Change search
Refine search result
45678910 301 - 350 of 616
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 301.
    Lainio, Jarmo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German, Finnish.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Muhonen, Anu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German, Finnish.
    Flerspråkiga ungas identiteter och diskurser om dessa – ett internationellt projekt som börjar avkasta resultat2012In: Fenno-Ugrica Suecana - Nova Series, ISSN 1504-1921, E-ISSN 2001-6204, Vol. 14, p. 41-56Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents the local, global and sociolinguistic contexts of an international HERAproject (IDII4MES; the Humanities in the European Research Area, 2010-2012). Its main aims are summarized as follows; to:

    - investigate the range of language and literacy practices of multilingual young people and how these practices are used to negotiate inheritance and identities,

    - explore the cultural and social significance of language and literacy practices of multilingual young people,

    - develop innovative multi-site, ethnographic team methodologies using interlocking case studies across national, social, cultural, and linguistic contexts

    - contribute to policy and practice in the inclusion of non-national minority languages in the wider European educational agenda.

    The four research sites, Birmingham (U.K.; coordinator), Copenhagen (Denmark), Stockholm (Sweden), and Tilburg (Netherlands), followed similar routes for data creation, but concentrated on school-age children of different language-backgrounds: Punjabi (Birmingham), Finnish and Spanish (Stockholm), Chinese (Tilburg, Eindhoven, Utrecht), and mainstream context (Danish) for various language-background children (Copenhagen). The methods involve ethnographic fieldwork in- and out-of-school, interviews, discussions, linguistic landscaping and ‘nethnographic’ studies of multilingual adolescents’ social media and internet communication. Analyses and reports based on the qualitative data from the diverse, multilingual contexts have been discussed and produced. Following these, new datadriven and comparative-theoretical studies of the project are being produced.

  • 302.
    Lainio, Jarmo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Finnish.
    Wande, Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Finnish.
    Meänkieli today – to be or not to be standardised2015In: Sociolinguistica: Internationales Jahrbuch fuer Europaeische Soziolinguistik, ISSN 0933-1883, E-ISSN 1865-939X, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 121-140Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 303.
    Larsson, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Breaking News: nya rön i jakten på det indoeuropeiska urspråket!2015In: Curie: en tidning från Vetenskapsrådet, ISSN 2001-3426Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 304.
    Larsson, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Baltic Languages.
    Det indoeuropeiska urspråket2015In: Anropet, ISSN 1653-8633Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 305.
    Larsson, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Om detta talar skeletten2015In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no juniArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 306.
    Larsson, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Report from the 9th Conference on Baltic Studies in Europe – Transitions, Visions and Beyond2011In: Baltu filoloģija, ISSN 1691-0036, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 90-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 9th Conference on Baltic Studies in Europe, Transitions, Visions andBeyond, was organized by the Center for Baltic and East European Studiesat Södertörn University, and held in Stockholm, 12–15 June 2011. Theconference attracted over 200 participants from all over the world, and thepanel sessions covered nearly all aspects of Baltic Studies, including linguistics,history, political studies, economics, media, culture, literature and the arts.Three key-note speakers were featured; Bengt Jacobsson (Södertörn) openedthe conference with the paper “Changes in Governance: Europeanization andthe Baltic States”, on the second day Valdis Muktupāvels (Riga) talked aboutlocal, regional and continental components of national musical culture, andon the last day, Tiina Kirss (Tallinn) addressed post-Soviet memory work inher talk “Writing Baltic Lives: Continuities and Caesuras”.In the following, I will attempt to briefly summarize the main points of the papers in the linguistic section, which was organized by Raimo Raag(Uppsala) and Pēteris Vanags (Stockholm).

  • 307.
    Larsson, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Baltic Languages.
    Ta inte listan på orden!2015In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no oktoberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 308.
    Larsson, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Var talades det indoeuropeiska urspråket?2015In: Curie: en tidning från Vetenskapsrådet, ISSN 2001-3426Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 309.
    Larsson, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Varför blir man språkhistoriker?2015In: Curie: en tidning från Vetenskapsrådet, ISSN 2001-3426Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 310.
    Larsson, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Vilket språk är äldst?2015In: Curie: en tidning från Vetenskapsrådet, ISSN 2001-3426Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 311.
    Larsson, Jenny H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Apophonie et catégories grammaticales dans les langues baltiques2013In: Kratylos, ISSN 0023-4567, Vol. 53, p. 147-156Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 312.
    Larsson, Jenny Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Deverbative Root Nouns in Baltic?2003In: Linguistica Baltica: International Journal of Baltic Linguistics, ISSN 1230-3984, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 99-104Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 313.
    Larsson, Jenny Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Nominal Compounds in Old Lithuanian Texts: the Original Distribution of the Composition Vowel2004In: Linguistica Baltica: International Journal of Baltic Linguistics, ISSN 1230-3984, Vol. 10, p. 99-104Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 314.
    Larsson, Jenny Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Nominal Compounds in the Baltic Languages2002In: Transactions of the Philological Society (Print), ISSN 0079-1636, E-ISSN 1467-968X, Vol. 100, no 2, p. 203-231Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 315.
    Larsson, Jenny Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Proto-Indo-European Root Nouns in the Baltic Languages2001In: Journal of Indo-European Monograph Series, Vol. 40, p. 50-64Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 316.
    Larsson, Jenny Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Secondary Ablaut in Baltic2006In: Meijerbergs Arkiv för Svensk Ordforskning, Vol. 32, p. 174-176Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 317.
    Larsson, Jenny Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    The master of the house – Lithuanian viẽšpats, Greek οἴκαδε and related issues2007In: Cambridge Classical Journal, ISSN 1750-2705, E-ISSN 2047-993X, Vol. 32, p. 101-106Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 318. Lehtonen, Minna
    et al.
    Harrer, Gabor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German, Finnish.
    Wande, Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German, Finnish.
    Laine, Matti
    Testing the Stem Dominance Hypothesis: Meaning Analysis of Inflected Words and Prepositional Phrases2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 3, p. e93136-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We tested the hypothesis that lexical-semantic access of inflected words is governed by the word stem. Object drawings overlaid with a dot/arrow marking position/movement were matched with corresponding linguistic expressions like from the house. To test whether the stem dominates lexical-semantic access irrespective of its position, we used Swedish prepositional phrases (locative information via preposition immediately preceding the stem) or Finnish case-inflected words (locative information via suffix immediately following the stem). Both in monolingual Swedish and in bilingual Finnish-Swedish speakers, correct stems with incorrect prepositions/case-endings were hardest to reject. This finding supports the view that the stem is indeed the dominant unit in meaning access of inflected words.

  • 319.
    Lemmouh, Zakaria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Lingvistik.
    The Relationship Between Grades and the Lexical Richness of Student Essays2008In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 163-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between lexical richness and the grades on essays produced by Swedish university students of English in order to shed light on the extent to which lexical richness is a predictor of overall essay quality. To this end, essays produced by 37 advanced learners of English were analyzed using a lexical richness measure that calculates the proportion of advanced vocabulary. The lexical

    richness score of the student essays were related to the following three variables: essay grade, course grade and vocabulary knowledge as measured by three discrete-item tests.

    In addition, a 14-item questionnaire administered to the teachers at the English department eliciting information about their essay assessment procedures was analyzed, in order to shed light on the relationship between the weight teachers put on lexical

    richness and the grade they award essays with different lexical richness profiles. The results show that there is a relationship between use of advanced vocabulary in student essays and the overall course grade. However, no relationship was found between lexical richness and overall essay quality as reflected by faculty teachers’ ratings. A possible explanation is that a majority of the surveyed faculty teachers state that their assessment of essay quality is primarily based on content and grammar features rather than lexical

    features.

  • 320. Lepic, Ryan
    et al.
    Börstell, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Belsitzman, Gal
    Sandler, Wendy
    Taking meaning in hand: Iconic motivations in two-handed signs2016In: Sign Language and Linguistics, ISSN 1387-9316, E-ISSN 1569-996X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 37-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally in sign language research, the issue of whether a lexical sign is articulated with one hand or two has been treated as a strictly phonological matter. We argue that accounting for two-handed signs also requires considering meaning as a motivating factor. We report results from a Swadesh list comparison, an analysis of semantic patterns among two-handed signs, and a picture-naming task. Comparing four unrelated languages, we demonstrate that the two hands are recruited to encode various relationship types in sign language lexicons. We develop the general principle that inherently "plural" concepts are straightforwardly mapped onto our paired human hands, resulting in systematic use of the two hands across sign languages. In our analysis, "plurality" subsumes four primary relationship types — interaction, location, dimension, and composition — and we predict that signs with meanings that encompass these relationships — such as 'meet', 'empty', 'large', or 'machine' — will preferentially be two-handed in any sign language.

  • 321.
    Liljegren, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Profiling Indo-Aryan in the Hindukush-Karakoram: A preliminary study of micro-typological patterns2017In: Journal of South Asian languages and linguistics, ISSN 2196-0771, E-ISSN 2196-078X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 107-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study is a typological profile of 31 Indo-Aryan (IA) languages in the Hindukush-Karakoram-Western Himalayan region (covering NE Afghanistan, N Pakistan, and parts of Kashmir). Native speakers were recruited to provide comparative data. This data, supplemented by reputable descriptions or field notes, was evaluated against a number of WALS- or WALS-like features, enabling a fine-tuned characterization of each language, taking different lin-guistic domains into account (phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicon). The emerging patterns were compared with global distributions as well as with characteristic IA features and well-known areal patterns. Some features, mainly syntactic, turned out to be shared with IA in general, whereas others do have scattered reflexes in IA outside of the region but are especially prevalent in the region: large consonant inventories, tripartite pronominal case alignment, a high frequency of left-branching constructions, and multi-degree deictic sys-tems. Yet other features display a high degree of diversity, often bundling subareally. Finally, there was a significant clustering of features that are not characterizing IA in general: tripartite affricate differentiation, retroflexion across several subsets, aspiration contrasts involving voiceless consonants only, tonal contrasts and 20-based numerals. This clustering forms a “hard core” at the centre of the region, gradually fading out toward its peripheries.

  • 322.
    Liljegren, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review: A Grammar of the Shina Language of Indus Kohistan by Ruth Laila Schmidt and Razwal Kohistani: (Beiträge zur Kenntnis südasiatischer Sprachen and Literaturen, 17. Herausgeben von Dieter B. Kapp)2008In: Himalayan Linguistics, ISSN 1544-7502, E-ISSN 1544-7502, no 6, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 323.
    Liljegren, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The Dangari Tongue of Choke and Machoke: Tracing the proto-language of Shina enclaves in the Hindu Kush2009In: Acta Orientalia, ISSN 0001-6438, E-ISSN 1600-0439, no 70, p. 7-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data from four little-studied varieties of Indo-Aryan (Southern Palula, Northern Palula, Sawi and Kalkoti) spoken in the Hindu Kush is analyzed and discussed from a historical-comparative perspective. Evidence is presented showing that Kalkoti, until recently only tentatively classified, is part of this particular cluster of closely-related Shina varieties. An attempt is made at reconstructing some phonological and grammatical features of a common source speech, here named Proto-Dangari, and the order in which the present-day varieties may have split off. An important conclusion drawn is that Southern and Northern Palula probably are more distantly related than present-day similarities seem to indicate, the high degree of synchronic similarity instead being due to relatively recent convergence taking place in southern Chitral. It is hypothesized that the present speech communities are the result of two different westward routes of migration, one geographically linking Southern Palula (Ashreti) and Sawi with Chilas, the other linking Northern Palula (Biori) and Kalkoti with Tangir, both located in the same general area of the main Indus Valley.

  • 324.
    Liljegren, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Where have all the verbs gone? On verb stretching and semi-words in Indo-Aryan Palula.2010In: Himalayan Linguistics, ISSN 1544-7502, E-ISSN 1544-7502, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 51-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of complex predicates consisting of a verb component (verbalizer) and a non-verb component (host) is well-known from descriptions of languages in large parts of West and South Asia. Looking particularly at data from the hitherto less-studied Indo-Aryan Palula (Chitral Valley, Pakistan), we will explore their position within the total verb lexicon. Instead of regarding the verbalizers and hosts as building blocks that due to their respective properties license particular argument structures, as has been done in some previous descriptions, I propose that it is the construction as a whole, and its semantics, that assigns case and selects arguments. Rather than seeing a strict dichotomy between verbalizers (also called “light verbs”) used in complex predicates and the corresponding simple verbs, a few highly generic verbs (BECOME, DO, GIVE) seem to be exposed to a high degree of “stretching”. As such they stand as syntactic models – basic argument templates (BAT) – when forming novel complexes, sometimes involving host elements that lack a lexical identity of their own (hence semi-words) in the language as of today.

  • 325.
    Liljegren, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Akhunzada, Fakhruddin
    Linguistic diversity, vitality and maintenance: A case study on the language situation in northern Pakistan2017In: Multiethnica. Meddelande från Centrum för multietnisk forskning, Uppsala universitet, ISSN 0284-396X, no 36-37, p. 61-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multilingual and multicultural region of northern Pakistan, which has approximately 30 distinct languages, is described and evaluated from the perspective of language vitality, revealing the diverse and complex interplay of language policies, community attitudes and generational transmission. Based on the experience of conscious language maintenance efforts carried out in the area, some conclusions are offered concerning the particular effectiveness of regional networking and non-governmental institution support to promote local languages and sustain their vitality in times of great change.

  • 326.
    Liljegren, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Haider, Naseem
    Forum for Language Initiatives, Islamabad, Pakistan.
    Palula: Illustrations of the IPA2009In: Journal of the International Phonetic Association, ISSN 0025-1003, E-ISSN 1475-3502, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 381-386Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 327.
    Liljegren, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Khan, Afsar Ali
    Khowar: Illustrations of the IPA2017In: Journal of the International Phonetic Association, ISSN 0025-1003, E-ISSN 1475-3502, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 219-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Khowar (ISO 639-3: khw) is an Indo-Aryan language spoken by 200,000–300,000 (Decker 1992: 31–32; Bashir 2003: 843) people in Pakistan's Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province (formerly North-West Frontier Province). The majority of the speakers are found in Chitral (a district and erstwhile princely state bordering Afghanistan, see Figure 1), where the language is used as a lingua franca, but there are also important pockets of speaker groups in adjacent areas of Gilgit-Baltistan and Swat District as well as a considerable number of recent migrants to larger cities such as Peshawar and Rawalpindi (Decker 1992: 25–26). Its closest linguistic relative is Kalasha, a much smaller language spoken in a few villages in southern Chitral (Morgenstierne 1961: 138; Strand 1973: 302, 2001: 252). While Khowar has preserved a number of features (phonological, morphological as well as lexical) now lost in other Indo-Aryan languages of the surrounding Hindukush-Karakoram mountain region, it has, over time, incorporated a massive amount of lexical material from neighbouring or influential Iranian languages (Morgenstierne 1936) – and with it, new phonological distinctions. Certain features might also be attributable to formerly dominant languages (e.g. Turkic), or to linguistic substrates, either in the form of, or related to, the language isolate Burushaski, or other, now extinct, languages previously spoken in the area (Morgenstierne 1932: 48, 1947: 6; Bashir 2007: 208–214). There is relatively little dialectal variation among the speakers in Chitral itself, probably attributable to the relative recency of the present expansion of the language (Morgenstierne 1932: 50).

  • 328.
    Liljegren, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Svärd, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Bisyndetic Contrast Marking in the Hindukush: Additional Evidence of a Historical Contact Zone2017In: Journal of Language Contact : Evolution of Languages, ISSN 1877-4091, E-ISSN 1955-2629, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 450-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A contrastive (or antithetical) construction which makes simultaneous use of two separate particles is identified through a mainly corpus-based study as a typical feature of a number of lesser-described languages spoken in the Afghanistan-Pakistan borderland in the high Hindukush. The feature encompasses Nuristani languages (Waigali, Kati) as well as the Indo-Aryan languages found in their close vicinity (Palula, Kalasha, Dameli, Gawri), while it is not shared by more closely related Indo-Aryan languages spoken outside of this geographically delimited area. Due to a striking (although not complete) overlap with at least two other (unrelated) structural features, pronominal kinship suffixes and retroflex vowels, we suggest that a linguistic and cultural diffusion zone of considerable age is centred in the mountainous Nuristan-Kunar-Panjkora area.

  • 329.
    Lim Falk, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    English and Swedish in CLIL student texts2015In: Language learning journal, ISSN 0957-1736, E-ISSN 1753-2167, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 304-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates Swedish students’ ability to produce the discourse of the subject history, in a situation where they had to demonstrate historical knowledge in written explanations, and where both English and Swedish were involved. The students attend a Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) programme at the upper secondary school level. The study highlights the roles of both languages in CLIL, thus including both English and the L1 Swedish. The research questions concern language choice, field-specific lexis and genre. These variables were related to the teacher’s assessment in terms of grading, in order to discover possible connections between linguistic choices on the part of the students and the degree of success in terms of grades. While the students had quite a lot of input in English during the history course, they mainly choose to write the exam in Swedish. The elements of English in the texts were primarily used for field-specific lexis. Texts with elements of English also tend to be slightly less successful than texts written in Swedish only. The overall achievements in this exam were quite low, even though the students used their strongest language. Few students display the significant linguistic resources needed in the production of successful historical explanations. Texts assessed with high grades represent content by means of linguistic choices that correspond to the typical patterns of the field, more than the texts with lower grades. The results confirm the importance of paying attention to both languages in CLIL education. 

  • 330.
    Lindblom, Bjorn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Sussman, Harvey M.
    Agwuele, Augustine
    A Duration-Dependent Account of Coarticulation for Hyper- and Hypoarticulation2009In: Phonetica, ISSN 0031-8388, E-ISSN 1423-0321, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 188-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies investigating anticipatory coarticulation in emphatically stressed CV sequences and during fast speaking rates reported that three factors contributed to the overall extent of the documented coarticulation. These factors were: (1) vowel identity, (2) vowel space expansion (emphasis) or reduction (fast rate), and a hypothesized (3) 'deeper' and 'shallower' stop closure contact in emphatic and faster speech, respectively. The objective of the current research was to conceptually and quantitatively unify these two studies. This was accomplished by showing that the opposite changes to frequency onsets of F2 transitions due to emphatic and rapid speech systematically vary as a function of the durational changes in the stop closure interval. Specifically, the decrease in coarticulation in emphatic speech is characterized by increases in F2 onsets and longer stop closures (relative to a normal baseline); the increase in coarticulation due to rapid speech shows concomitant decreases in F2 onsets coinciding with shorter stop closure intervals. Vocal tract area function simulations corresponding to emphatic and reduced speech implicitly support 'deeper' and 'shallower' closure contacts as a third factor contributing to the overall extent of anticipatory CV coarticulation. 

  • 331.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Laryngeal mechanisms in speech: The contributions of Jan Gauffin2009In: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, ISSN 1401-5439, E-ISSN 1651-2022, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 149-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Jan Gauffin was an early user of fiber optics which allowed him to discover that laryngeal structures above the glottal level are involved in speech. His research led him to postulate three independently controlled mechanisms: fundamental frequency control, glottal adduction/abduction, and laryngealization,the latter derived from the protective closure function. He argued that phonetic theory must be revised to account for the main phonation types of the world's languages. He saw them as combinations of two interacting dimensions: adduction/abduction and laryngealization. Secondly he gave the aryepiglottic sphincter an explanatory role in accounting for the production of low pitch and downward pitch inflections. During his lifetime his work received limited attention. However, later laryngoscopic research has confirmed and extended his thinking and findings. His contribution was a pioneering one.

  • 332.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Rejecting the phonetics/phonology split2006In: Theoretical Linguistics, ISSN 0301-4428, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 237-243Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Deduce sound structure from language use. Anchor theory construction in the universal conditions under which all speech communication must take place. Start from ‘first principles’ and not circularly from the data to be explained (cf ‘markedness’). At the level of the individual user, model phonological structure, not as autonomous form, but as an emergent organization of phonetic substance acquired by each native speaker in the context of socially shared, ambient knowledge. At the population level, model this knowledge as a use- & user-dependent process that undergoes change along the historical time scale. Get rid of the distinction between “phonological” and “extra-phonological”. Here is a key step: Make the ‘intrinsic content’ an integral part of the theory from scratch. Treat ‘intrinsic content’ as the source that helps generate discrete structure and that constrains both synchronic and diachronic phonological patterning.

  • 333.
    Lindblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Agwuele, Augustine
    Department of Anthropology, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666.
    Sussman, Harvey M.
    Departments of Linguistics and Communication Sciences & Disorders, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712.
    Cortes, Elisabet Eir
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    The effect of emphatic stress on consonant vowel coarticulation2007In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, Vol. 121, no 6, p. 3802-3813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assessed the acoustic coarticulatory effects of phrasal accent on [V1.CV2] sequences, when separately applied to V1 or V2, surrounding the voiced stops [b], [d], and [g]. Three adult speakers each produced 360 tokens (six V1 contexts x ten V2 contexts x three stops x two emphasis conditions). Realizing that anticipatory coarticulation of V2 onto the intervocalic C can be influenced by prosodic effects, as well as by vowel context effects, a modified locus equation regression metric was used to isolate the effect of phrasal accent on consonantal F2 onsets,independently of prosodically induced vowel expansion effects. The analyses revealed two main emphasis-dependent effects: systematic differences in F2 onset values and the expected expansion of vowel space. By accounting for the confounding variable of stress-induced vowel space expansion, a small but consistent coarticulatory effect of emphatic stress on the consonant was uncovered in lingually produced stops, but absent in labial stops. Formant calculations based on tube models indicated similarly increased F2 onsets when stressed /d/ and /g/ were simulated with deeper occlusions resulting from more forceful closure movements during phrasal accented speech.

  • 334.
    Lindblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Diehl, Randy
    Park, Sang-Hoon
    Salvi, Giampiero
    (Re)use of place features in voiced stop systems:: Role of phonetic constraints2008In: Proceedings FONETIK 2008Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Computational experiments focused on place of articulation in voiced stops were designed to

    generate ‘optimal’ inventories of CV syllables from a larger set of ‘possible CV:s’ in the presence

    of independently and numerically defined articulatory, perceptual and developmental

    constraints. Across vowel contexts the most salient places were retroflex, palatal and uvular.

    This was evident from acoustic measurements and perceptual data. Simulation results using

    the criterion of perceptual contrast alone failed to produce systems with the typologically widely

    attested set [b] [d] [g], whereas using articulatory cost as the sole criterion produced inventories

    in which bilabial, dental/alveolar and velar onsets formed the core. Neither perceptual

    contrast, nor articulatory cost, (nor the two combined), produced a consistent re-use of

    place features (‘phonemic coding’). Only systems constrained by ‘target learning’ exhibited

    a strong recombination of place features.

  • 335.
    Lindblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Moon, S-J
    Can the energy costs of speech movements be measured? A preliminary feasibility study2000In: Journal Acoustical Society of Korea, Vol. 19, no 19, p. 25-32Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 336.
    Lindblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Sussman, Harvey M.
    Dissecting coarticulation: How locus equations happen2012In: Journal of Phonetics, ISSN 0095-4470, E-ISSN 1095-8576, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A programmatic series of studies aimed at expanding our understanding of coarticulation in V(1) . CV(2) sequences is presented. The common thread was examining coarticulatory dynamics through the prism of locus equations (LEs). Multiple experimental methodologies (articulatory synthesis, X-ray film, Principal Component Analysis, and extraction of time constants for F2 transitions), guided by a few theoretical assumptions about speech motor planning and control, were used to uncover the articulatory underpinnings responsible for the trademark acoustic form of LE scatterplots. Specific findings were: (1) the concept of a stop consonantal 'target' was quantitatively derived as a vowel-neutral, 'deactivated,' tongue contour; (2) the linearity of LEs is significantly enhanced by the uniformity of F2 transition time constants, which normalize with respect to F2 transition extents, and an inherent linear bias created by the smaller frequency range of [F2(onset) - F2(vowel)] relative to F2(vowel) frequencies; (3) realistic LE slopes and y-intercepts were derived by modeling different extents of V(2) overlap onto stop consonantal target shapes at closure; and (4) a conceptually simple model, viz. interpolation between successive articulatory target shapes, followed by derivation of their formant values expressed as LEs, came surprisingly close to matching actual LEs obtained from our speaker.

  • 337.
    Lindblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Sussman, Harvey
    Modarresi, Golnaz
    Burlingame, E
    The trough effect: Implications for speech motor programming2002In: Phonetica, Vol. 59, p. 245-262Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 338.
    Lindqvist, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Inter- and intralingual lexical influences in advanced learners' French L3 oral production2010In: International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching, ISSN 0019-042X, E-ISSN 1613-4141, Vol. 48, no 2-3, p. 131-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates lexical inter- and intralingual influences in the oral production of 14 very advanced learners of French L3. Lexical deviances are divided into two main categories: formal influence and meaning-based influence. The results show that, as predicted with respect to advanced learners, meaning-based influence is the most important category, especially semantic extensions. Furthermore, only the languages in which the learners are highly proficient (Swedish L1, English L2 and French L3) are used in cases of meaning-based influence. By contrast, no use is made of closely related languages (Spanish and Italian). These results indicate that the proficiency factor is decisive for lexical inter- and intralingual influences to occur in advanced learners.

  • 339.
    Lindqvist, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    La richesse lexicale dans la production orale de l'apprenant avancé de français2010In: Canadian modern language review, ISSN 0008-4506, E-ISSN 1710-1131, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 393-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this study is to compare the lexical richness of the oral production of Swedish learners of French as a second language using the Lexical Frequency Profile method and the Vocabprofile program, elaborated by Laufer and Nation (1995) for written English. The French version of Vocabprofile is designed for written language; however, the study used oral data. The analysis focuses mainly on the use of infrequent words, which is supposed to indicate an advanced vocabulary. The comparison of two groups of advanced Swedish learners of French with a group of native speakers of French shows that the proportion of infrequent words increases with proficiency level. Moreover, the most advanced group has a lexical profile similar to that of the native speakers. However, using a database of written language to analyze spoken language does not seem entirely reliable, because of differences in frequency of certain words in oral and written language.  [

  • 340.
    Lindqvist, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    The use of the L1 and the L2 in French L3: examining cross-linguistic lexemes in multilingual learners’ oral production2009In: International Journal of Multilingualism, ISSN 1479-0718, E-ISSN 1747-7530, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 281-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates to what degree, and in what manner, the L1 and L2(s) influence spoken French L3. The analysis is divided in two parts. The first examines the cross-linguistic lexemes of 30 Swedish learners, divided into three groups according to previous exposure to French. The results show that proficiency in the L3 is crucial: the least advanced learners produce the highest number of cross-linguistic lexemes, whereas the most advanced learners produce the lowest number. Moreover, the lower the proficiency in the L3, the more background languages are used, and vice versa. Overall, there is a clear dominance of L1 influences. The second part contains six case studies of learners with partly different L1s and L2s. It examines the roles of the L1 and L2(s) in L3 oral production and the decisive factors for these roles. The main result is the use of Swedish L1/L2 and English L1 as instrumental languages, i.e. with clearly communicative purposes, in eliciting and metalinguistic functions. This is due to the interlocutors' common access to these languages. It does not seem to matter if the instrumental language represents a learner's L1 or L2. The fact that there is mutual comprehension seems to outweigh other factors.

  • 341.
    Lindqvist, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Bardel, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Education in Languages and Language Development.
    Approaches to third language acquisition: Introduction2010In: International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching, ISSN 0019-042X, E-ISSN 1613-4141, Vol. 48, no 2-3, p. 87-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information about several papers discussed at a conference titled The Role of the Background Languages in Third Language Acquisition. Romance Languages as L1, L2 or L3 which was held in Stockholm, Sweden on February 5, 2009 on third language (L3) acquisition is presented. Topics include Romance languages as background languages, research on vocabulary and syntax. The conference presented the works several language researchers including Christina Lindqvist, Rebekah Rast, and Jason Rothman.

  • 342.
    Lindström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Literacy in a Dying Language: The Case of Kuot, New Ireland, Papua New Guinea2005In: Current Issues in Language Planning, ISSN 1466-4208, E-ISSN 1747-7506, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 200-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kuot is a language in a critical situation. Most adults of lower middle age and older are full speakers but children are not learning it. In other words, it will become extinct in a few decades if nothing is done; but it is not too late if the community decides to turn it around, and do so fast. Thus far, the community has shown little interest. Into this situation, vernacular elementary education was introduced. While the community expects this to work for language survival, the aim of the education policy is the eventual transfer of literacy skills to English. This paper describes the tensions between these conflicting goals, and the various components that make up the specific situation of Kuot, including vernacular literacy, orthographic considerations arising from the language’s precarious situation, and the eventual extension of the internet era to Melanesia.

  • 343.
    Lindström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Påminnande: en funktion av demonstrativer i samtalssvenska2000In: ASLA Information: Denna – den här – den där. Om demonstrativer i tvärspråklig belysning. En minnesskrift till Elsie Wijk-Andersson, ISSN 1100-5629, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 93-102Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta bidrag redovisar några av resultaten från en studie av demonstrativerna den här/den där (etc) i svenska samtal. Ett lite förvånande resultat av studien var att mer än en tredjedel av förekomsterna av dessa demonstrativer utgjorde förstaomnämnanden. Detta finner sin främsta förklaring i deras funktion att påminna; att signalera att en viss referent förväntas vara bekant för lyssnaren.

    Svenska demonstrativer har tre formtyper: den/det/de, denna/detta/dessa, och den/det/de här/där. Den senare typen är som grupp föremål för den studie som redovisas här. (Proximitetsskillnaden i uttrycken kommer inte att behandlas, och inte heller faktorer som har med genus eller numerus att göra.) De förekommer framför allt i talspråket och är inte så väl representerade i skriven svenska (se Fraurud, denna volym).

    Med ”påminnande” menas här att talaren signalerar att lyssnaren förväntas kunna identifiera en icke-topikal referent via kunskap som inte nödvändigtvis förmedlats i det aktuella samtalet. Exempel (1) illustrerar principen:

    (1) A ja ja just det vi pratar den här killen som var hos oss i somras som [ohörbart] konstitutionen

    B amerikanen

    Det är tydligt att A väntar sig att B känner till referenten, vilket bekräftas i Bs yttrande, och det är också klart att referenten inte är aktiverad för B.

    Påminnande visar sig vara en typisk funktion för den aktuella gruppen demonstrativer. Denna funktion är mig veterligen inte tidigare beskriven för svenska. Funktionen har också en koppling till sökande efter ord och avbrutna eller reparerade yttranden.

  • 344.
    Lindström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The Body in Expressions of Emotion: Kuot2002In: Pragmatics & Cognition, ISSN 0929-0907, Vol. 10, no 1-2, p. 159-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution examines the use of body terms in expressions of emotion in Kuot, a non-Austronesian language of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea. It is found that expressions involving the word for ‘stomach’, daləp, correspond mainly to what we would consider to be psychological states, while expressions making use of neip ‘skin; body’ are largely concerned with physical states. Some other body parts also form part of emotive expressions.

  • 345.
    Lindström, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Remijsen, Bert
    Aspects of the prosody of Kuot, a language where intonation ignores stress2005In: Linguistics, ISSN 0024-3949, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 839-870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes the basic system of intonation and lexical stress in Kuot, a non-Austronesian language of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea. Kuot employs pitch (F0 variation) primarily to express structural information about the clause. Some intonation contours express functions that are commonly expressed by intonation crosslinguistically, such as final vs. nonfinal clauses and parts of clauses, and yes/no questions. In addition, Kuot has particular contours (or tunes) for question-word questions and negated sentences. Word stress, on the other hand, does not interact with intonation in terms of its encoding. It displays a very stable correlation with duration but no association with F0; in other words, there is no consistent marking of stress by means of F0 in Kuot. The position of Kuot word stress is lexically determined, yielding minimal stress pairs.

    In this article, we present a description of Kuot intonation on the basis of pitch extractions made from spontaneous speech. The results reveal that intonation in Kuot is anchored only at the boundaries of intonational phrases. A phonetic analysis of minimal stress pairs recorded in controlled environments demonstrates that lexically stressed syllables do not correlate with pitch.

    The findings are discussed against a background of prosodic typology.

  • 346. Lindström, Jan K.
    et al.
    Norrby, Catrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Wide, Camilla
    Nilsson, Jenny
    Intersubjectivity at the counter: Artefacts and multimodal interaction in theatre box office encounters2017In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 108, p. 81-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates the interplay between language, material and embodied resources in one specific type of service encounters: interactions at theatre box offices. The data consist of video recorded interactions in Swedish at three box offices, two in Sweden and one in Finland. Cases representative of the interactions are selected for a multimodal micro-analysis of the customer--seller interactions involving artefacts from the institutional and personal domain. The study specifically aims at advancing our understanding of the role of artefacts for structuring and facilitating communicative events in (institutional) interaction. In this way, it contributes to the growing research interest in the interactional importance of the material world. Our results show that mutual interactional focus is reached through mutual gaze in strategic moments, such as formulation of the reason for the visit. Artefacts are central in enhancing intersubjectivity and mutual focus in that they effectively invite the participants for negotiation, for example, about a seating plan which can be made visually accessible in different ways. Verbal language can be sparse and deictic in these moments while gaze and pointing to an artefact does more specific referential work. Artefacts are also a resource for signalling interactional inaccessibility, the seller orienting to the computer in order to progress a request and the customer orienting to a personal belonging (like a bag) to mirror and accept such a temporary non-accessibility. We also observe that speech can be paced to match the deployment of an artefact so that a focal verbal item is produced without competing, simultaneous physical activity.

  • 347. Lindström, Jan
    et al.
    Norrby, Catrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Nog är det tillräckligt!2016In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 8, p. 26-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 348.
    Lindström Tiedemann, Therese
    University of Sheffield.
    Grammaticalisation – past and present2005In: Logos and Language. Journal of General Linguistics and Language Theory, Vol. VI, no 2, p. 19-35Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 349.
    Lindström Tiedemann, Therese
    University of Sheffield.
    Grammaticalisation and Exaptation vs Coalescence and Secretion2004In: Beiträge zur Geschichte der Sprachwissenschaft, ISSN 0939-2815, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 251-284Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 350.
    Lindström Tiedemann, Therese
    University of Sheffield.
    The First, or one of the First, Treatments of Grammaticalisation in Britain2003In: Bulletin of the Henry Sweet Society for the history of linguistic ideas, no 40, p. 10-16Article in journal (Other academic)
45678910 301 - 350 of 616
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf