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  • 301.
    Jäger, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Allmän språkvetenskap.
    Grammaticalization paths of periphrastic 'do'-constructions2007In: Studies van de Belgische Kring voor Linguïstiek: Travaux de Cercle Belge de Linguistique, Papers of the Lingustic Society of Belgium, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study demonstrates cross-linguistic parallels in the grammaticalization of ‘do’-auxiliaries in ,periphrastic, verb constructions. Such constructions are exemplified by the phenomenon of ‘do’-support in English, where they are

    obligatory in interrogative and negative clauses. Similar phenomena can be attested across a wide range of genetically and typologically diverse languages. The auxiliary in ,periphrastic, ‘do’-constructions is derived from a ‘schematic action’ verb that can either be directly associated with a specific function, or it appears in the clause as a consequence of other grammatical

    factors. Based on a sample of 200 languages I will argue that ,periphrastic, ‘do’-constructions become grammaticalized in a limited range of grammatical context after going through a stage of optional usage, and also that direct expression of a verbal category by a ‘do’-auxiliary represents a possible final stage of grammaticalization of the ‘schematic action’-verb. The verbal

    categories expressed by such an element are restricted to a subsection of tense, aspect and mood. If in a given language the use of a ‘do’-auxiliary has become obligatory in association with other functions, the auxiliary will not grammaticalize further and continues as a semantically bleached dummy element. Tense, aspect and mood are therefore the only functional domains in which ‘do’-auxiliaries can become grammaticalized as meaningful elements.

  • 302.
    Jäger, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Reported speech constructions and the grammaticalization of hearsay evidentiality: a cross-linguistic survey2010In: Sprachtypologie und Universalienforschung, ISSN 0942-2919, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 177-195Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 303. Kalashnikova, Marina
    et al.
    Schwarz, Iris-Corinna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Burnham, Denis
    OZI: Australian English Communicative Development Inventory2016In: First language, ISSN 0142-7237, E-ISSN 1740-2344, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 407-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For more than 20 years, the MacArthur–Bates Communicative Development Inventory(CDI) and its adaptations for languages other than English have been used as reliable measures of infants’ and toddlers’ early receptive and productive vocabulary size. This article introduces the OZI, the Australian English adaptation of the MacArthur–Bates CDI, now normed for 12- to 30-month-old children. The findings of two studies are presented: (1) a comparison study that demonstrated that toddlers (N = 64) acquiring Australian English(24- and 30-month-olds) obtain higher productive vocabulary scores on the OZI than the MacArthur–Bates CDI; and (2) an OZI norming study that included 12- to 30-month-old Australian infants and toddlers (N = 1496). These studies provide (i) evidence for the greater applicability of the OZI for infants and toddlers learning Australian English and (ii) productive vocabulary acquisition norms for Australian English for ages 12–30 months, a research and diagnostic tool highly anticipated by researchers and clinicians around Australia.

  • 304. Kaneko, Michiko
    et al.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Eye gaze in creative sign language2013In: Sign Language Studies, ISSN 0302-1475, E-ISSN 1533-6263, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 372-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the role of eye gaze in creative sign language. Because eye gaze conveys various types of linguistic and poetic information, it is an intrinsic part of sign language linguistics in general and of creative signing in particular. We discuss various functions of eyegaze in poetic signing and propose a classification of gaze behaviors based on the observation of a number of poems in British Sign Language and Swedish Sign Language.

  • 305.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Backjumps: writing, watching, erasing train graffiti2018In: Social Semiotics, ISSN 1035-0330, E-ISSN 1470-1219, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 41-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with mobile semiotics. First and foremost, it discusses mobility as a semiotic device. The analysis engages with backjumps, a genre of train graffiti that draws inventively on various forms of movement. The term backjump refers to any fairly elaborate graffiti piece painted on trains in traffic, notably during the trains’ extended stops at terminal stations. The examples focus on the Stockholm metro, where a rigorous anti-graffiti policy has been firmly in place: graffiti is quickly cleaned off trains and a range of strategies is implemented to keep graffiti writing under wraps. By slyly inserting graffiti into the metro system, the mobility-driven backjump practice allows graffiti writers to temporarily subvert this semiotic regime. Furthermore, the forms of semiotic mobility at play are not limited to the movement of the trains. As the present study shows, mobile backjumps are entangled in other patterns of mobility, which jointly underwrite a number of interlinked semiotic processes.

  • 306.
    Karlander, David
    University of Hong Kong.
    Linguistic Prerequisites to Cultural Analysis: Lars Levander’s Reocentric Vision of Vernacular Language and Swedish Peasant Life2018In: Signs and Society, ISSN 2326-4489, E-ISSN 2326-4497, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 504-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article takes interest in reocentric thinking, as well as in the ways such thinking is brought to bear on research on language and social life. Reocentric thinking, understood as referential theories that treat words as standing for things, is pervasive throughout the history of (Western) linguistic thought. Yet, its manifestations in descriptive linguistic research are scantly explored. Seeking to account for how a reocentric vision of language and social life is realized and concomitantly adapted in scholarly practice, the article analyses the research of Swedish linguist and folklorist Lars Levander (1883–1950). Levander spent most of his life documenting the vernacular languages and peasant life of Sweden’s Dalarna province. His assumptions about the relationship between words and things, as this article argues, significantly guided his research practice. Furthermore, they served to conceptualize, and concomitantly capture, certain configurations of time and vernacular authenticity. The article seeks, accordingly, to grasp the dialectic between Levander’s epistemic presuppositions and his scholarly production. More broadly, the article’s historical, epistemological mode of engagement exemplifies how early and potentially ingrained apprehensions of language, as well as their epistemic prerequisites and effects, can be understood and rectified.

  • 307.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Roads to regimentation: Place, authenticity and the metapragmatics of naming2017In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 53, p. 11-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social agents often stake claims to the naming operations that are embedded in officialdiscourse. The present article explores the metapragmatics of such investments. Drawingon post-Austinian theories of naming (Kripke, Harris, Bourdieu, Silverstein), the articleanalyses the contentious process of naming roads in a rural community in Sweden. In thisprocess, one major stake was the entextualisation of names in Övdalsk, a locally used formof Scandinavian. Focusing on an extended exchange over spatial and linguistic authenticity,the article elucidates several ways in which the semiotics of place are bound up with arange of symbolic struggles and antagonisms. More generally, the article argues that suchfocus is necessary for grasping the semiotisation of space and spatialisation of semiosis.

  • 308.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    State categories, state vision and vernacular woes in Sweden’s language politics2018In: Language Policy, ISSN 1568-4555, E-ISSN 1573-1863, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 343-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the politics of classification in contemporary Sweden. It analyses the language political dispute that has developed over the language political regulation of Övdalsk, a non-standard form of Scandinavian spoken in Älvdalen in northern central Sweden. The analysis focuses on the ways in which a discursive exchange over metalinguistic categories contributes to the efficacy of a state vision of linguistic divisions. In the wake of Sweden’s ratification of the European Charter for Regional and Minority Languages (ECRML), and the language political reforms in which the ratification was embedded, Övdalsk has emerged as a contentious issue. Over three decades (1990s–2010s), the question of what Övdalsk ‘is’—a ‘language’, a ‘dialect’ or something else—has surged repeatedly in political, public and scholarly deliberations (i.e. in expert reports, in policy documents and in scientific publications). Nevertheless, the interests placed in this muddled taxonomic issue have not yet been subjected to any sociolinguistic analysis. Drawing on Bourdieu’s work on the state, the article attends to the ways in which the exchange over Övdalsk has paid tribute to an increasingly entrenched symbolic order. Commenting on Sweden’s commitment to the ECRML more generally, the article accounts for how and why an officialised vision of linguistic division has been rendered symbolically effective. Accordingly, the article argues that a sensitisation to the forms of tacit agreement that underwrite contention is a suitable lens for grasping the maintenance of a political order as legitimate and effective.

  • 309.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    The linguistic prerequisites for cultural analysis: Lars Levander’s reocentric ethnographies of Swedish peasant life and languageIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 310.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Souvereignity through indigenous Governance: Reviving 'Tradition lpolitical institutions' in Northeast India2005In: NEHU journal, ISSN 0972-8406, Vol. 3, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 311.
    Kaufhold, Kathrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Conventions in postgraduate academic writing: European students' negotiations of prior writing experience at an English speaking university2015In: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 20, p. 125-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postgraduate writing in the social sciences increasingly challenges the conventions of a model derived from the natural sciences. In addition, postgraduate second-language students usually bring with them prior experiences in academic writing which influences their writing development. Taking an Academic Literacies perspective, this ethnographically-informed case study combines and extends these lines of research in the specific context of student mobility in the European Higher Education Area. It investigates how Continental European master's students negotiate their prior experiences of academic writing when completing their theses at a UK university. The detailed analysis of three cases reveals that the students' initial understandings of academic English conventions as autonomous rules became increasingly depended on their disciplinary knowledge and the epistemological approaches of their theses. The results further highlight that the way students draw on prior experiences of academic English relates to their aims. In the light of their experiences, students might both challenge and actively preserve formal conventions of academic English. The findings suggest the need for EAP instructors and subject supervisors to adopt a balanced approach to scaffolding postgraduate academic writing and the importance of supportive institutional structures.

  • 312.
    Kaufhold, Kathrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Creating translanguaging spaces in students’ academic writing practices2018In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 45, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postgraduates increasingly write in multilingual contexts. Studies have focused on developing bilingual expertise or harnessing expressions of writer identity. Yet, the role of students’ linguistic ideologies and their writing experiences has so far not been problematised. Based on Busch’s sociolinguistic model oflinguistic repertoire (2012), this paper investigates how students develop their academic writing across language codes and registers in the multilingual contexts of a Swedish university. The qualitative, longi-tudinal study presents data from two students including interviews based on the students’ written text relating to their master’s thesis. Findings show that students’ linguistic ideologies and their experiences can enable or restrict their capacity to draw on their varied repertoires. When enabled, students create translanguaging spaces for meaning making in collaboration with peers and institutional actors. I argue that the metaphor of translanguaging space can be fruitfully applied as a pedagogic tool.

  • 313. Kauschke, Christina
    et al.
    Renner, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Domahs, Ulrike
    Prosodic constraints on inflected words: An area of difficulty for German-speaking children with specific language impairment?2013In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 574-593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies suggest that morphosyntactic difficulties may result from prosodic problems. We therefore address the interface between inflectional morphology and prosody in typically developing children (TD) and children with SLI by testing whether these groups are sensitive to prosodic constraints that guide plural formation in German. A plural elicitation task was designed consisting of 60 words and 20 pseudowords. The performance of 14 German-speaking children with SLI (mean age 7.5) was compared to age-matched controls and to younger children matched for productive vocabulary. TD children performed significantly better than children with SLI. Error analyses revealed that children with SLI produced more forms that did not meet the optimal shape of a noun plural. Beyond the fact that children with SLI have deficits in plural marking, the findings suggest that they also show reduced sensitivity to prosodic requirements. In other words, the prosodic structure of inflected words seems to be vulnerable in children with SLI.

  • 314. Kauschke, Christina
    et al.
    Renner, Lena F.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Domahs, Ulrike
    Past participle formation in specific language impairment2017In: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 168-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: German participles are formed by a co-occurrence of prefixation and suffixation. While the acquisition of regular and irregular suffixation has been investigated exhaustively, it is still unclear how German children master the prosodically determined prefixation rule (prefix ge-). Findings reported in the literature are inconsistent on this point. In particular, it is unclear whether participle formation is vulnerable in German children with specific language impairment (SLI).

    Aims: To compare children with and without SLI in their abilities to form German participles correctly, and to determine their relative sensitivities to the morphophonological regularities of prefixation.

    Methods & Procedures: The performance of 14 German-speaking children with SLI (mean age = 7;5) in a participle formation task was compared with that of age-matched and younger typically developing controls. The materials included 60 regular verbs and 20 pseudo-verbs, half of them requiring the prefix ge-.

    Outcome & Results: Overall, children with SLI performed poorly compared with both groups of typically developing children. Children with SLI tended either to avoid participle markings or choose inappropriate affixes. However, while such children showed marked impairment at the morphological level, they were generally successful in applying the morphoprosodic rules governing prefixation.

    Conclusions & Implications: In contrast to earlier findings, the present results demonstrate that regular participle formation is problematic for German children with SLI.

  • 315.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Bello-Nonjengele, Basirat
    Game changers? Multilingual learners in a Cape Town primary school2016In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 451-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article engages with Bourdieu’s notion of field as a ‘space of play’ to explore what happens to the educational field and the linguistic regimes operating within it in a site in which new discourses and practices of identity, language, ‘race’, and ethnicity become entangled with local economies of meaning. The context is a primary school in a low-income neighbourhood in Cape Town, South Africa. We draw on multilingual classroom and playground data from observations, interviews, and audio-recorded peer interactions among Grade 6 learners to illuminate the strategic mobilization of linguistic repertoires in encounters across difference: as identity-building resources and as means of shaping new interaction orders, restructuring hierarchies of value, subverting indexicalities, and sometimes resignifying racial categories. We further draw attention to a set of circumstances in which local actors have the potential to change, not only the rules of the game, but the game itself.

  • 316.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Simon-Vandenbergen, Anne-Marie
    Language in epistemic access: mobilising multilingualism and literacy development for more equitable education in South Africa2015In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 177-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is the guest editors’ introduction to the special issue ‘Language in Epistemic Access: Mobilising Multilingualism and Literacy Development for More Equitable Education in South Africa’. The issue offers complementary perspectives on improving epistemic access for all learners but especially those whose home language does not match the language of learning. Plüddemann examines the complex configurations of ideological and structural factors in South African language policy processes and the diverse positions taken up by teachers in response. Makalela argues that a methodology that encourages translanguaging can overcome historical separations between groups and promote transformative pedagogies. Probyn points to the importance of principled ‘pedagogical translanguaging’ in the mediation of secondary school science knowledge. Kerfoot and Van Heerden illustrate the substantial benefits of Systemic Functional Linguistic genre-based pedagogies for second or additional language writing in the middle years. White, Mammone and Caldwell in Australia offer evidence that similar benefits were maintained over six years for learners who faced both socio-economic and linguistic disadvantage in schools. Finally, Cummins and Heugh offer expansive perspectives on the issue. The editors argue that dynamic plurilingual pedagogies can be allied with the explicit scaffolding of genre-based pedagogies to help redress asymmetries in epistemic access.

  • 317. King, Kendall
    et al.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Language, Identity, and Transmigration: Chilean Adolescents in Sweden2005In: Journal of Language, Identity & Education, ISSN 1534-8458, E-ISSN 1532-7701, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 179-199Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 318.
    Kjellberg Smeds, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Blinda andraspråksinlärares talperception och talproduktion2008In: Nordand: nordisk tidsskrift for andrespråksforskning, ISSN 0809-9227, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 31-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 319. Klein, Raymond M.
    et al.
    Christie, John
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Does multilingualism affect the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease?: A worldwide analysis by country2016In: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 2, p. 463-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been suggested that the cognitive requirements associated with bi- and multilingual processing provide a form of mental exercise that, through increases in cognitive reserve and brain fitness, may delay the symptoms of cognitive failure associated with Alzheimer′s disease and other forms of dementia. We collected data on a country-by-country basis that might shed light on this suggestion. Using the best available evidence we could find, the somewhat mixed results we obtained provide tentative support for the protective benefits of multilingualism against cognitive decline. But more importantly, this study exposes a critical issue, which is the need for more comprehensive and more appropriate data on the subject.

  • 320.
    Kolu, Jaana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    "Koska ajattelit leikata ittes?" Ruotsin kielen vaikutus kaksikielisten nuorten suomen kieleen Haaparannalla ja Tukholmassa2018In: Lähivôrdlusi. Lähivertailuja, ISSN 1736-9290, E-ISSN 2228-3854, no 28, p. 178-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [fi]

    Tutkimuksessa kartoitetaan ruotsin kielen vaikutusta 13–15-vuotiaiden kaksikielisten nuorten suomen kieleen luokkahuoneen ulkopuolella nauhoitetuissa arkikielisissä keskusteluissa Haaparannalla (2014–2017) ja Tukholmassa (2015–2016). Artikkelissa pohditaan ruotsin kielen leksikaalista, semanttista ja morfosyntaktista vaikutusta mahdollisena selityksenä suomen standardipuhekielestä poikkeaviin sanavalintoihin ja kielioppirakenteisiin. Tutkimus on sekä kvalitatiivinen että kontrastiivinen. Tutkimustulokset osoittavat, että ruotsin kielen vaikutus näkyy enimmäkseen kaksikielisten nuorten suomen sanastossa. Koodinvaihdon ja lainaamisen ohella puhujat kääntävät ruotsinkielisiä idiomaattisia ilmauksia suomen kieleen. Myös suomen sanojen semanttisen kentän laajeneminen voi olla merkki ruotsin kielen vaikutuksesta. Osaa poikkeavista ilmauksista voi pitää puhekielen normaalivariaationa ja murrekielisinä ilmauksina, osaa taas standardikielen normista poikkeavina muotoina, joita ei voi selittää ruotsin kielen avulla. Kaksikielisten puhujien suomen kielessä esiintyy vain vähän esimerkkejä ruotsin morfosyntaktisesta vaikutuksesta. Puhujat pitävät erillään ruotsin ja suomen sanojen ääntämisen, eikä ruotsin kielen fonologista vaikutusta suomen kieleen ole juuri havaittavissa.

  • 321.
    Kolu, Jaana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    "Me ollaan mukana tässä experimentissä": Lingvistiska resurser och språkpraktiker i tvåspråkiga ungdomssamtal i Haparanda, Stockholm och Helsingfors2018In: Folkmålsstudier, ISSN 0356-1771, Vol. 56, p. 185-193Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 322.
    Kolu, Jaana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Translanguaging Practices in Bilingual Adolescents’ Conversations in Haparanda, Stockholm and Helsinki2018In: Nordiques, ISSN 1761-7677, no 35, p. 149-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 323.
    Koptjevskaja Tamm, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Vanhove, Martine
    Koch, Peter
    Typological approaches to lexical semantics2007In: Linguistic Typology, ISSN 1430-0532; 1613-415X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 159 – 186-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 324.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    From Aleksandr Evgen'evič's garden2013In: Linguistic typology, ISSN 1430-0532, E-ISSN 1613-415X, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 518-518Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 325.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Introduction from the new Editor: Linguistic Typology today and tomorrow2018In: Linguistic typology, ISSN 1430-0532, E-ISSN 1613-415X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 326. Kuhl, Patricia K
    et al.
    Andruski, J E
    Chistovich, I A
    Chistovich, L A
    Kozhevnikova, E V
    Ryskina, V L
    Stolyarova, E I
    Sundberg, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Cross-language analysis of phonetic units in language addressed to infants.1997In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, Vol. 277, no 5326, p. 684-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the early months of life, infants acquire information about the phonetic properties of their native language simply by listening to adults speak. The acoustic properties of phonetic units in language input to young infants in the United States, Russia, and Sweden were examined. In all three countries, mothers addressing their infants produced acoustically more extreme vowels than they did when addressing adults, resulting in a "stretching" of vowel space. The findings show that language input to infants provides exceptionally well-specified information about the linguistic units that form the building blocks for words.

  • 327.
    Kulick, Don
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Christianity, cargo and ideas of self: Patterns of literacy in a Papua New Guinean village1990In: Man, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 286-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Literacy in a small, rural, newly literate Papua New Guinean village is analysed by placing it in the context of local notions of Christianity, the self and language. Villagers' interpretations of the relationship between Catholicism and the written word are based on their Cargo-oriented world-view and on their pre-Christian beliefs about language as a powerful means by which individuals could bring about transformations in their world. Local ideas of the self and others are articulated and reinforced through an emphasis on particular dimensions of oral language use. This emphasis has consequences for the uses to which literacy is put, the structure of the writing the villagers produce, and the ways in which they attribute meaning to written texts.

     

  • 328. Kullenberg, Christopher
    et al.
    Van Meerbergen, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Dutch.
    Westberg, Gustav
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    What are analog bulletin boards used for today? Analysing media uses, intermediality and technology affordances in Swedish bulletin board messages using a citizen science approach: 2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 8, article id e0202077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analog bulletin boards are omnipresent in Swedish urban areas, yet little systematic knowledge about this communication medium exists. In the shadow of the rapid emergence of digital media the analog bulletin board has received less attention than its digital successors, many of them having incorporated similar functionality with novel technical solutions. In this study we used a citizen science method to collect 1167 messages from bulletin boards around Sweden aided by school children and teachers, with the purpose of shedding new light on what is communicated on the boards, by whom, using what types of technologies and in what way the messages refer to other media. Results show that the most common messages are invitations to events, such as concerts, lectures and sports events, followed by buy-and-sell ads for goods and services. The most frequent sender is an association, for example NGOs, sports associations or religious communities. Almost half of the sampled messages were professionally printed, about forty per cent were made by home printers. Only six per cent of the messages were handwritten, almost exclusively by private persons as senders. Moreover, we show how the analog bulletin board has adapted to recent changes in media technology-a media landscape which is saturated with electronicand mobile media. Further, the bulletin board still holds a firm place in a media ecology where local communication is in demand, and exists in parallel with electronic media. Close to forty percent of the messages contained hyperlinks to web pages and we found (and removed for anonymization purposes) more than six hundred phone numbers from the dataset.

  • 329.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Scriptlines as emergent artifacts in collaborative group planning2015In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 76, p. 135-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By adopting a process-oriented, praxeological approach to planning research, this study illustrates how group planning is collaboratively achieved as a situated activity during interactions-for-classroom-tasks. Such approach, based on the theoretical tenets of Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis, gives an emic (i.e., participant-relevant), non-mentalist account of planning as a nexus of situated discursive and embodied practices. The analysis focuses on a planning session during which three adult learners of Italian as a foreign language prepare for a classroom presentation in their L2; the final planning product is a written script for the presentation. Specifically, the participants' plan for their classroom presentation emerges as orally formulated scriptlines, which are collaboratively shaped until they come to constitute a written script for the presentation. Overall, this process-oriented study provides a moment-by-moment documentation of the participants' planning practices, such as inscribing, writing aloud, translating into their L2, and retranslating into their L1. The findings suggest that teachers should give students planning time in the classroom, in order to observe the students' practices and make sure that their respective interpretations of the final task follow the same agenda. Moreover, the direct observation of the planning process could provide an opportunity for assessment for learning.

  • 330.
    Kupula, Mikko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Nygrekiska.
    A visible trace of movement?2007In: Snippets, ISSN 1590-1807, no 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This snippet illustrates that placement of possessive clitics in Modern Greek can be used as heuristic for detecting a visible trace of N-to-D movement. The finding also supports the view that N>A strings involve movement chain.

  • 331.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mauranen, Anna
    Digital academic discourse: Texts and contexts: Introduction2018In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 24, p. 1-7Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This Special Issue focuses on how digital media – blogs, tweets, and other digital platforms – are used by researchers, and how these new modes of academic communication have impacted writing practices and language uses in the academy. It brings together research in two related areas of scholarship: academic discourse analysis and literacies research. In this introductory article, we first outline the concept of digital academic discourse as we perceive it in the context of our Special Issue and show how it is related to, and at the same time different from, its “analogue” predecessor. We then continue to discuss the practices surrounding the production of academic texts with the support of digital media, followed by an outline of how both digital academic discourse and related writing practices are tied to the networks, communities and spaces in which they take place. Next, methodological issues in the study of digital academic discourse are considered, and the articles in this special issue are presented in connection to the themes outlined above. We conclude by contextualising the studies reported here within current trends in discourse analytical and sociolinguistic research and identify venues for future studies.

  • 332.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Section for Phonetics.
    Därför fungerar inte röstbaserade lögndetektorer2009In: NewsmillArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Voice-based lie detectors rely on pseudo science. Nevertheless they are used in Great Britan and a number of other locations. One of the major producers of these detectors attempts to use threats to silence swedish researchers who pointed out that their technique lacks scientific basis, writes Francisco Lacerda, professor of Phonetics at Stockholm University.

  • 333.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Section for Phonetics.
    Lögnbaserade lögndetektorer2009In: Folkvett, ISSN 0283-0795, no 3, p. 7-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses the underlying principles of voice-based lie-detectors, in particular Nemesysco's LVA-technology. The conclusion is that the system cannot (even in principle) work, a notion that is supported by the results from the UK's Department of Work and Pensions' systematic evaluation.

  • 334.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Fonetik.
    Phonolgoy: An emergent consequence of memory constraints and sensory input2003In: Reading and Writing: An Interdisciplinary Journal, ISSN 0922-4777 (Print) 1573-0905 (Online), Vol. 16, no 1, p. 41-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    This paper presents a theoretical model that attempts to account for the early stages of language acquisition in terms of interaction between biological constraints and input characteristics. The model uses the implications of stochastic representations of the sensory input in a volatile and limited memory. It is argued that phonological structure is a consequence of limited memory resources under the pressure of ecologically relevant multi-sensory information.

  • 335.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Fonetik.
    Språkets begynnelse: Att härleda lingvistisk struktur ur löpande tal2008In: Dyslexi: Aktuellt om läs- och skrivsvårigheter, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 11-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikeln presenterar en översiklig modell av tidig talspråksinlärning som bygger på samspelet mellan barnet och sin omgivning. Fonologisk medvetenhet föreslås som vidare konsekvenser av samma hierarkiska process som förklarar hur spädbarn härleder ord som återkommande ljudsekvenser förekommande i initialt oanalyserat löpande tal.

  • 336.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Sundberg, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    An Ecological Theory of Language Acquisition2006In: Linguística: Revista de Estudos Linguísticos da Universidade do Porto, ISSN 1646-6195, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 54-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An ecological approach to early language acquisition is presented in this article. The general view is that the ability of language communication must have arisen as an evolutionary adaptation to the representational needs of Homo sapiens and that about the same process is observed in language acquisition, although under different ecological settings. It is argued that the basic principles of human language communication are observed even in non-human species and that it is possible to account for the emergence of an initial linguistic referential function on the basis of general-purpose perceptual, production and memory mechanisms, if there language learner interacts with the ecological environment. A simple computational model of how early language learning may be initiated in today's human infants is proposed.

  • 337.
    Lainio, Jarmo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German, Finnish.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Muhonen, Anu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German, Finnish.
    Flerspråkiga ungas identiteter och diskurser om dessa – ett internationellt projekt som börjar avkasta resultat2012In: Fenno-Ugrica Suecana - Nova Series, ISSN 1504-1921, E-ISSN 2001-6204, Vol. 14, p. 41-56Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents the local, global and sociolinguistic contexts of an international HERAproject (IDII4MES; the Humanities in the European Research Area, 2010-2012). Its main aims are summarized as follows; to:

    - investigate the range of language and literacy practices of multilingual young people and how these practices are used to negotiate inheritance and identities,

    - explore the cultural and social significance of language and literacy practices of multilingual young people,

    - develop innovative multi-site, ethnographic team methodologies using interlocking case studies across national, social, cultural, and linguistic contexts

    - contribute to policy and practice in the inclusion of non-national minority languages in the wider European educational agenda.

    The four research sites, Birmingham (U.K.; coordinator), Copenhagen (Denmark), Stockholm (Sweden), and Tilburg (Netherlands), followed similar routes for data creation, but concentrated on school-age children of different language-backgrounds: Punjabi (Birmingham), Finnish and Spanish (Stockholm), Chinese (Tilburg, Eindhoven, Utrecht), and mainstream context (Danish) for various language-background children (Copenhagen). The methods involve ethnographic fieldwork in- and out-of-school, interviews, discussions, linguistic landscaping and ‘nethnographic’ studies of multilingual adolescents’ social media and internet communication. Analyses and reports based on the qualitative data from the diverse, multilingual contexts have been discussed and produced. Following these, new datadriven and comparative-theoretical studies of the project are being produced.

  • 338.
    Lainio, Jarmo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Finnish.
    Wande, Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Finnish.
    Meänkieli today – to be or not to be standardised2015In: Sociolinguistica: Internationales Jahrbuch fuer Europaeische Soziolinguistik, ISSN 0933-1883, E-ISSN 1865-939X, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 121-140Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 339.
    Larsson, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Report from the 9th Conference on Baltic Studies in Europe – Transitions, Visions and Beyond2011In: Baltu filoloģija, ISSN 1691-0036, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 90-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 9th Conference on Baltic Studies in Europe, Transitions, Visions andBeyond, was organized by the Center for Baltic and East European Studiesat Södertörn University, and held in Stockholm, 12–15 June 2011. Theconference attracted over 200 participants from all over the world, and thepanel sessions covered nearly all aspects of Baltic Studies, including linguistics,history, political studies, economics, media, culture, literature and the arts.Three key-note speakers were featured; Bengt Jacobsson (Södertörn) openedthe conference with the paper “Changes in Governance: Europeanization andthe Baltic States”, on the second day Valdis Muktupāvels (Riga) talked aboutlocal, regional and continental components of national musical culture, andon the last day, Tiina Kirss (Tallinn) addressed post-Soviet memory work inher talk “Writing Baltic Lives: Continuities and Caesuras”.In the following, I will attempt to briefly summarize the main points of the papers in the linguistic section, which was organized by Raimo Raag(Uppsala) and Pēteris Vanags (Stockholm).

  • 340.
    Larsson, Jenny H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Baltic Languages.
    Breaking News: nya rön i jakten på det indoeuropeiska urspråket!2015In: Curie: en tidning från Vetenskapsrådet, ISSN 2001-3426Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 341.
    Larsson, Jenny H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Baltic Languages.
    Det indoeuropeiska urspråket2015In: Anropet, ISSN 1653-8633Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 342.
    Larsson, Jenny H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Baltic Languages.
    Om detta talar skeletten2015In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no juniArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 343.
    Larsson, Jenny H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Baltic Languages.
    Ta inte listan på orden!2015In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no oktoberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 344.
    Larsson, Jenny H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Baltic Languages.
    Var talades det indoeuropeiska urspråket?2015In: Curie: en tidning från Vetenskapsrådet, ISSN 2001-3426Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 345.
    Larsson, Jenny H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Baltic Languages.
    Varför blir man språkhistoriker?2015In: Curie: en tidning från Vetenskapsrådet, ISSN 2001-3426Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 346.
    Larsson, Jenny H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Baltic Languages.
    Vilket språk är äldst?2015In: Curie: en tidning från Vetenskapsrådet, ISSN 2001-3426Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 347.
    Larsson, Jenny Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Baltic Languages.
    Apophonie et catégories grammaticales dans les langues baltiques2013In: Kratylos, ISSN 0023-4567, Vol. 53, p. 147-156Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 348.
    Larsson, Jenny Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Deverbative Root Nouns in Baltic?2003In: Linguistica Baltica: International Journal of Baltic Linguistics, ISSN 1230-3984, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 99-104Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 349.
    Larsson, Jenny Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Nominal Compounds in Old Lithuanian Texts: the Original Distribution of the Composition Vowel2004In: Linguistica Baltica: International Journal of Baltic Linguistics, ISSN 1230-3984, Vol. 10, p. 99-104Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 350.
    Larsson, Jenny Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Nominal Compounds in the Baltic Languages2002In: Transactions of the Philological Society (Print), ISSN 0079-1636, E-ISSN 1467-968X, Vol. 100, no 2, p. 203-231Article in journal (Refereed)
45678910 301 - 350 of 688
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