL/SPCL/ACBLPE Conference 2014, 2014, s. 32-33Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 256.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Den flerspråkiga världen i siffror2003Inngår i: Låt mig ha kvar mitt språk: den tredje SUKKA-rapporten = Antakaa minun pitää kieleni: kolmas SUKKA-raportti / [ed] Raija Kangassalo, Ingmarie Mellenius, Umeå: Inst. för moderna språk, Umeå univérsitet , 2003, 11, s. 13-32Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 257.
    Jäger, Andreas
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Reported speech constructions and the grammaticalization of hearsay evidentiality: a cross-linguistic survey2010Inngår i: Sprachtypologie und Universalienforschung, ISSN 0942-2919, Vol. 63, nr 3, s. 177-195Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 258.
    Keidel Fernández, Alejandra
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik.
    Hörberg, Thomas
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Qualitative differences in L3 learners’ neurophysiological response to L1versus L2 transfer2017Inngår i: Proceedings of Interspeech 2017 / [ed] Francisco Lacerda, David House, Mattias Heldner, Joakim Gustafson, Sofia Strömbergsson, Marcin Włodarczak, The International Speech Communication Association (ISCA), 2017, s. 1789-1793Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Third language (L3) acquisition differs from first language (L1) and second language (L2) acquisition. There are different views on whether L1 or L2 is of primary influence on L3 acquisition in terms of transfer. This study examines differences in the event-related brain potentials (ERP) response to agreement incongruencies between L1 Spanish speakers and L3 Spanish learners, comparing response differences to incongruencies that are transferrable from the learners’ L1 (Swedish), or their L2 (English). Whereas verb incongruencies, available in L3 learners’ L2 but not their L1, engendered a similar response for L1 speakers and L3 learners, adjective incongruencies, available in L3 learners’ L1 but not their L2, elicited responses that differed between groups: Adjective incongruencies engendered a negativity in the 450-550 ms time window for L1 speakers only. Both congruent and incongruent adjectives also engendered an enhanced P3 wave in L3 learners compared to L1 speakers. Since the P300 correlates with task-related, strategic processing, this indicates that L3 learners process grammatical features that are transferrable from their L1 in a less automatic mode than features that are transferrable from their L2. L3 learners therefore seem to benefit more from their knowledge of their L2 than their knowledge of their L1.

  • 259. Klein, Raymond M.
    et al.
    Christie, John
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Does multilingualism affect the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease?: A worldwide analysis by country2016Inngår i: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 2, s. 463-467Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been suggested that the cognitive requirements associated with bi- and multilingual processing provide a form of mental exercise that, through increases in cognitive reserve and brain fitness, may delay the symptoms of cognitive failure associated with Alzheimer′s disease and other forms of dementia. We collected data on a country-by-country basis that might shed light on this suggestion. Using the best available evidence we could find, the somewhat mixed results we obtained provide tentative support for the protective benefits of multilingualism against cognitive decline. But more importantly, this study exposes a critical issue, which is the need for more comprehensive and more appropriate data on the subject.

  • 260.
    Klintfors, Eeva
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för fonetik.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för fonetik.
    Schwarz, Iris-Corinna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för fonetik.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för fonetik.
    Marklund, Ulrika
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för fonetik.
    Modellering av förälder-barn interaktion (MINT): Komponenter hos audio-visuella ledtrådar och deras konsekvenser för språkinlärning2013Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 261.
    Klintfors, Eeva
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för fonetik.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för fonetik.
    Schwarz, Iris-Corinna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för fonetik.
    Gerhom, Tove
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Marklund, Ulrika
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för fonetik.
    The Stockholm Babylab Multimodal Approach: Modelling Infant Language Acquisition Longitudinally from Parent-Child Interaction2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Auditory communicative interaction is in general best analyzed with the help of simultaneously recorded visual information about discourse objects and the positioning of interlocutors in space. Access to visual information is even more important in parent-child interaction since this type of communica-tion is largely based on use of contextual gestures, gaze and imitation. The un-derstanding of parent-child interaction benefits further from information on brain activation involved in speech processing. This paper introduces the Stockholm Babylab approach to study multimodal language learning in typi-cally developing infants and young children. Our effort is to build a multimodal corpus that incorporates EEG (electroencephalography) data in the model. Ap-plication fields are social signal processing (SSP), improvement of diagnosis of late or atypical language development, and further development of habilitation methods for individuals with neurocognitive and language deficits.   

