Change search
Refine search result
45678910 301 - 350 of 1323
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 301.
    Fondén, Charlotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Leiknes, M.
    "After all it’s my life we’re dealing with": Drug users’ encounters with social services, the police and voluntary organisations2003In: Regulating Drugs: Between Users, the Police and Social Workers / [ed] Houborg Pedersen, E. & Tigerstedt, C., Helsingfors: Nordiska nämnden för alkohol- och drogforskning (NAD) , 2003, p. 101-114Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 302.
    Fondén, Charlotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sato, Hanako
    Drogbruk eller narkotikamissbruk?: unga och narkotika i självpresentationer och pressbilder2005Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 303.
    Fondén, Charlotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sato, Hanako
    Drogrbruk eller narkotikamissbruk? Unga och narkotika i självpresentationer och pressbilder2005Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 304.
    Fondén, Charlotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sato, Hanako
    Pressbilder och självbilder - unga vuxna och narkotika2004In: Socialt perspektiv, ISSN 1102-2973, no 1-2, p. 137-151Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 305.
    Fondén, Charlotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Skrinjar, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    På vems villkor?: Om möten mellan myndigeter och narkotikamissbrukare2003Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 306. Frankl, My
    et al.
    Philips, Björn
    Berggraf, Lene
    Ulvenes, Pål
    Johansson, Robert
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 482-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to make the first evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Affect Phobia Test, using the Swedish translation - a test developed to screen the ability to experience, express and regulate emotions. Data was collected from a clinical sample (N=82) of patients with depression and/or anxiety participating in randomized controlled trial of Internet-based affect-focused treatment, and a university student sample (N=197). The internal consistency for the total score was satisfactory (Clinical sample =0.88/Student sample =0.84) as well as for all the affective domains, except Anger/Assertion (=0.44/0.36), Sadness/Grief (=0.24/0.46) and Attachment/Closeness (=0.67/0.69). Test retest reliability was satisfactory (ICC>0.77) for the total score and for all the affective domains except for Sadness/Grief (ICC=0.04). The exploratory factor analysis resulted in a six-factor solution and did only moderately match the test's original affective domains. An empirical cut-off between the clinical and the university student sample were calculated and yielded a cut-off of 72 points. As expected, the Affect Phobia test showed negative significant correlations in the clinical group with measures on depression (r(xy)=-0.229; p<0.01) and anxiety (r(xy)=-0.315; p<0.05). The conclusion is that the psychometric properties are satisfactory for the total score of the Affect Phobia Test but not for some of the test's affective domains. Consequently the domains should not be used as subscales. The test can discriminate between individuals who seek help for psychological problems and those who do not.

  • 307. Frankl, My
    et al.
    Philips, Björn
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Psychotherapy role expectations and experiences Discrepancy and therapeutic alliance among patients with substance use disorders2014In: Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, ISSN 1476-0835, E-ISSN 2044-8341, Vol. 87, no 4, p. 411-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesThe main aim of the study was to examine how the discrepancy between role expectations prior to psychotherapy and experiences of ongoing psychotherapy related to therapeutic alliance. We hypothesized that a similarity between patient role expectations and experiences would be associated with a stronger alliance. The study also examined whether different dimensions of psychotherapy role expectations predicted retention in psychotherapy. DesignA naturalistic study design was used with data collected prior to therapy and during the first 6months of therapy. MethodPatients with substance use disorders completed the Psychotherapy Expectation Questionnaire-short version (PEX-S) at the time of therapy assessment. A subsample of these patients (n=41; n=24 in individual therapy and n=17 in group therapy) provided data from therapy including psychotherapy experiences (also measured with PEX-S) and therapeutic alliance, measured with Working Alliance Questionnaire-short version. ResultsFor patients in group therapy, discrepancy between role expectations and experiences correlated negatively with alliance. Expectations prior to psychotherapy characterized by defensiveness correlated negatively with therapy retention. ConclusionThe finding that disconfirmation of patients' role expectations in group therapy were associated with weaker therapeutic alliance highlights the importance of discussing psychotherapy expectations at an early stage in treatment. Expectations characterized by defensiveness predicted worse retention in psychotherapy, which indicates that the PEX-S can be helpful in detecting patients at risk for dropout. Practitioner points <list list-type=bulleted> In targeting a patient's role expectancies prior to treatment, possible discrepancies between patient and therapist are made visible and possible to examine. Clarifying the patient's role expectations and the therapist's rationale might be a first step towards establishing a strong working alliance. Surveying the patient's defensiveness tendencies at the beginning of therapy offers a chance to discuss possible fears and other obstacles concerning therapy. Discrepancy between the patient's role expectations prior to treatment and their actual experiences of psychotherapy render valuable information that can be of use in the therapy process. <doi origin=wiley registered=yes>10.1111/(ISSN)2044-8341</doi

  • 308. Frick, Ulrich
    et al.
    Gmel, Gerhard
    Rehm, Jürgen
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Average volume of alcohol consumption, drinking patterns and related burden of mortality in young people in established market economies in Europe2001In: European Addiction Research, ISSN 1022-6877, E-ISSN 1421-9891, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 148-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the burden of mortality in young people (age 15-29) in established market economies in Europe in 1999, which is attributable to alcohol consumption. Two dimensions of alcohol consumption were considered: average volume of consumption, and patterns of drinking.

    METHODS:Mortality data were obtained from the WHO EIP data bank, average volume data from the WHO global databank on alcohol, pattern of drinking data from a questionnaire sent out to experts, from the published literature and from the WHO global databank. Methods are explained and discussed in detail in two other contributions to this volume.

    RESULTS:More than 8,000 deaths of people aged 15-29 in Europe in 1999 were attributable to alcohol. Young males show a higher proportion of alcohol-attributable deaths (12.8%) than females (8.3%). Both average volume and patterns of drinking contribute to alcohol-related death.

    CONCLUSIONS:Alcohol-related deaths constitute a considerable burden in young people in Europe.

  • 309. Friedrichs, A.
    et al.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Inst Therapieforsch, Munich, Germany.
    Berner, M.
    Schippers, G.
    Broekman, T.
    Rist, F.
    Piontek, D.
    Roehrlg, J.
    Buchholz, A.
    Adaptation of Dutch Allocation Guideline for Patients after Alcohol Detoxification - Results of a Delphi Survey2013In: SUCHTTHERAPIE, ISSN 1439-9903, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 148-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim of the study: In the Netherlands, guidelines for the allocation of patients with alcohol related disorders to different levels of care have been implemented and evaluated nationwide. These guidelines cannot be used in the German health care system without adaptation, but with modifications they may prove useful. Aim of this study was therefore to develop an adaptation of those allocation guidelines to the German system. Methods: Using the Delphi-technique, experts in substance use treatment discussed existing addiction treatment services and indication criteria relevant for allocation in 3 rounds. The results of this process were integrated by means of a concluding consensus conference. Results: The Dutch allocation guideline was adapted for treatment decisions following detoxification treatment of alcohol dependent patients. Conclusions: The consented guideline can support the allocation of patients with alcohol-related disorders. The guideline is currently evaluated in a randomized controlled trial.

  • 310. Friedrichs, Anke
    et al.
    Silkens, Anna
    Reimer, Jens
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institute for Therapeutic Research Munich, Germany.
    Scherbaum, Norbert
    Piontek, Daniela
    Röhrig, Jeanette
    Hempleman, Jochen
    Härter, Martin
    Buchholz, Angela
    Role preferences of patients with alcohol use disorders2018In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 84, p. 248-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    Shared decision making (SDM) is increasingly demanded in medical decision making. SDM acknowledges patients' role preferences in decision making processes. There has been limited research on SDM and role preferences in substance use disorders; results are promising. Aim of this study was to investigate role preferences of patients with alcohol use disorders (AUD), and to identify predictors of these preferences.

    Method

    Cross-sectional data collected from June 2013 to May 2014 in four detoxification wards in Germany during a randomised controlled trial (RCT, Registration Code O1GY1114) was analysed. Of the 250 patients with AUD who were included in the RCT, data from 242 patients [65% male; mean age = 45.2 years (sd = 10.3)] were analysed. Participants' role preferences were assessed with the Control Preference Scale. Potential correlates were drawn from instruments used in the RCT; multinomial logistic regression was used.

    Results

    90% (n = 217) of the AUD patients preferred an active or shared role in decision-making, 10% (n = 25) preferred a passive role. Patients' desire for help was associated with their role preference (OR = 3.087, p = .05). The model's goodness of fit was Nagelkerke's R-2 = 0.153 [chi(2) (24) = 25.206, p = .395].

    Conclusions

    Patients' preference for an active role in decision-making underscores the importance of involving patients in their treatment planning. Patients' desire for help seems to be an important determinant of paternalistic decision making. However, further research is needed to determine whether patients' role preferences are related to their behavior during their treatment referral and recovery.

  • 311. Fäldt, Johannes
    et al.
    Storbjörk, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Palm, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Oscarsson, Lars
    Stenius, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Vårdkedjeprojektet: Tre utvärderingsperspektiv2007Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 312.
    Gauffin, Karl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Hemmingsson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    The effect of childhood socioeconomic position on alcohol-related disorders later in life: a Swedish national cohort study2013In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 67, no 11, p. 932-938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Alcohol use is the third most important global-health risk factor and a main contributor to health inequalities. Previous research on social determinants of alcohol-related disorders has delivered inconsistent results. We aimed to investigate whether socioeconomic position (SEP) in childhood predicts alcohol-related disorders in young adulthood in a Swedish national cohort.

    Methods: We studied a register-based national cohort of Swedish citizens born during 1973–1984 (N=948 518) and followed them up to 2009 from age 15. Childhood SEP was defined by a six-category socioeconomic index from the Censuses of 1985 and 1990. Rs of alcohol-related disorders, as indicated by register entries on alcohol-related death and alcohol-related medical care, were analysed in Cox regression models with adjustment for sociodemographic variables and indicators of parental morbidity and criminality.

    Results: Low childhood SEP was associated with alcohol-related disorders later in life among both men and women in a stepwise manner. Growing up in a household with the lowest SEP was associated with risk for alcohol-related disorders of HR: 2.24 (95% CI 2.08 to 2.42) after adjustment for sociodemographic variables, compared with the highest SEP group. Adjusting the analysis for parental psychosocial problems attenuated the association to HR 1.87 (95% CI 1.73 to 2.01).

    Conclusions: The study demonstrates that low SEP in childhood predicts alcohol-related disorders in young adulthood. Alcohol abuse needs to be addressed in policies to bridge the gap of health inequalities.                                                                                 

  • 313. Giesbrecht, N.
    et al.
    Demers, A.
    Ogborne, A.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Stoduto, G.
    Lindquist, E.
    Introduction2006In: Sober Reflections: Commerce, Public Health, and the Evolution of Alcohol Policy in Canada, 1980-2000 / [ed] N. Giesbrecht, A. Demers, A. Ogborne, R. Room, G. Stoduto & E. Lindquist, Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press , 2006, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 314. Giesbrecht, N.
    et al.
    Demers, A.Ogborne, A.Room, RobinStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).Stoduto, G.Lindquist, E.
    Sober Reflections: Commerce, Public Health, and the Evolution of Alcohol Policy in Canada, 1980-20002006Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 315. Giesbrecht, N.
    et al.
    Ialomiteanu, A.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Anglin, L.
    Trends in public opinion on alcohol policy measures: Ontario 1989-19982001In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, ISSN 0096-882X, E-ISSN 1934-2683, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 142-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:This article presents trend data concerning public opinion on alcohol policy in the Canadian province of Ontario over a 10-year period (1989-98), highlights the currently debated issue of private venues for retail alcohol sales and assesses correspondence between public opinion and actual and proposed policy decisions.

    METHOD:Selected policy-related items from nine probability surveys on representative samples of male and female Ontario adults (range of unweighted n 's: 953 to 1,947) were analyzed by means of logistic regression.

    RESULTS:

    We found strong support for the status quo for a number of items, including beer and liquor store hours, corner store sales and taxes. Across all years, less than 6% of the total sample wanted to lower the legal drinking age. Over time, a linear trend showed a gradual but not entirely consistent development of attitudes among the Ontario public, favoring relaxation of some controls. However, contrary to this trend, disapproval of retail sales in corner stores increased significantly from 1992 to 1996. Demographic breakdown shows that relaxation of controls is most favored by those who report consumption of five or more drinks per occasion at least weekly over the past 12 months, and most strongly opposed by women and nondrinkers. Of those who seldom or never consume five or more drinks per occasion, the majority express satisfaction with the status quo.

    CONCLUSIONS:These data call into question the suitability of changes in alcohol policy that would diminish controls. It is of particular interest that there seems to be little public support for privatization proposals in the province. Public opinion against comer store sales of alcoholic beverages increased over time.

  • 316. Giesbrecht, N.
    et al.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Demers, A.
    Lindquist, E.
    Ogborne, A.
    Bondy, S.
    Stoduto, G.
    Alcohol policies: is there a future for public health considerations in a commerce-orineted environment?2006In: Sober Reflections: Commerce, Public Health, and the Evolution of Alcohol Policy in Canada, 1980-2000 / [ed] N. Giesbrecht, A. Demers, A. Ogborne, R. Room, G. Stoduto & E. Lindquist, Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press. , 2006, p. 289-320Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 317. Gmel, G.
    et al.
    Rehm, J.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Contrasting individual and aggregate studies in alcohol research? Combining them is the answer!2004In: Addiction Research and Theory, ISSN 1058-6989, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reprint of Rose's (1985) seminal paper reiterated the distinction between two etiological questions: What are the causes of individual cases, and what are the causes of population incidence? The first question deals with within-population variability and the second with between-population variability, suggesting that individual level studies should be used to answer the first question and aggregate level studies to answer the second. What findings should be trusted, however, when the results from aggregate and individual level studies on the same topic diverge? One example of the divergence of findings in the alcohol field is that of studies on coronary heart disease. The overwhelming majority of individual level studies have shown the protective effect of moderate alcohol consumption for coronary heart disease, however aggregate level studies have failed to corroborate this finding. This discrepancy has been taken by some as evidence that the aggregate level disproved a causal relation at the individual level. This implies that the same hypothesis could be tested at both levels. The present editorial will reiterate the notion of Rose (1985) that both types of analyses answer different questions and cannot be expected to coincide in results.

  • 318. Gmel, G
    et al.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Kuendig, H
    Kuntsche, S
    Detrimental drinking patterns: Empirical validation of the pattern values score of the Global Burden of Disease 2000 study in 13 countries.2007In: Journal of Substance Use, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 337-358Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 319. Gmel, Gerhard
    et al.
    Rehm, Jürgen
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Greenfield, Thomas K.
    Dimensions of alcohol-related social and health consequences in survey research2000In: Journal of Substance Abuse, ISSN 0899-3289, E-ISSN 1873-6491, Vol. 12, no 1-2, p. 113-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dimensions of alcohol-related social and health consequences are approached from two different perspectives. First, classical approaches with factor analytic techniques are used to empirically determine the dimensionality of item batteries intended to measure harm. Second, a closer look is taken at theoretically underlying dimensions of social and health consequences and their association with alcohol consumption. Using as empirical material data from the US national survey of males aged 21–59 (N3) conducted in 1969, the following specific questions are discussed: (1) What are the underlying dimensions of alcohol-related social and health consequences? (2) How should the relation between alcohol consumption and consequences best be assessed (in terms of epidemiological traditions or social constructivist traditions)? (3) How can we best incorporate the time perspective into modeling the relationship between alcohol consumption and consequences? A first attempt is made to develop practical guidelines for future research on handling these problems.

  • 320. Gomes de Matos, Elena
    et al.
    Atzendorf, Josefine
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany.
    Piontek, Daniela
    Substanzkonsum in der Allgemeinbevölkerung in Deutschland. Ergebnisse des Epidemiologischen Suchtsurveys 20152016In: SUCHT, ISSN 0939-5911, E-ISSN 1664-2856, Vol. 62, no 5, p. 271-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: We assess the extent of substance use among the adult general population in Germany. Method: Data come from the 2015 Epidemiological Survey of Substance Abuse, a national survey conducted among the resident population aged 18 to 64 years. With a response rate of 52.2 %, the sample size was n = 9,204. Participants were asked about their use of alcohol, tobacco, pharmaceuticals, and illicit drugs. Results: Of all respondents, 28.7 % had used tobacco products in the past 30 days, and 72.8 % had drunk alcohol. Indications of clinically relevant use within 12 months prior to the survey were found for 28.3 % of men and 9.6 % of women. Regarding illicit drugs, the 12-month prevalence was 6.1 % for cannabis and at most 1 % for all other substances. Analgesics were the class of pharmaceuticals with the highest prevalence of use (47.1 %), but the lowest prevalence of daily use among consumers of a given pharmaceutical (8.6 %). Conclusions: Results demonstrate that the use of psychoactive substances is still highly prevalent in the general population. Prevalence of use as well as indications for clinically problematic use were highest for licit substances that are highly available. Potentially clinically relevant illicit drug use affects considerably fewer individuals. However, because they comprise a specific risk population, it should be ensured that they are reached by appropriate prevention measures.

  • 321. Gomes de Matos, Elena
    et al.
    Hannemann, Tessa-Virginia
    Atzendorf, Josefine
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institute for Therapy Research, Germany.
    Piontek, Daniela
    The Consumption of New Psychoactive Substances and Methamphetamine Analysis of Data From 6 German Federal States2018In: Deutsches Ärzteblatt International, ISSN 1866-0452, E-ISSN 1866-0452, Vol. 115, no 4, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The abuse of new psychoactive substances (NPS) and methamphet amine has severe adverse effects. Here we provide the first report of regional patterns in NPS and methamphetamine consumption in Germany, on the basis of epidemiologic data from six federal states (Bavaria, Hamburg, Hesse, North Rhine-Westphalia, Saxony, and Thuringia).

    Methods: Data were derived from the 2015 Epidemiological Survey of Substance Abuse (Epidemiologischer Suchtsurvey) and supplemented with additional cases from the federal states that were studied. The numbers of persons included in the representative samples of persons aged 18 to 64 in each state were 1916 (Bavaria), 1125 (Hamburg), 1151 (Hesse), 2008 (North Rhine-Westphalia), 1897 (Saxony), and 1543 (Thuringia). Potential risk factors for the lifetime prevalence of consumption were studied by logistic regression.

    Results: The lifetime prevalence of methamphetamine consumption in the individual states ranged from 0.3% (North Rhine-Westphalia) to 2.0% (Saxony). Thuringia and Saxony displayed values that were significantly higher than average. For NPS, the figures ranged from 2.2% (Bavaria) to 3.9% (Hamburg), but multivariate analysis revealed no statistically significant differences between the states. Higher age and higher educational level were associated with lower consumption of NPS and methamphetamine, while smoking and cannabis use were each associated with higher consumption.

    Conclusion: NPS consumption is equally widespread in all of the federal states studied. Methamphetamine is rarely consumed; its consumption appears to be higher in Saxony and Thuringia. The risk factor analysis reported here should be interpreted cautiously in view of the low case numbers with respect to consumption.

  • 322. Gomes de Matos, Elena
    et al.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institute for Therapeutic Research, Germany.
    Hannemann, Tessa-Virginia
    Soellner, Renate
    Piontek, Daniela
    Cross-cultural variation in the association between family's socioeconomic status and adolescent alcohol use2017In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 797-804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and Aims. This study estimates cross-country variation in socioeconomic disparities in adolescent alcohol use and identifies country-level characteristics associated with these disparities. Design and Methods. The association between socioeconomic status (family wealth and parental education) and alcohol use (lifetime use and episodic heavy drinking) of 15- to 16-year-olds from 32 European countries was investigated. Country-level characteristics were national income, income inequality and per capita alcohol consumption. Multilevel modelling was applied. Results. Across countries, lifetime use was lower in wealthy than in less wealthy families (odds ratio [OR]((girls))=0.95, OR(boys)=0.94). The risk of episodic heavy drinking, in contrast, was higher for children from wealthier families (OR(girls)=1.04, OR(boys)=1.08) and lower when parents were highly educated (ORs=0.95-0.98). Socioeconomic disparities varied substantially between countries. National wealth and income inequality were associated with cross-country variation of disparities in lifetime use in few comparisons, such that among girls, the (negative) effect of family wealth was greatest in countries with unequally distributed income (OR=0.86). Among boys, the (negative) effect of family wealth was greatest in low-income countries (OR=1.00), and the (positive) effect of mothers' education was greatest in countries with high income inequality (OR=1.11). Discussion and Conclusions. Socioeconomic disparities in adolescent alcohol use vary across European countries. Broad country-level indicators can explain this variation only to a limited extent, but results point towards slightly greater socioeconomic disparities in drinking in countries of low national income and countries with a high income inequality. [Gomes de Matos E, Kraus L, Hannemann T-V, Soellner R, Piontek D. Cross-cultural variation in the association between family's socioeconomic status and adolescent alcohol use.

  • 323. Gomes de Matos, Elena
    et al.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany.
    Pabst, Alexander
    Piontek, Daniela
    Does a Change Over All Equal a Change in All? Testing for Polarized Alcohol Use Within and Across Socio-Economic Groups in Germany2015In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 700-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed at testing whether drinking volume and episodic heavy drinking (EHD) frequency in Germany are polarizing between consumption levels over time. Polarization is defined as a reduction in alcohol use among the majority of the population, while a subpopulation with a high intake level maintains or increases its drinking or its EHD frequency. The polarization hypothesis was tested across and within socio-economic subgroups. Analyses were based on seven cross-sectional waves of the Epidemiological Survey of Substance Abuse (ESA) conducted between 1995 and 2012 (n = 7833-9084). Overall polarization was estimated based on regression models with time by consumption level interactions; the three-way interaction with socio-economic status (SES) was consecutively introduced to test the stability of effects over socio-economic strata. Interactions were interpreted by graphical inspection. For both alcohol use indicators, declines over time were largest in the highest consumption level. This was found within all SES groups, but was most pronounced at low and least pronounced at medium SES. The results indicate no polarization but convergence between consumption levels. Socio-economic status groups differ in the magnitude of convergence which was lowest in medium SES. The overall decline was strongest for the highest consumption level of low SES.

  • 324. Gomes de Matos, Elena
    et al.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany.
    Pabst, Alexander
    Piontek, Daniela
    Problembewusstsein und Inanspruchnahme von Hilfe bei substanzbezogenen Problemen2013In: SUCHT, ISSN 0939-5911, E-ISSN 1664-2856, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 355-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: It was aimed to estimate 12-months prevalences of i) perception of substance-related problems among alcohol, illicit drugs and prescription drug users; ii) use of several formal and informal sources of care by individuals perceiving substance-related problems; and iii) use of professional help among individuals with a substance use disorder. Factors associated with help-seeking were assessed. Methods: Data come from the 2012 Epidemiological Survey of Substance Abuse (ESA; n = 9084; 18 to 64 years; response rate 53.6 %). DSM-IV diagnoses were assessed using the M-CIDI. Regression analyses were used to assess predictors of help-seeking. Results: Between 6 % (alcohol) and 19 % (illicit drugs) of substance users reported having experienced substance related problems. Of those, 14 % (alcohol), 33 % (illicit drugs) and 59 % (prescription drugs) sought help. With the exception of income, socio-demographic variables were not associated with help-seeking. Conclusions: Results show a clear under-treatment in individuals with substance related problems. Help-seeking seems to be mainly influenced by the severity of the substance-related disorder.

  • 325. Gomes de Matos, Elena
    et al.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany.
    Pabst, Alexander
    Piontek, Daniela
    Trends im Substanzkonsum Jugendlicher: gibt es regionale Unterschiede?2014In: SUCHT, ISSN 0939-5911, E-ISSN 1664-2856, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 163-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To examine differences between German federal states regarding adolescent consumption of alcohol, tobacco and cannabis and its time trends. Method: Data of 23,997 adolescents came from three waves (2003; 2007; 2011) of the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ESPAD) in Bavaria, Berlin, Brandenburg, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania and Thuringia. Descriptive and regression analyses were applied. Results: Across the five federal states and three substances, consumption declined over time. For cannabis use this trend is just observed until 2007. Adolescents in Berlin show the lowest level of alcohol use and the highest level of cannabis use. Tobacco use is highest in Brandenburg and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania and declined most strongly in Thuringia. Conclusions: Despite some differences in the federal states’ consumption patterns, most notably in Berlin, trends are very similar. Altogether, the observed consumption indicators, which on European level are high to moderate, show a declining trend.

  • 326.
    Granberg, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Trolldal, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Resandeinförsel och smuggling av cigaretter åren 2003-20042005Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 327.
    Grittner, Ulrike
    et al.
    Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometrics & Epidemiology.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Bloomfield, Kim
    Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research, University of Aarhus .
    Changes in Alcohol Consumption in Denmark after the Tax Reduction on Spirits2009In: European Addiction Research, ISSN 1022-6877, E-ISSN 1421-9891, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 216-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: This paper examines changes in alcohol consumption in Denmark between 2003 and 2006 after the excise tax on spirits in Denmark was lowered by 45% on October 1, 2003 and travelers' allowances for the import of alcohol were increased on January 1, 2004. Methods: Cross-sectional and panel data from Denmark from 2003 to 2006 were analyzed. Samples were collected by telephone interviews using random digit dialing. Results: Panel data for Denmark revealed that alcohol consumption remained relatively stable. Similar results were found in the Danish cross-sectional data. It appears that 'substitution' rather than increased importation occurred. Conclusion: We found no evidence to support earlier research stating that decreased prices and increased availability is related to higher alcohol consumption. This could be partly because (1) Denmark has reached a 'saturation' level of consumption over the past 30 years and (2) the survey mode of data collection did not capture specific subpopulations who might have increased their consumption. It may be necessary to examine other indicators of alcohol use or alcohol-related harm in order to fully assess the consequences of such changes in alcohol availability.

  • 328. Grittner, Ulrike
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Huhtanen, Petri
    Svensson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Stockholm Prevents Alcohol and Drug Problems (STAD), Centre for Dependency Disorders, Stockholm County Council.
    Nordlund, Sturla
    Bloomfield, Kim
    Who are the private alcohol importers in the Nordic countries?2014In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 125-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims – The high price of alcohol in the Nordic countries has been a long-standing policy to curb consumption, which has led consumers to importing alcohol from countries with lower prices. This paper seeks to develop a profile of alcohol importers in four Nordic countries. Methods – Cross-sectional data from general population surveys in Denmark (2003–2006), Norway (2004), Sweden (2003–2006) and Finland (2005–2006) were analysed by multiple logistic and linear regression. Independent variables included region, socio-demographics, drinking indicators and alcohol-related problems. Outcome variables were importer status and amount of imported alcohol.  Results – People living in regions close to countries with lower alcohol prices were more often importers and imported higher amounts than people living in other regions. Higher educated persons were more likely to be importers, but the amounts imported were smaller than those by people with lower education. Persons with higher incomes were also more likely to be importers and they also imported larger amounts than people with lower incomes. In Sweden and Denmark regional differences of importer rates were more pronounced for persons of lower incomes. Age, risky single-occasion drinking, risky drinking and alcohol problems were positively related to the amounts of imported alcohol. Conclusions – Private importers in the Nordic countries are an integrated yet heavy drinking segment of society and do not appear to be located on the fringes of society.

  • 329.
    Grittner, Ulrike
    et al.
    Charité Medical School Berlin, Germany.
    Huhtanen, Petri
    THL, Finland.
    Svensson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Nordlund, Sturla
    SIRUS, Oslo, Norway.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Bloomfield, Kim
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Characteristics of alcohol importers in the Nordic countries2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 330. Gross, Cornelius
    et al.
    Reis, Olaf
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany.
    Piontek, Daniela
    Zimmermann, Ulrich S.
    Long-term outcomes after adolescent in-patient treatment due to alcohol intoxication: A control group study2016In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 162, p. 116-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The long-term psychosocial development of adolescents admitted to in-patient treatment with alcohol intoxication (AIA) is largely unknown. Methods: We invited all 1603 AIAs and 641 age- and sex-matched controls, who had been hospitalized in one of five pediatric departments between 2000 and 2007, to participate in a telephone interview. 277 cases of AIA and 116 controls (mean age 24.2 years (SD 2.2); 46% female) could be studied 5-13 years (mean 8.3, SD 2.3) after the event. The control group consisted of subjects who were admitted due to conditions other than alcohol intoxication. Blood alcohol concentration on admission was systematically measured in the AIA but, owing to the retrospective study design, not in the control group. Subtle alcohol intoxication could therefore not be entirely ruled out in the control group. Long-term outcome measures included current DSM-5 alcohol use disorders (AUD), drinking patterns, illicit substance use, regular smoking, general life satisfaction, use of mental health treatment, and delinquency. Results: AIA had a significantly elevated risk to engage in problematic habitual alcohol use, to exhibit delinquent behaviors, and to use illicit substances in young adulthood compared to the control group. Severe AUD also occurred considerably more often in the AIA than the control group. Conclusions: In the majority of AIAs, further development until their mid-twenties appears to be unremarkable. However, their risk to develop severe AUD and other problematic outcomes is significantly increased. This finding calls for a diagnostic instrument distinguishing between high- and low-risk AIAs already in the emergency room.

  • 331. Groß, Cornelius
    et al.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Munich, Germany.
    Piontek, Daniela
    Reis, Olaf
    Zimmermann, Ulrich S.
    Prediction of long-term outcomes in young adults with a history of adolescent alcohol-related hospitalization2016In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 47-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Empirical data concerning the long-term psychosocial development of adolescents admitted to inpatient treatment with alcohol intoxication (AIA) are lacking. The aim of this study was to identify the factors that, at the time of admission, predict future substance use, alcohol use disorders (AUD), mental health treatment, delinquency and life satisfaction.

    Methods: We identified 1603 cases of AIA treated between 2000 and 2007 in one of five pediatric departments in Germany. These former patients were invited to participate in a telephone interview. Medical records were retrospectively analyzed extracting potential variables predicting long-term outcomes.

    Results: Interviews were conducted with 277 individuals, 5–13 [mean 8.3 (SD 2.3)] years after treatment, with a response rate of 22.7%; of these, 44.8% were female. Mean age at the interview was 24.4 (SD 2.2) years. Logistic and linear regression models revealed that being male, using illicit substances and truancy or runaway behavior in adolescence predicted binge drinking, alcohol dependence, use of illicit substances and poor general life satisfaction in young adulthood, explaining between 13 and 24% of the variance for the different outcome variables.

    Conclusions: This naturalistic study confirms that known risk factors for the development of AUD also apply to AIA. This finding facilitates targeted prevention efforts for those cases of AIA who need more than the standard brief intervention for aftercare.

  • 332. Gruenewald, P.
    et al.
    Ponicki, W.
    Holder, H.
    Romelsjö, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol prices, beverages quality, and the demand for alcohol: quality substitution and price elasticies2006In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 0145-6008, E-ISSN 1530-0277, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 96-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although the published literature on alcohol beverage taxes, prices, sales, and related problems treats alcoholic beverages as a simple good, alcohol is a complex good composed of different beverage types (i.e., beer, wine, and spirits) and quality brands (e.g., high-, medium-, and low-quality beers). As a complex good, consumers may make substitutions between purchases of different beverage types and brands in response to price increases. For this reason, the availability of a broad range of beverage prices provides opportunities for consumers to mitigate the effects of average price increases through quality substitutions; a change in beverage choice in response to price increases to maintain consumption.

    Methods: Using Swedish price and sales data provided by Systembolaget for the years 1984 through 1994, this study assessed the relationships between alcohol beverage prices, beverage quality, and alcohol sales. The study examined price effects on alcohol consumption using seemingly unrelated regression equations to model the impacts of price increases within 9 empirically defined quality classes across beverage types. The models enabled statistical assessments of both own-price and cross-price effects between types and classes.

    Results: The results of these analyses showed that consumers respond to price increases by altering their total consumption and by varying their brand choices. Significant reductions in sales were observed in response to price increases, but these effects were mitigated by significant substitutions between quality classes.

    Conclusions: The findings suggest that the net impacts of purposeful price policy to reduce consumption will depend on how such policies affect the range of prices across beverage brands.

  • 333. Gruenewald, Paul
    et al.
    Ponicki, William
    Holder, Harold
    Romelsjö, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol prices, beverage quality, and the demand for alcohol: quality substitution and price elasticities2006In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, Vol. 31, no 96-105Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 334. Grüne, Bettina
    et al.
    Piontek, Daniela
    Pogarell, Oliver
    Grübl, Armin
    Groß, Cornelius
    Reis, Olaf
    Zimmermann, Ulrich S.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany.
    Acute alcohol intoxication among adolescents - the role of the context of drinking2017In: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 176, no 1, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims (1) to describe the context of drinking among adolescents with acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) by gender, (2) to explore temporal changes in the context of drinking and (3) to analyse the association between the context of drinking and blood alcohol concentration (BAC). A retrospective chart review of 12- to 17-year-old inpatients with AAI (n = 1441) of the years 2000 to 2006 has been conducted in five participating hospitals in Germany. Gender differences in the context of drinking were tested with t test and chi2 test. Differences over time were analysed using logistic regressions. Multivariate linear regression was used to predict BAC. Girls and boys differed in admission time, drinking situation, drinking occasion and admission context. No temporal changes in drinking situation and in admission to hospital from public locations or places were found. Higher BAC coincided with male gender and age. Moreover, BAC was higher among patients admitted to hospital from public places and lower among patients who drank for coping.

    Conclusion: The results suggest gender differences in the context of drinking. The context of drinking needs to be considered in the development and implementation of target group-specific prevention and intervention measures.

  • 335. Grüne, Bettina
    et al.
    Piontek, Daniela
    Sleczka, Pawel
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany.
    Pogarell, Oliver
    Drinking Location and Drinking Culture and Their Association With Alcohol Use Among Girls and Boys in Europe2017In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1937-1888, E-ISSN 1938-4114, Vol. 78, no 4, p. 549-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to (a) investigate the relationship between drinking location and adolescent alcohol use, (b) analyze the association of drinking culture indicators with alcohol use, and (c) explore interaction effects of drinking location and drinking culture indicators. Method: Analyses were based on the 2011 European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ESPAD). The analytical sample consisted of 15-to 16-year-old students (N = 36,366; 51.6% female) from 11 countries. Alcohol volume and perceived drunkenness were used as outcomes. Drinking location was used as predictor variable. Per capita consumption and restrictions on public drinking were used as country-level predictors. Sex-stratified generalized linear models with cluster robust standard errors were applied. Results: Compared with drinking outdoors, the reported alcohol volume was lower when drinking at home and higher when drinking in multiple locations or at someone else's home. Drunkenness was highest among boys drinking at someone else's home and, compared with drinking outdoors, lower among girls drinking on premise. Per capita consumption was positively associated with alcohol volume. Among girls, the association between per capita consumption and both outcomes was stronger when drinking in multiple locations than when drinking outdoors. A ban on public drinking showed a negative effect on drinking volume and drunkenness among girls. Conclusions: The role of different drinking locations in alcohol use as well as sex differences should be considered in prevention and intervention of adolescent heavy drinking. Setting-specific prevention and intervention measures are of greater importance in medium-or high-consumption societies.

  • 336.
    Gustafsson, Hjördis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Efter fängelset: åtta personer berättar om tiden efter anstaltsvistelse2007Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 337.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol consumption in southern Sweden after major decreases in Danish spirits tax and increases in Swedish traveller's quotas2010In: European Addiction Research, ISSN 1022-6877, E-ISSN 1421-9891, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 152-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. In 2003, Denmark lowered its tax on spirits, and in 2004, Sweden increased its traveller import quotas. Aim. The aim was to determine whether these two changes increased self-reported alcohol consumption in southern Sweden, which is located near to Denmark. Method. Data were collected through telephone interviews with the general population between 2003 and 2006. People aged 16-80 years were interviewed. Some lived in southern Sweden, others in the northern region, which was assumed to be unaffected by the policy changes and thus used as a control site. Analyses were performed for the total population as well as by sex, age, socio-economic group and by consumption pattern. Results. The expected results were not found; alcohol consumption in southern Sweden had not changed. The few statistically significant changes found in southern Sweden indicated decreases. In the north, however, consumption seemed to have increased. Conclusion. In addition to the two policy changes mentioned above, other changes seem to have affected alcohol consumption in Sweden. It is possible, however, that the policy changes have affected population groups not reached by surveys, and thus other types of data need to be analysed before drawing any far-reaching conclusions.

  • 338.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol Policy in Transition and Diverging Alcohol Patterns2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 339.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol-related problems in southern Sweden before and after major changes in availability of cheap alcohol2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 340.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Changes in alcohol availability, price and alcohol-related problems and the collectivity of drinking cultures: What happened in southern and northern Sweden?2010In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 456-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims. There were two aims with this paper; first to study whether alcohol-related self-reported problems behaved in the same way as alcohol consumption in southern Sweden -- assumed to be affected by a decrease in Danish spirits tax and increased Swedish travellers’ import quotas. The second aim was to study whether the results in southern and northern Sweden followed the predictions of Skog’s theory of collectivity of drinking cultures. Methods. Analysis was carried out on a sample from the general Swedish population for southern and northern Sweden separately. Two indexes for alcohol-related problems were computed and analysed by sex, age, income and alcohol consumption level. Results. Although there were no large changes in the number of persons reporting alcohol-related problems, the general trend in data for various sub-populations was a decrease in the southern site and an increase in the northern site. The increase among men noted in alcohol consumption in the northern site was found among alcohol-related problems as well. However, various population subgroups changed in different directions and did not move in concert over the population distribution. Conclusions. Analyses conformed that alcohol-related problems according to the two indexes used were behaving similarly to alcohol consumption, but less divergent. Skog’s theory could not be confirmed, alcohol-related problems did not change collectively within the population.

  • 341.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Effects on Alcohol-related Problems in South of Sweden due to increased availability of cheap spirits from Denmark2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 342.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Increased availability of cheap alcohol and its effect on the alcohol consumption2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 343.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Still no increase in alcohol consumption? A follow-up of the unexpected results of a tax change and increased availability2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Background On October 1st 2003 Denmark dropped its spirits tax by 45%, and on January 1st 2004 Sweden increased the traveller’s allowances. These two major changes were expected to increase alcohol purchases from Denmark by Swedes in the southern parts of Sweden. Aims The aim of the paper was to examine to what extent the policy changes were associated with changes in alcohol consumption in southern Sweden, for the total sample and in different population groups. Design, setting and participants Data were collected through telephone interviews from the southern parts of Sweden during the third quarter 2003-2006 (N’s 972-1425). The north of Sweden served as a control site, using the same method as in the experimental site (N’s 994-1343). Additional longitudinal samples were collected (NS=697, NN=670). Measurements Alcohol consumption was measured with beverage specific QF-scale questions. Separate analyses for monthly bingers and risk consumers were also performed. Findings Alcohol consumption did not increase more in the southern parts compared to the northern parts, but rather decreased while consumption increased in the north. Some population groups were however also found to have increased the consumption in the South, like women especially the older ones and those highly educated. Results indicated also that increase might have occurred among risk-consumers both among men and women and all age groups. Conclusions The study did not support earlier studies stating that decreased prices and increased availability leads to higher alcohol consumption, but neither could the possibility that the changes had an impact on some subgroups be eliminated.

  • 344.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Who buys smuggled alcohol in Sweden?2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 345.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ramstedt, Mats R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Changes in alcohol-related harm in Sweden after increasing alcohol import quotas and a Danish tax decrease-an interrupted time-series analysis for 2000-20072011In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 432-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Denmark decreased its tax on spirits by 45% on 1 October 2003. Shortly thereafter, on 1 January 2004, Sweden increased its import quotas of privately imported alcohol, allowing travellers to bring in much larger amounts of alcohol from other European Union countries. Although these changes were assumed to increase alcohol-related harm in Sweden, particularly among people living close to Denmark, analyses based on survey data collected before and after these changes have not supported this assumption. The present article tests whether alcohol-related harm in southern Sweden was affected by these changes by analysing other indicators of alcohol-related harm, e. g. harm recorded in different kinds of registers. Methods Interrupted time-series analysis was performed with monthly data on cases of hospitalization due to acute alcohol poisoning, number of reported violent assaults and drunk driving for the years 2000-07 in southern Sweden using the northern parts of Sweden as a control and additionally controlling for two earlier major changes in quotas. Results The findings were not consistent with respect to whether alcohol-related harm increased in southern Sweden after the decrease in Danish spirits tax and the increase in Swedish alcohol import quotas. On the one hand, an increase in acute alcohol poisonings was found, particularly in the 50-69 years age group, on the other hand, no increase was found in violent assaults and drunk driving. Conclusions The present results raise important questions about the association between changes in availability and alcohol-related harms. More research using other methodological approaches and data is needed to obtain a comprehensive picture of what actually happened in southern Sweden.

  • 346.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Changes in alcohol-related harm in Sweden after increasing import quotas and a Danish tax decrease2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 347.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Increasing traveller's allowances in Sweden - how did it affect private imports ad recorded sales2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 348.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Increasing traveller's allowances in Sweden - how did it affect private imports and recorded sales?2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 349.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Trolldal, Björn
    Svenska folkets alkoholkonsumtion under år 20032004Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 350.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Developmental alcohol trajectories when price and availability changed2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To identify developmental trajectories for alcohol consumption in southern Sweden in relation to increased availability of cheaper alcohol, and to study the likelihood of belonging to one of the identified trajectory groups. An increase of total consumption was expected to be related to an increase in consumption of spirits due to the nature of the changes. Developmental patterns were assumed to be different in northern Sweden given the distance to the changes.

    Design: 16-80 year olds from general population samples from southern (n=610) and northern (n=575) Sweden were interviewed by telephone before and after changes. Alcohol use trajectories for the years 2003-2006 were identified through longitudinal cluster analysis. Characteristics of clusters – sex, age, income, price expectations, alcohol attitude, alcohol consumption, binge drinking and beverage preferences – were compared.

    Findings: Three developmental trajectories for consumption were identified for each region. Alcohol habits influenced the likelihood of trajectory membership as decreasers on average had a higher initial consumption. An increase in spirits consumption was also observed among overall increasers. Other potential explanations were not linked to trajectories.

    Research implications: Earlier research of the changes was unable to find an overall increase in consumption but these results suggests that some groups changed as expected.

    Originality: Few studies have identified trajectories of alcohol use in relation to policy changes. Studying patterns of change puts the focus on consumption rather than population groups.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
45678910 301 - 350 of 1323
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf