Change search
Refine search result
45678910 301 - 350 of 1465
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 301.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Children's development of facework practices - An emotional endeavor2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 13, p. 3099-3110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the origin and development of facework practices in young children by focusing on two kinds of practices in child–parent interaction: (1) situations in which a child’s verbal and nonverbal emotive expressions indicate a need to save face; and (2) situations in which a child uses various strategies in order to save face. Through illustrations from a longitudinal material of child–adult interaction it is argued that emotive reactions constitute the base for face awareness in children. This awareness in time turns to child facework practices, a process aided and shaped by the interactional routines with parents. The central aim of the article is to highlight these two aspects of facework, one internal, emotional and related to face; the other external and interactional. As a second aim the article will enforce that the way we analyze interaction must be transparent in that it can be understood, reviewed and contested by others.

  • 302.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Conventions for annotation and transcription of the MINT-project: Modulating child language acquisition through parent-child interaction, MAW:2011.0072018Report (Other academic)
  • 303.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    From shrieks to "Stupid poo": emotive language in a developmental perspective2018In: Text & Talk, ISSN 1860-7330, E-ISSN 1860-7349, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 137-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to highlight and describe the forms of verbal emotive utterances that appeared in a longitudinal corpus of 11 Swedish children interacting with parents, siblings and friends. The children were in the ages 0;9 to 5;10 and were recorded four to six times during a two-year period. The verbal emotive expressions of the material are divided into the categories Descriptive versus Accompanying utterances. Descriptive utterances are emotive mainly from semantic conventions, whereas Accompanying utterances are emotive due to prosodic and contextual traits. The categories are illustrated and related to conventions, language development and cognitive growth. By classifying and labeling verbal expressions as emotive in different ways, it is argued that we can gain a better understanding of how language is used when intertwined with emotions, but also that we access a way to compare and investigate emotive language in a more thorough manner.

  • 304.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Gestures and gestures in child language development2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The underlying question in most work on gestures is how the relation between gesture and speech should be understood. This is also the fundamental question in this presentation, where focus is on children’s gestures in relation to language development and socialization.

    Gesture studies on adult interaction tend to divide gestural movements into various kinds depending on their assumed relation to spoken language. The group of gestures which have received most attention in the scientific world is the so called “co-speech gestures”, i.e. hand- and arm movements that occur simultaneously with speech and that are integrated temporally and semantically with the verbal utterance (Kendon, 1981, 2004; McNeill, 1992, 2005).

    In child language studies, the term co-speech gestures is not used as frequently, although the gestures actually described tend to be within that domain, e.g. the deictic pointing gesture co-occurring with “there” (Tomasello et al.,2007; Rowe et al.,2008). Other child gestures receiving attention are the more pragmatically oriented “grab/reach gesture” or emblematic gestures like “nodding”, “waving goodbye”, etc. (e.g., Bates et al., 1975). Although humans remain children for quite some time the majority of child-gesture studies end when the children reach the vocabulary spurt (around the second birthday). A likely reason is that the questions posed relate to the transition from pre-language to language and the role played by gestural behavior in this developmental interval.

    The presentation builds on a study taking the child gestures one step further by allowing the gesture definition to be wider (including in this term movements of the whole body), and the age span studied to go beyond the first two years. The material is longitudinal and consists of child-child and child-adult interaction between the ages 1 to 6. There are 11 children in the study, belonging to five families and they were recorded in their homes regularly during 2 ½ years. The data (in all 22 h) where transcribed and annotated using the ELAN software. The annotations of gestural behavior were categorized according to age of the child, interactional partner (child/adult), setting, activity/semantic theme, and concurrent speech/vocalizations.

    In the presentation, main focus will be on two groups of gestural behavior in particular: co-speech gestures and co-activity speech. Whereas the former is an established term (se above), the latter is the term I have been using to describe speech-gesture combinations where the vocalizations seem to be redundant or at least second in priority, for example the utterances made while going through the motions of ritualized and mainly gestural play (e.g., “pat-a-cake”, “peek-a-boo”, “hide-and-seek”). The differences between these two classes of gestural behavior will be illustrated, described, and related to language development, cognitive growth, and socialization patterns. Ending the talk the fundamental question of speech-gesture relation will be addressed and a developmental path including the described gestural forms will be sketched out.

  • 305.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Imitation vs association in child-adult and child-child interaction2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of imitation in language development is debated and unclear (e.g., Meltzoff, 2011; Heyes, 2001; Paulus, 2012) in part because of the difficulty to define imitation. Is it when A copies an act or an utterance from B within a specific time frame, or is it when the goal of B is captured and executed by A, regardless of the means to reach the goal? Further, must A be aware that s/he imitated B, or should low-level cognitive mechanisms be regarded as imitation as well?

    The aim of the present study was to identify and describe imitative behaviors in young children as they appear in a longitudinal material of child-child and child-adult interaction. “Imitation” was defined as: any verbal/vocal/nonverbal act that i) occurs after an identical such act; ii) semantically and/or pragmatically repeats an earlier verbal/vocal/nonverbal act. An example of the first kind would be a child, A, clapping his hands against his head hollering “hallo” and another nearby child, B, starts doing the same while watching A. The second kind could be illustrated with a child, C, saying to another mother than his own “mommy there is no need to talk, you can just go straight away” to which his own mother says “I recognize that comment, that’s what I say to grandma”. While the first example appears to be a direct, situated, practice where instant imitation is taking place, the second is a sequence where a more or less formulaic verbalization is copied from some previous occasion/s and delivered in a situation where it appears to fit, an associated imitation.

    In the talk, different imitative behavioral will be illustrated and related to instant vs associated contextual aspects. It will be argued that both behaviors build on common mechanisms of learning (Schöner, 2009; Smith & Katz, 1996), that they appear in parallel throughout the ages studied (see below), but that they differ in cognitive – although not necessarily social – complexity, as well as in their part in language development and socialization routines.

    Data consists of 22 hours of video recordings of 5 Swedish families with in all 11 children. The children are in the ages 0;9 to 5;10 years old and were recorded during a period of 2 ½ years. The recordings were done in a home environment together with siblings and parents.

  • 306.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Mamma!2010In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, Vol. December, no 6, p. 24-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 307.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Nods, headshakeas and the perception of multimodal constructions in child language2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within gesture studies, gesture and speech is often conceived of as a single communicative system. This means that human production of gestures are temporally and semantically synchronized with the concurrent verbal phrase, or vice versa. These multimodal clusters are described as constructions where the modalities add different but interrelated content to a common semantic whole, an Utterance (e.g. Goldin-Meadow, 2009, 2011; Kendon, 2004; Murillo & Belinchón, 2012). While this appears to be true for a large amount of gesture types – in particular those who fall under the heading Co-speech Gestures (i.e. gesture that by definition co-occur with a spoken utterance) – there are other gestures that are less explored as to their relation to speech and multimodal meaning. Among these other gestures we find emblems, a vaguely defined group of gestures that are often claimed to carry a semantic meaning on their own, regardless of (optional) concurrent verbalizations (McNeill, 1992). The present study investigated two emblematic gesture forms – nods and headshakes – and their appearance and use in a longitudinal, naturalistic material of child-child and child-adult interaction. The data consists of 11 Swedish children in the ages 0;9 to 5;10 years of age, recorded during a period of 2 ½ years as they interacted with siblings, parents, and friends in their home environment. In all, 22 hours of video recordings were transcribed and analyzed. From the data we could conclude two main factors: i) even emblems appear to be largely speech dependent for their interpretation; and ii) nods and headshakes appear to follow different developmental trajectories and behave rather differently throughout the ages studied. These findings will be discussed in relation to language development in general and to the perceptive system of humans in particular.

  • 308.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Socialization of verbal and nonverbal emotive expressions in young children2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The subject matter of this dissertation is children’s use and development of emotive expressions. While prior studies have either focused on facial expressions of emotions or on emotions in the social mechanisms of in situ interactions, this thesis opts to merge two traditions by applying an interactional approach to the interpretation of child–child and child–adult encounters. This approach is further supplemented with an interpretational frame stemming from studies on child development, sociology and psychology.

    In order to depict the multi-leveled process of socialization, a number of sub-areas are investigated such as the emotive expressions per se; how and when these expressions are used in interaction with parents and siblings; the kinds of responses the children get after using an emotive expression; parental acts (verbal or nonverbal) that bear on children’s conduct and their choice of such expressions. Finally, the relation between nonverbal displays and language as expressive means for emotions is analyzed from a developmental perspective.

    The data consists of video-recordings of five sibling groups in the ages between 1 ½ and 5 ½ who were followed for 2 ½ years in their home environment. In all, 19 recordings (15 h) were transcribed and analyzed.

    The results from the study lead to several different taxonomies previously not discussed in the pertinent literature: (i) the nonverbal, vocal and verbal emotive expressions used by children; (ii) the different means these expressions were put to in child–parent encounters; (iii) the ways relations to siblings can be seen as creating and shaping certain emotive processes. Furthermore, this work demonstrates that parental responses are of vital importance for the outcome of specific child expressions. As parents reprimand, comfort, praise and mediate in their interaction with their children, they create paths later used by the child as she practices and acquires her own expressive means for handling emotions in interactional contexts. Finally, a developmental frame of language and nonverbal acts is elaborated and suggested as a tool for discovering the paths of linguistic and emotional socialization.

  • 309.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språkprojektet i Farsta/Fagersjö1998In: Samverkan för barn och ungdom: en antologi om konsten att bedriva projekt / [ed] Ulf Hammare, Stockholm: Resursförvaltningen skola och socialtjänst, Forsknings- och utvecklingsenheten , 1998, p. 72-97Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 310.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    The relation between modalities in spoken language acquisition: Preliminary results from the Swedish MINT-project2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 311.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    The Swedish MINT-project – or, the quest to pull apart and put together constituents of verbal and nonverbal interaction2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 312.
    Gerholm, Tove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Salomão, Gláucia Laís
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Schwarz, Iris-Corinna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    The Swedish MINT Project: modelling infant language acquisition from parten-child interaction2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The MINT-project is a longitudinal study of verbal and nonverbal interaction between 73 Swedish children and their parents, recorded in lab environment from 3 months to 3 years of age. The overall goal of the project is to deepen our understanding of how language acquisition takes place in a multimodal and interactional framework. 

  • 313.
    Gerholm, Tove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Hörberg, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Tonér, Signe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Frankenberg, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Kjällander, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Lenz Taguchi, Hillevi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    A protocol for a three-arm cluster randomized controlled superiority trial investigating the effects of two pedagogical methodologies in Swedish preschool settings on language and communication, executive functions, auditive selective attention, socioemotional skills and early maths skills2018In: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 6, article id 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    During the preschool years, children develop abilities and skills in areas crucial for later success in life. These abilities include language, executive functions, attention, and socioemotional skills. The pedagogical methods used in preschools hold the potential to enhance these abilities, but our knowledge of which pedagogical practices aid which abilities, and for which children, is limited. The aim of this paper is to describe an intervention study designed to evaluate and compare two pedagogical methodologies in terms of their effect on the above-mentioned skills in Swedish preschool children.

    Method

    The study is a randomized control trial (RCT) where two pedagogical methodologies were tested to evaluate how they enhanced children’s language, executive functions and attention, socioemotional skills, and early maths skills during an intensive 6-week intervention. Eighteen preschools including 28 units and 432 children were enrolled in a municipality close to Stockholm, Sweden. The children were between 4;0 and 6;0 years old and each preschool unit was randomly assigned to either of the interventions or to the control group. Background information on all children was collected via questionnaires completed by parents and preschools. Pre- and post-intervention testing consisted of a test battery including tests on language, executive functions, selective auditive attention, socioemotional skills and early maths skills. The interventions consisted of 6 weeks of intensive practice of either a socioemotional and material learning paradigm (SEMLA), for which group-based activities and interactional structures were the main focus, or an individual, digitally implemented attention and math training paradigm, which also included a set of self-regulation practices (DIL). All preschools were evaluated with the ECERS-3.

    Discussion

    If this intervention study shows evidence of a difference between group-based learning paradigms and individual training of specific skills in terms of enhancing children’s abilities in fundamental areas like language, executive functions and attention, socioemotional skills and early math, this will have big impact on the preschool agenda in the future. The potential for different pedagogical methodologies to have different impacts on children of different ages and with different backgrounds invites a wider discussion within the field of how to develop a preschool curriculum suited for all children.

  • 314.
    Gerholm, Tove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Tonér, Signe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Frankenberg, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Kjällander, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Lenz-Taguchi, Hillevi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    A randomized controlled trial to examine the effect of two teaching methods on preschool children’s language and communication, executive functions, socioemotional comprehension, and early math skills2019In: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 7, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    During the preschool years, children’s development of skills like language and communication, executive functions, and socioemotional comprehension undergo dramatic development. Still, our knowledge of how these skills are enhanced is limited. The preschool contexts constitute a well-suited arena for investigating these skills and hold the potential for giving children an equal opportunity preparing for the school years to come. The present study compared two pedagogical methods in the Swedish preschool context as to their effect on language and communication, executive functions, socioemotional comprehension, and early math. The study targeted children in the age span four-to-six-year-old, with an additional focus on these children’s backgrounds in terms of socioeconomic status, age, gender, number of languages, time spent at preschool, and preschool start. An additional goal of the study was to add to prior research by aiming at disentangling the relationship between the investigated variables.

    Method

    The study constitutes a randomized controlled trial including 18 preschools and 29 preschool units, with a total of 431 children, and 98 teachers. The interventions lasted for 6 weeks, preceded by pre-testing and followed by post-testing of the children. Randomization was conducted on the level of preschool unit, to either of the two interventions or to control. The interventions consisted of a socioemotional and material learning paradigm (SEMLA) and a digitally implemented attention and math training paradigm (DIL). The preschools were further evaluated with ECERS-3. The main analysis was a series of univariate mixed regression models, where the nested structure of individuals, preschool units and preschools were modeled using random variables.

    Results

    The result of the intervention shows that neither of the two intervention paradigms had measurable effects on the targeted skills. However, there were results as to the follow-up questions, such as executive functions predicting all other variables (language and communication, socioemotional comprehension, and math). Background variables were related to each other in patterns congruent with earlier findings, such as socioeconomic status predicting outcome measures across the board. The results are discussed in relation to intervention fidelity, length of intervention, preschool quality, and the impact of background variables on children’s developmental trajectories and life prospects.

  • 315.
    Gerholm, Tove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Pagmar, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The MINT-project: Modeling infant language acquisition from parent-child interction2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 316.
    Gerholm, Tove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Tonér, Signe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Ge tid till goda samtal2018In: Förskoletidningen, ISSN 0348-0364, Vol. 43, no 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Förskolan är viktig för barns språk- och kommunikations- utveckling, särskilt för dem som inte har optimala förutsättningar. Den som har lätt för kommunikation har en fördel i livet. Genom att stötta barns samtal kan pedagogerna stärka språk och kommunikation.

  • 317.
    Ghazarian Andersson, Annie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Jubiska- pidgin eller kreol?2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna uppsats studerar jag jubiskans (JA) lexikon utifrån exempelmeningar och enstaka ord insamlade från olika källor om JA i syfte att svara på frågan – är JA en pidgin eller har den expanderats bortom denna fas? I studiet utgår jag ifrån språkliga kriterier som pidgin- och kreollexikon generellt utmärks av. Jag väljer ut både egenskaper som förekommer i båda språkvarianter (polysemi, multifunktionalitet) och egenskaper som förekommer i var och en av dessa språkvarianter (perifrastiska konstruktioner i pidginspråk och synonymi i kreoler). Förekomsten av synonyma ord i mitt material tyder på att språket är en kreol men i kombination med perifrastiska konstruktioner och en låg andel multifunktionella ord gör att jag inte får ett entydigt resultat. Därför väljer jag att komplettera med andra egenskaper som främst är kreolprominenta som t.ex. markering av TMA med hjälp av preverbala markörer och förekomsten av komplementerare och relativa pronomina. Resultatet av detta visar att JA faktiskt har expanderats bortom pidginfasen och är nu en kreol.

    C-

  • 318.
    Ghebre, Adi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Negation in Tigrinya: An Afro-Semitic language2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Tigrinya is one of the Afro Semitic languages, traditionally classified as North Ethiopic, and spoken in Eritrean and Northern Ethiopia. In this work Tigrinya negation particles were investigated and analyzed. with the main aim to emphasise distribution of negation particles in different word classes in the language. It is designed to provide some analysis of how the North Afro Semitic languages are related, with some descriptions about how they have different distribution of negation forms. Some linguistic ideas in using Tigrinya negation by comparing it with its sister languages are also given.

  • 319.
    Glaas, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Ett smärtsamt uppsatsvärk: Smärta, värk och ont på svenska2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Pain may be expressed in different ways depending on language and experiencer. This study aims to get a close up of Swedish pain expressions, and is based on earlier studies executed on Swedish and Greek respectively. Questions written by experiencers of pain to both the general public and physicians, and blogs of more narrative nature formed a corpus, divided in three different genres, where it was focused on the primary pain words pain and ache. The pain expressions were analyzed to provide information on how ordinary people, with various pain histories, tend to express their pain depending on addressee; if differences are found in between the genres. The results suggested, among other things, that the choice of pain word is to some extent governed by the perception of time, intensity, and also where pain is located within the body. The way chosen to verbally express pain differs somewhat in terms of how pain is perceived; as thing, process or quality.

  • 320. Glahn, Esther
    et al.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Holmen, Anne
    Hvenekilde, Anne
    Håkansson, Gisela
    Lund, Karen
    Pienemanns processabilitetsteori testet på dansk, norsk og svensk2002In: Forskning i nordiske sprog som andet- og fremmedsprog: Rapport fra konference i Reykjavik 23-25 maj 2001 / [ed] Audur Hauksdóttir et al., 2002, p. 31-47Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 321. Glahn, Esther
    et al.
    Håkansson, Gisela
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Holmen, Anne
    Hvenekilde, Anne
    Lund, Karen
    Processability in Scandinavian second language acquisition2001In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 389-416Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 322.
    Glant, Oliver
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Attitydanalys av svenska produktomdömen – behövs språkspecifika verktyg?2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sentiment analysis of Swedish data is often performed using English tools and machine. This thesis compares using a neural network trained on Swedish data with a corresponding one trained on English data. Two datasets were used: approximately 200,000 non-neutral Swedish reviews from the company Prisjakt Sverige AB, one of the largest annotated datasets used for Swedish sentiment analysis, and 1,000,000 non-neutral English reviews from Amazon.com. Both networks were evaluated on 11,638 randomly selected reviews, in Swedish and in English machine translation. The test set had the same overrepresentation of positive reviews as the Swedish dataset (84% were positive). The results suggest that English tools can be used with machine translation for sentiment analysis of Swedish reviews, without loss of classification ability. However, the English tool required 33% more training data to achieve maximum performance. Evaluation on the unbalanced test set required extra consideration regarding statistical measures. F1-measure turned out to be reliable only when calculated for the underrepresented class. It then showed a strong correlation with the Matthews correlation coefficient, which has been found to be more reliable. This warrants further investigation into whether the correlation is valid for all different balances, which would simplify comparison between studies.

  • 323.
    Gomes, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Investigating the tonal contours of Sawi nouns: A contrastive analysis with established tonal features of Palula2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores whether or not tonal contours are a contrastive feature in Sawi nouns. It aims to provide evidence towards the claim that Sawi has lost contrastive tones and provide a basis from which further research into how the use of qualitative vowel differences may have replaced the pitch accent system still found in Sawi’s closest relative, Palula. This was done through the analysis of a corpus of Sawi nouns with a computer program that visually stylizes prosodic and tonal features in audio samples of the language. This corpus was then analyzed for trends within itself as well as compared to known trends in the Palula lexicon. The findings support the original hypothesis that Sawi nouns do not have contrastive pitch accents, as found in Palula; and that further research may reveal a regular or semi-regular tonal contour accentuating the final mora of each noun.

  • 324.
    Granqvist, Pehr
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Vestbrant, Karolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Döllinger, Lillian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Liuzza, Marco Tullio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cognitive psychology. University of Catanzaro, Italy.
    Olsson, Mats J.
    Blomkvist, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Lundström, Johan N.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Monell Chemical Senses Center, USA; University of Pennsylvania, USA.
    The scent of security: Odor of romantic partner alters subjective discomfort and autonomic stress responses in an adult attachment-dependent manner2019In: Physiology and Behavior, ISSN 0031-9384, E-ISSN 1873-507X, Vol. 198, p. 144-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When in a stressful situation, access to adult attachment figures (e.g., romantic partners) is an important means by which adults regulate stress responses. The practice of smelling a partner's worn garment is reported as a self-treatment against stress. Here, we experimentally determined whether exposure to a partner's body odor attenuates adults' subjective discomfort and psychophysiological responses, and whether such effects are qualified by adult attachment security. In a blocked design, participants (N = 34) were presented with their partner's body odor, their own body odor, the odor of a clean t-shirt and rose odor, while exposed to weak electric shocks to induce discomfort and stress responses. Results showed that partner body odor reduces subjective discomfort during a stressful event, as compared with the odor of oneself. Also, highly secure participants had attenuated skin conductance when exposed to partner odor. We conclude that partner odor is a scent of security, especially for attachment-secure adults.

  • 325.
    Granqvist, Svante
    et al.
    Department of Speech, Music and Hearing, KTH.
    Sundberg, Johan
    Department of Speech, Music and Hearing, KTH.
    Cortes, Elisabet Eir
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Larsson, Josefina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Branderud, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    The front and sub-lingual cavities in coronal stops: An acoustic approach to volume estimation.2003In: Proceedings of the XVth International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Barcelona, p. 941-944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The subapical cavity has been shown to play a significant role in determining the F-patterns of articulations made with a raised tongue blade. This paper reports quantitative data on subapical volumes for Swedish dental and retroflex voiced stops. These estimates were made by means of an acoustic method using pulse excitation of the front cavity. EPG was employed to determine the place of articulation of the consonants. Front cavity volumes were found to vary in an approximately linear fashion as a function of place of articulation. For retroflex consonants, volumes ranged between 2 and 11 cm3. A lawful second-order effect was observed with front vowel contexts tending to shift the pattern towards smaller, and back vowels towards larger volumes.

  • 326.
    Grigonyte, Gintare
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Baldwin, Timothy
    Automatic Detection of Multilingual Dictionaries on the Web2014In: Proceedings of the 52nd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics (Short Papers), Association for Computational Linguistics, 2014, p. 93-98Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 327.
    Grigonyte, Gintare
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Clematide, Simon
    Institute of Computational Linguistics, University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Rinaldi, Fabio
    Institute of Computational Linguistics, University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    How preferred are preferred terms?2013In: eLex 2013 / [ed] Kosem, I., Kallas, J., Gantar, P., Krek, S., Langemets, M., Tuulik, M., 2013, p. 452-459Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 328.
    Grigonyte, Gintare
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Clematide, SimonUniversity of Zurich.Volk, MartinUniversity of Zurich.Utka, AndriusVytautas Magnus University.
    Proceedings of the Workshop on Innovative Corpus Query and Visualization Tools, NODALIDA 20152015Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen an increased interest in and availability of many different kinds of corpora. These range from small, but carefully annotated treebanks to large parallel corpora and very large monolingual corpora for big data research.

    It remains a challenge to offer flexible and powerful query tools for multilayer annotations of small corpora. When dealing with large corpora, query tools also need to scale in terms of processing speed and reporting through statistical information and visualization options. This becomes evident, for example, when dealing with very large corpora (such as complete Wikipedia corpora) or multi-parallel corpora (such as Europarl or JRC Acquis).

    The QueryVis workshop has gathered researchers who develop and evaluate new corpus query and visualization tools for linguistics, language technology and related disciplines. The papers focus on the design of query languages, and on various new visualization options for monolingual and parallel corpora, both for written and spoken language.

    We hope that QueryVis will stimulate discussions and trigger new ideas for the workshop participants and any reader of the proceedings. The preparation of the workshop and the reviewing of the submissions has already been an inspiring experience.

    All papers were peer-reviewed by three program committee members. We would like to thank all reviewers and contributors for their work and for sharing their thoughts and experiences with us.

    Let us all join our forces to make corpus exploration a rewarding, entertaining, and exciting experience which will grant us ever new insights into language and thought.

  • 329.
    Grigonyte, Gintare
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Pronunciation and Spelling: the Case of Misspellings in Swedish L2 Written Essays2014In: Human Language Technologies - The Baltic Perspective, Baltic HLT 2014 / [ed] Andrius Utka, Gintarė Grigonytė, Jurgita Kapočiūtė-Dzikienė, Jurgita Vaičenonienė, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2014, p. 95-98Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research presents an investigation performed on the ASU corpus. We analyse to what extent does the pronunciation of intended words reflects in spelling errors done by L2 Swedish learners. We also propose a method that helps to automatically discriminate the misspellings affected by pronunciation from other types of misspellings.

  • 330.
    Grigonyte, Gintare
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Kvist, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Velupillai, Sumithra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Henriksson, Aron
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Swedification patterns of Latin and Greek affixes in clinical text2016In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 5-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish medical language is rich with Latin and Greek terminology which has undergone a Swedification since the 1980s. However, many original expressions are still used by clinical professionals. The goal of this study is to obtain precise quantitative measures of how the foreign terminology is manifested in Swedish clinical text. To this end, we explore the use of Latin and Greek affixes in Swedish medical texts in three genres: clinical text, scientific medical text and online medical information for laypersons. More specifically, we use frequency lists derived from tokenised Swedish medical corpora in the three domains, and extract word pairs belonging to types that display both the original and Swedified spellings. We describe six distinct patterns explaining the variation in the usage of Latin and Greek affixes in clinical text. The results show that to a large extent affixes in clinical text are Swedified and that prefixes are used more conservatively than suffixes.

  • 331.
    Grigonyte, Gintare
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Schneider, Gerold
    From lexical bundles to surprisal: Measuring the idiom principle2014In: Lexical bundles in English non-fiction writing: forms and functions, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lexical bundles (LB) testify to Sinclair's idiom principle (SIP), and measure formulaicity, complexity and (non-) creativity (FCN). We exploit the information-theoretic measure of surprisal to analyze these.Frequency as measure of LB has been criticized (McEnery et al, 2006:208–220), instead collocation measures were suggested until Biber (2009:286–290) raised three criticisms. First, MI ranks rare collocations, which often include idioms, highest. We answer that also idioms are formulaic, and there are collocation measures which have a bias towards frequent collocations.Second, MI doesn't respect word order. We thus use directed word transition probabilities like surprisal (Levy and Jaeger 2007):3-gram surprisal =Third, formulaic sequences are often discontinuous. We thus sum over sequences, use 3-grams as atoms, and address syntactic surprisal.We argue that abstracting to surprisal as measure of LB and FCN is appropriate, as it expresses reader expectations and text entropy. We use surprisal to analyse differences between:

    1. spoken and written learner language (L2);
    2. L2 across proficiency levels;
    3. L2 compared with L1

    We test Pawley and Syder (1983)'s and Levy and Jaeger (2007)'s hypothesis that native speakers play the tug-of-war between formulaicity and expressiveness best, thus minimizing comprehension difficulty, according to the uniform information density principle.

  • 332.
    Grigonyte, Gintare
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Schneider, Gerold
    Measuring Encoding Efficiency in Swedish and English Language Learner Speech Production2017In: Proceedings of Interspeech 2017 / [ed] Francisco Lacerda, David House, Mattias Heldner, Joakim Gustafson, Sofia Strömbergsson, Marcin Włodarczak, The International Speech Communication Association (ISCA), 2017, p. 1779-1783Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use n-gram language models to investigate how far language approximates an optimal code for human communication in terms of Information Theory [1], and what differences there are between Learner proficiency levels. Although the language of lower level learners is simpler, it is less optimal in terms of information theory, and as a consequence more difficult to process.

  • 333.
    Grigonyté, Gintaré
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Kvist, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Velupillai, Sumithra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Improving Readability of Swedish Electronic Health Records through Lexical Simplification: First Results2014In: Proceedings of the 3rd Workshop on Predicting and Improving Text Readability for Target Reader Populations (PITR), Stroudsburg, USA: Association for Computational Linguistics, 2014, p. 74-83Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes part of an ongoing effort to improve the readability of Swedish electronic health records (EHRs). An EHR contains systematic documentation of a single patient’s medical history across time, entered by healthcare professionals with the purpose of enabling safe and informed care. Linguistically, medical records exemplify a highly specialised domain, which can be superficially characterised as having telegraphic sentences involving displaced or missing words, abundant abbreviations, spelling variations including misspellings, and terminology. We report results on lexical simplification of Swedish EHRs, by which we mean detecting the unknown, out-ofdictionary words and trying to resolve them either as compounded known words, abbreviations or misspellings.

  • 334.
    Grigonyté, Gintaré
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Kvist, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Velupillai, Sumithra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Spelling Variation of Latin and Greek words in Swedish Medical Text2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 335.
    Grigonyté, Gintaré
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Language-independent exploration of repetition and variation in longitudinal child-directed speech: A tool and resources2016In: Proceedings of the joint workshop on NLP for Computer Assisted Language Learning and NLP for Language Acquisition at SLTC, Umeå, 16th November 2016 / [ed] Elena Volodina, Gintarė Grigonytė, Ildikó Pilán, Kristina Nilsson Björkenstam, Lars Borin, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016, p. 41-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a language-independent tool, called Varseta, for extracting variation sets in child-directed speech. This tool is evaluated against a gold standard corpus annotated with variation sets, MINGLE-3-VS, and used to explore variation sets in 26 languages in CHILDES-26-VS, a comparable corpus derived from the CHILDES database. The tool and the resources are freely available for re-search.

  • 336.
    Grzech, Karolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Schwarz, Anne
    Ennis, Georgia
    Divided we stand, unified we fall? The impact of standardisation onoral language varieties: a case study of Amazonian Kichwa2019In: Revista de Llengua i Dret, ISSN 0212-5056, no 71, p. 123-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article adds to the discussion on standardisation of minority languages spoken in primarily oral cultures. Focusingon Amazonian Kichwa (Quechuan, lowland Ecuador), we show how the introduction of a written standard can undermine language transmission, prompt contradictory ideologies, and instil conflicting aims within speech communities. Our approach combines descriptive linguistics and ethnography. First, we examine the extent of variation within Amazonian Kichwa and compare the local varieties with the standard. We juxtapose this with the speakers’ perceptions of and attitudes towards variation, evidenced in their linguistic practices and discourse. We show that these perceptions have little to do with the features being standardised, but this does not preclude the speakers’ having clear attitudes towards what the perceived standard. To explain this, we propose that Amazonian Kichwa speakers value authenticity above mutual intelligibility, contrary to ideologies assigning value to languages as potential tools of wider communication. To conclude, we provide policy recommendations grounded in this study, but applicable to minoritised oral varieties in other contexts.

  • 337.
    Grzech, Karolina Zofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Elizabeth Couper-Kuhlen and Margret Selting, Interactional Linguistics: Studying Language in Social Interaction, Cambridge University Press, 20172019In: Linguist List, E-ISSN 1068-4875, no 30, article id 338Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 338.
    Guseinova, Fatima
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Kartläggning av KVINNA och MAN i August Strindbergs verk: En korpusstudie av sammansatta substantiv och kollokationer med ett diakront perspektiv2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Discourse prosody and semantic preference are inherent aspects of language. As soon as a word becomes part of text, it seizes to exist as an isolated unit. The aim of this thesis was to study quantitatively the use of the lemmas woman and man, and the compound nouns containing them, in the works of August Strindberg. The material used consists of his novels The Red Room, Gothic Rooms and Black Banners. The occurrence of the two lemmas was observed with respect to frequency, the degree of emotional weight in compounds and the distribution of lexicalized compounds between women and men. Additionally, the context of lemmas was observed diachronically, through an analysis of discourse prosody and semantic preference of the collocations for woman and man. The results showed that the lemma man is mentioned more often than woman. Most compounds for man are lexicalized, while the opposite pertains to women. Compounds containing woman are more often negatively charged. Meanwhile, compounds containing man are predominantly neutral. The analysis of collocations for the lemmas was not able to map the author’s attitude accurately and more data and deeper methods of analysis are needed.

  • 339.
    Gustafson Capkova, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Schlafende Bücher aufwecken: Meine Erfahrungen als Teilnehmerin am Kunstprojekt ÜBERMALTE BÜCHER2015In: Kunst & Therapie, Zeitschrift für bildnerische Therapien, ISSN 1432-833X, no 2, p. 76-78Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 340.
    Gustafson-Capková, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Integrating Prosody into an Account of Discourse Structure2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis a study of discourse segmenting is carried out, which investigates both segment boundaries and segment content. The results are related to discourse theory. We study the questions of how the prosody and the text structure influence subjects' annotations of discourse boundaries and discourse prominence. The hypothesis was that the annotations would be influenced by the discourse type.

    Two studies were carried out. 1) a study of boundary annotation, 2) a study of prominence annotation. All studies were made on four different discourse types, scripted and spontaneous monologue and scripted and spontaneous dialogue. In addition the annotations were carried out under two different conditions 1) based on transcripts alone and 2) based on transcripts together with access to the speech signal.

    The results indicate that the boundary annotations were less dependent on the speech signal than the prominence annotations. It seems that subjects have segmented on the basis of the text structure, while prominence to a great extent was annotated on the basis of the prosody. In the case of boundary markings the boundary context in terms of parts of speech differs across speaking styles, which is not the case for the prominences. A separate study of segment intentions was also made, and it was found that the interpretation of a specific intention, questions, seems to be arrived at primarily on the basis of the text structure. However, in some cases also the prosody affects the annotations.

    The picture that emerges indicates a distribution of labour between text structure and prosody, governed by the principle of economy. In cases where the boundaries were less well definied, as in e.g. spontaneous monologue, the pattern of the prominences was clearer. In cases where the boundaries were more clearly indicated, as in read aloud text, the prominences were less clearly communicated.

    The findings were interpreted within Grosz and Sidner's (1986) discourse theory. It is suggested that differences in the segmenting strategy originating from the interaction of text structure and prosody can be expressed as differences in the contributions from the different components of discourse suggested in the framework of Grosz and Sidner (1986).

  • 341.
    Gustavsson, Alice
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Beröring i interaktion mellan föräldrar och deras barn2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Beröring är, efter att länge ha varit ganska förbisett, numera ett växande forskningsområde inom förälder-barn kommunikation. Detta har skett i takt med att man har insett vikten av social interaktion för utvecklingen av alla kognitiva förmågor, och kanske särskilt för språkutvecklingen. Denna studie undersöker hur beröring ser ut i förälder-barn interaktion, och anpassar en tidigare utarbetad mall (Agrawal, 2010) för annotering av beröring i interaktion av svenska förälder-barn dyader. Inspelningar av fyra förälder-barn-par i åtta filer, två filer per barn, annoterades och analyserades. Barnen, två flickor och två pojkar, var vid första inspelningstillfället 3 månader gamla och vid andra 6 månader.

    Förälderns beröring annoterades och analyserades med perspektiv på vilka kroppsdelar som berördes mest, vilken typ av beröring som var vanligast och hur mycket hudkontakt som förekom i den totala tiden av beröringen. Resultaten visar att föräldrarna vid båda inspelningstillfällena mest höll sina barn, samt att de mest förekommande kroppsdelar att beröra var händerna och överkroppen vid 3 respektive 6 månaders ålder. Det framkom även att den totala beröringen samt beröringen med hudkontakt minskade från första inspelningstillfället. Detta konfirmerar tidigare forskningsresultat som bland annat sett att hållande av barn är vanligast vid tidig ålder, samt att beröringen i stort minskar gradvis under det första levnadsåret.

  • 342.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    F0-patterns in infant directed speech2002In: EURESCO: Brain development and cognition, 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 343.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Pre-attentive speaker recognition: A realistic possibility or Science Fiction?2016In: Abstracts for the presentations at the Campinas Workshop on Vocal Profile Analysis (VPA) to be held at UNICAMP, April 4–8, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In my talk I will present a study on neural processing of voices. The aim was to investigate the possibility of using ERPs as a measure of recognition of a familiar voice. The methodology however raises questions concerning pre-attentive processing of voices. I will present the study on voice familiarity and discuss the typical MMN (Mismatch Negativity) that was found in relation to voices, but not to familiarization. Acoustic analysis of voice characteristics in the current study as well as follow up studies with controlled exposure and voice parameters will also be addressed. I would like to discuss these issues with you, and also the implications of a possible MMN to familiar voices.

  • 344.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    The language learning infant: Effects of speech input, vocal output, and feedback2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis studies the characteristics of the acoustic signal in speech, especially in speech directed to infants and in infant vocal development, to gain insight on essential aspects of speech processing, speech production and communicative interaction in early language acquisition. Three sets of experimental studies are presented in this thesis. From a phonetic point of view they investigate the fundamental processes involved in first language acquisition.

    The first set (study 1.1 and study 1.2) investigated how linguistic structure in the speech signal can be derived and which strategy infants and adults use to process information depending on its presentation. The second set (study 2.1 and study 2.2) studied acoustic consequences of the anatomical geometry of the infant vocal tract and the development of sensory-motor control for articulatory strategies. The third set of studies (study 3.1 and study 3.2) explored the infant's interaction with the linguistic environment, specifically how vocal imitation and reinforcement may assist infants to converge towards adult-like speech.

    The first set of studies suggests that structure and quality of simultaneous sensory input impact on the establishment of initial linguistic representations. The second set indicates that the anatomy of the infant vocal tract does not constrain the production of adult-like speech sounds and that some degree of articulatory motor control is present from six months of age. The third set of studies suggests that the adult interprets and reinforces vocalizations produced by the infant in a developmentally-adjusted fashion that can guide the infant towards the sounds of the ambient language. The results are discussed in terms of essential aspects of early speech processing and speech production that can be accounted for by biological general purpose mechanisms in the language learning infant.

     

  • 345.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Klintfors, Eeva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lindh, Jonas
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Neural processing of voices - familiarity2013In: Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics: POMA - ICA 2013 Montreal, Acoustical Society of America (ASA), 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brain responses to familiar and unfamiliar voices were investigated with ERPs (Event Related Potentials). Presentation of a stream of one syllable utterances from a female voice established a standard expectation, and similar samples from four other male voices where inserted as unexpected deviants in a typical mismatch paradigm. The participants were 12 students from the basic course in linguistics. Two of the deviant voices were familiar voices of their teachers. The two other deviant voices were matched (same age, sex and dialect) but unfamiliar to the participants. A typical MMN (Mismatch Negativity) was elicited, i.e. a more negative response to the deviants compared to the standards. In contrast to verbal reports, where only one participant identified any of the deviant voices, the MMN response differed on group level between familiar and unfamiliar voices. MMN to familiar voices was larger. Using teachers' voices ensured naturalistic long term exposure, but did not allow for random assignment to conditions of familiarity making the design quasi-experimental. Thus acoustic analysis of voice characteristics as well as follow up studies with randomized exposure to voices are needed to rule out possible confounds and establish a causal effect of voice familiarity.

  • 346.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Klintfors, Eeva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Schwarz, Iris-Corinna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Assessing language acquisition from parent-child interaction: An event-related potential study on perception of intonation contours in infancy2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to present our multidisciplinary project to study parent-child interaction. The goal of the project is to identify, test, and simulate components of child and adult speechand gestures and the consequences they might have on child language acquisition. Since typical parent-child interaction is built upon both interlocutors’ intention-reading, responsiveness to joint-attention, and imitation of speech/gestures, we make video recordings along with recordings of speech data to grasp the integration of semantic and pragmatic aspects of language acquisition. The understanding of parent-child interaction benefits further frominformation on brain activation involved in speech processing. As a first step to achieve the project goals, an electroencephalography/event-related potential (EEG/ERP) study exploring children’s early perception of intonation contours involved in human interactions was performed. This paper discusses the characteristics of integration of multimodal social-emotional (speech,prosody, faces, posture) signals as part of the dynamics of communication in typically developing children. Possible application fields are social signal processing (SSP; an emerging research domain that aims to provide computers ability to understand human social signals), and improvement of diagnosis of late or atypical language development in pathologies that affect the dynamics of social interaction (such as autism spectrum disorders).

  • 347.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Assessing F0 patterns in infant-directed speech: A tentative stochastic model2002In: TMH-QPSR Vol. 43 – Fonetik 2002, 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 348.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Vocal imitation in early language acquisition2008In: Interspeech2008, 2008, p. 1976-1979Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study of vocal imitation during the early stages of the language acquisition process. Utterances were extracted from recordings of adult-infant interactions in controlled but naturalistic experimental settings. For each recording session, utterances were used to create pairs of adult-infant samples that were presented to a panel of listeners, whose task was to judge whether the samples in a pair could be considered as imitations of each other or not. The results suggest an age-dependent hierarchy for the impact of different phonetic dimensions on imitation judgments and provide a basis for a quantitative model of vocal imitation.

  • 349.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lindh, Jonas
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Markelius, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Ericsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Moniri, Sadegheh Farah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Klintfors, Eeva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Neural processing of familiar and unfamiliar voices2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a pilot study on neural processing of familiar and unfamiliar voices in adults. This is the first of a series of experiments we plan to perform to examine how general biological mechanisms and linguistic experience might interact during voice recognition, from birth up until adulthood. We have chosen to measure ERPs1 during voice presentation because it allows for an experimental setup suitable for both adults and infants (in future studies). Furthermore it captures the subject’s reaction to stimuli in both the sensory pathways and cognitive processing. In the current study our intention was to examine adults’ responses to familiar and unfamiliar voices as well as to evaluate the experimental design for our future studies.

  • 350.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ellen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Klintfors, Eeva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Directional hearing in a humanoid robot: Evaluation of microphones regarding HRTF and azimuthal dependence2006In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2006 / [ed] Gilbert Ambrazaitis and Susanne Schötz, Lund: Department of Linguistics and Phonetics, Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund University , 2006, p. 45-49Conference paper (Other academic)
45678910 301 - 350 of 1465
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf