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  • 301.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Meierkord, Christiane
    English in contemporary Sweden: Perceptions, policies, and narrated practices2013In: Journal of Sociolinguistics, ISSN 1360-6441, E-ISSN 1467-9841, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 93-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compares trends in Sweden's language planning and language policies, and particularly the rationale underlying recent government legislation, to actual language use at the grass roots' of society, in order to investigate the extent to which academic and official rationales are confirmed by observed language practices. The passing of the Swedish Language Act of 2009 followed debates in academia and the media which not infrequently characterised English as a major threat to the survival of Swedish. However, despite the strong belief in the utility of English widely held in Sweden, the Swedish language is the preferred language of Swedes as well as immigrants in most domains. These results reveal a contradiction between the arguments put forward by a number of academics, educators and journalists concerning the threat' of English, and the language practices of ordinary folk in their daily lives.

  • 302.
    Ursini, Francesco-Alessio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Esse and sta: auxiliary selection in the Aquilan dialect.2013In: Dialectologia, ISSN 2013-2247, no 10, p. 107-134Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 303.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Exploring ELF: Academic English Shaped by Non-native Speakers2013In: English Language Teaching, ISSN 1916-4742, E-ISSN 1916-4750, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 494-497Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 304.
    Vermeulen, Pieter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Flights of Memory: Teju Cole’s Open City and the Limits of Aesthetic Cosmopolitanism2013In: Journal of Modern Literature, ISSN 0022-281X, E-ISSN 1529-1464, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 40-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While Teju Cole's 2011 novel Open City has been received as an exemplary cosmopolitan performance, a careful reading of the novel's engagement with memories of suffering and of its evocations of aesthetic experiences shows that it interrogates rather than affirms an aesthetic cosmopolitan program. Through its use of a flat, nearly affectless tone, it renders visible the inability of contemporary calls for aesthetic and memorial cosmopolitan practices to engage a global landscape riven by injustice and inequality. As the novel progresses, its apparent celebration of the exemplary cosmopolitan figure of the flâneur makes way for the decidedly less glamorous figure of the fugueur. By mobilizing this marginal figure from the history of psychiatry, a condition marked by unwanted restlessness and ambulatory automatism, Open City exposes the limited critical purchase of the imaginative mobility and intercultural curiosity celebrated by cosmopolitan defenses of literature and art.

  • 305.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Graduate learners’ approaches to genre-analysis tasks: Variations across and within four disciplines2013In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 84-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genre-based approaches are widely used in academic writing courses for graduate students. Yet, despite numerous studies of academic discourses and genres, there is still little research focusing on the learner in ESP genre-based instruction, and further consideration of individual learners’ responses to genre pedagogy is needed. This paper reports on a study conducted at a multi-disciplinary humanities faculty. It examines graduate learners’ approaches to “examine-and-report-back” genre-analysis tasks by comparing thirty-two students from four disciplines: archaeology, history, literature, and media studies. The data are subjected to qualitative analysis inspired by the constant comparative method. The overview of features in students’ genre-analysis tasks across the four disciplines is illustrated with excerpts from student writing. Graduate learners’ approaches to genre-analysis fall into two categories: descriptive and analytical. It is shown that graduate learners’ approaches to genre-analysis tasks vary depending on individual students’ capacity to analyse academic texts in relation to their purpose, audience, and disciplinary practices. Another possible factor impacting this variation includes the extent of learners’ understanding of disciplinary knowledge-making practices.  Finally, students’ own aims and learning histories affect the way they approach genre-analysis tasks.

  • 306.
    Shaw, Philip M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Grammar in Academic Writing2013In: The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics / [ed] Carol A. Chapelle, Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Academic discourse (the language, organization, and rhetoric of academic texts) is a member of a set of discourses called “language for specific purposes” (LSP), which include business, legal, and technical discourse. These discourses occur in spoken and written texts of many sorts. Their vocabulary and grammar can be called their registers, so that one could speak of a general academic written register characterized, for example, by formality and precision, and, within that, of the register of chemistry, characterized above all by a particular terminology. But all these LSP discourses are also characterized by having a particular set of genres (i.e., types of texts with a particular purpose and audience, for example textbooks, research articles, student essays). They use the grammar of the general language but the frequency and functions of some features are different, depending partly on the genre.

  • 307. Åsman, Thea Palm
    et al.
    Pedersen, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    How Bert got into Ned's head: domestication in the translation of literature for young readers2013In: Perspectives: studies in translatology, ISSN 0907-676X, E-ISSN 1747-6623, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 143-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper was to discover to what extent the American translation of the Swedish children's novel Berts dagbok had been adapted to its audience as a result of the translator's initial norm. Previous research has found that while translators of children's literature traditionally mainly employ domesticating strategies, recent research has shown that current translations of canonized children's literature, and literature aimed at a slightly older demographic segment, have been more source-oriented. We therefore decided to investigate whether the translator's initial norm had been to domesticate the text, i.e. adapting any unfamiliar cultural context with regard to the new audience, American children and young teenagers. Through the analysis of coupled pairs it was concluded that the translator's initial norm was still to domesticate the text, and, as a result, a majority of the extracted examples had been replaced by something more familiar to the new audience, which consequently moved the story from Sweden to USA.

  • 308.
    Álvarez López, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    Seiler Brylla, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Introduction2013In: Computer mediated discourse across languages / [ed] Laura Álvarez López, Charlotta Seiler Brylla, Philip Shaw, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013, p. 11-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 309.
    Rasmussen Goloubeva, Irina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Joyce, Benjamin and Magical Urbanism (European Joyce Studies 21) by Maurizia Boscagli, Enda Duffy2013In: James Joyce Broadsheet, ISSN 0143-6333, no 96Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 310.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    João Paulo Borges Coelho, João Albasini and the Worlding of Mozambican Literature2013In: 1616: Anuario de literatura comparada, ISSN 0210-7287, Vol. 3, p. 91-106Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In O Olho de Hertzog (2010), set in the immediate aftermath ofthe First World War, the Mozambican writer João Paulo Borges Coelho presentsa cosmopolitan panorama of colonial south-eastern Africa. «Mozambique» emergeshere not primarily as a Portuguese colonial space but as a site of multipleentanglements between interests: transnational and local, European and African,South African and Mozambican, British and German, colonial and proto-nationalist.In such a way, and differently from previous Mozambican literature, O Olhode Hertzog performs a complex act of worlding that exceeds the bounded colonial/national space of Mozambique, but resists synthesis. This cosmopolitanismcan be read expressive of the strained relations and constitutive hierarchies ofcolonial society as well as, by implication, of contemporary globalisation. Themost important index of such a critical cosmopolitanism is the trope of the «twoworlds» of Lourenço Marques, embodied in the central character João Albasini,legendary mestiço activist and founder of the proto-nationalist journal O BradoAfricano (1918-1974). Albasini functions as a Virgil for the protagonist HansMahrenholz’s descent into the colonial inferno of Mozambique. Not least byciting documentary material –Albasini’s editorials and shop signs in LourençoMarques– Coelho problematises the divisions of the colonial city, sustained byinternational capital, and provides a sharp contrast to the otherwise dominant«European» narrative of novel, which revolves around a fabled diamond andwhite South African intrigue.

  • 311.
    Hynninen, Niina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Kuka päättää, mikä on oikein?2013In: Tempus, ISSN 0355-8053, no 5, p. 14-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 312.
    Mezek, Spela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Learning terminology from reading texts in English: The effects of note-taking strategies2013In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 133-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Student note-taking strategies can provide an insight into how students learn subject-specific terminology in L2 from L2 reading. This article explores the relationship between reading, note-taking strategies, and the learning of English terms among Swedish students. Students participated in an experiment in which they were presented with new terminology and could take notes. Their learning was measured with a multiple-choice test. Results show that students who took more extensive notes and who engaged with the text better learnt more terms. Pedagogical implications for subject and LSP teachers are discussed.

  • 313.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Literary Language and the Translated Self of Assia Djebar2013In: Transcultural Identities in Contemporary Literature / [ed] Irene Gilsena Nordin, Julie Hansen, Carmen Zamorano Llena, Amsterdam/New York: Rodopi, 2013, p. 203-222Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 314.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Litteraturvetenskapen och det kosmopolitiska begäret2013In: Tidskrift för litteraturvetenskap, ISSN 1104-0556, E-ISSN 2001-094X, no 1, p. 81-93Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 315.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mauranen, Anna: Exploring ELF: Academic English shaped by non-native speakers, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2012; ISBN: 978-0521-17752-82013In: Journal of English as a Lingua Franca, ISSN 2191-9216, E-ISSN 2191-933X, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 397-400Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book could be seen as an early representative of a mature phase of ELF studies,in which the validity of ELF usage is well enough established for the focus tobe on dispassionate investigation rather than advocacy. It is based on the millionwordHelsinki ELFA corpus of academic speech in English produced (mainly) byspeakers with a different home language. The author’s wide reading, clear vision,and rational approach make it an exceptionally valuable book, not only withinELF studies but in terms of a number of general issues raised. Mauranen sets thediscussion of SLU (second language use) in the context of established studiesof translation studies, second language acquisition, spoken language, languagechange, and language processing and presents empirical findings with implicationsfor all these areas and for language teaching.

  • 316. Bollen, Katrien
    et al.
    Craps, Stef
    Vermeulen, Pieter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    McSweeney's and the Challenges of the Marketplace for Independent Publishing2013In: CLCWeb, ISSN 1481-4374, E-ISSN 1481-4374, Vol. 15, no 4, article id 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In their article McSweeney's and the Challenges of the Marketplace for Independent Publishing Katrien Bollen, Stef Craps, and Pieter Vermeulen argue that the artistic projects of the US-American author, activist, and editor Dave Eggers are marked by a tension between the desire for independence and the demands of brand-building. The article offers a close analysis of the materiality and paratexts of one particular issue of McSweeney's, the literary magazine of which Eggers is the founding editor. Both the content and the apologetically aggressive tone of Eggers's editorial statements betray a deep unease with the inability to inhabit a cultural and economic position that is untainted by the compromises that publishing requires. Still, this disavowed complicity with the market in fact sustains Eggers's editorial practice in McSweeney's, which, in marked contrast to his explicit statements, thrives on a dynamic of commodification.

  • 317.
    Ädel, Annelie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Metadiscourse2013In: The encyclopedia of applied linguistics / [ed] Carol A. Chapelle (general editor), Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 318.
    Mezek, Spela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Multilingual reading proficiency in an emerging parallel-language environment2013In: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 166-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid changes have taken place in the linguistic environment of higher education in Europe, where many students attend parallel-language courses, leading to a use of English (officially a foreign language) for academic purposes alongside the local language. This study investigated the relationship of Swedish students’ reading habits and abilities in Swedish and English. Their reading abilities were assessed with an interview and a Swedish and English reading test, and their reading habits with an interview, questionnaire, and Author Recognition Test. The study found correlation between English reading ability and some of the reading habits measures which is more reminiscent of situations where English is an official language. This was reflected in the students’ reading habits. Their leisure reading included both Swedish and English material, and their choice between the two depended primarily on factors such as quality and availability, and not language. So for these students there is little difference between reading difficulty in L1 and L2. These results suggest that many students in the parallel-language environments are highly biliterate, implying very different EAP requirements than encountered elsewhere. Implications are discussed.

  • 319.
    Erman, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Lewis, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Fant, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Multiword structures in different materials, and with different goals and methodologies2013In: Yearbook of Corpus Linguistics and Pragmatics 2013 / [ed] Jesús Romero Trillo, Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 77-103Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a well-known fact that multi-word units (MWUs), however pervasive they may be in language use, are difficult to define To date, no definition widely agreed upon exists and, seemingly, an even more complicated endeavor has been to agree upon which subcategories should be included for analysis.

    As Granger & Pacquot (2008) point out, largely two methodologies are being used in the study of MWUs. One is the phraseological method, where researchers use linguistic criteria regarding e.g. fixedness and exchangeability, with some intervention of researcher introspection and intersubjectivity.  Within this tradition, mainly idioms (‘grab the bull by its horns’) and collocations (‘draw a conclusion’) have been explored.  The other is the statistical method, where sequences are given the status of MWUs on the basis of purely statistical measures such as log likelihood and MI-score. Frequently, studies using these methods focus on lexical bundles (Biber et al. 2003, Ellis et al. 2008) and also on collocations (Durrant & Schmitt, 2009). In addition, proponents of this latter method tend to use very large corpora of written academic English, whereas the phraseological tradition is used on all sorts of corpora.

    The fact that these different methods thus target different MWUs   considering that a major challenge for linguistics today is to map to what extent language use is composed of ready-made chunks (cf. Erman & Warren 2000, Melčuk 1998). Accordingly, a methodology is called for that can account for MWUs from a more holistic perspective.

    In order to pinpoint methodological issues related to MWU identification in corpora, the present study will analyze data from English and Spanish spoken corpora and confront phraseological/introspective methods with statistical methods. The results show that the different methods arrive at essentially divergent sets of MWUs, and the consequences thereof will be discussed.

  • 320.
    Johannesson, Nils-Lennart
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Melchers, GunnelStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.Björkman, BeyzaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Of butterflies and birds, of dialects and genres: Essays in honour of Philip Shaw2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume is a tribute to our friend and colleague Philip Shaw, Professor of English linguistics at the Department of English, Stockholm University, on the occasion of his 65th birthday.

    The 22 contributions to this volume by friends and colleagues worldwide bear witness to Philip’s academic versatility as well as his interests beyond academia. The first paper, ‘Narratives of Nature in English and Swedish: Butterfly books and the case of Argynnis paphia’, a genre study by Annelie Ädel and John Swales, is illustrated by Philip devoting himself to one of his favourite activities. It is followed by four other genre analyses, based on very different texts: Trine Dahl, ‘Telling it Like it Is or Strategic Writing? A portrait of the economist writer’, Paul Gillaerts, ‘Move Analysis of Abstracts from a Diachronic Perspective: A case study’, Maurizio Gotti, ‘Investigating the Generic Structure of Mediation Processes’, and Nils-Lennart Johannesson, ‘Orrmulum: Genre membership and text organisation’.

    The following five papers all relate to Philip’s work in the fields of English as a Second Language (ESL), English as a Lingua Franca (ELF), and English for Academic Purposes (EAP). The ESL study by Britt Erman and Margareta Lewis is titled ‘Vocabulary in Advanced L2 English Speech’, and ELF is represented by Beyza Björkman’s ‘Peer Assessment of Spoken Lingua Franca English in Tertiary Education in Sweden: Criterion-referenced versus norm-referenced assessment’. The three following papers relate to Philip’s work on academic writing: Magnus Gustafsson & Hans Malmström, ‘Master Level Writing in Engineering and Productive Vocabulary: What does measuring academic vocabulary levels tell us?’, Akiko Okamura, ‘Philip Shaw’s Writing Expertise in Academic Discourse’, and Diane Pecorari, ‘Additional Reasons for the Correlation of Voice, Tense and Sentence Function’.

    The three papers to follow address issues within the fields of dialectology and sociolinguistics, representing different speech communities in the English-speaking world: Joan C. Beal, ‘Tourism and the Commodification of Language’, Peter Sundkvist, ‘“Ridiculously Country”: The representation of Appalachian English in the Deliverance screenplay’, and Sandra Jansen, ‘“I don’t sound like a Geordie!”: Phonological and morphosyntactic aspects of Carlisle English’.

    This naturally leads on to studies on World Englishes, represented by papers by Kingsley Bolton, ‘World Englishes, Globalisation, and Language Worlds’, Gunnel Melchers, ‘The North Wind and the Sun: A classic text as data for World Englishes’, Christiane Meierkord & Bridget Fonkeu, ‘Of Birds and the Human Species – Communication in Migration Contexts: English in the Cameroonian migrant community in the Ruhr area’, and Augustin Simo Bobda, ‘The Emergence of a Standardizing Cameroon Francophone English Pronunciation in Cameroon’.

    The five final papers deal with a variety of linguistic topics all close to Philip’s heart but not so easily accommodated into the above sections. They are: Maria Kuteeva, ‘Tolkien and Lewis on Language in their Scholarly Work’, Karin Aijmer and Anna Elgemark, ‘The Pragmatic Markers Look and Listen in a Cross-linguistic Perspective’, Magnus Ljung, ‘Goddamn: From curse to byname’, Christina Alm-Arvius, ‘Opposites Attract’, and Erik Smitterberg, ‘Non-correlative Commas between Subjects and Verbs in Nineteenth-century Newspaper English’.

  • 321.
    Ursini, Francesco-Alessio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    On the Distributed Morphology of Spatial Prepositions and Anaphors2013In: Proceedings of the 15th Seoul International Conference on Generative Grammar (SICOGG 15): Seoul, South Korea, 07-Aug-2013 - 10-Aug-2013, / [ed] Il-Jae Lee and Uujinbai Dolgormaa, Hankuk University Press , 2013, p. 447-468Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a Distributed Morphology approach to the morphology and semantics of spatial prepositions (in front of) and anaphors (here), complete with a situation semantics interpretation. The proposal is shown to account both known and recalcitrant data, such as anaphoric relations between elements of the two categories. Ideal follow-up to the "Borealis" paper.More Info: Conference proceeding in which we introduce a type-logical version of Distributed Morphology, with a Situation Semantics interpretation.

  • 322.
    Ursini, Francesco-Alessio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    On the Syntax and Semantics of Haber and Tener2013In: Lingue e linguaggio, ISSN 1720-9331, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 89-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a novel approach on the syntax and semantics of the two spanish auxiliary verbs haber and tener and their distributional properties. It is argued that these verbs share key syntactic properties, but denote two different types of semantic relations. While tener denotes a property ascribed to the subject, haber only introduces the temporal reference of a sentence. This proposal on the semantics of tener and haber is then inserted in a broader proposal on auxiliary verbs, copulae and their distribution. It is shown that the current proposal can correctly account the distribution of tener and haber, and be seamlessly integrated with standard approaches to ser and estar.

  • 323.
    Ursini, Francesco-Alessio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    On The Syntax and Semantics of Spanish Spatial Prepositions2013In: Borealis: A journal of International Spanish Linguistics, ISSN 1893-3211, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 117-166Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 324.
    Johannesson, Nils-Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Orrmulum: Genre membership and text organisation2013In: Of butterflies and birds, of dialects and genres: Essays in honour of Philip Shaw / [ed] Nils-Lennart Johannesson, Gunnel Melchers, Beyza Björkman, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013, p. 77-89Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the genre membership of the twelfth-century Middle English exegetical work named by its author Orrmulum. The work is usually described as a homily collection, but a closer analysis shows that it combines properties of two contemporary text genres. On the one hand it exhibits some typical features of a homiliary (homily collection), such as a verse-by-verse exegesis of gospel texts (while lacking others, such as following the arrangement of the gospel texts (lections) in the Missal, as these are presented chronologically for each Mass throughout the liturgical year). On the other hand the work exhibits some properties of a gospel harmony, a kind of text whose aim is to combine the narratives of the four gospels into one coherent story (while it lacks other properties, such as independence of the Missal).

    The Preface of Orrmulum can similarly be shown to be of mixed genre member-ship. On the one hand it has all the properties of a Ciceronian praefatio, in that it comments on the relationship between the author and various other people, such as his patron, his readers, his copyist, and his detractors. On the other hand it shows the typical features of the prologue of a twelfth-century exegetical work (a “type C prologue”, Minnis 1985): it presents the name of the author and of the work, it states the usefulness of the work, etc.

    This paper also outlines the textual organisation of Orrmulum, since the marking of these matters in the author’s holograph manuscript is only poorly represented in the standard edition (Holt 1878), and therefore unknown to any reader of the text who does not go back to the manuscript.

  • 325.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Pater's Parerga: Framing the Imaginary Portraits2013In: Victoriographies, ISSN 2044-2416, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 119-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Walter Pater’s late-nineteenth-century literary genre of the imaginary portrait has received relatively little critical attention. Conceived of assomething of a continuum between his role as an art critic and hisfictional pursuits, this essay probes the liminal space of the imaginary portraits, focusing on the role of the parergon, or frame, in his portraits. Guided by Pater’s reading of Kant, who distinguishes between thework (ergon) and that which lies outside of the work (the parergon), between inside and outside, and contextualised alongside the analysis of Derrida, who shows how such distinctions have always already deconstructed themselves, I demonstrate a similar operation at work in the portraits. By closely analysing the parerga of two of Pater’s portraits, ‘Duke Carl of Rosenmold’ (1887) and ‘Apollo in Picardy’ (1893), focusing on his partial quotation of Goethe in the former, and his playful autocitation and impersonation of Heine in the latter, I arguethat Pater’s parerga seek to destabilise the relationship between text and context so that the parerga do not lie outside the text but are implicated throughout in their reading, changing the portraits constitutively. As such, the formal structure of the parergon in Pater’s portraits is also a theoretical fulcrum in his aesthetic criticism and marks that space where the limits of, and distinctions between, art and life become blurred.

  • 326.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Peer assessment of spoken lingua franca English in tertiary education in Sweden: criterion-referenced versus norm-referenced assessment2013In: Of Butterflies and Birds, of Dialects and Genres: essays in Honour of Philip Shaw / [ed] Johannesson, N. L., Melchers, G., Björkman, B., Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013, p. 109-123Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 327.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Performing Scottishness and being Scottish : spelling and identity in Scottish internet discourse2013In: Computer mediated discourse across languages / [ed] Laura Alvarez Lopez, Charlotta Seiler Brylla, Philip Shaw, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 328.
    Garcia-Yeste, Miguel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Press advertisements for food in Spain: Cultural orientations and communicative style2013In: Ibérica, ISSN 1139-7241, E-ISSN 2340-2784, no 26, p. 195-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the impact of cultural values on the design and communicative style of Spanish graphic advertising for food and beverages. More specifically, the influence of Hall's (1976: 101) context dependence and Hofstede's (1994: 51) individualism index is surveyed. Gnillen-Nieto's (2009) table of hypothetical correlations between culture and communicative style is adapted for the analysis of 100 Spanish advertisements at the macro- and microlinguistic levels. The study is organised in two stages: (i) a qualitative examination of the communicative strategies found in the sample; and (ii) a quantitative analysis of the previous findings in order to identify significant patterns statistically. The findings indicate that context dependence and the individualism index can be traced in the texts in relation to the verbal and nonverbal elements, the explicitness of the communicative style and the purpose of the message. A set of multimodal communicative strategies is offered at the end of the paper aimed at advertising professionals and students as well as TSP practitioners.

  • 329.
    Wåghäll Nivre, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Schirrmacher, BeateStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.Egerer, ClaudiaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    (Re-)Contextualizing Literary and Cultural History: The Representation of the Past in Literary and Material Culture2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume holds a number of contributions from a conference held at Stockholm University 2–4 September, 2010: (Re)ContextualizingLiterary and Cultural History. The aim of the conference was to gather scholars from a variety of disciplines, not only to investigate material or literary history and culture but also to bring theoretical aspects from different elds of research into play. The conference thus brought together scholars to (re-)examine the importance of historical perspectives in literary studies, and to scrutinize the impact of cultural studies on early modern scholarship. A selection of revised papers was chosen for publication in this volume. It is divided into three parts: I Theorizing Literary and Cultural History II Ordering Thoughts—Making Sense of the World, and III Communicating Things and Thoughts.

  • 330.
    Ursini, Francesco-Alessio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Review of "Anaphora and Language Design"2013In: Canadian Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0008-4131, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 137-140Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 331.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Review of Philippe Van Parijs Linguistic Justice for Europe and for the World2013In: International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0269-8595, E-ISSN 1469-9281, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 354-359Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 332.
    Mahmutovic, Adnan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Revolution Revisited: The Politics of Dreaming in Ben Okri’s The Famished Road2013In: Famished Road: Ben Okri's Imaginary Homelands / [ed] Vanessa Guignery, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013, p. 136-152Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 333.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Kwok, Helen
    Sociolinguistics today: international perspectives2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This collection of essays developed out of a conference held in Hong Kong in 1988. The aim was to provide a forum for an exchange of views between academics working within the field of sociolinguistics, in particular between those working in the West and those working in the East. Sociolinguistics Today has taken this aim a step further to produce an overview of contemporary research into sociolinguistics worldwide. The book contains articles by acknowledged leaders in the study of language and society, and the presence of sociolinguists working in Asia provides a new and exciting challenge to the hitherto western-dominated field. The comprehensive study of Asian sociolinguistics is unique and engages with the non-Asian contributions to great effect. The range of contributors reinforces the international emphasis of the book.

  • 334.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Languages, Växjö, Sweden.
    Source use in academic writing: An introduction to the special issue2013In: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 12, no 2, p. A1-A3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 335.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Stage Accents on Steroids: ‘Oirish’, ‘Pirate Speech’, and Jim Carrey’sNew Foundland Fisherman ‘Captain Sham’2013In: NIS: Nordic Irish Studies, ISSN 1602-124X, E-ISSN 2002-4517, Vol. 12, p. 147-162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 336.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Sugar Man and Anglo-Sweden2013In: Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Comparative Studies, ISSN 1753-3171, E-ISSN 1543-1304, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 481-484Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 337.
    Vermeulen, Pieter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Teaching the Critique of Romanticism and Empire in Coetzee’s Disgrace2013In: Approaches to Teaching Coetzee’s Disgrace and Other Works / [ed] Laura Wright, Jane Poyner, Elleke Boehmer, New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2013, p. 80-86Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 338.
    Rasmussen Goloubeva, Irina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    "That's the Music of the Future": James Joyce's Ulusses and the Writing of a Difficult History2013In: Modernism/Modernity, ISSN 1071-6068, E-ISSN 1080-6601, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 685-708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The modernists' obsession with history is well known. Responding to the ineluctable pace of modernization that threatened to sweep away the past, some modernists celebrated the loss and welcomed the new world; others engaged the historical imagination by capturing the disappearing world and the intransigent present. The actual difference between these two forms of modernist historical imagination is, however, not so tidy and complete, reflecting both the general disjunction between modernity's historical and anti-historical instincts and history's inexorable traces in the collective unconscious. James Joyce's adaptation of an epic perspective in Ulysses, however absurd and half serious, is instinctively historical and characteristically works both ways. He revels in the intoxicating dynamic of the new fast-changing world while at the same time obstinately working to capture the historicity of a disappearing present.

  • 339.
    Ekelund, Bo G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Anglophone Caribbean2013In: Postcolonial Texts and Events: Cultural Narratives from the English-speaking World / [ed] Ulrika Andersson Hval, Alastair Henry, and Catharine Walker Bergström, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013, p. 157-198Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 340.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The grammar of English as a lingua franca2013In: The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics / [ed] Chapelle, C., Oxford/UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 341.
    Ursini, Francesco-Alessio
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Akagi, Nobuaki
    The interpretation of plural definites in discourse: the case of spatial prepositions2013In: Linguistics and the human sciences, ISSN 1742-2906, E-ISSN 1743-1662, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 201-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n this paper we offer a study on the interpretation of plural definites in discourse (‘the tank engines’) and their interaction with spatial adpositions (‘to’ and ‘at’). The novel empirical findings in the paper support the following assumptions on the contribution of spatial adpositions to the interpretation of plural definites. First, the interpretation of plural definites can be influenced by the lexical aspect type of adpositions. While ‘to’ as ‘telic’ predicate can license both a ‘collective’ and a ‘distributive’ reading for plural definites, ‘at’ as an ‘atelic’ predicate only licenses a ‘collective’ reading. Second, the precise lexical content of adpositions determines which interpretation is accessed. It is claimed that ‘at’ denotes a ‘general location’ relation between locatum and landmark object, and thus licenses a collective reading for plural definites.

  • 342.
    Ursini, Francesco-Alessio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. 2Centre for Cognition and its Disorders (CCD), Macquarie University.
    The interpretation of Spatial 'At': An Experimental Study2013In: Journal of cognitive science, ISSN 1598-2327, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 47-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an experimental study on the interpretation of the spatialpreposition at in adult speakers, based on a variant of the Truth ValueJudgment Task. It is shown that speakers can interpret at as denoting a spatialrelation that stands in the “lexical entailment” relation with other spatial prepositions(e.g. inside, in front of, on top of, behind). For instance, if multiplelocated entities are involved in this relation, then they may occupy locationsthat can be “internal”, “external”, or placed on different verses of the samedirection, e.g. in front or behind a certain landmark object. It is discussed whichsemantic hypothesis correctly predicts these findings, and what the implicationscould be, for a theory of spatial prepositions and their Semantics.

  • 343.
    Mahmutovic, Adnan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Nomadic Home in Tabish Khair’s Filming2013In: Tabish Khair: A Critical Companion / [ed] Om Prakash Dwivedi, Roman Books , 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 344.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Tolkien and Lewis on language in their scholarly work2013In: Of butterflies and birds, of dialects and genres: Essays in honour of Philip Shaw / [ed] Nils-Lennart Johannesson, Gunnel Melchers, and Beyza Björkman, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013, p. 305-324Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares Tolkien’s and Lewis’s views on language as expressed in their scholarly work. I show that Tolkien’s approach to the study of language is, above all, that of a comparative philologist. In particular, he shares many ideas with the initiators of the science of language, Bopp, Rask and Grimm, who studied languages in close relation to their literature and history. Tolkien also continues the tradition of “imaginative scholarship”, but separates his scholarly investigations from his philological imagination. Lewis largely remains an amateur in the area of language study. On the one hand, he appears to be influenced by Barfield and Tolkien, but on the other, he holds on to his own views with regard to metaphor and meaning. His interest in the study of language derives from the professional need of a literary historian, and his inspiration to write about words arises from ‘moralistic purposes’. In the context of the twentieth century, the two Inklings’ views appear to be anti-positivist. The interest taken by Barfield, Tolkien, and, to a certain extent, Lewis, in the beginnings of language and its association with poetry and myth allies them with a number of nineteenth-century language scholars.

  • 345. De Graef, Ortwin
    et al.
    Vermeulen, Pieter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Virgilian Incarnation: Hartman and the Issue of Auerbach’s Jewishness2013In: Jewish Quarterly Review, ISSN 0021-6682, E-ISSN 1553-0604, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 141-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his memoir A Scholar’s Tale, Geoffrey Hartman recognizes the decisive influence of Erich Auerbach, one of his teachers at Yale, on his own early work. Auerbach came to Yale after having spent the Second World War in Istanbul, where he wrote his magisterial Mimesis. That book not only bears the stamp of the war that was then ravaging Europe, the continent whose literary heritage he aimed to preserve in Mimesis, but also of a second trauma: the demise, somewhere (according to Auerbach) in between Dante and Montaigne, of a divinely sanctioned reality, which condemned the West to the historical world. For Auerbach, what saved this historical reality was the unfulfilled figure of the Incarnation still haunting it against all odds... The influence of Auerbach’s sense of lateness, and of the autumnal literary ethos it sustains, can be traced in Hartman’s lifelong engagement with William Wordsworth, whose exemplary remediation of the loss of rural life, Hartman recognizes, today threatens to fade away in our increasingly networked memory-and mediascapes. It is significant that in the last three decades, Hartman has supplemented his Romanticism and his work on the memory of the Holocaust with an increasingly explicit elaboration of the Jewish imagination. Does this point to the perceived insufficiency of Auerbach’s autumnal stance? Or does the tension between the literary, the disaster, and the religious point to an ethos beyond Incarnation?

  • 346.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Vocabulary in advanced L2 speech2013In: Of butterflies and birds, of dialects and genres: essays in honour of Philip Shaw / [ed] Nils-Lennart Johannesson, Gunnel Melchers, Beyza Björkman, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013, p. 93-108Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While there are a number of studies of productive vocabulary knowledge focussing on writing, there are considerably fewer on speech. This study seeks to remedy this imbalance by analyzing the vocabulary in spoken production, examining two groups of advanced Swedish speakers of L2 English—one studying English at a Swedish university and the other resident in London—and one group of English native speakers. The three groups performed two tasks, a role play and a simultaneous retelling of the first 14½ minutes of the film Modern Times. To obtain lexical frequency profiles for these groups, Cobb’s software program LexTutor was used. The program distributed the lexical items in the transcriptions of the speech of the three groups over the first thousand (K1) and second thousand (K2) frequency bands, the Academic Wordlist (AWL) and an ‘Off-list’ containing items outside of these three lists. The results showed that in the Role play the lexical profile of the London Swedes was closer to the native speakers compared to the university students. In the Retelling task the two Swedish groups performed similarly, differing significantly from the native group. An additional analysis of the length of repeated words and sequences showed that the London Swedes were closer to the native speakers in both tasks, suggesting a higher degree of automaticity in this group.

  • 347.
    Vinde, Ann-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Which Emily Dickinson in Translation?2013In: Moderna Språk, ISSN 2000-3560, E-ISSN 2000-3560, Vol. 107, no 2, p. 115-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Which Emily Dickinson in Translation discusses the choice of source text/s for translations of poems by Emily Dickinson into Swedish, mainly from the point of view of line division. Should translators use source texts with conventional layouts or opt for trying to reproduce also the less conventional ones found in Dickinson's manuscripts as today shown on the Internet or in R. W. Franklin's facsimile edition (1981), as poet Ann Jaderlund does in her 2012 translations? What are the consequences of choosing one or the other? Five poems from about 1860 to about 1884 in a number of different translations illustrate the discussion, which concludes that the former is to be preferred, for the sake of syntactical and metrical clarity.

  • 348.
    Ursini, Francesco-Alessio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    WHICH MODEL OF BIOLOGICAL PLAUSIBILITY FOR LANGUAGE? THE CASE OF “WHAT DARWIN GOT WRONG”2013In: Language and information society, ISSN 1598-1886, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 103-139Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 349.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    World Englishes, globalisation and language worlds2013In: Of Butterflies and Birds, of Dialects and Genres: Essays in Honour of Philip Shaw / [ed] Nils-Lennart Johannesson, Gunnel Melchers, Beyza Björkman, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013, p. 227-251Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 350.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Ödemarkens språk: Euclides da Cunha, João Guimarães Rosa och översättningens resa2013In: Resor i tid och rum: festskrift till Margareta Petersson / [ed] Årheim, Annette, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2013, p. 154-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
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