  • 262.
    Knobloch, Nina
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    A Micro-Typological Study of Shina: A Hindu Kush Language Cluster2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, 9 Indo-Aryan languages which have previously been classified as Shina languages were analyzed. A cognate analysis of basic vocabulary was conducted, in order to explore the relatedness of the languages. Furthermore, a selection of phonological, morphological, syntactic, and lexical features was analyzed, in order to explore areal patterns among the languages. The data mainly consisted of first-hand data, which has been collected for the project ”Language contact and relatedness in the Hindu Kush region”, but even previous descriptions of the languages were used. The results primarily confirmed hypotheses about the relatedness of the Shina languages, and showed interesting areal patterns.The data also suggested that the Shina languages share many typical features with other Hindu Kush Indo-Aryan languages, such as SOV word order, the use of postpositions, sex based grammatical gender, and moderately complex to complex syllable structures. Other features, such as aspiration, retroflexion, and case alignment in noun phrases showed more variation and could certainly be relevant for future studies on these languages.

  • 263.
    Knuchel, Dominique
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    A comparative study of egophoric marking: Investigating its relation to person and epistemic marking in three language families2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Egophoric marking as a potentially categorical expression in language is conceived of as a binary semantic contrast that marks an event as either involving one of the speech act participants (egophoric), or as one that does not (non-egophoric). Prima facie, the egophoric marking pattern resembles person indexing and has been interpreted as such. However, it appears that what is marked does not simply correspond to indexing the speech act roles of speaker and addressee. Rather, egophoric marking appears to encode the speech participant’s respective access to events/information in terms of ‘involvement’ and is therefore more akin to epistemic categories, such as evidentiality.

    This thesis presents a comparative study of egophoric marking on the basis of data from descriptions of relevant languages from the Barbacoan (South America), Nakh-Daghestanian (Caucasus) and Tibeto-Burman (Himalaya) language families. The study covers grammatical and functional properties, as well as diachronic aspects of egophoric marking systems. The findings are discussed in relation to typological studies on person and evidentiality in order to determine similarities and differences between egophoric marking and these associated categories. 

  • 264.
    Kolehmainen, Leena
    et al.
    University of Eastern Finland .
    Miestamo, Matti
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Nordlund, Taru
    Johdanto: Kielten vertailu menetelmänä kieli- ja käännöstieteessä2013Inngår i: Kielten vertailun metodiikka / [ed] Kolehmainen, Leena; Miestamo, Matti; Nordlund, Taru, Helsinki: Suomalaisen Kirjallisuuden Seura, 2013, s. 7-23Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 265. Kolehmainen, Leena
    et al.
    Miestamo, MattiStockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.Nordlund, Taru
    Kielten vertailun metodiikka2013Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 266.
    Koptjevskaja Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Adnominal Possession in the European Languages2002Inngår i: Sprachtypologie und Universalienforschung (STUF), Vol. 55, nr 2, s. 31-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 267.
    Koptjevskaja Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Introducing the panel: what can be meant by areal semantics?2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the panel is to initiate a discussion on which lexico-semantic phenomena show parallells across the (West-)African languages and how these similarities may be described and accounted for – by universal tendencies, genetic relations among the languages, their contacts and/or their common extra-linguistic surrounding. Areal semantics (Ameka & Wilkins 1996, Koptjevskaja-Tamm & Liljegren forthc.), in its concern with the diffusion of semantic features across language boundaries in a geographical area, is a potentially vast field, spanning the convergence of individual lexemes, through the structuring of entire semantic domains to the organization of complete lexicons. It has a great potential for historical and areal linguistics, but is still awaiting systematic research. Lexical phenomena have a long standing record in research on language contact and linguistic areas. However, the recent developments in areal linguistics and areal typology have, with a few exceptions, mainly concerned grammatical phenomena. This is not at all surprising given the central place of this research in modern linguistics of all denominations, including typology, where the rapidly developing field of areal typology has encouraged and facilitated serious research on the relative role of universal, genetic and areal factors for many grammatical and phonetic phenomena. The two traditionally distinguished groups of contact phenomena in the lexicon are loanwords and calques, or semantic loans – the distinction paralleled by contact phenomena at other levels (‘replication of matter’ vs. ‘pattern replication’ in Matras and Sakel 2007, also Croft's 2000 distinction between ‘substance linguemes’ and ‘schematic linguemes’ and Heine and Kuteva's 2005 ‘polysemy copying’). Loanwords have been studied from a more systematic cross-linguistic perspective, where the core issue has been the varying borrowability of various words, seen as belonging to different parts of speech and/or coming from different semantic domains (cf. Haspelmath and Tadmor eds. 2009, Wohlgemuth 2009). The interesting research angles here, as elsewhere in research on contact phenomena and in (areal-)typological research (cf. Koptjevskaja-Tamm 2011) are possible outcomes of language contact in the realm of the lexicon, on the one hand, and a possibility of using lexical phenomena for reconstructing contact, on the other. But a lexical-typological contribution to areal linguistics has an even greater potential when it comes to pattern replication rather than to replication of matter. To give one example, Hayward (1991, 2000, also Treis 2010) points out many shared lexicalization patterns in the three Ethiopian languages Amharic (Semitic), Oromo (Cushitic) and Gamo (Omotic), which add to the cumulative evidence in favour of the Ethio-Erithrean linguistic area and fall into four categories: (i) shared semantic specializations, e.g. ‘die without ritual slaughter (of cattle)’;  (ii) shared polysemy, e.g. ‘draw water’ – ‘copy’; (iii) shared derivational pathways, e.g. ‘need’ = causative of ‘want’: (iv) shared ideophones and idioms, e.g., ‘I caught a cold’ expressed via ‘a cold caught me’. Matisoff (2004), Vanhove (ed. 2008), Zalizniak et al. (2012) and Urban (2012) give numerous examples of cross-linguistically recurrent patterns of polysemy (e.g., ‘eat’ –> ‘suffer’), some of which are clearly areally restricted and witness of language contact, whereas others rather reflect universal tendencies.

  • 268.
    Koptjevskaja Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Swedish proper-name compounds in blogs: creativity, productivity and frequency2015Inngår i: Abstracts, 2015, s. 9-10Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate creativity, productivity and frequency of Swedish proper-name compounds following in the steps of Dahl (2003, 2008) and Kajanus (2005). These studies described several examples of Swedish compounding patterns based on a particular proper name that have manifested a gradual diachronic rise in the frequency of both types (by spreading to further stems) and tokens, i.e. have been gradually entrenched. Dahl’s most striking example is the explosive development of Swedish PropN-compounding with Palme as the first component, following on the important and highly salient event in the modern Swedish history, the murder of the Swedish prime-minister in 1986. In fact, many Palme-compounds are related to the “murder script”, with Palme often metonymic for the Palme murder and also for further compounds derived from it (by means of metonymical chains), cf. Palme+kulorna — ’the Palme bullets, i.e. the bullets found at some distance from the place of the Palme murder’, Palme+misstänkta — ‘Palme suspects, i.e. persons suspected of having committed the Palme murder’, Palme+utredningen ’the Palme investigation, i.e. the investigation of the Palme murder’, etc. In all these previous studies the data come from the Swedish press and novel corpus (86 mln words). Our research uses the Swedish Blog Sentences corpus containing 6 mlrd tokens from 46 mln blog posts in the period of 2010-2014 (Östling and Wirén. We focus on creativity, productivity and frequency of compounds based on several proper names that have been particularly salient in the discourse during the relevant period . We consider how the fluctuations in the type and token frequencies of the proper-name compouns correlate with the rises and falls in the frequency of the relevant proper names. Interestingly, there are very few highly frequent compounds – in fact, 1-2 for each of the proper names considered (e.g., Putinregimen ‘the Putin regime’, Zlatanboken ‘the Zlatan book’, Obamaadministrationen ‘the Obama administration’). On the other hand, each of the proper names ”generates” a high number of unique compounds, i.e. compounds that have only one occurrence in the whole corpus. Finally, there are also proper name compounds that are in-between the unique and the highly frequent ones, but this group is quite restricted.

  • 269.
    Koptjevskaja Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Temperature terms across languages: derivation, lexical stability and lexical universals2015Inngår i: Abstracts, 2015, s. 28-28Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this talk I will focus on the cross-linguistic regularities in the origin and development of temperature terms, such as ‘warm’ or ‘cold’, based on the data from about 40 languages in Koptjevskaja-Tamm (ed. 2015). The first question concerns motivational patterns typical for temperature terms, i.e., to what extent and by which word-formation strategies temperature terms are derived from expressions with other meanings. To give a few examples, some of the most frequent sources for ‘hot’ include, not surprisingly, such concepts as ‘burn’, ‘fire’, ‘boil’, ‘cook’, ‘sweat’, while those for ‘cold’ include ‘ice’, ‘shade’, ‘winter’, ‘brr’, ‘to become stiff’. In fact, the close relation between the conventionalised expressions for ‘warm/hot’ and those for ‘fire’ or ‘sweat’ in some languages raises the issue of whether the former do indeed belong to the basic or central temperature terms. In addition, there are many other sources for temperature terms. A fascinating group of questions related to the origin and development of temperature terms concerns their stability. For instance, do genetically related languages share temperature cognates? If they do, do the cognates have the same or similar meanings? What is the role of language contact in shaping the temperature term systems? It has been suggested in earlier research that central temperature terms are unusually stable, i.e. that they are typically «passed on essentially unchanged and with essentially no vocabulary turn-over across hundreds of generations of grammar&lexicon acquirers for thousands of years» (Plank 2010). However, the answers to the above listed questions differ for different languages, or for groups of languages. For instance, some of the central temperature terms across Indo-European turn out to be extremely stable, but these languages also testify to numerous instances of lexical replacement or addition of new temperature terms. The temperature terms in the two closely related Timor-Alor-Pantar languages Abui and Kamang and across the Nyulnyulan family are, on the contrary, strikingly dissimilar. Significantly, in all these cases, the meanings of cognates and their place in the overall temperature system of a language may be subject to significant variation.

  • 270.
    Koptjevskaja Tamm, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    IJzerman, Hans
    How our biology predisposes us to an "AFFECTION IS WARMTH" "metaphor", and how our environment changes its anchor2015Inngår i: 48th Annual Meeting of the Societas Linguistica Europea: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Alwin Kloekhorst, Martin Kohlberger, 2015, s. 83-84Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    "AFFECTION IS WARMTH" is one of the most widely quoted "universal" conceptual metaphors. Cognitive linguists suggest these to be conceptual, based on frequently used English expressions as “warm words, feelings”. In this talk, we will reflect on their cross-disciplinary collaboration, using both the findings of a large-scale cross-linguistic study of the meanings and uses of the temperature terms in the world’s languages and the insights from (social) psychology. Our first question –inspired by Geeraerts and Grondelaers (1995) –was to explore whether these reflect universal patterns or whether they are based on specific cultural traditions. Their presence across languages indeed varies considerably: while some languages demonstrate elaborated systems of such uses, quite a few lack them altogether, and yet others vary as to which temperature term has predominantly positive associations in its extended uses (e.g. ‘cold’rather than ‘warm’). This disconfirms the idea that this conceptual metaphor is universal, and further confirms suspicions from social psychology, which has falsified another basic assumption from conceptual metaphor theory –unidirectionality (IJzerman & Semin 2010). In the remainder, we first explore these patterns, and then provide first explorations for why they are likely to differ across languages. Perhaps surprisingly, the edited volume by Koptjevskaja-Tamm (2015) clearly reveals a significant variance in using temperature metaphors. Australian languages, Hup (Nadahup), Mapudungun (Araucanian), and Ojibwe (Algonquian) basically lack any extended use of temperature terms, while the 84SLE 2015 Book of AbstractsOceanic languages in Vanuatu and Nganasan (Uralic) have very few. This is in contrast both to some European and other Asian languages, but also to the African languages Ewe, Gbaya, Gurenɛ, Likpe, Sɛlɛɛ, Abui and Kamang (Timor-Alor-Pantar), and Yucatec Maya. These latter reveal a rich inventory of extended uses pertaining to their temperature terms, ranging from the more common ones, to the idiosyncratic ones. The actual cross-linguistic variation is both striking, thought-provoking, and calling for more research. Insights from (social) psychology may provide us with further answers for why such cross-cultural variation exists among languages. The most important reason is likely that temperature metaphors reflect how people deal with the metabolic demands of the environment. Thermoregulation is one of the most metabolically expensive activities across the animal kingdom. Other animals (and thus also humans) help regulate the temperature environment when this gets too cold, making a comfortable warm touch seem to answer basic biological necessities in mammalian sociality (Harlow & Suomi 1970; IJzerman et al. 2015). The second part of this talk will discuss the biological mechanisms behind social thermoregulation, and point to how others keeping us warm can help us answer to basic metabolic needs (cf. Beckes & Coan 2011; Beckes et al. 2014). From that, humans have developed so-called "cultural complements" to deal with the demands of the environment, and we will speculate that different linguistic metaphors are reflective of different metabolic needs across cultures, which are implemented according to different cultural practices (e.g., differences in touch) and rely on different needsdepending on the environment (e.g., different climates). Together, we discuss how language can facilitate culturally coordinated metabolism regulation, and thus point to the role of different attention-driving functions of linguistic –not conceptual –metaphors in cultural coordination.

  • 271.
    Koptjevskaja Tamm, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Miestamo, Matti
    Antonyms and derivational negation: a pilot study of cross-linguistic variation2015Inngår i: ALT 2015: 11th Conference of the Association for Linguistic Typology. August 1-3, 2015, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. Abstract Booklet, Albuquerque: University of New Mexico , 2015, s. 85-86Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Typological research on negation has mainly focused on clausal negation and on indefinite pronouns in the scope of negation (see Miestamo 2007 for an overview). Derivational affixes expressing negation (e.g., un- in unhappy or -less in powerless), have so far not figured in systematic typological studies. Zimmer's (1964) seminal study of affixal negation with adjectives is mainly restricted to a few well-known Indo-European languages; other families are given less attention. Semantically, derivational negation is closely connected to antonymy, which can be expressed by unrelated lexemes (lexical antonyms: small vs. big) or by means of overt derivational negation (morphological antonyms: happy vs. unhappy). Lexical and morphological antonymy do not necessarily exclude each other. E.g., Russian has regular triads of the kind bol’šoj ‘big’ – malen’kij ‘little’ – nebol’šoj ‘NEG.big’, and even tetrads, such as dobryj ‘kind’ – zloj ‘mean’ – nedobryj ‘NEG.kind’ – nezloj ‘NEG.mean’. Antonymy has been a popular topic in semantic theories and in logic (see Horn 2001). A central distinction is the one between contradictory vs. contrary opposites; the former are either–or (dead vs. alive), whereas the latter show a middle ground between the two poles (small vs. big). It has been suggested that languages have “canonical antonyms”, i.e. “a limited core of highly opposable couplings” (speed: slow/fast, luminosity: dark/light, strength: weak/strong, size small/large, width: narrow/wide, merit bad/good and thickness thin/thick) (Paradis & al. 2009). However, systematic typological studies of antonymy are lacking. This talk presents a cross-linguistic pilot study of antonymy and its expression by both lexical and overt morphological means. Our pilot sample includes 20 languages from different families and geographical areas. The data come from dictionaries and grammars as well as from a questionnaire sent to language experts. We focus on antonymy in property words (adjectives), more specifically in such forms that can be used as adnominal modifiers, with the goal to find correlations between semantic and formal properties of antonyms. From the formal point of view, we will pay attention to the type of marking (e.g., prefix vs. suffix), to the number of different derivational negators in a language, whether these markers can be used on other word classes than property words and how they are related to other negative markers in the language, primarily to clausal negation. Taking in semantics, we will observe what types of opposition (contrary vs. contradictory, scalar vs. non-scalar etc.) and which domains (evaluation, size, dimension, temperature etc.) are expressed by lexical antonyms vs. each attested type of overt morphological marking. Specific hypotheses to be tested against the cross-linguistic data include the following. Evaluatively positive members of an antonym pair are more likely to accept morphological negation (unclever vs. *unstupid). The existence of a lexical antonym may block the possibility of morphological marking and if triads (or tetrads) exist, there will be cross-linguistically recurring ways in which the meanings of the lexical vs. morphological antonyms are related to each other. Morphological antonyms built with elements similar to clausal negators in the language will tend to involve contradictory rather than contrary opposites.

  • 272.
    Koptjevskaja Tamm, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Miestamo, Matti
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Antonyms and word-level negation2015Inngår i: Abstracts, 2015, s. 74-74Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Typological research on negation has focused most prominently on standard negation, i.e. the basic negation strategies in declarative clauses, and some work has also been done on other aspects of clausal negation as well as on indefinite pronouns in the scope of negation. Negation at the level of words, i.e., derivational affixes expressing negation as well as case markers with negative semantics, has so far not figured in systematic typological studies, but it has received some attention in theoretical literature on semantics and morphology. Zimmer (1964) discusses “affixal” negation primarily in English and a couple of other Indo-European languages, but also comments on a few non-­Indo‐European languages and even suggests some cross‐linguistic generalizations. Subsequent work (e.g., Horn 1989) is similarly restricted in its cross‐linguistic scope. From the semantic point of view, the issue of word­‐level negation is closely connected to antonymy. Antonymy and types of opposition have been a popular topic in semantic theories (see Horn 1989), where the central distinction is between contrary and contradictory opposites. The two types differ as to whether they allow a third possibility in-­between: contradictory opposites are either–or (dead vs. alive), whereas in contrary opposites there is a middle ground between the two poles (small vs. big). Linguistically, antonyms can be expressed by unrelated lexemes (lexical antonyms) like the examples cited above, or by means of overt negation (happy vs. unhappy, possible vs. impossible). Lexical and morphological antonymy do not necessarily exclude each other. E.g., Russian has regular triads of the kind bol’šoj ‘big’ – malen’kij ‘little’ – nebol’šoj ‘NEG‐big’, and even tetrads, such as dobryj ‘kind’ – zloj ‘mean’ – nedobryj ‘NEG-­kind’ – nezloj ‘NEG-­mean’. Despite all the attention that antonymy has received from semanticists, work in a broader cross‐linguistic comparative perspective is lacking. This talk presents a pilot study of antonymy and its expression by both lexical and overt morphological means. We will focus on antonymy in property words (adjectives), more specifically in such forms that can be used as adnominal modifiers. Our main interest will be in finding correlations between semantic and formal properties of antonyms. From the formal point of view, we will pay attention to the type of marking (e.g., prefix vs. suffix), to the number of different word-­‐level negators in a language, whether these markers can be used on other word classes than property words and how they are related to other negative markers in the language. Taking in semantics, we will observe what types of opposition (contrary vs. contradictory, scalar vs. non-­‐scalar etc.)and which domains of property scales (evaluation, size, dimension, temperature etc.) are expressed by lexical antonyms vs. each attested type of overt morphological marking, i.e. whether the linguistic evidence allows us to classify antonyms into cross‐linguistically relevant types. Does the existence of a lexical antonym exclude the possibility of morphological marking? Do the markers exclude one another on the same lexical item? Are there semantic principles governing such blocking effects? Can triads and/or tetrads be found in addition to pairs? Our pilot sample includes 15 languages from different families and geographical areas. The data comes from dictionaries and grammars and, most importantly, from a questionnaire sent to language experts. As this is a pilot study of a domain previously unexplored in language typology, our main goal is to sketch different ways of approaching this intriguing domain from a broader cross-­linguistic perspective.

  • 273.
    Koptjevskaja Tamm, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Vanhove, Martine
    Koch, Peter
    Typological approaches to lexical semantics2007Inngår i: Linguistic Typology, ISSN 1430-0532; 1613-415X, Vol. 11, nr 1, s. 159 – 186-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 274.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    A book notice on Savickienė, I. & W. U. Dressler (eds.), The acquisition of diminutives a cross-linguistic perspective2008Inngår i: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, Vol. 559Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 275.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    “A lot of grammar with a good portion of lexicon” towards a typology of partitive and pseudo-partitive nominal constructions2009Inngår i: Form and Function in Language Research: Papers in honour of Christian Lehmann / [ed] Helmbrecht, Johannes, Nishina, Yoko, Shin, Yong-Min, Skopeteas, Stavros & Elisabeth Verhoeven, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter , 2009, s. 329-346Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 276.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    A Mozart sonata and the Palme funeral: The structure and uses of proper-name compounds in Swedish2013Inngår i: Morpho-syntactic categories and the expression of possession / [ed] Börjars, Kersti, Denison, David & Alan Scott, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2013, s. 253-290Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on Swedish nominal compounds with a personal proper name as their first component (PropN-compounds), e.g. en Mozart+sonat ‘a Mozart sonata’ or Palme+mord-et ‘the Palme murder’ (‘Palme+murder-the’). Although these expressions have so far hardly appeared in the scientific discourse on possession, they do in fact constitute an important resource for expressing possession in the broadest sense in Swedish and, further, in Germanic. For instance, many PropN-compounds are more or less synonymous with nominals modified by preposed s-genitives and/or by postposed prepositional phrases, i.e. by the two constructions that make up the core of adnominal possession in Swedish. In the present paper I will be mostly interested in the structure and meanings/uses of PropN-compounds, in particular, as compared to the other “possessive” constructions in Swedish.

  • 277.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    A review of “The changing languages of Europe” by Heine, B. & T. Kuteva2008Inngår i: Linguistics, Vol. 46, nr 5, s. 1019-1030Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 278.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    A woman of sin, a man of duty, and a hell of a mess: non-determiner genitives in Swedish2003Inngår i: Noun phrase structure in the languages of Europe / [ed] Frans Plank, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2003, s. 515-558Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 279.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Action nominal constructions2005Inngår i: The world atlas of language structures / [ed] Martin Haspelmath, Matthew S. Dryer, David Gil, Bernard Comrie, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005, s. 254-257Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 280.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Action Nominal Constructions in the Languages of Europe2003Inngår i: Noun Phrase Structure in the Languages of Europe, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter , 2003Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 281.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Action nouns2015Inngår i: Word formation: an international handbook of the Languages of Europe / [ed] Peter O. Müller, ingeborg Ohnheiser, Susan Olsen, Franz Rainer, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2015, s. 1195-2009Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Action nominals consitute a cross-linguistically robustly attested phenomenon. The present article provides an overview of the central problems related to their status as mixed category, situated in-between prototypical verbs and prototypical nouns, such as the verbal and nominal properties of action nominals and internal syntax of action nominal constructions, the status of action nominals as inflected, derived or transposed words and the different theoretical approaches to their formation. It combines a large-scale typological perspective on action nominals in the languages of Europe with a closer look at some particular phenomena in particular languages. 

  • 282.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Adnominal possession2001Inngår i: Language Typology and Language Universals, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter , 2001Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 283.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Approaching lexical typology2013Inngår i: Classics in linguistic typology / [ed] Dai, Qingxia & Wang, Feng, Bejing: Commercial press , 2013Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 284.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Approaching lexical typology2008Inngår i: From polysemy to semantic change: towards a typology of lexical semantic associations / [ed] Martine Vanhove, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2008, s. 3-54Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 285.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Central Europe: Circum-baltic area2010Inngår i: Handbuch der Eurolinguistik / [ed] Hinrichts, Uwe, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag , 2010, s. 503-518Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 286.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Circum-Baltic area2006Inngår i: Encyclopedia of language & linguistics. [Vol. 2], [Bil-Con] / [ed] Editor-in-chief Keith Brown; co-ordinating editors Anne H. Anderson, Laurie Bauer, Margie Berns, Graeme Hirst, Jim Miller, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2006, 2. uppl., s. 422-426Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 287.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Den språkliga mångfalden kring Östersjön2000Inngår i: Att förstå det mänskliga: humanistisk forskning vid Stockholms universitet / [ed] Kerstin Dahlbäck, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2000, s. 138-166Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 288.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Finiteness1994Inngår i: The encyclopedia of language and linguistics: Vol. 3 / [ed] R. E. Asher, J. M. Y. Simpson, Oxford: Pergamon Press, 1994, s. 1245-1248Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 289.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    From Aleksandr Evgen'evič's garden2013Inngår i: Linguistic typology, ISSN 1430-0532, E-ISSN 1613-415X, Vol. 17, nr 3, s. 518-518Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 290.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Glagoly peremeščenija v vode v švedskom jazyke [Aqua-motion verbs in Swedish]2007Inngår i: Glagoly dviženija v vode: Leksičeskaja tipologija [Aqua-motion verbs: A lexical typology], Indrik, Moskva , 2007, s. 128–151-Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 291.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Introducing "The linguistics of temperature"2015Inngår i: The linguistics of temperature / [ed] Maria Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, s. 1-40Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 292.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Introduction from the new Editor: Linguistic Typology today and tomorrow2018Inngår i: Linguistic typology, ISSN 1430-0532, E-ISSN 1613-415X, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 1-11Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 293.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    It’s boiling hot!: On the structure of the linguistic temperature domain across languages2011Inngår i: Rahmen des Sprechens : Beiträge zur Valenztheorie, Varietätenlinguistik, Kognitiven und Historischen Semantik / [ed] Schmid, Sarah Dessì, Ulrich Detges, Paul Gévaudan, Wiltrud Mihatsch and Richard Waltereit, Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag, 2011, s. 379-396Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 294.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Lexical typology and contact2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 295.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Lexical typology and universals: a temperature perspective2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 296.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Linguistic typology and language contact2011Inngår i: The Oxford Handbook of Linguistic Typology / [ed] Jae Jung Song, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, s. 568-590Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 297.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Linguistics of temperature and lexical typology2010Inngår i: Materialy 7-oj konferencii po tipologii i grammatike dlja molodyx issledovanij [Proceedings of the 7th junior researchers conference on typology and grammar], St:Petersburg: "Nauka" , 2010, s. 189-191Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 298.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Maria's ring of gold: adnominal possession and non-anchoring relations in the European languages2004Inngår i: Possessives and Beyond: Semantics and Syntax. / [ed] Kim, Ji-yung, Yu. Lander, and B. H. Partee, Amherst, Ma.: GLSA Publications , 2004, s. 155-181Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 299.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Mass and collection2004Inngår i: Morphologie: ein internationales Handbuch zur Flexion und Wortbildung = Morphology : an international handbook on inflection and word-formation. Halbbd./Vol. 2 / [ed] Geert Booij, Christian Lehmann, Joachim Mugdan, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2004, s. 1067-1072Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 300.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik, Avdelningen för allmän språkvetenskap.
    Moja kamchatskaja èkspedicija [My Kamchatka expedition]2017Inngår i: Zhizn’ kak èkspedicija: sbornik k 50-letiju shkoly polevoj lingvistiki A.E. Kibrika I S.V. Kodzasova [Life as expedition: a volume for the 50th anniversary of A.E. Kibrik’s and S.V. Kodzasov’s school of field linguistics] / [ed] V. A. Plungian, O. V Fëdorova, Moscow: Buki Vedi , 2017, s. 651-672Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
3456789 251 - 300 of 598
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf