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  • 301.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Botulf - helgon eller frifräsare?2010In: Gotländskt Arkiv, ISSN 0434-2429, Vol. 82, p. 34-45Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Botulf – Saint or Free Mover? (summary)

    “For Botulf ”. A cryptic inscription on a series of Gotlandic coins from c. 1210 is discussed in this article in relation to different types of references to the name Botulf on Gotland. Gravestones, farmsteads, mural paintings, toll lists and numismatic evidence all provide clues as to what or whom the inscription may be alluding to. Was Botulf, the English saint, popular on Gotland to the point of having dedication coins minted in his honour? Or was Botulf, the Gotlandic tradesman, taking advantage of a temporary change of powers on the island to gain a reputation for himself? Enigmatic and fortified Västergarn on Gotland’s west coast, the German Bishop Albert’s Riga, and the Hanseatic Steelyard of London all play roles in the story of Botulf of Gotland.

  • 302.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Det gotländska myntet från Bårarp2008In: Nordisk numismatisk unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 1, p. 30-36Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    År 1932 gjordes ett mynt fynd i Bårarp, Halland, som kunde dateras till ca 1153-55 (mynt från Svend Grate) (Jensen 1983). Med utgångspunkt från detta fynd kunde en serie gotländska 1100-talsmynt 25 år senare tidfästas vilket blev en viktig hållpunkt i arbetet med den gotlåndksa myntningen.

  • 303.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    PAX PORTA NY: Gotländsk uttolkning av ett fridskoncept2009In: Samlad Glädje II: Numismatiska Klubben i Uppsala 40 år / [ed] Ekström, Curt & Holmberg, Kjell, Uppsala: Numismatiska klubben i Uppsala , 2009, p. 149-154Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In about 1140 AD, the island of Gotland, off the Swedish coast, initiated what was to become one of the most influential coinages of the medieval Baltic Sea Area. One of the types minted was inscribed PAX PORTA NY. The paper argues that these coins were part of a strategy adopted by the Gotlanders in the 1160s, to proclaim peace in the town of Visby and to direct their international partners to where control and trading peace could be maintained. The different dimensions of the coins (object, text and picture) give away plenty of information on several levels when combined with historical sources, and tell us about the networks, ideological framework, artisanship, and changing loyalties of this time and area.

  • 304.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Room for all? Spaces and places for thing assemblies: the case of the All-thing on Gotland, Sweden2008In: Viking and Medieval Scandinavia, ISSN 1782-7183, E-ISSN 2030-9902, Vol. 4, p. 133-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Roma on Gotland in the Baltic Sea was an important place at the physical and symbolic centre of Iron-Age and Medieval Gotland. Roma has two particularly well-known historical features: the Cistercian monastery and the gathering-place of the Gotlandic all-thing. This article will consider the nature of the place, the foundation of the monastery, and the character of the thing, and will point to an alternative site for the all-thing. It will be suggested that an older Iron-Age cult site came under the control of a chieftain in the later Iron Age, and that in the Viking and early medieval phases a major landowner or chieftain/petty king may have introduced Christianity, established connections with the continental Church, founded a monastery and inaugurated a thing-place in Roma, just as his equals did in other areas of Scandinavia. The monastery and the all-thing have in the past been thought to indicate the existence of a particularly egalitarian and non-stratified society on Gotland in the Viking Age and Middle Ages. I propose that this was not the case. Through historical circumstance, Gotland never developed a noble class as on the mainland; this however does not mean there were not Viking-Age or early medieval lords with such aspirations.

  • 305.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Shared values: Creative links and hybridity in an Anglo-Scandinavian techno-web2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In present-day Denmark, Norway and Sweden a coinage was initiated about AD 995, which imitated contemporary Anglo-Saxon coins. For more than 30 years the English and Scandinavian coinages were closely connected. Individuals (commissioners, moneyers, artisans) as well as objects (e.g. coin-dies) moved between the mints. Coinage is often perceived of as expressing sovereign rights in a certain area. Instead, the Anglo-Scandinavian coinage network was not limited by realms and borders, but cut across kingdoms from west (England) to east (Byzantium) through Scandinavia and the Southern Baltic. Despite the ongoing “state-formation processes” and competition between the areas, values like artisans and dies were shared within the network.

    The material underlines how “social” technology is; dependent on choices, cooperative skills, talent, capital, etc. The coin images, inscriptions and links offer unique openings for a situated study of a process of change in the past, of different levels and actors in the network, of patterns of movement, and of ideological and historical contexts. Imitations are often depreciated out from our contemporary notions of authenticity. Here, the creative and hybrid character of the material is instead underlined, opening up for a deeper understanding of the wider connotations and meanings of the objects.

  • 306.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The colour of money: crusaders and coins in the thirteenth-century Baltic Sea 2010In: Making sense of things: archaeologies of sensory perception / [ed] Fredrik Fahlander & Anna Kjellström, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies , 2010, 1, p. 83-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how colour was perceived differently in the European Middle Ages and carried significance beyond what we ascribe it today. It also considers how the various colours worked as important carriers of values and concepts in this context, where pigments were rare and expensive.

    A way to access the medieval understanding of colour is through heraldry and its colours, the tinctures, which combine hard and soft materials, even and three-dimensional surfaces, in a way that evades present-day definitions of colour. Medieval people used their senses in a cross-modal way to perceive colour and connect it to an intricate world of symbolism and values. To them, it is argued, colour was a texture just as much as a hue.

    The aim of the paper is to investigate this relationship between colour, ideas and materiality, filtered through the senses, and made manifest in a group of thirteenth-century Scandinavian coins. Were coins actually perceived as coloured?

  • 307.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The social identity of coin hoards: An example of theory and practice in the space between numismatics and archaeology2009In: Coins in context I: New perspectives for the interpretation of coin finds / [ed] von Kaenel, H-M. & Kemmers, F., Mainz: Philipp von Zabern , 2009, p. 157-171Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Silver coin hoarding is a distinct feature of the Viking Age in some northern European areas, and these hoards convey much information about coin types and chronologies to numismatists. However, there is still no explanation of the custom itself. I argue that hoards should be considered in terms of social categories or genders as a means to understand the specific reasons behind their deposition. This contribution provides examples of this approach through contextualizing hoards and their contents.

    I also propose some theoretical premises regarding the role of numismatics in the space between archaeology, history, economic history and art history. Numismatics as a discipline must develop an explicit research agenda of its own in order to benefit equally from the numismatist's knowledge of a coin's primary context (origin), as well as secondary (use and reuse) and tertiary contexts (deposition). Coins do not belong to one single context; neither the one of primary interest to the historian, nor just that which the archaeologist encounters. A numismatic approach sensitive to all contexts opens a wealth of information in terms of the life biography of objects, social relationships, and the routines and cognitive patterns of the society which produced, used and deposited coins.

  • 308.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Kemmers, Fleur
    JW Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main.
    Re-thinking numismatics: The archaeology of coins2011In: Archaeological Dialogues, ISSN 1380-2038, E-ISSN 1478-2294, no 2, p. 87-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper sets out to re-member coins into archaeological discourse. It is argued that coins, as part of material culture, need to be examined within the theoretical framework of historical archaeology and material-culture studies. Through several case studies we demonstrate how coins, through their integration of text, image and existence as material objects, offer profound insights not only into matters of economy and the ‘big history’ of issuers and state organization but also into ‘small histories’, cultural values and the agency of humans and objects. In the formative period of archaeology in the 19th century the study of coins played an important role in the development of new methods and concepts. Today, numismatics is viewed as a field apart. The mutual benefits of our approach to the fields of archaeology and numismatics highlight the need for a new and constructive dialogue between the disciplines.

  • 309.
    Odelman, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages, Classical Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    En bukett från kyrkofädernas trädgård: en medeltida latinsk text om der himmelska fäderneslandets beskaffenhet2008In: Signum, ISSN 0347-0423, no 9, p. 37-42Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 310.
    Odelman, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages, Classical Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Glossarium till medeltidslatinet i Sverige = Glossarium mediae latinitatis Sueciae: Supplement, a-Zweuicus 2009Book (Other academic)
  • 311.
    Oen, Maria H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    A Companion to Birgitta of Sweden and Her Legacy in the Later Middle Ages2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    St Birgitta of Sweden (d. 1373) is one of the most celebrated female visionaries and authors of the Middle Ages and a central figure in the history of late-medieval religion. An aristocratic widow, Birgitta left her native country in 1349 and settled in Rome, where she established herself as an outspoken critic of the Avignon Papacy and an advocate of spiritual and ecclesiastical reform. Birgitta founded a new monastic order, and her major work, The Heavenly Book of Revelations, circulated widely in a variety of monastic, reformist, and intellectual milieus following her death. This volume offers an introduction to the saint and the reception of her work written by experts from various disciplines. In addition to acquainting the reader with the state of the scholarship, the study also presents fresh interpretations and new perspectives on Birgitta and the sources for her life and writings.

  • 312.
    Oen, Maria H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Ambivalent Images of Authorship2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper deals with the question of Birgitta’s and Catherine’s status as authors and examines the visual representations of the two women, notably in the context of the books containing their texts. In the images of the two women found in the illuminated manuscripts, which began circulating just after their deaths in 1373 and 1380 respectively, and in the early printed copies dating to around 1500, Birgitta is generally represented with a pen in her hand, whereas Catherine is never depicted in the act of writing. This visual material emerges as a paradox when compared to the way the two women are presented in the texts. In the Revelations, Birgitta claims to be a medium and not an author, and she generally refers to herself in third person, or simply as “a person.” Catherine, by contrast, is constantly present in the first person in her letters which frequently open with “I, Catherine, write to you.” By focusing on the tension between the images of the two women and the way they are presented in their respective texts, this chapter will explore the role of the visual in shaping the notions of Birgitta and Catherine as female authors in a time when female authority was still highly controversial. The conflicting representations of their authorial role will also be connected to contemporary debates about their sanctity, where questions concerning human and divine authorship as well as ecclesiastical mediation and approval of the texts of these lay visionaries were of paramount importance. 

  • 313.
    Oen, Maria H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Birgitta Birgersdotter and the Liber celestis revelacionum2019In: A Companion to Birgitta of Sweden and Her Legacy in the Later Middle Ages / [ed] Maria H. Oen, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2019, p. 1-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On 7 October 1391, Pope Boniface ix pronounced the sanctity of Birgitta Birgersdotter—a Swedish widow who, 42 years earlier, had left her native country in order to settle in Rome, where she presented herself as a prophet. The widow’s primary claim to sanctity was constituted by the substantial literary corpus known as the Liber celestis revelacionum (“The Heavenly Book of Revelations,” hereafter the Revelations), which had been compiled by her confessors after Birgitta’s death, in 1373, to serve as evidence in support of a canonization. The Revelations, which spread swiftly in their original Latin and soon in numerous vernacular translations, purported to contain divine messages received by Birgitta directly from God, Christ, the Virgin, and several saints for the benefit of the Church and the salvation of humankind. Their content touches on most of the principal political conflicts and ecclesiastical debates of the time: the Avignon papacy, the Hundred Years’ War, the legitimacy of secular and ecclesiastical rulers, the state of the priesthood, apostolic life, the immaculate conception of the Virgin, the authenticity of relics, the Eucharist, and numerous other subjects. Within a few decades the Revelations, whose status and validity were continuously debated at church councils after the proclamation of Birgitta’s sainthood, were read in lay and ecclesiastical contexts all over Europe, including monasteries, universities, humanist circles, and various reform groups. How was it that a laywoman from the northern fringes of the world came to exercise such a great influence in so many different milieus in the later Middle Ages? The present volume seeks to answer this question by way of a study of Birgitta’s life and legacy. The following ten chapters will explore St Birgitta of Sweden, the Revelations, and the monastic order she founded, while also offering an introduction to the scholarship of the field.

  • 314.
    Oen, Maria H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. University of Oslo, Norway.
    Iconography and Visions: St. Birgitta’s Revelation of the Nativity of Christ2018In: The Locus of Meaning in Medieval Art: Iconography, Iconology, and Interpreting the Visual Imagery of the Middle Ages / [ed] Lena Eva Liepe, Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 315.
    Oen, Maria H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. University of Oslo, Norway.
    Jerusalem and the Authority of Birgitta of Sweden2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 316.
    Oen, Maria H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. University of Oslo, Norway.
    Rome and the Sanctity of Saint Birgitta2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A year before the Jubilee of 1350, the Swedish noblewoman Birgitta Birgersdotter left her home country for Rome never to return. After having become a widow in her mid-forties, Birgitta had converted to a religious life. The past three years before setting off on her Roman pilgrimage, she had been a lay affiliate of the Cistercian monastery of Alvastra, where she had gained the support of the prior Petrus Olavi. In this paper I shall argue that the city of Rome plays a significant role, both for Birgitta and for Prior Peter, who among others would later campaign for her sanctity, in transforming her from a mulier religiosainto a mulier sancta. It was during the period of more than two decades that Birgitta’s lived in Rome that the Liber coelestis Revelacionum, which would soon represent her primary claim to sanctity,took shape. By analysing the Revelacionesand the proceedings from Birgitta’s canonization process, initiated in Italy immediately after her death in Rome in 1373, I shall demonstrate that the sacred topography of the city, its concrete buildings, relics and artworks, not only provides the contents, protagonists and the mise-en-scène of a number of Birgitta’s visions, but her physical presence at the specific Roman shrines is also employed by her supporters as an effective argument in favour of her sanctity.

  • 317.
    Oen, Maria H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. University of Oslo, Norway.
    The Authority of Birgitta’s Heavenly Revelations: The Image of the Saint and Her Work in Quattrocento Manuscripts2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 318.
    Oen, Maria H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The Iconography of Birgitta in Liber celestis revelacionum2019In: A Companion to Birgitta of Sweden and Her Legacy in the Later Middle Ages / [ed] Maria H. Oen, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2019, p. 186-222Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 319.
    Oen, Maria H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Universitetet i Oslo, Norge.
    The Iconography of Birgitta of Sweden: Author, Prophet, and Saint2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As the reputed author of Liber celestis revelacionum, an eight-volume literary corpus with a highly political content, Birgitta Birgersdotter stands out among the many laywomen who were venerated as saints in the later Middle Ages. In the canonization process, initiated immediately after her death in Rome in 1373, Birgitta’s assumed role as a divinely appointed prophet formed her primary claim to sainthood, and the textual work served as the principal evidence. The oldest extant images of Birgitta all derive from the first years of the canonization process when panel paintings and illuminations decorating the manuscripts containing the Liber celestiswere produced in Naples. Highly original iconographical formulas were developed for the two media respectively, most likely under the direct supervision of Birgitta’s confessors who had assisted her in the production and dissemination of her revelations. 

    This paper will explore the form and purpose of the iconography developed for the promotion of Birgitta’s sanctity. Special attention will be given to the visual strategies by which the images seeks to negotiate her role as an outspoken public figure, an author, and an active political agent in a time when women were prohibited from instructing men in public, in both speech and text. The paper will also examine how the meaning of the original iconography of Birgitta developed as it spread from one medium to another, and in various social, religious, and linguistic contexts in Europe after the visionary had been elevated to sainthood only 18 years after her death.

  • 320.
    Oen, Maria H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The Iconography of the Revelations2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 321.
    Oen, Maria H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The Role of Art in the Construction of Late Medieval Visions2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 322. Olofsson, Björn
    et al.
    Holm, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Dateringar av kyrkor i Jämtland: Dendrokronologiska och byggnadshistoriska undersökningar 2011-20122013Report (Other academic)
  • 323.
    Pettersson, Jonatan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Recension av Alexanders saga. Manuscripta Nordica. 2. Utg. Andrea de Leeuw van Weenen, Köpenhamn 2009: Museum Tusculanum Press, 352 s. 1 CD-ROM-skiva.2010In: Scripta Islandica: Isländska Sällskapets Årsbok, ISSN 0582-3234, E-ISSN 2001-9416, Vol. 61, p. 108-116Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 324. Pinto Costa, Paula
    et al.
    de Fonseca, Luís Adão
    Jensen, Kurt Villads
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Pimenta, Cristina
    Military Orders Between Territorialization and Periphery from the 12th to the 16th Century: A comparative perspective on Portugal and Denmark2016In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 141-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Military orders have historically played a key role in defining borders, both in a mental sense, by favouring an awareness of alterity in the most peripheral territories (Christians against Muslims and Christians against Pagans), and also in more direct ways, as owners of land in these territories. This article1 discusses both the influence, in the broadest sense, of territory and periphery upon the medieval military orders, and the relationship between the crown and the military orders. It will be done through a comparative historical analysis of two cases: Portugal and Denmark in the 12th–16th centuries. Both countries were placed at the periphery of the Western world in the Middle Ages, and they were both active agents in the Crusading movement.

  • 325. Salonen, Kirsi
    et al.
    Jensen, Kurt Villads
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Om hor og andre åndelige sager, i Aarhus2018In: Religion som forklaring? kirke og religion i stat og samfund: Festskrift til Per Ingesman / [ed] Nina Javette Koefoed, Bo Kristian Holm, Sasja Emilie Mathiasen Stopa, Aarhus: Aarhus Universitetsforlag, 2018, p. 107-123Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 326.
    Thungren Lindbärg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages, Classical Languages.
    "Den store bland kejsare, Symeon": Om maktanspråk i Bysans och Bulgarien under tidigt 900-tal2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 327.
    Tjällén, Biörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Aristotle’s heroic virtue and medieval theories of monarchy2015In: Shaping heroic virtue: studies in the art and politics of supereminence in Europe and Scandinavia / [ed] Stefano Fogelberg Rota, Andreas Hellerstedt, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2015, p. 55-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 328.
    Tjällén, Biörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Blockmans, W., Holenstein, A., & Mathieu, J. (eds.), Empowering Interactions: Political Cultures and the Emergence of the State in Europe 1300 – 19002011In: Zeitschrift für historische Forschung, ISSN 0340-0174, Vol. 1Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 329.
    Tjällén, Biörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Finnen, svensken och Irlands uppror2016In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 26 marsArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 330.
    Tjällén, Biörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Induced by the devil? Christian I and the privilegium canonis2014In: Constitutionalism before 1789: Constitutional arrangements from the High Middle Ages to the French revolution / [ed] Jørn Øyrehagen Sunde, Oslo: Pax Forlag, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 331.
    Tjällén, Biörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    John Barbour's scholastic discourse on thraldom2015In: Barbour's Bruce and its cultural context: politics, chivalry and literature in late medieval Scotland / [ed] Steve Boardman, Susan Foran, Cambridge: Boydell & Brewer, 2015, p. 149-162Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 332.
    Tjällén, Biörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    John Watts, The Making of Polities: Europe 1250—15002011In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 1Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 333.
    Tjällén, Biörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Kungens biktfader – andlig vägledning och politisk rådgivning vid senmedeltidens hov2012In: Kyrkohistorisk årsskrift, ISSN 0085-2619, Vol. 112, p. 49-59Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Royal Confessor: Pastoral care and Political counsel at the Late Medieval Swedish Court

    Authors of medieval political thought were more concerned with the personal qualities of the prince than with political institutions. They wrote more about his virtues than about his role in parlia- ment. This article examines the sacrament of penance as one of the didactic means by which such norms were communicated to the prince. The royal confessor was the crucial link in this transfer, and this article traces his appearance at the late medieval Swedish court and also discusses the confessional manuals that were produced to help him interrogate his royal confessant. The Swedish court is relatively unexplored as a locus of devotion and little is known about its clerical personnel. This article presents the appearance of the papally-sanctioned royal confessor, in the reign of Magnus Eriksson in 1347, and offers a brief discussion of the careers of a number of later incumbents of this office, suggesting that the post of royal confessor was a likely path to a bishopric. The main part of the article is a scrutiny of manuals for confessors and penitents, which elucidates the political norms communicated through the pastoral care of the confessors. At the centre of this discussion is a Swedish instruction for royal devotion – Fjorton råd om et gudelikt leverne (c.1457), compiled by the Vadstena abbess, Ingeborg Gerhardsotter, for King Christian I – and a popular Latin manual for confessors that included a specific interrogatory for temporal lords, the Defecerunt of St Antoninus of Florence (print 1499). What, according to these texts, were the particular spiritual dangers of holding power? And did the confessor examine the policies of the king? The Defecerunt provides didactic examples that demonstrate how princes sin in their exercise of central governmental concerns, such as jurisdic- tion, warfare, relations to the church, taxation and usurpation. Ideally, if administered in accordance with the advice in the Defecerunt and similar manuals, the sacrament of penance would not only benefit the spiritual wellbeing of the king, but also instill a set of constitutional standards. 

  • 334.
    Tjällén, Biörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Political thought and political myth in late medieval national histories: Rodrigo Sánchez de Arévalo (†1470)2013In: The Medieval Chronicle, ISSN 1567-2336, E-ISSN 1879-5927, Vol. 8, p. 273-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By the end of the fifteenth century, most European realms had created their national pedigrees in the form of written histories. The result often took the form of schematic pre-histories or ethno-historical origin myths, with original heroes who are as eponymous as they are historically implausible. But the last medieval century was also a time of constitutional experimentation, debate and consolidation, a process sometimes described as a development from a ‘crisis of monarchy’ to its ‘triumph’. This article explores the role of the national-historical writing in such debates of constitutional ideals and suggests that their naïve representations of political origins might be better understood in the context of learned political speculation.

  • 335.
    Tjällén, Biörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    "The Spiritual and Temporal Office of the King": Confessional Anxieties in the Seventeenth-Century Editions of the Chronica regni Gothorum2008In: Hortvs troporvm : florilegivm in honorem Gvnillae Iversen: Festschrift in honour of Professor Gunilla Iversen on the occasion of her retirement as Chair of Latin at Stockholm University / [ed] Erika Kihlman & Alexander André, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2008, p. 315-323Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 336. Varberg, Jeanette
    et al.
    Jensen, Kurt Villads
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Historien om Danmark: Oldtid og middelalder2017Book (Other academic)
  • 337.
    Wåghäll Nivre, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Eckart, Maren
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Narrating Life: Early Modern Accounts of the Life of Queen Christina of Sweden (162-1689)2010In: Cultural Ways of Worldmaking: Media and Narratives / [ed] Vera Nünning, Ansgar Nünning, Birgit Neumann, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter , 2010, p. 307-328Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 338.
    Zamore, Gustav
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Bonaventure’s Thought Experiment: The Use of Synderesis in the Itinerarium mentis in Deum, the Ineffability Topos and Francis’s Stigmata2018In: Medieval Thought Experiments: Poetry, Hypothesis, and Experience in the European Middle Ages / [ed] Philip Knox, Jonathan Morton, Daniel Reeve, Turnhout: Brepols, 2018, p. 173-195Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 339.
    Åkestam, Mia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    I Felt Like Jumping for Joy: Smile and Laughter in Medieval Imagery2017In: Tears, Sighs and Laughter: Expressions of Emotions in the Middle Ages / [ed] Per Förnegård, Erika Kihlman, Mia Åkestam, Gunnel Engwall, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2017, p. 215-239Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within a hundred years The Bjälbo- or the Folkungar-palace in Vadstena by the Lake Vättern, was built (c. 1250) and transformed from king Valdemars royal palace to the nuns´s convent in the Birgittine monastery (1360s). This paper deals with an era in Swedish history when a powerful nobility wanted to establish a courtly culture and connected to a broader European context in politics as well as in religious life. Birgitta Birgersdotter (1303–1373) was a part of, and a strong force in, this milieu. New attitudes towards smile and laughter ought to be an important factor in such a transformation. Sweden was peripheral  in relation to central cultural areas, but the ambitions to establish the aristocracy after a german/french model was taken very seriously in  13th century Sweden. This is also true for architecture and sculpture. The grand cathedrals of France, Germany and England were models and “the gothic smile” was an ideal outside the courts. By stressing the importance public spaces the paper shows how a visual culture, profane and religious, could be adopted in remote areas. The meeting with medieval faces is a challence not only for us contemporary wievers, but was also during the middle ages.

  • 340.
    Åkestam, Mia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Kihlman, Erika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages, Classical Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Lire, comprendre et mémoriser l'Éthique à Nicomaque: le rapport texte-image dans ms. Stockholm, Kungl. bibl., Va 32009In: Regards sur la France du Moyen Âge: mélanges offerts à Gunnel Engwall à l'occasion de son départ à la retraite / [ed] Olle Ferm, Per Förnegård, Stockholm: Sällskapet Runica et Mediaevalia , 2009, p. 111-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
4567 301 - 340 of 340
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