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  • 301.
    Jensen, Brian Møller
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Non-biblical Introit Antiphons in Cassinese Liturgical Sources2012In: Musica e liturgia a Montecassino nel medioevo: atti del Simposio internazionale di studi (Cassino, 9-10 dicembre 2010) / [ed] Nicola Tangari, Roma: Viella , 2012, p. 169-175Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    After the presentation of the Ars edendi programme and the connections between lectionaries and chants sung in the medieval liturgy follow analyses of three non-biblical introit antiphons, Gaudeamus omnes in domino, Vir Dei Benedictus and Beatus Martinus, in the Cassinese sources, Vat. urbin. lat. 602 and Monte Cassino ms. 546.

  • 302.
    Johannesson, Nils-Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    “Rihht alls an hunnte takeþþ der. /Wiþþ hise 3æpe racchess”: Hunting as a metaphor for proselytizing in the Ormulum2012In: The Use and Development of Middle English: Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Middle English, Cambridge 2008 / [ed] Richard Dance, Laura Wright, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2012, p. 231-242Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Homily xxii of the twelfth-century Middle English homily collection Ormulum by the Augustinian canon Orm deals with the calling of the first disciples. In the account given in Matthew 4:18-22, we are told how first Peter and Andrew, then James and John, are made to leave their nets where they have been fishing in the Sea of Galilee in order to follow Jesus and become fishers of men. Much play is made in the Latin homiletic literature of the use of nets in fishing as metaphors for preaching and conversion.

    Orm, however, takes his text for Homily xxii from John 1:35-51, where the story is told differently: John the Baptist saw Jesus walking past and said, "This is the Lamb of God", whereupon two of his disciples left him and followed Jesus. One of these was Andrew, who then brought his brother Simon to Jesus. The next day Jesus called Philip, whao came from the city of Bethsaida, just like Andrew and Simon. Philip then told Nathanael that they had found him of whom Moses and the prophets wrote, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph. No mention is made here of anybody's occupation, only of their home town (Betsaida, domus venatorum, 'the house of the hunters', according to Orm's source texts). Consequently, Orm plays down the role of 'fishers of men' and instead discusses the disciples as 'hunters for men's souls'. The only nets occurring in Orm's exposition and forming the source domain for his metaphor spelless nett ('net of preaching') are hunting nets for catching deer, not fishing nets.

    In his exposition of the name of Bethsaida in Homily xxii Orm develops an extended 'hunting' metaphor representing successful preaching as part of proselytizing activities, taking the interpretation of Bethsaida, 'the house of the hunters', as his point of departure. The metaphor involves 'hunting' [hunntenn] and 'chasing' [slætenn] as well as 'catching' [lacchenn], 'net' [nett] and 'hounds' [hundess, racchess]. Apart from the analysis of this metaphor, the paper also discusses the possible impact of such a metaphor on a contemporary audience in the light of other representations of hunting, nets and hounds in medieval literature and art.

  • 303.
    Johansson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Unzuverlässiges Erzählen in Lenz Deutschstunde. : Eine Analyse der unzuverlässigen Erzählerfigur Siggi Jepsen2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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    Unzuverlässiges Erzählen
  • 304.
    Johnson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Modes of Accidentalness and Shock in the Fiction of Mary E. Mann: A Phenomenological Study2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    It is proposed in this investigation that the phenomenon of shock is central to the fiction of Mary E. Mann as a premier factor at the heart of its powers of creative constitution. The study highlights Mann’s writing as a system of jolts, fits, and shocks lacking intrinsic meaning. The lack of intrinsic meaning in events is not viewed negatively as a mode of loss, existential meaning not having been posited beforehand as standard for measuring the nature of feelings, acts, or lives. The tendency for shocks to lack meaning in Mann’s writing is not seen as nihilistic. Shock in Mann’s writing needs to be elucidated without a prior meaning-frame or nihilistic loss-of-meaning agenda. The study presents the case that Mann’s fiction is devoted to the business of exhibiting the potential horror of human life in a non-metaphysical, non-theoretic way. In Mann’s literary texts lives fall apart without justification or forewarning. Characters walk straight into darkness and pain—but no loss or gain of metaphysical meaning is to be inferred. Disaster does not mean that life is intrinsically disastrous. Nor does catastrophe imply that we live in a universe where meaning is inevitably withheld. When meaning is given or withheld it happens to be given or withheld. This accidentalness is itself shocking. Like happiness, disaster is non-essential. It is to a large extent ruled by chance. Unlike Thomas Hardy, with whom she is sometimes compared, Mary Mann is accordingly not a pessimistic writer who tends to want to let darkness have the final word in order to immerse the reader in a metaphysics of gloom. In her short stories and novels darkness often has the last word; yet that tells us nothing about the intrinsic nature of reality. Negativity is real but extrinsic and non-essential. In Mann’s tales of Norfolk destinies, lives and characters fail simply because times are sometimes hard, and because adversity is central to fiction and existence. 

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    Modes of Accidentalness and Shock in the Fiction of Mary E. Mann: A Phenomenological Study
  • 305.
    Jonsson, Anton
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Wise Men in Times of Woe: Wizards as representations of human interaction with the natural world in The Lord of the Rings2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The fictive world created by Oxford Professor J. R. R. Tolkien is intimately linked with his own views of the world. His love for the natural world shines through his works and has given rise to multiple scholars focusing on Tolkien and ecology. This study falls under that category and is an ecological interpretation of The Lord of the Rings and presents the argument that Tolkien divides his characters into three types. These types are representations of different approaches to nature: nature as a tool for human progress, nature as our ideal existence and nature as an equal part of the world. The significance of the study is the focus on the three wizards in The Lord of the Rings, Gandalf the Grey, Saruman the White and Radagast the Brown, as representatives of different ecological positions. The study centres on the argument that Gandalf is a representative of nature as an equal part of the world. A balanced, holistic view of nature and humanity is put forward by J. R. R. Tolkien as the correct way for humanity to view nature. Furthermore, Gandalf as a character shows how humanity is supposed to act in terms of natural protection and preservation.

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    fulltext
  • 306.
    Juhani, Saari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Power and Resistance in Herman Melville’s Three B’s2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 307.
    Julén, Björn
    Stockholm University.
    Hjärtats landsflykt: en Levertin-studie1961Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 308.
    Junker, Nicklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Sang Young Park: Kärlek i Seoul, recension2023In: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, no 3, p. 92-93Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 309.
    Junker, Nicklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Xue Mo: Vargmamman Gråpäls2023In: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, no 2, p. 94-95Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 310.
    Kaarle, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Queering in the Rye: Teaching The Catcher in the Rye as Queer Literature2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    J.D. Salinger’s seminal novel The Catcher in the Rye contains several scenes of sexual ambiguity which open up for queer readings of the novel. The first part of this essay will be a queering of the text, examining scenes of sexual ambiguity, and looking at the way masculinity is perceived and portrayed in the novel. This analysis argues that Holden’s issues stem from his protective nature not allowing him to perform masculinity in a normative fashion for the era, which the novel portrays as an oppressive form of masculinity that victimizes women and others who do not fit the role of a white, straight male.

    The second part of the essay will look at why and how a queer reading of The Catcher in the Rye should be taught. The main point being that queer and other non-normative texts are often overlooked in classroom settings. This has real-world consequences for the non-normative individuals made invisible and silenced by this practice. There is a need for queer voices and texts in education. By engaging students in discussions about norms by relating normativity to the novel, one can draw attention to the way norms can restrict individuals, just as they might empower others. This can help students form their own critical ways of analysing literature in the future, as well as the way they perceive the world and people around them.

  • 311.
    Kaikkonen, Marja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Chinese Studies.
    “Den kinesiska kulturens hemliga motor – brott, sex och annat populärt” (The secret motor of Chinese culture – crime, sex, and other things popular)2002In: Orientaliska Studier, ISSN 0345-8997, Vol. 110, p. 22-36Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 312.
    Kaikkonen, Marja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Chinese Studies.
    “From Knights to Nudes: Chinese Popular Literature since Mao”1994In: The Stockholm Journal of East Asian Studies, Vol. 4, p. 85-110Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 313.
    Kaikkonen, Marja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Chinese Studies.
    "From Knights to Nudes: Popular Literature since Mao"1996In: EACS Selected Papers of the 10th Biannual Conference, Prague: Charles University , 1996Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 314.
    Kaikkonen, Marja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Chinese Studies.
    “Gongfulitteratur – bästsäljare med traditioner” (Kungfu literature – best-sellers with traditions)2003In: Kinarapport: Fårets år 2003, ISSN 1404-185, no 4, p. 56-61Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 315.
    Kaikkonen, Marja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Chinese Studies.
    "International Workshop on Oral Literature in Modern China"1996In: NIASnytt (NIASnews), no 4, p. 24-25Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 316.
    Kaikkonen, Marja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages.
    Kinesisk kärlek i pestens och kolerans tid2013In: Orientaliska Studier, ISSN 0345-8997, no 136, p. 65-79Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 317.
    Kaikkonen, Marja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages.
    Laughable Propaganda: Modern Xiangsheng as Didactic Entertainment1990Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation introduces the popular Chinese comic story-telling genrexiangsheng. The genre is first viewed in the light of historical predecessorswhich contain elements similar to those found in traditional xiangsheng. After1949, the genre has been extensively used for propaganda purposes through thecreation of numerous new works, while the traditional works have been partlybanned, partly adapted to suit the communist ideological and didactic ambitions.The study describes how this change was accomplished: a production of new,ideologically correct pieces was effected and the artistes were made to perform thenew and the adapted old works. The study also presents how the governmentdirectives for this work fluctuated, the ensuing problems, and the discussion onwhether the writers and artistes were considered to have succeeded in followingthem. The technical varieties and the structure of xiangsheng are described. Theresults of a detailed contents analysis with quantitative basis of 105 newxiangsheng pieces from the years 1955-66 and 1979-84 are accounted for andshow how and through what kinds of elements the propagated messages weresupposed to affect the public of this entertainment.

  • 318.
    Kaikkonen, Marja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Chinese Studies.
    Li T'ai-po1979In: Otavan suuri ensyklopedia: 6, Malaijit - oppiminen, Helsinki: Otava , 1979, p. 3786-3787Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 319.
    Kaikkonen, Marja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Chinese Studies.
    “Läsarens guide till egna landet” (A reader’s guide to her own country)2001In: Karavan, no 1, p. 36-40Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 320.
    Kaikkonen, Marja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Chinese Studies.
    "Några ord om Lao She"  (A few words on Lao She)1984In: Orientaliska Studier, Vol. 49-50, p. 66-70Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 321.
    Kaikkonen, Marja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Chinese Studies.
    “Perry Link, 'The Uses of Literature: Life in the Socialist Chinese Literary System'.”2002In: Journal of Modern Literature in Chinese, Vol. MayArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 322.
    Kaikkonen, Marja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Chinese Studies.
    Quyi: Will It Survive?1999In: The Eternal Storyteller: Oral Literature in Modern China / [ed] Vibeke Børdahl, Richmond: Curzon Press , 1999, 1, p. 62-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 323.
    Kaikkonen, Marja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Chinese Studies.
    Stories and Legends: The Largest Contemporary Popular Literature Journals.1999In: The Literary Field of Twentieth Century China / [ed] Michel Hockx, Richmond: Curzon Press , 1999, p. 134-160Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 324.
    Kaikkonen, Marja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Chinese Studies.
    "Traditionens kulisser bakom utvecklingens fasad?" (Backdrops of tradition behind façades of development?)1997In: Orientaliska Studier, Vol. 95, p. 22-27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 325.
    Kaikkonen, Marja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Chinese Studies.
    《故事会》让我们了解中国2016In: 故事会 = Gushihui, ISSN 0257-0238, Vol. 603, no 6, p. 84-85Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 326.
    Karlsson, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Statement that is Randolph Carter: Growth in a Nihilistic Universe2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this essay is to give a nuanced and problematized view of the notion that the literary universe of H.P. Lovecraft is purely nihilistic, in the most basic sense of the word, and instead try to show that it, in spite of this actually allows for both hope and growth for its characters. To do so, the essay will closely examine one of Lovecraft’s few recurring protagonists, Randolph Carter, who in relation to Lovecraft’s other characters, is much more on the outside of society than a part of it. To accomplish this, the essay will focus on those of Lovecraft’s texts which feature Carter and this one’s personal goals, philosophy and morals in relation to those of the society that surrounds him. Carter’s character and actions and ideals will throughout this be contrasted to the philosophical ideas of Friedrich Nietzsche to try to show that adherence to Nietzschean virtues can allow a character to actually transcend the supposed intrinsic nihilism and horror of Lovecraft’s universe. In examining Carter, central concepts will include, among other things: the search for beauty, the power of dreams as well as the power of passion, as well as Nietzschean concepts such as The Will to Power, Apollonian and Dionysian, The Eternal Return and Nihilism. 

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    The Statement that is Randolph Carter
  • 327.
    Kihlman, Erika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages, Classical Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Medieval Sequence Commentaries: Traditions and Techniques2013In: Papers read at the 15th Meeting of the IMS Study Group Cantus planus : Dobogókő/Hungary, 2009, Aug. 23–29, 2 vols / [ed] B. Haggh-Huglo, D. Lacost, N. Bell, Lions Bay, BS, Canada: The Institute of Mediaeval Music , 2013, p. 343-359-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 328.
    Kisro, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Finding Dystopia in Utopia: Gender, Power and Politics in The Carhullan Army2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sarah Hall’s feminist dystopia The Carhullan Army presents a near-future society by using oppositional binaries traditional to the genre of the literary dystopia; Utopia/Dystopia, Male/Female, and Good/Evil. This essay deconstructs these binaries in order to unveil the inherent complexities in power structures that cannot be captured by such binaries. Previous research on the novel has approached it with feminist theory, and different branches of feminism such as ecofeminism. In this essay, I use feminist theory as a starting point to discuss the Authority’s oppression of women in the novel, but I also show the limits to this approach when considering the apparent post-9/11 context in which the novel is situated, which decisively inflects its treatment of power. Michel Foucault’s theories on power and knowledge are used in order to examine the complex power structures in The Carhullan Army, which relate to—and transcend—borders of gender. I find that the subtle political presence of American imperialism in the novel is vital to understand the power struggles that are apparent in both the patriarchal city of Rith and the matriarchal Carhullan farm. This essay examines the novel both as a critique to the political submissiveness that Great Britain showed when it followed America into war against Iraq in 2003 and as a depiction of what this submission might lead to.

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    Finding Utopia in Dystopia
  • 329.
    Kjellsson, Linnea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Alex Saum-Pascual, #Postweb! Crear con la máquina y en la red2019In: Mélanges de la Casa de Velázquez, ISSN 0076-230X, Vol. 49, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 330.
    Kjellsson, Linnea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    El retorno del rostro: Narrativas postnacionales y escrituras precarias en tiempos de la globalización2022Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization in the past decades has been considered a new phase of integrated global economy, with increased cultural interactions and loss of nation-state sovereignty. In recent years, critics and citizens have raised concern towards a neoliberal system that sustains inequality and growing uncertainty. Following the financial crisis’ beginning in 2007, Spanish and Latin American citizens began voicing their opinions and shifting the attention inwards.

    This dissertation explores how Hispanic novels, published from 2008 to 2018, have moved from a postnational and cosmopolitan scenario towards a conversation about precarious conditions, disappearances, the subaltern and the consequences of globalization. Using the method of narratology and the critical approach of New Historicism, the dissertation analyses the aesthetics and characteristics of selected novels from Spain, Chile, Peru and Mexico, as well as their dialogue with sociocultural and political discourses. It focuses on writers sharing an interest in visuality and in disrupting conventional novelistic forms. It argues that while some writers play with the novelistic forms in order to break national restrains, others use it to demonstrate the crisis suffered by their characters and to recover the corporeality in their works.

    Chapter 1 presents an interdisciplinary discussion of theoretical key concepts and a brief review of the literary industry and its gatekeepers. Chapter 2 describes the emergence of postnational novels in Latin America in 1996 with the anthology McOndo and the Crack manifest and establishes its connections to the Spanish anthology Mutantes in 2007. Based on previous studies and through the analyses of 80M84RD3R0 (2008) by César Gutiérrez, El genuino sabor (2014) by Mercedes Cebrián and Los huérfanos (2014) by Jorge Carrión, seven characteristics in the postnational literature are proposed: fragmented structure, discontinuous time, deterritorialized space, polyphonic narrators, hybrid characters, digital visuality and technopoetics.

    Chapter 3 introduces what I have termed precarious writings, which highlight the material traits of recent Hispanic novels and are characterized by fragmented structures, anachronisms, peripheral spaces, first-person narrators, marginalized characters, analogue visuality and an attentiveness to materiality. Through the analysis of La filial (2012) by Matías Celedón, Nancy (2015) by Bruno Lloret and Conjunto vacío (2015) by Verónica Gerber Bicecci, it is argued that the novels present aesthetics of the ineffable, proposing ways of understanding diverse conditions of precarity experienced by their characters.

    Finally, the dissertation reaches its concluding chapter, where the similarities and differences between the two tendencies are presented. Taking different sociocultural, economic and political aspects into consideration, mapping these different spatio-temporal voices provides new knowledge of Transatlantic connections between Latin American and Spanish writers, and gives insight into the directions and responses of contemporary Hispanic Narratives in times of globalization. The “return of the face” describes the reappearance of the voice of the other in its vulnerability and subalternity, previously hidden in postnational and global novels. It discusses whether the notion of precarity, as a bottom-up approach, may contribute to a new perspective of understanding current local and global tensions and dynamics.

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    El retorno del rostro
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  • 331.
    Kjellsson, Linnea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Narrativa postnacional y nueva normalidad. Globalización, tecnopoética e identidades postnacionales en Los muertos, de Jorge Carrión2021In: Territorios in(di)visibles: Dilemas en las literaturas hispánicas actuales / [ed] Ken Benson; Juan Carlos Cruz Suárez, Madrid / Frankfurt am Main: Iberoamericana / Vervuert Verlag, 2021, p. 195-217Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [es]

    Este capítulo elabora un estudio de la novela Los muertos de Jorge Carrión y la sitúa como ejemplo de una narrativa postnacional que, siguiendo a Jürgen Habermas, problematiza la forma en que la historia y la memoria se ligan a la idea de la construcción de una nación. Mientras que la novela propone la aspiración a una identidad postnacional y rompe con el mito de un Estado en el que habita una población nacional homogénea, también revela la dificultad de su realización. El capítulo plantea una lectura de la novela en su correlación con la acelerada digitalización del mundo, las crisis democráticas actuales y el regreso a los nacionalismos populistas de corte tradicional. Se propone, a su vez, el término tecnopoética para caracterizar la interacción entre el medio visual y el lenguaje poético que domina la obra. El análisis revela que a la par que la novela trabaja la textura literaria y plantea una literatura capaz de trasladar sensibilidad a la pantalla, critica la creencia ingenua en la red y en las nuevas tecnologías que reproducen estructuras de poder. La obra de Carrión muestra una clara consciencia de su propia participación en un contexto que no se puede separar de las inquietudes sociopolíticas actuales. 

  • 332.
    Kjellsson, Linnea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Rupturas espaciotemporales y el sujeto mutante en España de Manuel Vilas y POV de Óscar Escudero2020In: Perspectivas sobre el futuro de la narrativa hispánica: ensayos y testimonios / [ed] Robin Lefere, Fernando Díaz Ruiz, Lidia Morales Benito, Alicante: Universidad de Alicante, 2020, p. 371-393Chapter in book (Refereed)
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    fulltext
  • 333.
    Kjellsson, Linnea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    “Vivimos rodeados de ruinas que no entendemos”: La estética analógica, memoria y experimentación en entrevista con el escritor Matías Celedón2022In: Diálogos Latinoamericanos, ISSN 1600-0110, E-ISSN 2246-8609, Vol. 31, p. 126-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2012, the Chilean writer Matías Celedón published La filial, a book-object conditioned by the precariousness and economic circumstances of his time, but also by the analogue materiality of the stamp he used to write it. At a time when the paper book seemed doomed to obsolescence, Celedón responds with anguish at the possible disappearance of archived memory and with a reflexive nostalgia (Boym, 2001) for obsolete technologies and found objects. This interview with the writer explores his narrative, analogue aesthetics, the importance of memory and the role of independent publishers in the commitment to experimentation.

  • 334.
    Kleberg, Lars
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola.
    Semenenko, AlekseiStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
    Aksenov and the Environs: Aksenov i okrestnosti2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 335.
    Klingberg, Angelica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Geocritical reading of Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book and Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, an adaption towards English literature teaching2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Although literature by Rudyard Kipling and Joseph Conrad has been studied for an extended period, the spatial surroundings in their works have only sparingly been studied. The representations of space and spatiality in literature have been critically approached through postcolonialism or versions of literary reviews; here, a geocritical methodology has been used to look at Kipling’s The Jungle Book and Conrad’s Heart of Darkness. Narratology and the representation of physical space share similarities, as both deal with society and the way people perceive and experience places. Still, the relation between narration, space and spatiality is presented differently in both style and extent. The understanding of spatial surroundings in these novellas has been integrated with a lesson unit focusing on increasing students’ critical thinking and ability to interpret literary works from a geocritical perspective. When teaching literature from a geocritical perspective, it is important to consider how to help students decode and find clues about the perspective in the texts. One approach is to use an interactive reading model such as the Top-down and Bottom-up method, where students use details in the text to gain an overall understanding. This can be particularly beneficial for students as it helps them form cognitive maps of the locations in the texts and improves their understanding of how the world is connected and formed through ideas and representations of power in literary texts.

    When using a geocritical approach, questions of how the narrators describe and build physical space, how the characters navigate and perceive space, and how the physical and perceived space is inhabited in the stories have been explored. The results show that the authors’ spatial understanding of the locations and populations during the colonial era connects to their representation of settings in The Jungle Book and Heart of Darkness. The connection has been made through reflections on characters and representations of nature in the stories, with an interpretation of style and symbolism in the perception of symbols, physical space, and the development of narration in relation to the literary spatial surrounding. Additionally, it has shown that the narration of space can be presented differently in style but still have similarities in understanding physical space and cognitive mapping.

    Keywords: Geocritical; Physical space; Perceived space; Narration; Multifocalization

     

  • 336.
    Koivunen, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    A Clinging Embrace: A Study of the Female Rapist in Ovid’s Metamorphoses2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 337.
    Koivunen, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Matter Manifesting Itself: Understanding Nonhuman Agency in Ovid’s Metamorphoses2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines transformations of human characters into trees, stones, and water sources in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. The current climate crisis is partly the result of a view of nature as a passive object, or inert matter, that humans without consequences can exploit. Using primarily the ecocritical theory new materialism, this thesis is a study of how nonhuman organisms can be assumed to have agency in order to alter this view of nature. The characters in the Metamorphoses that transform have different forms of agency before and after transformation depending on the body they inhabit. With close reading of the transformations themselves and the portrayal of the characters after transformation, the thesis finds that the material reality of the body determines what a body can do. Thus, it is possible to use the Metamorphoses to do a contemporary ecocritical reading that shows how a narrative can portray nature and nonhuman organisms with as much importance as human organism. By understanding the agency of nature and find it to be an active subject instead of only an object, it can change the relationship humans have with nature to one that is less exploitative.

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  • 338.
    Koivunen, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Room for Thought: Privacy and the Private Home in Mrs Dalloway and To the Lighthouse2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Modernism is often connected to the public sphere due to its associations with urbanity and technological changes. But interiority and private life was as important to modernity and, in particular, in Virginia Woolf’s writing. This essay explores the protagonists’ access to and experience of privacy in Woolf’s novels To the Lighthouse (1927) and Mrs Dalloway (1925), which both centre on women in a domestic environment. The reading combines modernist reactions against Victorian domesticity, which was structured on the private/public dichotomy and which limited women’s access to privacy, and combines it with modernist views of interiority, informed, more specifically, by Freud’s model of the unconscious and the spatial features of it. Privacy and interiority are imagined with spatial metaphors, but privacy is not necessarily connected to physical place and being alone, but rather having the ability to control the social situation and to choose what one reveals about oneself. Both novels re-imagine privacy and its ties to physical as well as mental space. This essay argues that To the Lighthouse is centred on a traditional Victorian home which reflects how its protagonist experiences interior privacy, and Mrs Dalloway explores a more modern domesticity that challenges Victorian organisation of the home and in turn, women’s access to privacy and solitude. With modernity public life was made available for women to a larger extent, but just as public life is coded by power relations, so is private life, which determines what sort of life could be lived by, for example, women.

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  • 339.
    Kourie, Nagham
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Frankenstein Unmasked: A Critical Analysis of “Otherness” in Frankenstein and its Significance for Establishing an Anti-Oppressive Education2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay analyzes the theme of “Otherness” in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein through three different lenses: queer readings, feminist readings, and disability studies, which will offer multiple perspectives of the “Otherness” present in the novel. The essay will engage with critics such as Benjamin Bagocius, Fuson Wang, and Colleen Hobbs.

    The aim of this essay is to utilize analyzed passages in Upper Secondary classrooms to cultivate critical thinking among students on issues of oppression and privilege in order to foster Anti-Oppressive education. The essay begins by introducing the concept of “Otherness” and its significance in Frankenstein. It then delves into the three different lenses and their perspectives on the theme of “Otherness.” Through these different readings, the essay demonstrates the complex and multi-layered nature of “Otherness” in Frankenstein. Furthermore, the essay argues that this analysis can be used to establish an Anti-Oppressive education in the Upper Secondary classroom. By critically examining how oppression and privilege operate in the novel, students can learn to recognize and challenge oppressive systems in society.

     The essay then moves into a discussion of why an Anti-Oppressive education is necessary. Specifically, it briefly critiques the Swedish curriculum for addressing oppression in a way that increases tolerance towards marginalized groups, rather than recognizing privilege and challenging the systemic roots of oppression. 

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  • 340.
    Kubulenso, Kalyani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Proof of the Power is in the Influence: Deconstructing Legitimate Power in The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodie and Old School 2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The educational system is one construct of our political and social culture created to empower and inform. Teachers and institutions uphold an ingrained responsibility to carry out such tasks. Although our society is equipped with checks and balances to regulate the efficiency of our systems, the opinions and actions of participants in society can assist with providing feedback from a larger point of view based on experience. Literature, a classic means of storytelling to entertain, inform and educate, can be used as a way to reach people on another level. I claim that the familiar experiences of authors through their fiction help society to question plausible situations in everyday life in order to induce change.

    The use of power in the education system, primarily legitimate power, according to French and Raven rationalizes the use of authority in order to produce influence. I argue that two narratives, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie and Old School, highlight the abuse of legitimate power through satire (to convey norms) and irony (a search for an unknown truth the norm opposes) in order to encourage readers to question their societal systems. The theories of deconstruction (to find meaning in the contradiction of truth in a text) and narrative ethics (moral constructs in storytelling between author, audience, character and narrator) help me to analyze how the chaos and confusion of abuse allows individuals to reevaluate norms through a moral and ethical lens in the hopes to empower others to search for alternative ways to constructively improve and regulate behaviors and attitudes which can compromise our societal structures.

  • 341.
    Kuusela, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies.
    Bakgrund till J.R.R. Tolkiens världar – Kalevala och andra källor2013In: Chaos: skandinavisk tidsskrift for religionshistoriske studier, ISSN 0108-4453, E-ISSN 1901-9106, no 59, p. 97-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to show how the Finnish language, and especially the epic poetry of Kalevala formed and inspired J.R.R. Tolkien in the shaping of Middle-earth. This article explores the background of Elias Lönnrot and his compilation, and compares it to the way Tolkien’s interrelated and independent stories grew and took form in what posthumously was published in a series of edited collections by his son Christopher. Reading The Lord of the Rings makes it obvious that it is part of a bigger collection of stories, unfinished tales that somehow connects with real history, legend and myth. In 2007 Christopher Tolkien published The Children of Húrin, an edited, long version of the tale of Túrin Turambar, a hero bearing close resemblances to the character Kullervo in Kalevala. This is but the tip of the iceberg, and we know from Tolkien’s fictive Elven language Quenya that it is modelled directly on Finnish, which is also true of lot of other names in his works. In his idea of “Sub-creation” he could combine elements from myth, legend, history and folklore with his fictive world, and make it seem like a primarily world. This article shows how close Elias Lönnrot and J.R.R. Tolkien where in their idea of creating what is known as "National Literature".

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  • 342.
    Kuzmičová, Anežka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Does it make a difference where you read?2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognition is situated and the environment is part of the cognitive system. These are two of the basic tenets of embodiment, a research framework rapidly growing in popularity. They are abstract enough to have inspired a diverse array of approaches to literature and reading. Some of these approaches look into how the minds of literary characters engage with their environment; some study how this environment informs readers’ imagination; others analyze the spatiality of literary metaphor. What all these approaches have in common is a primary focus on environment as encoded in a text. Meanwhile, this lecture will take the notions of environment and situatedness more literally and explore physical site-sensitivity in the reading of literary narrative. Leaving aside the obvious cases of overly distractive reading situations, I will outline some new theoretical distinctions applying to the relationship between narrative style and reading environment. I will propose that it does make a difference where you read, and recount several levels at which physical environment may structure your experience and understanding of a text.

  • 343.
    Kuzmičová, Anežka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    The audiobook experience: attention and mental imagery2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The audiobook experience differs radically from traditional silent reading in several respects, one of them being mental imagery. While mental imagery in silent reading taps equally into the referential (story content; all sensory modalities) and verbal (narrative qua discourse; auditory and kinesthetic) domains, listening activates the auditory circuitry to a degree that leaves little need or capacity for verbal mental images. In traditional silent reading, continuous shifts between referential and verbal imaging coincide with the general distribution of one's attention between story and discourse. But how is attention distributed in narrative audiobook processing? On the one hand, one might speculate that the medium, liberating the listener from the visually taxing burden of reading, allows richer possibilities for referential imaging and a deeper focus on story content. On the other hand, the overt voicing of the discourse can make people attentive to linguistic qualities that otherwise would go unnoticed. Moreover, people use audiobooks widely while performing physical tasks or during transportation, thus receiving a flux of sensorimotor stimuli from the environment concurrent with the spoken narrative. This may interfere with, rather than encourage, referential imagery, or even any deeper focus whatsoever. In my talk I will try to systematize and reconcile some of these contradictions from an aesthetic and psychological perspective. Reviewing extant comparative data on literary listening and reading, I will thus elaborate on recent attempts to define the phenomenology of the audiobook as a specific medium. I will support my conclusions with anecdotal evidence from my own experience of listening to vs. reading Ernest Hemingway's The Garden of Eden, a novel high in referential imageability as well as linguistic craftsmanship.

  • 344.
    Kuzmičová, Anežka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas.
    Dixon, Peter
    Bortolussi, Marisa
    Mental imagery from visual description2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most challenging topics for cognitive literary study is the reader's mental imagery. In this talk I will focus on the particular kind of mental imagery prompted by the stylistic device of visual description. Although valuable predictive inquiries have been made into readers' mental imagery in general, its relation to visual description is largely undertheorized. In spite of the fact that visual description is unique, compared to other modes of verbal representation, in its potential to control the specific contents of one's mental image. Referring to my own experimental data from an imagery study conducted under the tutorship of Professors Bortolussi and Dixon of Alberta, I will use the example of visual description to make the following points regarding all predictive inquiry into the cognitive effects of literary style, and into readers' mental imagery in particular: 1) To advance literary study, prediction about the parameters of literary processing (e.g., the occurrence of visual imagery) should be made conjointly with prediction about the specific value of these parameters (e.g., the contents of the visual image). 2) Therefore, cognitive science can be fully helpful to literary study only insofar as it encompasses phenomenology and other methods of informed introspection. 3) That prediction made from within traditional scientific paradigms sometimes runs counter to phenomenological prediction does not necessarily entail mutual exclusivity. Rather, the tension between the two is precisely what is distinctive for literature as an object of scientific knowledge.

  • 345.
    Landh, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Coming of Age of a Woman: Proto-feminism and Female Bildung in Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines the influence of the proto-feminist ideas of the Enlightenment on Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey, specifically their presence in the coming-of-age journey of the novel’s heroine Catherine Morland. In this thesis, the proto-feminist ideas of the Enlightenment discussed are based on the ideas of Mary Wollstonecraft as presented in A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. I focus on Wollstonecraft’s emphasis on the importance of reason for the emancipation of women as well as the role of virtue and modesty, but also on the existence of an ambivalent relationship between sense and sentiment. The aim of the thesis is to show that Catherine Morland’s coming-of-age journey in Northanger Abbey can be understood as a representation of the emancipation of women that Wollstonecraft hopes for, and that the obstacles standing in the way of Catherine’s maturation are parallel to the obstacles which, during the Enlightenment, prevented women from claiming reason for themselves. First, I draw upon Wollstonecraft’s criticism of sentimental fiction and its hampering effect on women’s minds and show that the same idea is present in the narrative of Northanger Abbey, in the shape of gothic fiction. Then, I show how Catherine’s ability to discern between virtuous and immodest behaviour improves drastically as she starts to exercise her reason, in concurrence with Wollstonecraft’s claim that all virtuous thought must stem from reason. I analyse the importance of Catherine’s choice of partner and its relationship to the proto-feminist critique of women’s inability to express ideas contrary to those of a man. Finally, I dissect the proto-feminist ambivalent relationship between sense and sentiment and connect it to the finale of Northanger Abbey. These elements put together all point toward Wollstonecraft and Austen being coextensive, and demonstrate how Austen makes use of Wollstonecraft’s ideas to promote the emergence of female bildung.

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  • 346.
    Lane, Tora
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
    A Groundless Foundation Pit2012In: Ulbandus Review. The Slavic Review of Columbia University, ISSN 0163-450X, Vol. 14, p. 61-75Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 347.
    Lappin, Anthony John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Baroquely valedicting: Donne forbidding mourning. Date, purpose, and repurposing2020In: Studia Neophilologica, ISSN 0039-3274, E-ISSN 1651-2308, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 1-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The poem known to readers since the seventeenth century as 'A valediction: forbidding mourning' is analyzed regarding, first, the transmission of the text: I show that there is a recognizably early version, close to the original written by Donne although he did not himself subsequently intervene in any significant fashion in the transmission of the poem. I then consider the dating of the poem, arguing that it was a communication to Anne before her secret marriage to Donne in 1601. I define 'Valediction' as a Baroque piece, and develop a reading with particular emphasis upon its playing with paradox. Finally, I consider its ms. transmission as an indication of its reception, and, in particular, consider Walton’s purposes in presenting both an eccentric version of the text and his use of invented or re-interpreted biographical details to force his own ideological allegiances onto Donne and his poetry. This article, then, attempts to draw an arc, stretching from the initial intention that informed the composition of the poem, to its later, definitive reception within a carefully constructed web of misleading, and mainly invented, details about Donne’s life which have informed criticism of Valediction (and other poems) since.

  • 348.
    Lappin, Anthony John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Giving and taking life: flower arranging in Howard Nemerov and Medb McGuckian2020In: Ocula, E-ISSN 1724-7810, Vol. 21, no 23, p. 198-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The power of flower-symbolism is examined with regard to two very different poets from the latter half of the 2oth century who use petalled plants to deal with fundamentally religious or spiritual values even when explicitly religious language, allegiance or even evocation of the numinous was policed as un-poetic. The poets are distinct in gender, political situation, public acclaim, and style, and they use the motif of flower arranging to explore the virtues, on the one hand, of stoic acceptance, and, on the other, female solidarity; and to deploy, for the first, the concentrated bifurcations of paronomasia to explore the topic, and, for the second, intricate webs of allusion and metaphor to describe both the (female) poet’s situation and meditate upon the craft. Both, however, rely on a poetics of indefinition to circumvent censure and rejection.

  • 349.
    Lappin, Anthony John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    The Green Grocer vs. the Bulgar Slayer: interreligious diplomacy between al-Bāqillānī and Emperor Basil II in Andalusi traditions2020In: War, Diplomacy and Peace-Making in Medieval Iberia / [ed] Kim Bergkvist; Kurt Villads Jensen; A.J. Lappin, Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2020, p. 83-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 350.
    Lengborn, Thorbjörn
    Stockholm University.
    Schriftsteller und Gesellschaft in der Schweiz: eine Studie zur Behandlung der Gesellschaftsproblematik bei Zollinger, Frisch und Dürrenmatt1972Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
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