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  • 301.
    Jensen, Kurt Villads
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Nielsen, Torben Kjersgaard
    Introduction2021In: The Crusades: History and Memory. Proceedings of the Ninth Conference of the Society for the Study of the Crusades and the Latin East, Odense, 27 June – 1 July 2016, vol. 2 / [ed] Kurt Villads Jensen, Torben Kjersgaard Nielsen, Brepols, 2021, p. 9-11Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 302.
    Jensen, Kurt Villads
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Nielsen, Torben Kjersgaard
    The Crusades: History and Memory. Proceedings of the Ninth Conference of the Society for the Study of the Crusades and the Latin East, Odense, 27 June – 1 July 2016, vol. 22021Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The crusades have been remembered and commemorated in many ways, from the late eleventh century until today. Soon after the conquest of Jerusalem in 1099, the fate of the First Crusade inspired literary, historiographical and artistic traditions. Participants in the subsequent crusades would look to the first Crusade for inspiration and spiritual guidance, while playing out their own ideas of crusading. Since then the crusades have been put to use in very divers ways and for different purposes. This volume explores how the crusades have been remembered, revered and ridiculed by those who participated in them and by those who in later periods made use of the crusades as an historical phenomenon. The volume thus traces the memory and legacy of the crusades by putting together essays that focus on the specific ways in which the crusades have been memorized, evoked and exploited from the eleventh century until today.

  • 303.
    Jensen, Kurt Villads
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Salonen, Kirsi
    Bauch, Wolfgang
    Hillebrand, Katja
    Rude: Zisterzienser2019In: Klosterbuch Schleswig-Holstein und Hamburg: Kloster, Stifte und Konvente von den Anfängen bis zur Reformation / [ed] Oliver Auge, Hatja Hillebrand, Regensburg: Verlag Schnell + Steiner GmbH, 2019, p. 509-532Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 304.
    Jezierski, Wojtek
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Paranoia sangallensis: A Micro-Study in the Etiquette of Monastic Persecution2008In: Frühmittelalterliche Studien, ISSN 0071-9706, E-ISSN 1613-0812, Vol. 42, p. 147-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Can we use contemporary sociological models of exclusion of paranoiacs to account for the miscarried visitation of a monastic reformer in the tenth century? This article, by offering a thick description of an incident from Ekkehard IV’s 'Casus sancti Galli', explores early medieval mechanisms of social control and the collective manufacturing of scapegoats and deviants in the monastic milieu.

  • 305.
    Jezierski, Wojtek
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Risk, Emotions, and Hospitality in the Christianization of the Baltic Rim, 1000-13002022Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What anxieties did medieval missionaries and crusaders face and what role did the sense of risk play in their community-building? To what extent did crusaders and Christian colonists empathize with the local populations they set out to conquer? Who were the hosts and who were the guests during the confrontations with the pagan societies on the Baltic Rim? And how were the uncertainties of the conversion process addressed in concrete encounters and in the accounts of Christian authors?

    This book explores emotional bonding as well as practices and discourses of hospitality as uncertain means of evangelization, interaction, and socialization across cultural divides on the Baltic Rim, c. 1000–1300. It focuses on interactions between local populations and missionary communities, as well as crusader frontier societies. By applying tools of historical anthropology to the study of host-guest relations, spaces of hospitality, emotional communities, and empathy on the fronts of Christianization, this book offers fresh insights and approaches to the manner in which missionaries and crusaders reflexively engaged with the groups targeted by Christianization in terms of practice, ethics, and identity.

  • 306.
    Jezierski, Wojtek
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Spaces of Hospitality on the Missionary Baltic Rim, Tenth–Twelfth Centuries2022In: Baltic Hospitality from the Middle Ages to the Twentieth Century: Receiving Strangers in Northeastern Europe / [ed] Sari Nauman, Wojtek Jezierski, Christina Reimann, Leif Runefelt, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2022, p. 33-62Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter studies examples of confrontations between missionary guests and pagan host communities on the Baltic Rim from the late tenth to mid-twelfth centuries to uncover the spatial dynamics and intercultural articulations of hospitality in Christianization contexts. In terms of method, the chapter focuses on the functional, political, and symbolic mechanisms structuring collective production spaces of hospitality during such encounters. The addressed problems consider how spaces of hospitality were practically and discursively produced and negotiated through such meetings. It delves also into the ways arrival of this special type of Christian strangers and guests was contained in terms of power relations and security measures. And, finally, how these interactions involved and oscillated between hospitable and hostile attitudes. The results point out the deeply ambiguous, volatile, and heavily contested nature of spaces of hospitality in the Christianization of the Baltic Rim, both for missionary agents and for the host communities receiving/rejecting them.

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    Spaces of Hospitality on the Missionary Baltic Rim, Tenth–Twelfth Centuries
  • 307.
    Jezierski, Wojtek
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Verba volant, scripta manent: Limits of Speech, Power of Silence and Logic of Practice in some Monastic Conflicts of the High Middle Ages2011In: Understanding Monastic Practices of Oral Communication (Western Europe, tenth-thirteenth centuries) / [ed] Steven Vanderputten, Turnhout: Brepols , 2011, p. 19-44Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes three examples (St Gall, Fulda, Bury St Edmunds) of conflicts between abbots and their monks in the High Middle Ages. It explores the strategies and means of power , as well as the communicative and linguistic conditions underlying them, which monks used when they clashed with their abusive abbots. The article argues that in those delicate moments when the outside world was involved into the internal conflicts, the monks often resorted to oral and ritual communication rather than writing. Writing was public and therefore precarious while monks strived to control the message and the image the outside world had of them.

  • 308.
    Jezierski, Wojtek
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. University of Oslo, Norway.
    Nauman, Sari
    Lindkvist, Thomas
    Tjällén, Biörn
    Sweden, Inc.: Temporal Sovereignty of the Realm and People from the Middle Ages to Modernity2022In: Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 0036-5637, E-ISSN 2163-8195, Vol. 94, no 3, p. 352-381Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 309.
    Jezierski, Wojtek
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Nauman, Sari
    Reimann, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Runefelt, Leif
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Introduction: Baltic Hospitality, 1000–19002022In: Baltic Hospitality from the Middle Ages to the Twentieth Century: Receiving Strangers in Northeastern Europe / [ed] Sari Nauman, Wojtek Jezierski, Christina Reimann, Leif Runefelt, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2022Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introductory chapter presents the thematic, geographical, and chronological scope of the volume and explicates its guiding questions and conceptual framework. Our focus is on the Baltic Sea region, considered as a multi-layered space of intercultural encounter and conflict and its specific legacy of hospitality. In terms of guiding concepts for the empirical chapters, this introduction combines issues of host–guest relations with the problems of securitization. It is our contention that hospitality in Baltic migration contexts, from the turn of the first millennium until the twentieth century and beyond, triggered security issues both on the part of arriving strangers and receiving host communities. Why and how were multifarious categories of guests and strangers—migrants, war refugees, prisoners of war, merchants, missionaries, vagrants, vagabonds, etc.—portrayed as threats to local populations or as objects of their charity? Under what circumstances did hospitality turn into hostility? How was hospitality practiced and contained spatially? By focusing predominantly on coastal contexts as spaces for meetings and confrontations, we decouple the study of hospitality and migration from state-centered methodology. Instead, we offer a close-up view on hospitality dilemmas and practices of dealing with arriving guests and strangers, which we consider in transhistorical perspective. These conceptual themes and problems are fleshed out in the presentation of the individual chapters.

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    Introduction Baltic Hospitality
  • 310. Katajala-Peltomaa, Sari
    et al.
    Salonen, Kirsi
    Jensen, Kurt Villads
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    In the Name of Saints Peter and Paul: Popes, Conversion, and Sainthood in Western Christianity2016In: Church and Belief in the Middle Ages: Popes, Saints, and Crusaders / [ed] Kirsi Salonen, Sari Katajala-Peltomaa, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2016, p. 11-35Chapter in book (Refereed)
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    fulltext
  • 311.
    Kihlman, Erika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages, Department of Classical Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Commentaries on Verbum dei deo natum in Fourteenth- and Fifteenth-century Manuscripts2008In: Leaves from Paradise: The Cult of John the Evangelist at the Dominican Nunnery of Paradies bei Soest / [ed] Jeffrey F. Hamburger, Houghton Library of the Harvard College Library, Cambridge MA , 2008, p. 101-131Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 312.
    Kihlman, Erika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Kalendarier2022In: Kodex: Boken i medeltidens Sverige / [ed] Jonas Nordin, Lund: Mediehistoriskt arkiv , 2022, p. 254-261Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 313.
    Kihlman, Erika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages, Department of Classical Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    "Medieval Sequence Commentaries"2007In: The Journal of medieval Latin, Vol. 17, p. 110-124Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 314.
    Kihlman, Erika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages, Classical Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Medieval Sequence Commentaries: Traditions and Techniques2013In: Papers read at the 15th Meeting of the IMS Study Group Cantus planus : Dobogókő/Hungary, 2009, Aug. 23–29, 2 vols / [ed] B. Haggh-Huglo, D. Lacost, N. Bell, Lions Bay, BS, Canada: The Institute of Mediaeval Music , 2013, p. 343-359-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 315.
    Kihlman, Erika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages, Department of Classical Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    "Understanding a text. Presentation and edition of a sequence commentary in Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Auct. F. 6. 8"2009In: Sapientia et eloquentia: Meaning and Function in Liturgical Poetry, Music, Drama and Biblical Commentary in the Middle Ages / [ed] G. Iversen och N. Bell, Turnhout: Brepols , 2009, p. 381-455Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 316.
    Kihlman, Erika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages, Classical Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Searby, DenisStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages, Classical Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Ars edendi Lecture Series: Volume 12011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
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  • 317. Kjersgaard Nielsen, Torben
    et al.
    Jensen, Kurt Villads
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Introduction: Legacies of the Crusades2021In: Legacies of the Crusades: Proceedings of the Ninth Conference of the Society for the Study of the Crusades and the Latin East, Odense, 27 June – 1 July 2016, vol. 1 / [ed] Torben Kjersgaard Nielsen & Kurt Villads Jensen, Turnhout: Brepols, 2021, p. 13-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 318. Kjersgaard Nielsen, Torben
    et al.
    Jensen, Kurt VilladsStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Legacies of the Crusades: Proceedings of the Ninth Conference of the Society for the Study of the Crusades and the Latin East, Odense, 27 June - 1 July 2016. Volume 12021Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When war ended, the hard work began. Crusader warfare was only the beginning, for after peace came huge and often fundamental changes for individuals and societies. First it was necessary to establish firm and secure agreements between enemies, and take care of prisoners of war and refugees. Soon followed new legal systems, and new social groups emerged as old and new families intermarried, or entire segments of the population became subordinates under new rulers. And in a longer time perspective, the entire physical landscape was changed to conform to and express the beliefs and values of the conquerors.00The military expeditions of the medieval crusades are well studied, at different times and in many diverse areas, but the consequences for individuals and societies much less. This book opens up a new research area, and contributes with 11 studies covering the Middle Eastern crusader states, the Mediterranean, and the Baltic Sea.

  • 319.
    Knight, Gwendolyne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Jesse Keskiaho, Dreams and Visions in the Early Middle Ages2015In: Mirator, ISSN 1457-2362, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 351-355Article, book review (Other academic)
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  • 320.
    Knight, Gwendolyne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    "The Night is Dark and Full of Terrors": Darkness, Terror, and Perception in Anglo-Saxon England2019In: Darkness, Depression, and Descent in Anglo-Saxon England / [ed] Ruth Wehlau, Medieval Institute Publications, 2019, p. 37-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 321. Knutson, Sara Ann
    et al.
    Ellis, Caitlin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Durham University, UK.
    'Conversion' to Islam in Early Medieval Europe: Historical and Archaeological Perspectives on Arab and Northern Eurasian Interactions2021In: Religions, ISSN 2077-1444, E-ISSN 2077-1444, Vol. 12, no 7, article id 544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the influence of Muslims and Islam on developments in medieval Europe has captured the attention of scholars and the general public alike. Nevertheless, 'conversion' to Islam remains a challenging subject for historical research and demands more transdisciplinary collaborations. This article examines early medieval interactions between Muslim Arabs and Northern and Eastern Europeans as a case study for whether some individuals in Northern Eurasia 'converted' to Islam. More importantly, we address some key examples and lines of evidence that demonstrate why the process of 'conversion' to Islam is not more visible in the historical and archaeological records of Northern Eurasia. We find that, despite the well-established evidence for economic exchanges between the Islamic World and Northern Eurasia, the historical and material records are much more complex, but not entirely silent, on the issue of religious change. We also conclude that religious connectivity and exchanges, including with Islam, were common in early medieval Northern Eurasia, even if it is difficult in most cases to identify conclusive instances of 'conversion' to Islam.

  • 322.
    Lannebjer, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Medeltida runor och runliteracy: kulturell krock eller kompromiss?2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    During the 12th to the 16th century the Scandinavian region went through a cultural change, from Germanic to Latin culture. This change effected a wide variety of areas for example law, piety, clothing, religion and system of writing. It is the change in the system of writing this essay will examine i.e. the change from runes to the Latin alphabet. The medieval runic Europe (including the Nordic countries and the north Atlantic islands) has a great variety in their numbers of runic material but in total there is about 2800 of them. Most are from the Scandinavian countries Sweden and Norway. The runic alphabet and the Latin alphabet coexisted during the Nordic Middle ages but the Latin alphabet became dominant over time.The runic alphabet changed during the 11th and 12th centuries from 16 runes to 28 (as many letters as the Latin alphabet) and was in continues use during the whole time period. The question is why it survived for so long? How come the runic alphabet did not die out sooner given the introduction of the Latin alphabet and the influence from Latin countries (i.e. Western Europe)? Earlier research has largely focused on the Viking age carvings and has not problematized the change from an historical point of view or from a cultural perspective. This essays goal is to explain that change by categorizing the inscriptions according to their theme and content in order to identify runic usage as a cultural belonging, be it a passive or active choice. I will also discuss the literacy level (or to be precis the runeliteracy) of the Scandinavian countries. Who could read the runes and in what context where they used?

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  • 323.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Beyond Byzantium: Medieval Swedish herbalism and plant names2013In: Byzantine Gardens and Beyond / [ed] Helena Bodin, Ragnar Hedlund, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 2013, p. 184-209Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 324.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Diplom - det medeltida brevet2010In: Den medeltida skriftkulturen i Sverige: Genrer och texter / [ed] Inger Larsson, Rune Palm m fl, Stockholm: Runica et mediaevalia , 2010, p. 123-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 325.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Encyklopedisk litteratur2010In: Den medeltida skriftkulturen i Sverige: Genrer och texter / [ed] Inger Larsson, Rune Palm m fl, Stockholm: Runica et mediaevalia , 2010, p. 200-220Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 326.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Från byttgräs till älgört – svensk växtnamnsforskning i ett historiskt perspektiv2013In: Växter och växtnamn – ett möte mellan botanik och språkvetenskap: Föredrag från ett symposium i Stockholm och Uppsala 25-26 november 2010 / [ed] Lars-Erik Edlund, Inger Larsson, Staffan Nyström, Uppsala: Kungl. Gustav Adolfs Akademien för svensk folkkultur , 2013, p. 9-43Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 327.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Julia Sigurdson & Sune Zachrisson, Aplagårdar och klosterliljor: 800 år kring Vadstena klosters historia2013In: Bulletin för trädgårdshistorisk forskning, ISSN 1652-2362, E-ISSN 2001-1261, no 26, p. 38-39Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 328.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Kultur och trädgårdsväxternas historia: Under och på mark, i herbarier och arkiv2013In: Bulletin för trädgårdshistorisk forskning, ISSN 1652-2362, E-ISSN 2001-1261, no 26, p. 32-32Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 329.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Läsvärt: Norska klosterplanter2015In: Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-646X, Vol. 109, no 6, p. 348-348Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 330.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Medeltida kålgårdar i skriftliga belägg2014In: Källor till trädgårdsodlingens historia: fyra tvärvetenskapliga seminarier 2010–2013 arrangerade av Nordiskt nätverk för trädgårdens arkeologi och arkeobotanik (NTAA) / [ed] Anna Andréasson, Elisabeth Gräslund Berg, Jens Heimdahl, Anna Jakobsson, Inger Larsson, Erik Persson, Alnarp: Fakulteten för landskapsarkitektur, trädgårds- och växtproduktionsvetenskap, Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet , 2014, p. 75-87Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 331.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Millefolium, rölika, näsegräs: Medeltidens svenska växtvärld i lärd tradition. Vernacular Plant-names and Plants in Medieval Sweden2010 (ed. Andra reviderade och utökade upplagan)Book (Other academic)
  • 332.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Nordic Digraphia and Diglossia2013In: Spoken and Written Language : Relations between Latin and the Vernacular Languages in the Earlier Middle Ages / [ed] Mary Garrison, Arpad P. Orbán, Marco Mostert, Turnhout: Brepols, 2013, p. 73-85Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 333.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Några oväntade arkeobotaniska fynd2012In: Medeltida klostergrunder på Island – vegetation och flora, kultur- och relikväxter, samtida växtnamn: rapport från ett forskningsprojekt 2009–2011, Alnarp: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences , 2012, p. 76-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 334.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Producing, Using, and Keeping Records in Medieval Swedish Towns2014In: Writing and the Administration of Medieval Towns: Medieval Urban Literacy I / [ed] Marco Mostert, Anna Adamska, Turnhout: Brepols , 2014, p. 13-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 335.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Skriftliga källor och äldre isländska växtnamn2012In: Medeltida klostergrunder på Island – vegetation och flora, kultur- och relikväxter, samtida växtnamn: rapport från ett forskningsprojekt 2009–2011 / [ed] Inger Larsson, Per Arvid Åsen, Steinunn Kristjánsdottír, Kjell Lundquist, Alnarp: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences , 2012, p. 49-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 336.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Skriðuklaustur och Viðeyjarklaustur – spår av medeltida klosterträdgårdar?2012In: Medeltida klostergrunder på Island – vegetation och flora, kultur- och relikväxter, samtida växtnamn: rapport från ett forskningsprojekt 2009–2011 / [ed] Inger Larsson, Per Arvid Åsen, Steinunn Kristjánsdottír, Kjell Lundquist, Alnarp: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences , 2012, p. 81-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 337.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Syster Botilda i Vårfruberga kloster och broder Johan Petersson i Vadstena kloster: fakta eller fiktion?2014In: Källor till trädgårdsodlingens historia: Fyra tvärvetenskapliga seminarier 2010–2013 arrangerade av NordisktNätverk för Trädgårdens Arkeologi och Arkeobotanik (NTAA / [ed] Anna Andréasson, Elisabeth Gräslund Berg, Jens Heimdahl, Anna Jakobsson, Inger Larsson, Erik Persson, Alnarp: Fakulteten för landskapsarkitektur, trädgårds- och växtproduktionsvetenskap, Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet , 2014, p. 181-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 338.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The Role of the Swedish Lawman in the Spread of Lay Literacy2010In: Along the Oral-Written Continuum. Types of Texts, Relations and their Implications. / [ed] Slávica Rankovic, Turnhout: Brepols , 2010, p. 411-427Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 339.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Örta- och läkeböcker i den Bröndegaardska boksamlingen2010In: Nycklar till kunskap: Om människans bruk av naturen / [ed] Håkan Tunón och Anna Dahlström, Stockholm, Uppsala: CBM, KSLA , 2010, p. 137-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 340.
    Larsson, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Andersson, Roger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Kyrkans och klostrens texter : Inledning : Encyklopedisk litteratur2010In: Den medeltida skriftkulturen i Sverige: Genrer och texter / [ed] Inger Larsson, Rune Pal m fl, Stockholm: Runica et mediaevalia , 2010, p. 152-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 341.
    Larsson, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Palm, RuneStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Den medeltida skriftkulturen i Sverige: Genrer och texter2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 342.
    Larsson, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Åsen, Per Arvid
    Kristjánsdottír, Steinunn
    Lundquist, Kjell
    Medeltida klostergrunder på Island - vegetation och flora, kultur och reliktväxter, samtida växtnamn: rapport från ett forskningsprojekt 2009-20112012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Icelandic medieval monastic sites – vegetation and flora, cultural- and relict plants, contemporary plant-names The colonization of Iceland began in the late 9th century and in the year 1000 the Althing chose Christianity to replace paganism as the religion of the country. The bishopric of Skálholt was established in 1056 and Hólar in 1106. There are traces of twelve to fifteen monasteries, of which nine are recognized as having lasted for some time. Of these only Skriðuklaustur has been fully excavated, exhibiting a European building model. Viðeyjarklaustur and Kirkjubaejarklaustur have been partly excavated not revealing any specific monastic buildings as yet. Archaeobotanical investigations have only been undertaken on Viðey and at Skriðuklaustur. The exact localisation of the monastic buildings, or possible monastic cultivation. are only presumptions at all other places, as is the type of monastic building, whether traditional Icelandic farm type or continental monastery building type. The questions that this project seeks to answer are which cultivated plants on the whole, and garden plants in particular, were known and used in the medieval Icelandic monastic context, and whether it is possible to find medieval relict plants in connection with the Icelandic monastic sites. All monastic sites were surveyed for landscape and plants, and complete lists of the plants found are published in Bilaga 1. Medicinal, utility and ornamental plants, known in Iceland and abroad, have been recorded, but their status as true medieval monastic relict plants cannot be fully determined at this stage of research. The very special conditions in which a hitherto uninhabited island was colonized in some hundred years by people bringing and adapting their knowledge of farming, cultivating and using plants for both utility and pleasure led inevitably to a situation where common knowledge became integrated with the specific uses of plants and plant medicine in a monastic context. Many of the plants found today, such as Angelica, Alchemilla, Allium, Filipendula, Plantago or Sanguisorba have a medieval past as medicinal herbs. We cannot, however, establish for sure whether some of these plants’ properties were not common knowledge to the Icelanders of the Middle Ages but were specific monastic plants. The Icelandic monastic sites, as well as all Iceland, are today dominated by farming leaving little space for herbs to grow and survive. There are however traces of deliberate use and possibly cultivation of plants at Skriðuklaustur and Viðeyjarklaustur, although more archaeobotanical evidence from monastic sites is needed as well as an archeological search for traces of cultivation. This is required not only at these two sites but at all monastic sites in Iceland. Medieval plant-names tell us little since most of the medico-botanical literature are translations of the Dane Henrik Harpestræng’s works. The Icelandic laws, another source for plant-names, are heavily influenced by Norwegian law and therefore may only be used with caution for the documentation of Icelandic matters. Later historic plant-names, however, reveal many interesting details about the local use of some plants, although some of these names are loans from or translations of Scandinavian or German names and may not reveal anything about their local Icelandic use.

  • 343.
    Larsson, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Åsen, Per Arvid
    Kristjánsdóttir, Steinunn
    Lundquist, Kjell
    Medeltida klostergrunder på Island: vegetation och flora, kultur- och reliktväxter, samtida växtnamn - några tankar kring ett tvärvetenskapligt projekt2014In: Källor till trädgårdsodlingens historia: fyra tvärvetenskapliga seminarier 2010-2012 arrangerade av Nordiskt Nätverk för Trädgårdens Arkeologi och Arkeobotanik (NTAA) / [ed] Anna Andréasson, Elisabeth Gräslund Berg, Jens Heimdahl, Anna Jakobsson, Inger Larsson, Erik Persson, Alnarp: Fakulteten för landskapsarkitektur, trädgårds- och växtproduktionsvetenskap, Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet , 2014, p. 47-53Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 344.
    Moesgaard, Jens Christian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Ewing, Annica
    Hedlund, Ragnar
    Kilger, Christopher
    Jonsson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Lundberg, Linda
    Hårdh, Birgitta
    Ingvardson, Gitte
    Debatt: Ny försäljning av stulna mynt2023In: Svensk Numismatisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0283-071X, no 8, p. 188-188Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 345.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Bishops and Pastoral Obligations2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 346.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Bishops and Pastoral Obligations: Ælfric’s Pastoral Letters and Preaching in the 11th and 12th Centuries2018In: Dominus Episcopus: Medieval Bishops between Diocese and Court / [ed] Anthony John Lappin, Elena Balzamo, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2018, p. 53-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 347.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Correct Knowledge and the Aftermath of the Benedictine Reform in Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman England2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 348.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Hagiography, Historiography and the Patterns of Sanctity: The Saga of Edward the Confessor and its European Contexts2015In: Medieval Nordic literature in its European context / [ed] Else Mundal, Oslo: Dreyer Forlag A/S, 2015, p. 126-151Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 349.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Latin and Vernacular Homilies of Anglo-Saxon England: Preaching and Perceptions of Society2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The advances in the study of homiletic writing of Anglo-Saxon England in the past few decades have made it possible to situate many seemingly formulaic and conventional texts in their specific historical contexts, and to perceive in them certain participation in and commentary on the contemporary social and political situation. This pertains especially to homilies written in Old English – the long-term primary interest of Anglo-Saxon scholarship – which may at times seem to overshadow the coexistent Latin culture. This paper pays attention to this division and explores both Latin and vernacular homiletic writing from the perspective of preaching and social perception. It examines the features of Latin and Old English as languages of teaching, and then discusses Archbishop Wulfstan’s (ca. 950-1023) Latin sermons as a case study, especially those in one of his own ‘Commonplace Books’, Copenhagen Kongelige Bibliotek, Gl. Kgs. Sam. 1595. From the outset, the linguistic division appears to have many fundamental implications for both composition and delivery: the Latin sermons and homilies were for the most part meant to be used in the monastic office, whereas the vernacular ones are thought to have served the needs of lay preaching or private devotion. In terms of social perception, therefore, preaching on social order, vices and virtues, or rules and responsibilities would have found its audiences in different social categories, at least in theory. In practice, the boundaries between these categories were much more fluid, and the language of a text in itself does not always denote a certain audience. The act of preaching as a potentially infuential type of medium in circulating ideas and conceptions on social order makes the two corpora essential sources for studying social ideas, their implementation and authorization. Consequently, the paper contributes to the discussion of both oral and literary as well as the Latin and vernacular communication in the Middle Ages.

  • 350.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Law, Learning, and the Networks of Knowledge: Archbishop Wulfstan and the Worcester Manuscripts in Context2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The fundamental interconnections between homiletics, religious instruction, legislation and political theory are apparent in the works of Wulfstan, Bishop of London and Worcester and Archbishop of York (d. 1023). When assessing the impact of Wulfstan’s own background on his religious-political discourse, however, we are forced to rely mainly on conjectures. His life before the appointment to the see of London in 996 remains unknown, and he rarely mentions his sources or quotes them verbatim. Wulfstan’s position in the politics of the day was nonetheless important, and it is clear that his monastic education played a crucial role in it. This paper explores this interconnectedness of learning, teaching and political engagement, focusing on manuscripts that can be connected to Wulfstan himself, as well as those connected to the cathedral monastery of Worcester. The purpose of the paper is, firstly, to shed light on Wulfstan’s own educational background and networks, and thus to elucidate his choices in transferring knowledge of the ’holy society’ into the political and legal discourse. Secondly, the paper also emphasizes the role of Worcester itself, as a node of learning through which these notions were further circulated by means of lay education, pastoral care, and secular legislation.

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