Change search
Refine search result
45678910 301 - 350 of 1750
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 301.
    Byerley, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Uganda: Geography and Economy2007In: New Encyclopedia of Africa, Volume 5, Gale Cengage , 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 302.
    Byerley, Andrew
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Bylund, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Stockholm Parklife: Public issues, friction zones, and displacement2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stockholm Parklife investigates alcohol consumption in urban parks and how the boundary between acceptable and unacceptable behaviour is drawn. Focus is mainly on how norms, regulation and policy create different claims on and conflicts in public spaces. Conflict around rowdy drinking behaviour in urban parks often generates proposals on alcohol free zones whose effects are not yet clear. The paper propose following this controversy over the fate of public space as an issue around which a public can form and participate in local (formal) politics. The project centers around the Stockholm inner-city parks Drakensbergsparken, Tantolunden, and Skinnarviksparken.

  • 303.
    Byerley, Andrew
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Sverige.
    Bylund, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Södertörns högskola, Sverige.
    Vad är ett bra parkliv?: Om det offentliga rummets öde, alkohol och Tanto i Stockholm2012In: Geografiska Notiser, ISSN 0016-724X, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 17-24Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stockholm Parklife investigates alcohol consumption in urban parks and how the boundary between acceptable and unacceptable behaviour is drawn. Focus is mainly on how norms, regulation and policy create different claims on and conflicts in public spaces. Conflict around rowdy drinking behaviour in urban parks often generates proposals on alcohol free zones whose effects are not yet clear. The paper propose following this controversy over the fate of public space as an issue around which a public can form and participate in local (formal) politics. The project centers around the Stockholm inner-city parks Drakensbergsparken, Tantolunden, and Skinnarviksparken.

  • 304.
    Bylund, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Plassein: On the fluid mobility of place and urban qualities in planning2013In: Planning Theory, ISSN 1473-0952, E-ISSN 1741-3052, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 244-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What could the addition of a variegated spatial approach contribute to planning studies? Planning studies, by and large, rely on Euclidean space as a ‘reality’ to be planned. However, Euclidean space may only be one of many spaces enacted in planning practice. Thus, this article proposes that most urban planning practice features at least a severe spatial imaginative challenge to our understanding of it. First, there is the problem of how to manage at a distance, which is solved by a translation and hence mobilization of place. Second, there is the problem of how mobilized place is done ex situ, which suggests that it must become somewhat fluid and be translated into plassein. These features are discussed in light of brief empirical illustrations drawn from a study of urban waterfront redevelopment in Swedish cities. In concluding the argument, a note is made on the relevance of plassein with a suggestion that fluidity is a requirement for achieving democracy in planning practices.

  • 305.
    Bylund, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Postpolitical correctness?2012In: Planning Theory, ISSN 1473-0952, E-ISSN 1741-3052, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 319-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the recent symposium ‘Is Planning Past Politics?’, the notion of postpolitics and the question what the proper political could be in relation to planning became the main topic. The issue concerning the practices of politics in planning is pertinent, particularly when democratic politics is not necessarily seen to derive its legitimacy only through institutional and procedural arrangements. However, this article identifies a danger in the binary of postpolitics/proper political that it might develop into a kind of ‘postpolitical correctness’.

  • 306.
    Bylund, Jonas R
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Planning, Projects, Practice: A Human Geography of the Stockholm Local Investment Programme in Hammarby Sjöstad2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Programmes and policies to support ecological sustainable development and the practice of implementation is a question of innovation rather than known and taken for granted procedure. This thesis argues a priori models concerning stability in the social sciences, and human geography especially, are less able to help us understand this practice and planning in such unstable situations. Problematic in common understandings of planning and policy implementation concerning sustainability are the dualisms between physical-social spaces and between rationality-contingency. The first dualism makes it hard to grasp the interaction between humans and nonhumans. The second dualism concerns the problem of how to capture change without resorting to reductionism and explanaining the evolving projects as either technically, economically, or culturally rational.

    The scope of the thesis is to test resources from actor-network theory as a means of resolving these dualisms. The case is the Stockholm Local Investment Programme and the new district of Hammarby Sjöstad. The programme’s objective was to support the implemention of new technologies and systems, energy efficiency and reduced resource-use as well as eco-cycling measures. The case-study follows how the work with the programme unfolded and how administrators’ efforts to reach satisfactory results was approached. In doing this, the actors had to be far more creative than models of implementation and traditional technology diffusion seem to suggest. The recommendation is to take the instrumentalisation framing the plasticity of a project in planning seriously – as innovativeness is not a special but the general case. Hence, to broaden our tools and understanding of planning a human geography of planning projects is pertinent.

  • 307.
    Bylund, Jonas R
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Planning, Projects, Practice: A Human Geography of the Stockholm Local Investment Programme in Hammarby Sjöstad2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Programmes and policies to support ecological sustainable development and the practice of implementation is a question of innovation rather than known and taken for granted procedure. This thesis argues a priori models concerning stability in the social sciences, and human geography especially, are less able to help us understand this practice and planning in such unstable situations. Problematic in common understandings of planning and policy implementation concerning sustainability are the dualisms between physical-social spaces and between rationality-contingency. The first dualism makes it hard to grasp the interaction between humans and nonhumans. The second dualism concerns the problem of how to capture change without resorting to reductionism and explaining the evolving projects as either technically, economically, or culturally rational.

    The scope of the thesis is to test resources from actor-network theory as a means of resolving these dualisms. The case is the Stockholm Local Investment Programme and the new district of Hammarby Sjöstad. The programme’s objective was to support the implementation of new technologies and systems, energy efficiency and reduced resource-use as well as eco-cycling measures. The case-study follows how the work with the programme unfolded and how administrators’ efforts to reach satisfactory results was approached. In doing this, the actors had to be far more creative than models of implementation and traditional technology diffusion seem to suggest. The recommendation is to take the instrumentalisation framing the plasticity of a project in planning seriously – as innovativeness is not a special but the general case. Hence, to broaden our tools and understanding of planning a human geography of planning projects is pertinent.

  • 308.
    Bäckstrand, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Kuyper, Jonathan W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. University of Oslo, Norway.
    The democratic legitimacy of orchestration: the UNFCCC, non-state actors, and transnational climate governance2017In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 764-788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is orchestration democratically legitimate? On one hand, debates concerning the legitimacy and democratic deficits of international politics continue unabated. On the other, the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has progressively engaged in processes of orchestration culminating in the 2015 Paris Agreement. Scholarship on orchestration has almost exclusively focused on how to ensure effectiveness while excluding normative questions. This lacuna is addressed by arguing that orchestration should be assessed according to its democratic credentials. The promises and pitfalls of orchestration can be usefully analyzed by applying a set of democratic values: participation, deliberation, accountability, and transparency. Two major orchestration efforts by the UNFCCC both pre- and post-Paris are shown to have substantive democratic shortfalls, not least with regard to participation and accountability. Ways of strengthening the democratic legitimacy of orchestration are identified.

  • 309.
    Börjeson, Lowe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    A History under Siege: Intensive Agriculture in the Mbulu Highlands, Tanzania, 19th Century to the Present2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This doctoral thesis examines the history of the Iraqw’ar Da/aw area in the Mbulu Highlands of northern Tanzania. Since the late nineteenth century this area has been known for its intensive cultivation, and referred to as an “island” within a matrix of less intensive land use. The conventional explanation for its characteristics has been high population densities resulting from the prevention of expansion by hostility from surrounding pastoral groups, leading to a siegelike situation. Drawing on an intensive programme of interviews, detailed field mapping and studies of aerial photographs, early travellers’ accounts and landscape photographs, this study challenges that explanation. The study concludes that the process of agricultural intensification has largely been its own driving force, based on self-reinforcing processes of change, and not a consequence of land scarcity.

  • 310.
    Börjeson, Lowe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Agricultural Intensification2010In: Encyclopedia of Geography / [ed] Barney Warf, Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications, 2010Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 311.
    Börjeson, Lowe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Boserup Backwards? Agricultural intensification as ‘its own driving force’ in the Mbulu Highlands, Tanzania2007In: Geografiska Annaler: Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, Vol. 89B, no 3, p. 249-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why do farmers intensify their agricultural practices? Recent revisions of African environmental historiographies have greatly enriched our understanding of human–environmental interactions. To simply point at poor farming practices as the main cause of deforestation, desertification and other processes of land degradation is, for example, no longer possible. The contemporary analytical focus is instead on the complex and often unpredictable set of causal relations between societal, ecological and climatic factors.

    In the literature on agricultural intensification, conventionally defined driving forces, such as population pressure and market demand, remain important explanatory factors despite a growing body of research that suggests more dynamic scenarios of agricultural development and landscape change. This article reports on a case where the common-sense logic of population pressure theory has dominated the historical narrative of a local process of agricultural intensification among an agro-pastoral people in north-central Tanzania. By way of a ‘detailed participatory landscape analyses’ a more complex and dynamic historical process of intensification is suggested, in which the landscape and the process of agricultural intensification itself are in focus.

    It is concluded that the accumulation of landesque capital has been incremental in character, and that the process of agricultural intensification in the study area has largely been its own driving force based on self-reinforcing processes of change, and not a consequence of land scarcity and population pressure. This result demonstrates the possibility and usefulness of reversing the Boserupian argument in analyses of agricultural intensification.

  • 312.
    Börjeson, Lowe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    The antithesis of degraded land: toward a greener conceptualization of landesque capital2014In: Landesque capital: the historical ecology of enduring landscape modifications / [ed] N. Thomas Håkansson, Mats Widgren, Walnut Creek: Left Coast Press Inc., 2014, p. 251-268Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 313.
    Börjeson, Lowe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Using a historical map as a baseline in a land-cover change study of northeast Tanzania2009In: African Journal of Ecology, ISSN 0141-6707, E-ISSN 1365-2028, Vol. 47, no s1, p. 185-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vegetation data in an early 20th century map from northern Tanzania are presented and discussed for its potential of expanding the analytical time-frame in studies of land-use and land-cover change. The starting point is that much research on land-use and land-cover change suffers from a time-frame bias, caused by limitations in remote sensing data. At the same time, the use of historical maps as a complementary data-set is rather insignificant. Can information in historical maps be used to extend the baseline in land-use and land-cover change studies? The historical context of the vegetation data is evaluated, and as an illustration of its potential for interdisciplinary research on land-cover and ecosystems change, a section of the map is juxtaposed with a recent pollen record specifically addressing the impact of a 'large infrequent disturbance' (LID) event at the end of the 19th century. It is concluded that the vegetation data in the map are not likely to be reflecting an extreme situation due to the LID event. Finally, the historical vegetation data were visually compared with a national 1995 land-cover data set, illustrating the possibility of using the map data as a baseline in land-cover change studies.

  • 314.
    Börjeson, Lowe
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Berg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Cousins, Sara A. O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Jansson, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Open Access to Rural Landscapes!2014In: Rural Landscapes: Society, Environment, History, ISSN 2002-0104, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The academic study of rural landscapes covers a broad range of academic disciplines and thematic, methodological and theoretical concerns and interests; including questions concerned with resource use (e.g. agriculture, forestry, water and mining), settlement, livelihoods, conflicts, conservation, culture and identity. This diversity is clearly a strength (the rich empirical and intellectual base), but also presents a challenge, as the dissemination of research findings is distributed through a plethora of publishing channels, which do not necessarily encourage exchange of results and ideas that are not already perceived as germane to already established academic networks.

  • 315.
    Börjeson, Lowe
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Hodgson, Dorothy L.
    Yanda, Pius Z.
    Northeast Tanzania's Disappearing Rangelands: Historical Perspectives on Recent Land Use Change2008In: International Journal of African Historical Studies, ISSN 0361-7882, E-ISSN 2326-3016, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 523-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article focuses on the historical perspectives on the land use change of rangelands in the northeastern part of Tanzania. It traces the influence of colonial policies and precolonial political economic connection on the rapid land cover transformation on the Maasai Plains. Specifically, the authors present a historical narratives of landscape changes in the northeastern part of the country, focusing on land cover and land use change. It cites several areas in the northeast that were affected by landscape change and how these areas were agriculturally converted. Furthermore, the impact on the alterations in landscape that rooted in the colonial and precolonial history in the region is considered.

  • 316. Bürk-Matsunami, Thomas
    et al.
    Bylund, Jonas R
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Förster, Kim
    Gebhardt, Dirk
    Naumann, Matthias
    Sozialgeographien des Reichtums in Berlin: Ergebnisse eines Projektseminars2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This text is the result of a two-semester project course on 'Social geographies of affluence in Berlin' at the Geography Department of Humboldt-University. The starting point of our work was the thesis, that within the scenario of socio-spatial polarisation in the cities, the scientific and political gaze often turns unidirectionally towards the poor and their so-called disadvantaged neighbourhoods. We wanted to redirect this gaze towards affluence, the other side of polarisation, and thus approach a field that appeared to us rather neglected, at least within Geography. Our expedition into this so far sparsely investigated field required usable methodological and theoretical tools as well as thematic approaches to the topic. This did not lead us to uncover the social geography of affluence in Berlin. It rather represents an attempt, to try out some empirical approaches alongside the students’ interest and within in a narrow time frame. The organisational setting for our preoccupation with affluence was the simulation of a research project with discussions, presentations, mutual knowledge transfer and narrow deadlines. The results of the students’ work groups presented here deal with the relation between urban policies and affluence, the spaces of the functional elites of the German capital, the phenomenon of luxury goods and its spatial expression, cartographic approaches to affluence and the topic of affluent migrants exemplified by Turkish entrepreneurs. An introductory chapter reconstructs the thematic and organisational frame of the course.

  • 317.
    Cachia Marsh, Patrick
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Creation of a Practical Framework for Congestion Charging Systems in the Maltese Islands: Analysis of the Valletta CVA System2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Congestion is a phenomenon that is becoming an increasing problem on road networks in and around many urban areas. As congestion causes a number of environmental, economic and social problems, policy and decision makers have started to consider a number of measures to tackle it. A number of cities have therefore implemented congestion charging systems, with one of the most recent being Valletta, Malta, in May 2007. Despite being part of a number of initiatives in attempting to curb Malta’s considerable congestion problems, there are indicators that the Valletta Controlled Vehicular Access system has not been as successful as originally envisaged in reaching its objectives. This thesis therefore analyses the Valletta CVA system, and other proposed and implemented congestion charging systems around Europe, to discern the common factors of successful and unsuccessful congestion charging systems and their implications for transport policy. This therefore enables the construction of a practical framework for the implementation and operation of a successful congestion charging system in the Maltese context.

  • 318.
    Cadstedt, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Influence and Invisibility: Tenants in Housing Provision in Mwanza City, Tanzania2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A high proportion of urban residents in Tanzanian cities are tenants who rent rooms in privately owned houses in unplanned settlements. However, in housing policy and in urban planning rental tenure gets very little attention. This study focuses on the reasons for and consequences of this discrepancy between policy and practice.

    Perspectives and actions of different actors involved in the housing provision process in Mwanza City, Tanzania, have been central to the research. The examined actors are residents in various housing tenure forms as well as government officials and representatives at different levels, from the neighbourhood level to UN-Habitat. The main methods have been interviews and discussions with actors as well as studies of policy documents, laws and plans.

    Among government actors, private rental tenure is largely seen as an issue between landlords and tenants. Tanzanian housing policy focuses more on land for housing than on shelter. This means that house-owners who control land have a more important role in urban planning and policies than tenants have. In Tanzania in general and in Mwanza in particular, housing policy focuses on residents’ involvement in upgrading unplanned areas by organising in Community Based Organisations. This means that owners who live for a longer period in an area benefit more from settlement improvements than tenants. Tenants are relatively mobile and do not take for granted that they will stay in the same house for long. This raises the question of tenants’ possibilities to influence as well as their rights as citizens as compared to that of owners. The question of citizens’ rights for dwellers in informal settlements has received increased attention during the last years in international housing policy discussions. There is an evident need to intensify and diversify this discussion.

  • 319.
    Cadstedt, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Tenants' and owners' participation in rotating savings groups and help groups A study of housing tenure forms and social inclusion in Mwanza city, Tanzania2012In: IDPR. International Development Planning Review, ISSN 1474-6743, E-ISSN 1478-3401, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 19-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International policy emphasises the importance of slum dwellers rights of access to cities and their social inclusion. Legalisation of land holdings in informal settlements is one way of enacting this policy. However, this measure favours house owners over the large proportion of tenants renting rooms in private houses in informal settlements in many cities in the global South. Rental housing is neglected by marry governments. What role does the form of house tenure play in other processes of social inclusion in informal settlements? This article examines one of many forms of social inclusion: participation of tenants and owners in rotating savings groups and help groups in two areas in Mwanza city, Tanzania. The results indicate that both tenants and owners participate in groups, which are based not only on the geographical area of residence but on work, ethnicity and religion. The study also indicates that not all groups accept tenants as members, because of their high mobility.

  • 320.
    Camilla, Årlin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Altering forms of the human behaviour we know as 'going on safari'2011In: Watching Humans Watching / [ed] Inka Lindergård & Niclas Holmström, Berlin: Kehrer Verlag Heidelberg Berlin , 2011Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 321. Campbell, Bruce M.
    et al.
    Beare, Douglas J.
    Bennett, Elena M.
    Hall-Spencer, Jason M.
    Ingram, John S. I.
    Jaramillo, Fernando
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Ortiz, Rodomiro
    Ramankutty, Navin
    Sayer, Jeffrey A.
    Shindell, Drew
    Agriculture production as a major driver of the Earth system exceeding planetary boundaries2017In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 22, no 4, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the role of agriculture in destabilizing the Earth system at the planetary scale, through examining nine planetary boundaries, or safe limits: land-system change, freshwater use, biogeochemical flows, biosphere integrity, climate change, ocean acidification, stratospheric ozone depletion, atmospheric aerosol loading, and introduction of novel entities. Two planetary boundaries have been fully transgressed, i.e., are at high risk, biosphere integrity and biogeochemical flows, and agriculture has been the major driver of the transgression. Three are in a zone of uncertainty i.e., at increasing risk, with agriculture the major driver of two of those, land-system change and freshwater use, and a significant contributor to the third, climate change. Agriculture is also a significant or major contributor to change for many of those planetary boundaries still in the safe zone. To reduce the role of agriculture in transgressing planetary boundaries, many interventions will be needed, including those in broader food systems.

  • 322.
    Canas, Gabriella
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    The necessity of more or less wooden construction?: A critical discourse analysis of the modern wooden housing debate in Sweden2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Due to numerous city fires in the 19th century, timber was prohibited as a frame material in Swedish multi-storey buildings in 1888. This led to the establishment of a concrete construction system, which has come to characterize the Swedish construction tradition. The aim of this thesis is to critically analyse and illuminate the discourses that affected the debate about modern wooden housing in Sweden between 2003-2017, in order to better understand what motivates change within our society. A critical discourse analysis was conducted with the purpose to try to interpret and understand which discourses that factors into the process of change. Thusly, the thesis seeks to answer following research questions: How is modern wooden housing motivated in Sweden? The study emphasized three discourses (economic, environmental and political) that were later on analysed in regards to being motivators for change. The environmental discourse functions as a shallow motivator and the political discourse was often shaped through ideological influences. But the main factor for change was the economic discourse, since most focus within the analysed quotes was influenced in one way or another by that discourse. In closing, the study has also showed that in order to influence change, it is of importance to understand what motivates change.

  • 323. Canova, Moara Almeida
    et al.
    Lapola, David M.
    Pinho, Patrícia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Dick, Jan
    Patricio, Gleiciani B.
    Priess, Joerg A.
    Different ecosystem services, same (dis)satisfaction with compensation: A critical comparison between farmers' perception in Scotland and Brazil2019In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 35, p. 164-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) schemes have increasingly expanded to consider ecosystem services (ESS). In Brazil, the Forest Code permits PES but does not specify the scheme operationalization. The way ESS should be quantified and valued has not yet been implemented country-wide, nor has the funding source for PES. Through interviews with farmers in Rio Claro-SP, Brazil, and in Cairngorms National Park in the highlands and lowlands of Scotland, UK, we compared farmers' perspectives concerning ESS and PES, focusing on the PES implementation in sugarcane landscape in Sao Paulo state. While Scottish farmers perceived more cultural services, Brazilian farmers focused on regulating services, which we attribute to socio-political and landscape differences. Despite these differences, farmers in both areas preferred opportunity cost approach for ESS valuation because this method captures efforts to maintain ESS. Thereby, the opportunity cost should be considered for valuation in PES schemes, but conversely, budgetary constraints make it impossible to satisfy farmers with PES in regions of high productivity in the southeast of Brazil. Lessons learned concerning the PES subsidies in Scotland indicates the importance of co-designing schemes with stakeholders, minimizing trade-offs between the environment. Therefore, the participants as ESS providers, beneficiaries and intermediaries in the public policies arena was recognized for co-optimize the trade-offs between costs and effectiveness in PES.

  • 324.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    East African Hydropatriarchies: An analysis of changing waterscapes in smallholder irrigation farming2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines the local waterscapes of two smallholder irrigation farming systems in the dry lands of East African in a context of socio-ecological changes. It focuses on three aspects: institutional arrangements, gender relations and landscape investments. 

    This thesis is based on a reflexive analysis of cross-cultural, cross-language research, particularly focusing on the role of field assistants and interpreters, and on member checking as a method to ensure validity.

    Flexible irrigation infrastructure in Sibou, Kenya, and Engaruka, Tanzania, allow farmers to shift the course of water and to extend or reduce the area cultivated depending on seasonal rainfall patterns. Water conflicts are avoided through a decentralized common property management system. Water rights are continuously renegotiated depending on water supply. Water is seen as a common good the management of which is guided by mutual understanding to prevent conflicts through participation and shared information about water rights.

    However, participation in water management is a privilege that is endowed mostly to men. Strict patriarchal norms regulate control over water and practically exclude women from irrigation management. The control over water usage for productive means is a manifestation of masculinity. The same gender bias has emerged in recent decades as men have increased their engagement in agriculture by cultivating crops for sale. Women, because of their subordinated position, cannot take advantage of the recent livelihood diversification. Rather, the cultivation of horticultural products for sale has increased the workload for women who already farm most food crops for family consumption. In addition, they now have to weed and harvest the commercial crops that their husbands sell for profit. This agricultural gender divide is mirrored in men´s and women´s response to increased climate variability. Women intercrop as a risk adverting strategy, while men sow more rounds of crops for sale when the rain allows for it. Additionally, while discursively underestimated by men, women´s assistance is materially fundamental to maintaining of the irrigation infrastructure and to ensuring the soil fertility that makes the cultivation of crops for sale possible.

    In sum, this thesis highlights the adaptation potentials of contemporary smallholder irrigation systems through local common property regimes that, while not inclusive towards women, avoid conflicts generated by shifting water supply and increased climate variability.

    To be able to assess the success and viability of irrigation systems, research must be carried out at a local level. By studying how local water management works, how conflicts are adverted through common property regimes and how these systems adapt to socio-ecological changes, this thesis provides insights that are important both for the planning of current irrigation schemes and the rehabilitation or the extension of older systems. By investigating the factors behind the consistent marginalization of women from water management and their subordinated role in agricultural production, this study also cautions against the reproduction of these discriminatory norms in the planning of irrigation projects.

  • 325.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Hydropatriarchies and landesque capital: a local gender contract analysis of two smallholder irrigation systems in East Africa2015In: Geographical Journal, ISSN 0016-7398, E-ISSN 1475-4959, Vol. 181, no 4, p. 388-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water is a natural resource whose control for productive purposes is often in the hands of men. Societies grounded on such unequal gender relations have been defined ‘hydropatriarchies’. Against this background, this paper presents a gender analysis of landscape investments, conceptualised as landesque capital in smallholder irrigation farming in East Africa. Based on the analysis of how local gender contracts are negotiated, I argue that as processes of landesque capital formation are often explicitly gendered, attentiveness to gender dynamics is required to fully understand such practices. Moreover, as investments in landesque capital, for example, irrigation, terracing and drainage systems, have primarily been conceptualised as the result of men's systematic work, this study highlights women's contributions to the creation of landesque capital, taking smallholder irrigation as an example. Findings show that a distinction between ‘incremental’ and ‘systematic’ change (Doolittle 1984; Annals of the Association of American Geographers 74 124–37) is central to understanding the gender dynamics of landesque capital investment, but it is not sufficient. As women's work processes are typically not systematic, possibly promoting incremental change, they contribute to the production of landesque capital by supporting and facilitating men's work. However, the work of women is, as a rule, homogenised and stereotypically rendered as reproductive and secondary, due to the underlying cultural norms that limit, control or exploit women. This conceptualisation, or rather lack of, I argue, risks leading to a gender-blind analysis of land use intensification processes. Building on the gendered and symbolic nature of landesque capital, I propose a local gender contract analysis that integrates the cultural, symbolic and physical dimensions of the local gender division of labour into agricultural work and landscape change processes.

  • 326.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Managing variability and scarcity. An analysis of Engaruka: A Maasai smallholder irrigation farming community2015In: Agricultural Water Management, ISSN 0378-3774, E-ISSN 1873-2283, Vol. 159, p. 318-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the common-pool regime of Engaruka, a smallholder irrigation farming community in northern Tanzania. Irrigation is a complex issue due to water asymmetry. Water use is regulated in Engaruka through boundary, allocation, input and penalty rules by a users’ association that controls and negotiates water allocation to avoid conflicts among headenders and tailenders. As different crops – maize and beans, bananas and vegetables – are cultivated, different watering schemes are applied depending on the water requirements of every single crop. Farmers benefit from different irrigation schedules and from different soil characteristics through having their plots both downstream and upstream. In fact, depending on water supply, cultivation is resourcefully extended and retracted. Engaruka is an ethnically homogeneous and interdependent community where headenders and tailenders are often the same people and are hence inhibited to carry out unilateral action. Drawing on common-pool resource literature, this study argues that in a context of population pressure alongside limited and fluctuating water availability, non-equilibrium behavior, consisting in negotiating water rights and modifying irrigation area continuously through demand management, is crucial for the satisfaction of basic and productive needs and for the avoidance of water conflicts.

  • 327.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Member checking: a participatory method to test and analyze preliminary results in cross-cultural, cross-language researchManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Participation and reflexivity have become buzzwords that are seldom discussed in terms of their practical employment. Against this backdrop, with a specific focus on geography, this article presents and analyzes the advantages and limitations of a methodological tool that seeks to enhance both reflexivity and participation. The tool was a pamphlet written in local languages that contained several pictures and summarized the data gathered in previous fieldwork sessions. This tool was used in a four-year research project on the gender division of labor in smallholder irrigation farming in Kenya and Tanzania. The pamphlet showed participants their contributions to the research process and offered them the opportunity to correct, improve and further discuss previously collected data. It not only ensured research validity but also allowed for a shift in the research power hierarchy. Finally, the pamphlet effectively created a space for inclusion, discussion and reciprocal learning, leading to collective reflexivity and catalytic validity by empowering participants and re-orienting the researcher. 

  • 328.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Situated knowledge in cross-cultural, cross-language research: a collaborative reflexive analysis of researcher, assistant and participant subjectivities2014In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 489-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes situated knowledge through the lens of the author and her three field assistants. This work is written self-reflexively and is based on geographical fieldwork in Eastern Africa. It seeks to capitalize on the personal and professional relationships of the researcher and her field assistants to improve both research outcomes and working arrangements. Reflecting on episodes of failure, anxiety and misunderstanding, it disentangles the power geometry of situated knowledge and sheds light on the vital role played by the assistant/interpreter and by his/her positionality ‘in the making’ of cross-cultural, cross-language research. Grounded in a feminist epistemological perspective, this article shows that methodological reflexivity should engage not only the researcher or the participants but also the field assistants. This praxis is crucial to enhancing the validity of studies conducted in a cross-cultural, cross-language environment across social science.

  • 329.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Börjeson, Lowe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Local gender contract and adaptive capacity in smallholder irrigation farming: a case study from the Kenyan drylands2015In: Gender, Place and Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography, ISSN 0966-369X, E-ISSN 1360-0524, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 644-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the local gender contract of a smallholder irrigation farming community in Sibou, Kenya. Women's role in subsistence farming in Africa has mostly been analyzed through the lens of gender division of labor. In addition to this, we used the concept of ‘local gender contract’ to analyze cultural and material preconditions shaping gender-specific tasks in agricultural production, and consequently, men's and women's different strategies for adapting to climate variability. We show that the introduction of cash crops, as a trigger for negotiating women's and men's roles in the agricultural production, results in a process of gender contract renegotiation, and that families engaged in cash cropping are in the process of shifting from a ‘local resource contract’ to a ‘household income contract.’ Based on our analysis, we argue that a transformation of the local gender contract will have a direct impact on the community's adaptive capacity climate variability. It is, therefore, important to take the negotiation of local gender contracts into account in assessments of farming communities' adaptive capacity.

  • 330.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Cadena Montero, Yulier Cadena
    Sulbaran, Luisana
    Sandoval, Rafael
    “¿La revolución tiene cara de campesina?” Un caso de estudio de la participación activa de las mujeres en el riego del páramo venezolano "Has the Revolution a Peasant Face?" A case study on the activeparticipation of women in an irrigation project in the Venezuelan Páramo2015In: Revista Latino-Americana de Geografia e Gênero, ISSN 2177-2886, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 3-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Venezuela, women’s participation in decision making processes has improved thanks to theBolivarian revolution. While it has been shown that legislative changes have brought aboutachievements for women in urban areas, there are no similar studies done in rural zones. Thisarticle is a first attempt to fill this scientific gap. Qualitative data have been gathered with a focuson gender, in order to investigate women’s participation in the spatial organization of the economicand productive system of Mixteque, in the municipality of Rangel, in the state of Mérida,Venezuela. The results show that while women are mainly in charge in the municipal council, theirparticipation is passive in decision makings related to the productive processes. The irrigationcommittee is indeed mainly composed by men, who consequently control agriculture, which is themost important economic activity in Mixteque. Our study also indicates that although patriarchalrelations are changing in some families, at the community level there has been a reinforcement ofthe productive/reproductive work division between men and women, respectively. This articleconfirms that Venezuela is a unique case when it comes to the legislative impulse towards women’sparticipation and that gender equality has been improving. Nevertheless, it emerges, mostimportantly, that women farmers in the Venezuelan Andes are no different from their counterpartsin Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia: none of them has direct access to water management decisionmaking. Given its novelty within the discipline of geography in Venezuela, this research can help toilluminate how new organizational processes could – if they could – change gender roles inVenezuela.

  • 331. Caretta, Martina Angela
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Jokinen, Johanna Carolina
    Falconer, Emily
    “Who can play this game?” The lived experiences of doctoral candidates and early career women in the neoliberal university2018In: Journal of geography in higher education (Print), ISSN 0309-8265, E-ISSN 1466-1845, Vol. EarlyView, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 332.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Duong, Sandra
    MIGRATION WITH DIGNITY. EN STUDIE OM KLIMATSANPASSNING I KIRIBATI2015In: Geografiska Notiser, ISSN 0016-724X, Vol. 73, no 3, p. 120-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Små östater med utvecklingsstatus (SIDS– Small Island Developing States) erkändesformellt som en unik grupp länder medspecifika hållbarhetsutmaningar vid FN:skonferens om miljö och utveckling i Rio deJaneiro år 1992 (FN 1992). Små önationeromnämns ofta som att vara i frontlinjen förklimatförändringar på grund av sina lågtliggande kustländer av ringa storlek, sinabegränsade resurser, sin ömtåliga naturmiljöoch geografiska spridning som görde isolerade från marknader. Klimatförändringar,i form av förhöjda temperatureroch havsnivåer, kommer att ha stora effekterpå beboeligheten på dessa öar, framföralltlängs kustområden där de flesta människoridag lever. Andra allvarliga följderav klimatförändringar är ökad förekomstoch intensitet av stormfloder, cykloner,och översvämningar, samt minskad tillförlitlighetför nederbörd (Hugo 2010; Nunn2012).

  • 333.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Kuns, Brian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Webster, Natasha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Praktiska, metodologiska och emotionella utmaningar i fält – mot ärligare diskurser om fältarbete inom kulturgeografi2014In: Geografiska Notiser, ISSN 0016-724X, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 116-127Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 334.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Riano, Yvonne
    Feminist participatory methodologies in geography: creating spaces of inclusion2016In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction prefaces a special issue on the topic of feminist participatory methodologies in geography. Drawing upon the experiences of the contributors in developing new tools and methods to facilitate interaction with participants and working with groups that tend to be forgotten, subordinated and/or alienated, we argue for the methodological significance of instating a feminist perspective to participatory research. Although much theoretical debate has taken place among feminist and post-colonial scholars on unequal research relationships between “researchers” and “research subjects”, the literature on how to operationalize greater equality remains quite limited. We attempt to fill this research gap by bringing together scholars working in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres in order to illuminate the multifaceted ways in which these methods can be used not only to debunk hierarchical research relationships, but also to produce new scientific insights with greater validity.  

  • 335.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Vacchelli, Elena
    Re-Thinking the Boundaries of the Focus Group: A Reflexive Analysis on the Use and Legitimacy of Group Methodologies in Qualitative Research2015In: Sociological research online, ISSN 1360-7804, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 20, no 4, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims at problematizing the boundaries of what counts as focus group and in so doing it identifies some continuity between focus group and workshop, especially when it comes to arts informed and activity laden focus groups. The workshop[1] is often marginalized as a legitimate method for qualitative data collection outside PAR (Participatory Action Research)-based methodologies. Using examples from our research projects in East Africa and in London we argue that there are areas of overlap between these two methods, yet we tend to use concepts and definitions associated with focus groups because of the lack of visibility of workshops in qualitative research methods academic literature.

    The article argues that focus groups and workshops present a series of intertwined features resulting in a blending of the two which needs further exploration. In problematizing the boundaries of focus groups and recognizing the increasing usage of art-based and activity-based processes for the production of qualitative data during focus groups, we argue that focus groups and workshop are increasingly converging. We use a specifically feminist epistemology in order to critically unveil the myth around the non-hierarchical nature of consensus and group interaction during focus group discussions and other multi-vocal qualitative methods and contend that more methodological research should be carried out on the workshop as a legitimate qualitative data collection technique situated outside the cycle of action research.

  • 336. Caretta, Martina Angela
    et al.
    Webster, Natasha Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    “What kept me going was stubbornness”: Perspectives from Swedish early career women academics in geography2016In: Investigaciones Feministas, ISSN 2171-6080, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 89-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rise of neoliberalism is creating inequalities for women as they balance their private lives and career trajectories. Geography as a middle sized discipline bridging the social and physical sciences offers insights into the ways neoliberal policies are felt by early career women (ECW). Using a life course model, this study presents the results of a workshop which sought to explore the ways in which women geographers, in Sweden, perceive and experience obstacles in their career advancement and which coping strategies they put in place to overcome those. The results show the blurring of the ECW ´s work and private lives. We find the experiences of ECW in Swedish geography departments are consistent with those of women in other countries. We conclude that ECW carry extra burdens in their career trajectories as academics due to increasingly neoliberal working environments, lack of mentorship, and an increasing pressure to produce measurable outputs and precarious employment. We argue that initiatives and programs aimed at retaining women in academia need to take on a broader perspective acknowledging the entanglement of women´s private and public spheres.

  • 337.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Westerberg, Lars-Owe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Börjeson, Lowe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Östberg, Wilhelm
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Labour, climate perceptions and soils in the irrigation systems in Sibou, Kenya & Engaruka, Tanzania2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This booklet presents the results of a 4 years project (2011-2015) by four geographers from the university of Stockholm. This research took place in two small villages: Sibou, Kenya and Engaruka, Tanzania. The overall project looks at three variables: soil, climate and labor. These aspects can give an indication of the type of changes that happened in these irrigation systems and what have been the triggers behind them. In this booklet results are presented according to location and focus on: agricultural practices, women´s and men´s labor tasks, soil and water characteristics, adaptation weather variability and how all of these aspects have changed over time.

  • 338.
    Carl, Hässler
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Fransk Vingeografi sett från Svenskt Konsumtionsmönster2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Uppsatsens syfte är att undersöka de mönster och trender som kännetecknar den franska vinindustrin och visa på ett geografiskt regionalperspektiv för svenska konsumenters vinhandel med Frankrike. Uppsatsen har utgått från kvantitativa försäljningsdata från Systembolaget under en period av 19 år för att skapa en deskriptiv bild av handeln. Hypotesen har varit att Frankrike och resten av Europa genomgått en differentiering i produktionen ledande mot en mer kvalitetsorienterad vinindustri. Detta har präglats av vinindustrins fokus på geografiska indikationer eller ursprungsbeteckningar som det franska AOC (Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée) eller de nya EU beteckningarna PDO och PGI (Protected Designation of Origin, Protected Geografical indication). Uppsatsens analyserade data överensstämmer till stor del med rådande teorier men med en antydan till en avvikande trendutveckling i de traditionella vinregionerna i Frankrike. Dock kan slutsatsen inte ge någon säkerhet då resultatet bygger på en ytlig och endast översiktlig grund. Detta visar på att försiktighet bör iakttas vid framtida användning av kvantitativ försäljningsdata för geografer.

  • 339.
    Carlberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Från förort till stad: En uppskattad förvandling?: Konflikt och dialog i fallet Bagarmossen - Skarpnäck2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna uppsats kretsar kring en fallstudie av en konflikt, rörande planerad förtätning av skogsområdet Bagarmossenskogen mellan stadsdelarna Bagarmossen och Skarpnäck i Stockholm. Syftet är att undersöka hur och varför konflikten uppstått och hur den har hanterats med hjälp av medborgardialog, för att kunna dra slutsatser kring hur processen skulle kunna utvecklas för att undvika liknande konflikter i framtiden. Studien knyter an till en teoretisk diskussion om kommunikativ planering och deliberativ demokrati, samt om förtätningens godtagbarhet. Resultaten visar att konflikten uppstått bland annat på grund av otillräcklig hänsyn till planhistoriska faktorer och på grund av otillräcklig respons på medborgarnas kritik, samt att planeringsprocessen skulle vinna större legitimitet om medborgardialoger fördes kring en hel stadsdel, frikopplade från enskilda planprojekt.    

  • 340.
    Carlsen, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Eriksson, E. Anders
    Dreborg, Karl Henrik
    Johansson, Bengt
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Systematic exploration of scenario spaces2016In: Foresight, ISSN 1463-6689, E-ISSN 1465-9832, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 59-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Scenarios have become a vital methodological approach in business as well as in public policy. When scenarios are used to guide analysis and decision-making, the aim is typically robustness and in this context we argue that two main problems at scenario set level is conservatism, i.e. all scenarios are close to a perceived business-as-usual trajectory and lack of balance in the sense of arbitrarily mixing some conservative and some extreme scenarios. The purpose of this paper is to address these shortcomings by proposing a methodology for generating sets of scenarios which are in a mathematical sense maximally diverse. Design/methodology/approach - In this paper, we develop a systematic methodology, Scenario Diversity Analysis (SDA), which addresses the problems of broad span vs conservatism and imbalance. From a given set of variables with associated states, SDA generates scenario sets where the scenarios are in a quantifiable sense maximally different and therefore best span the whole set of feasible scenarios. Findings - The usefulness of the methodology is exemplified by applying it to sets of storylines of the emissions scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. This ex-post analysis shows that the storylines were not maximally diverse and given the challenges ahead with regard to emissions reduction and adaptation planning, we argue that it is important to strive for diversity when developing scenario sets for climate change research. Originality/value - The proposed methodology adds significant novel features to the field of systematic scenario generation, especially with regard to scenario diversity. The methodology also enables the combination of systematics with the distinct future logics of good intuitive logics scenarios.

  • 341.
    Carlsson, Dan
    Stockholm University.
    Kulturlandskapets utveckling på Gotland: en studie av jordbruks- och bebyggelseförändringar under järnåldern1979Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 342.
    Carlsson, Matilda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Vision 2030 – En diskursanalys av visionens normer och ideal för framtidens Stockholm. 2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    År 2007 antog Stockholms stad Vision 2030 och visioner är idag ett vanligt tillvägagångssätt för politiker att kommunicera sina långsiktiga mål. Studiens teoretiska utgångspunkt ligger i synen på språket som social konstruktion och Vision 2030 betraktas som både resultat och återskapare av sociala och ekonomiska strukturer. Genom diskursanalys och intervju ämnar studien synliggöra de normer och ideal som Vision 2030 skapar för framtidens Stockholm samt hur visionen tillämpas av stadens medarbetare. Resultatet visar att visionens framställda syfte och innehåll har en tydlig koppling till den samtida nyliberalistiska doktrinen samt att visionens implementering bygger på antaganden kring den framtida medborgarens förutsättningar.

  • 343.
    Carolina, Nuñez Ciceros
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Social Impact of Coca Crops in Colombia.: From socio-territorial processes to new social configurations: the role of land tenure, armed conflict, environment and coca crops.2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores alterations in social dynamics caused by coca crops in Curvaradó and Jiguamiandó, at Choco department in the Colombian Pacific region. The research analyzes the role of armed actors such as paramilitaries and guerrillas in the conformation of new social spaces where local people find resistance as the main tool to survive in chaotic environments. Local power as a politics of resistance is also analyzed. Non-governmental organizations are a key tool to comprehend new social configurations. By doing the analysis and comparison using political ecology as the theoretical background along with concepts of moral economy and everyday resistance, with qualitative research methods. The paper aims to interpret and provide a better understanding of those changes considering social-environmental relations. Findings suggest that those changes in social structure are leading to an understanding, not just of the organization of the area, but also that social dynamics and coca crops cannot be generalized in the country. 

  • 344.
    Carolina, Prentius
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Som en liten apa i bur känner man sig: En kulturgeografisk studie av ensamstående kvinnor i Hägersten-Liljeholmen och på Södermalm2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Uppsatsen undersöker relationen mellan plats, identitet och förtryck av ensamstående

    kvinnor i Hägersten-Liljeholmen och Södermalm.

    Syftet har varit att analysera

    kulturimperialistiskt förtryck med utgångspunkt i Marion Iris Youngs teori om förtryck

    och dominans. Empirin har bestått av djupintervjuer med 13 ensamstående kvinnor.

    Studien visar på att kvinnorna utsätts för kulturimperialistiskt förtryck som tar sitt

    uttryck i fördomar, marginalisering och våld genom diskursstyrande system. Studien

    uppmärksammar hur förtryck av ensamstående kvinnor är kopplat till deras livssituation

    som ensamansvariga för barn, fördomar, och en jämställdhetsdiskurs som tar sitt

    praktiska uttryck i mäns hävdade förutsättningar och kvinnors plikt och ansvar. 

  • 345. Carpenter, Stephen R.
    et al.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Scheffer, Marten
    Westley, Frances R.
    Dancing on the volcano: social exploration in times of discontent2019In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radical recent developments such as Brexit, the rise of extreme nationalism, the gilets jaunes, polarizing leaders, the Arab Spring, and fundamentalist movements are indications of societal discontent with the status quo. Other societal phenomena such as gender fluidity, veganism, and bartering are also associated with a perceived need to change. The context is the Anthropocene, a humandominated biosphere challenging the resilience of a livable planet. Such a broad set of developments may be interpreted in the light of new insights from theory of complex systems about what happens as resilience of the current pathway (societal organization as we know it) decreases. Rising fluctuations characterize a phase of uncertainty and exploration, potentially leading into a transition of the system toward a new pathway. We reflect on global changes that may contribute to social destabilization such as rising wealth concentration and environmental degradation and ask how responses may be understood from social-psychological forces such as the need for group identity and managing the terror of mortality. The emerging image is that of a society engaged in multifaceted experimentation. Maintaining such experimentation may help inspire novel pathways to desirable futures, but there is a risk of societies becoming trapped in backward-looking narratives that threaten long-term sustainable outcomes.

  • 346. Carse, Ashley
    et al.
    Lewis, Joshua A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Tulane University, USA.
    Toward a political ecology of infrastructure standards: Or, how to think about ships, waterways, sediment, and communities together2017In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 9-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars have shown that technical standards play an important role in building global transportation and communication infrastructures, but the environmental standardization efforts associated with infrastructures have received far less attention. Combining scholarship from transportation geography, political ecology, and science and technology studies, we show how global connection is made, maintained, and contested through environmental management practices pegged to infrastructure standards. The Panama Canal expansion, completed in 2016, is a revealing illustration. The expansion has established the New Panamax shipping standard: the maximum allowable dimensions for vessels passing through the canal's massive new locks. The standard has become a benchmark for port modernization and channel deepening projects along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States and beyond. Because the maximum underwater depth, or draft, of ships transiting the new locks is much deeper than before (50 rather than 39.5 feet), geographically dispersed governments, firms, and port authorities have scrambled to reach that standard in hopes of attracting New Panamax ships and associated revenue streams. As this case shows, global transportation depends on the expensive, ecologically destabilizing, and often-contested practices of dredging and disposing of large volumes of sediment and organic matter. By showing how shipping networks and situated politics converge around infrastructure standards, we foreground the uneven environmental burdens and benefits of transportation.

  • 347. Castro, Antonio J.
    et al.
    Quintas-Soriano, Cristina
    Brandt, Jodi
    Atkinson, Carla L.
    Baxter, Colden
    Burnham, Morey
    Egoh, Benis N.
    Garcia-Llorente, Marina
    Julian, Jason P.
    Martin-Lopez, Berta
    Liao, Felix Haifeng
    Running, Katrina
    Vaughn, Caryn C.
    Norström, Albert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Applying Place-Based Social-Ecological Research to Address Water Scarcity: Insights for Future Research2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 5, article id 1516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globally, environmental and social change in water-scarce regions challenge the sustainability of social-ecological systems. WaterSES, a sponsored working group within the Program for Ecosystem Change and Society, explores and compares the social-ecological dynamics related to water scarcity across placed-based international research sites with contrasting local and regional water needs and governance, including research sites in Spain and Sweden in Europe, South Africa, China, and Alabama, Idaho, Oklahoma, and Texas in the USA. This paper aims to provide a commentary on insights into conducting future solutions-oriented research on water scarcity based on the understanding of the social-ecological dynamics of water scarce regions.

  • 348.
    Cedergren, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Landsbygdsutveckla med kust som resurs : En studie om tillämpningen av LIS på Gotland2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna uppsats är att explorativt undersöka hur lagen om landsbygdsutveckling i strandnära läge (LIS) tillämpas på Gotland med fokus på hur olika aktörer uppfattar och betraktar landsbygdsutveckling, kustnyttjande och planeringsprocessen. Genom en fenomenologisk, kvalitativ fallstudie har text-/dokumentanalys och semistrukturerade intervjuer samt platsobservationer tillämpats. Analysen bygger på perspektiv på landsbygden och kusten som fritidslandskap, urbana och icke-urbana intressen samt kommunal planering för utveckling. Dessa ger en insyn i hur kust som landskap och planering som process kan tolkas av olika aktörer i ett samhälle. Resultatet av studien påvisar en invecklad process där aktörer lyfter varierade förväntningar och perspektiv på kusten som landsbygdsutvecklingsresurs och vad landsbygdsutveckling egentligen innebär. Det föreligger en problematik att nå ut till eller engagera fler än de som berörs i närområden, samtidigt som den gotländska kusten utgör riksintresse och kommunalt varumärke som värdefull resurs för alla.

  • 349.
    Cele, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Children in Interaction with Urban Space: The Challenges of Children's Participation2005In: Revista de Psihologie Aplicata, Vol. 6, no 3-4, p. 71-80Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 350.
    Cele, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Communicating Place: Methods for Understanding Children's Experience of Place2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation explores how children communicate their experiences of place. It focuses on the qualitative methods of group interviews, walks, drawings and photographs, and asks how children communicate different aspects of place. Drawing on feminist theory and qualitative methodology, the importance of situated knowledge for understanding children’s narratives is argued. Through studies in Sweden and England, it is shown how children’s place experiences are multi-dimensional, consisting of both concrete and abstract processes, places and objects.

    The different methods reveal different aspects of these dimensions and the children provided rich evidence of their experience of place in regard to physical, social and cultural aspects. It is found that children’s individuality affects the success of the methods, rather than factors such as gender, age or nationality. The methods’ different characteristics, such as creative and interactive aspects, and how power relations are reflected through them are determining factors as to how and what children communicate.

    Place-interactive methods allow children to communicate the direct experience of place and include subconscious actions as communication occurs through movement and play. The creative aspects of the methods allow children to focus more on their abstract experiences and to include experiences based on a wider time perspective than the present. Walking is discussed as a critical method for the researcher to include place as an active and multi-sensuous phenomenon. As it is shown that the methods reveal different aspects of the children’s place experiences, it is also discussed how this can be used from an adult perspective.

45678910 301 - 350 of 1750
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf