Change search
Refine search result
45678 301 - 350 of 400
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 301.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    A worth of their own: on Gotland in the Baltic Sea, and its 12th-century coinage2010In: Medieval Archaeology, ISSN 0076-6097, E-ISSN 1745-817X, Vol. 54, p. 158-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In about AD 1140, the island of Gotland initiated what was to become one of the most influential coinages of the medieval Baltic Sea area. This was part of a strategy to meet the impact and pressure from the world outside in a period characterised by large-scale political and ideological changes. In this situation, old and new networks were important to maintain autonomy from those aiming for dominance over the island. The coins, with an independent weight standard and an iconography inspired by NW German and Frisian coins, were one way of attracting partners to the island’s main harbour, where its inhabitants could maintain control and trading peace.

    Coins incorporate in them the dimensions of object, text and picture. A historical archaeology of coins needs not only focus on large-scale perspectives and formal power, but must also give weight to the archaeological context, the life biography of the coins and the social negotiations behind their production and use. Thus intention and reality, symbolism and social practice may be studied to find openings to the stories behind the objects. The different dimensions of the coins together with historical sources give away plenty of information on several levels: about the networks, ideological framework, artisanship and changing loyalties of this time and area.

  • 302.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Botulf - helgon eller frifräsare?2010In: Gotländskt arkiv, ISSN 0434-2429, Vol. 82, p. 34-45Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Botulf – Saint or Free Mover? (summary)

    “For Botulf ”. A cryptic inscription on a series of Gotlandic coins from c. 1210 is discussed in this article in relation to different types of references to the name Botulf on Gotland. Gravestones, farmsteads, mural paintings, toll lists and numismatic evidence all provide clues as to what or whom the inscription may be alluding to. Was Botulf, the English saint, popular on Gotland to the point of having dedication coins minted in his honour? Or was Botulf, the Gotlandic tradesman, taking advantage of a temporary change of powers on the island to gain a reputation for himself? Enigmatic and fortified Västergarn on Gotland’s west coast, the German Bishop Albert’s Riga, and the Hanseatic Steelyard of London all play roles in the story of Botulf of Gotland.

  • 303.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Det gotländska myntet från Bårarp2008In: Nordisk numismatisk unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 1, p. 30-36Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    År 1932 gjordes ett mynt fynd i Bårarp, Halland, som kunde dateras till ca 1153-55 (mynt från Svend Grate) (Jensen 1983). Med utgångspunkt från detta fynd kunde en serie gotländska 1100-talsmynt 25 år senare tidfästas vilket blev en viktig hållpunkt i arbetet med den gotlåndksa myntningen.

  • 304.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    PAX PORTA NY: Gotländsk uttolkning av ett fridskoncept2009In: Samlad Glädje II: Numismatiska Klubben i Uppsala 40 år / [ed] Ekström, Curt & Holmberg, Kjell, Uppsala: Numismatiska klubben i Uppsala , 2009, p. 149-154Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In about 1140 AD, the island of Gotland, off the Swedish coast, initiated what was to become one of the most influential coinages of the medieval Baltic Sea Area. One of the types minted was inscribed PAX PORTA NY. The paper argues that these coins were part of a strategy adopted by the Gotlanders in the 1160s, to proclaim peace in the town of Visby and to direct their international partners to where control and trading peace could be maintained. The different dimensions of the coins (object, text and picture) give away plenty of information on several levels when combined with historical sources, and tell us about the networks, ideological framework, artisanship, and changing loyalties of this time and area.

  • 305.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Shared values: Creative links and hybridity in an Anglo-Scandinavian techno-web2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In present-day Denmark, Norway and Sweden a coinage was initiated about AD 995, which imitated contemporary Anglo-Saxon coins. For more than 30 years the English and Scandinavian coinages were closely connected. Individuals (commissioners, moneyers, artisans) as well as objects (e.g. coin-dies) moved between the mints. Coinage is often perceived of as expressing sovereign rights in a certain area. Instead, the Anglo-Scandinavian coinage network was not limited by realms and borders, but cut across kingdoms from west (England) to east (Byzantium) through Scandinavia and the Southern Baltic. Despite the ongoing “state-formation processes” and competition between the areas, values like artisans and dies were shared within the network.

    The material underlines how “social” technology is; dependent on choices, cooperative skills, talent, capital, etc. The coin images, inscriptions and links offer unique openings for a situated study of a process of change in the past, of different levels and actors in the network, of patterns of movement, and of ideological and historical contexts. Imitations are often depreciated out from our contemporary notions of authenticity. Here, the creative and hybrid character of the material is instead underlined, opening up for a deeper understanding of the wider connotations and meanings of the objects.

  • 306.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The colour of money: crusaders and coins in the thirteenth-century Baltic Sea 2010In: Making sense of things: archaeologies of sensory perception / [ed] Fredrik Fahlander & Anna Kjellström, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies , 2010, 1, p. 83-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how colour was perceived differently in the European Middle Ages and carried significance beyond what we ascribe it today. It also considers how the various colours worked as important carriers of values and concepts in this context, where pigments were rare and expensive.

    A way to access the medieval understanding of colour is through heraldry and its colours, the tinctures, which combine hard and soft materials, even and three-dimensional surfaces, in a way that evades present-day definitions of colour. Medieval people used their senses in a cross-modal way to perceive colour and connect it to an intricate world of symbolism and values. To them, it is argued, colour was a texture just as much as a hue.

    The aim of the paper is to investigate this relationship between colour, ideas and materiality, filtered through the senses, and made manifest in a group of thirteenth-century Scandinavian coins. Were coins actually perceived as coloured?

  • 307.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Kemmers, Fleur
    JW Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main.
    Re-thinking numismatics: The archaeology of coins2011In: Archaeological Dialogues, ISSN 1380-2038, E-ISSN 1478-2294, no 2, p. 87-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper sets out to re-member coins into archaeological discourse. It is argued that coins, as part of material culture, need to be examined within the theoretical framework of historical archaeology and material-culture studies. Through several case studies we demonstrate how coins, through their integration of text, image and existence as material objects, offer profound insights not only into matters of economy and the ‘big history’ of issuers and state organization but also into ‘small histories’, cultural values and the agency of humans and objects. In the formative period of archaeology in the 19th century the study of coins played an important role in the development of new methods and concepts. Today, numismatics is viewed as a field apart. The mutual benefits of our approach to the fields of archaeology and numismatics highlight the need for a new and constructive dialogue between the disciplines.

  • 308.
    Nielsen, Camilla Paulsson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Skeppslagens runstenar: Vaxholms och Österåkers minnesstenar2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Despite being in a geographical area abundant of rune stones, there are few found in the Stockholm archipelago. This paper explores these stones and why this is by examining the preserved rune stones in two archipelago municipals; Vaxholm and Österåker, their locations and who placed the stones there.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 309.
    Nilsson, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Hijacked by the Bronze Age discourse? A discussion of rock art and ownership2015In: Own and be owned: Archaeological approaches to the concept of possessions / [ed] Alison Klevnäs, Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University , 2015, p. 109-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Hijacked by the Bronze Age discourse?
  • 310.
    Nilsson, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Sörman, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    En gjutform av täljsten från den yngre bronsåldern - spår av bronshantverk vid Rambodal i Norrköping: [A Late Bronze Age soapstone mould - traces of bronze casting from Rambodal in Norrköping]2015In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 110, no 2, p. 84-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The excavation of a Late Bronze Age settlement at Rambodal, just outside the city of Norrköping, has provided interesting evidence for Bronze Age metalworking, including the third Bronze Age stone casting mould found to date in the county of Östergötland. The settlement consisted of a single farm with dates from Per. V of the Bronze Age to the earliest Iron Age. In addition to high-quality ceramics, the settlement yielded several traces of bronze casting, such as a copper melt and part of a soapstone mould for a small socketed axe, probably dating to Per. VI. Soapstone moulds are rarely found at settlement sites. The find provides interesting data for discussions of the molds’ use contexts. The evidence for small-scale household metalworking at a minor farmstead like Rambodal holds significant potential for future research on the spread and organisation of this craft.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 311.
    Nilsson, Siri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Vraken i Narvik: Objektbiorafiska studier om vraken i Narvik efter slaget 19402022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study has examined a selection of the wrecks of Narvik, which comes from the battle of Narvik in april 1940. The essay introduces every ship that was involved in the battle of Narvik in a chart, and the wreck which is still in Narvik on a map over Ofotfjorden. Ofotfjorden is the fjord where Narvik is located. The chart shows which country the ships comes from, what kind of ship and when it was built. Then the study used an object biography to study the life stories of P/S Norge, S/S Rauenfels, Wilhelm Heidkamp and Anton Schmitt.

    The result shows that the ships had been used in different ways before the battle of Narvik, both for war, transportation and escorting, and then met the same fate. The result also tells about the interest in the wrecks and discusses how marine archealogy can be used to use the source material to get more knowledge about the ships that were involved in the dramatic battle in april 1940.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 312.
    Nordahl, Ebba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Tune i Buttle och gotländska tunegårdar från mellersta järnåldern2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the connection between the size of the stone house foundations and their distribution in parishes with evidence of place names connected to the roman iron age phenomena Tuna farms on the island of Gotland. This is done using diagrams and tables of length – width variables and landscape and prehistoric remains analysis together with place name discussions in each parish.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 313.
    Noterman, Astrid A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    In Search of an Acceptable Past: History, Archaeology, and ‘Looted’ Graves in the Construction of the Frankish Early Middle Ages2022In: Interdisciplinary Explorations of Postmortem Interaction: Dead Bodies, Funerary Objects, and Burial Spaces Through Texts and Time / [ed] Estella Weiss-Krejci; Sebastian Becker; Philip Schwyzer, Springer, 2022, p. 133-166Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Early Middle Ages have provided material for imagining selves and groups in a wide range of contexts since the earliest beginnings of the historical and archaeological disciplines. Considerable recent research has shown how modern political conflicts and regional-national identities have crystallized in this period in particular. This essay traces ways in which early medieval remains, mainly from the richly furnished cemeteries, have been brought into play in developing scholarly and popular accounts of the history of France. During the second half of the nineteenth century, the recovery of considerable numbers of finely worked grave goods from the large rural cemeteries provided material for studying and reevaluating Merovingian-period societies, previously only glimpsed in written sources and largely out-competed as national ancestors by the popular appeal of Gaulish warriors. Yet paradoxically, another form of discovery in the same burial grounds seemed to place them back in the Dark Ages: many graves were found to have been ransacked and robbed soon after burial, making the communities of the time appear lawless and barbarous. Archaeological attitudes towards excavated early medieval graves, and in particular the many thousands of graves already reopened in antiquity, not only highlight key aspects of the development of the discipline, but also reveal ways in which the remains of the dead may be integral to processes of national identity construction.

  • 314.
    Noterman, Astrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Aspöck, Edeltraud
    La perturbation des sépulturesmérovingiennes est-elle « élémentaire »en archéologie ? Nouveaux regards surles réouvertures de tombes au hautMoyen Âge en Europe2021In: Archéologie médiévale, ISSN 2608-4228, Vol. 51, p. 69-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is the Disturbance of Merovingian Burials ‘Elementary’ in Archaeology? New Views on the Reopening of Tombs in theEarly Middle Ages in Europe. The reopening of Merovingian burials with the removal of objects is a practice well known to archaeologistsand historians. Recent studies highlight the extent of this phenomenon across a Europe with rich and varied funerary practices.It began during the 6th century, particularly in its second half, and reached its peak during the 7th century. The concerned sites belongto the Reihengräberfelder horizon (row grave necropolises) and are characterised by the use of clothed inhumations and the burialdeposits. They spread over a large part of Europe, from the south-east of England to Romania. The removal of objects is selective andanswers to considerations that cannot be systematically linked to a search for beautiful objects motivated by greed. The chronologyof intervention is similar between sites with ancient reopenings, contemporary with the use periods of the cemeteries. Archaeothanatologicalstudy shows that disruption typically occurs after the decomposition of the bodies, but before the complete disappearanceof the container and the obstruction of the burial. Considered for a long time as transgressive acts, reopenings appear today more as acomplex community practice, weaving a close link between the world of the living and that of the dead.

  • 315.
    Nyberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    A Peaceful Sleep and Heavenly Celebration for the Pure and Innocent: The Sensory Experience of Death during the Long Eighteenth Century2010In: Making Sense of Things: Archaeologies of Sensory Perception / [ed] Fahlander, Fredrik & Kjellström, Anna, Stockholm: Stockholm University , 2010, p. 15-33Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 316.
    Odbratt, Ivan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    “When you see me, weep”: The archaeology of the hunger stones of Europe.2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates the phenomenon of hunger stones and their resurgence due to climate change-induced droughts, shedding light on their evolving societal significance. The initial focus lies on understanding the origins of the term and exploring how humanity has historically adapted to and remembered climatic transformations. A noteworthy aspect of this research revolves around the role of various objects worldwide serving as mnemonic devices, alongside a consideration of distinct cultural perceptions of time. Special emphasis is given to hunger stones that gained broad attention through social and traditional media in August 2022, owing to the droughts and their ominous inscriptions. It is posited that these stones likely served as hydrological markers or epigraphical reminders during periods of low water levels.

    The thesis delves into the approximately 900-year-old history of these stones in Europe, examining a range of hunger stones, beginning with the most renowned one located in Děčín, northern Czechia. Comparisons are made to other hydrological markers from around the globe, including Egypt's Nilometers and the intriguing White Crane Ridge in China. Furthermore, contemporary climate change is discussed, and the research explores potential parallels with past climatic conditions, concentrating on rivers as both physical and societal artefacts. In examining the relationship between humans and their environment, the thesis evaluates the effects of this relationship on human food systems, highlighting how the quest for food security has frequently led to the demise of cultures and species. A significant part of this research is devoted to examining memory, transitioning from tangible memory to social memory, and exploring the evolution of landscapes due to religious and other cultural developments.The concluding part of the thesis provides an analysis of how humans have dealt with food scarcity and their attempts to relay these struggles to future generations. It posits that the hunger stones serve as custodians of memory, maintaining relevance despite shifting interpretations over time.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 317.
    Oehrl, Sigmund
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Re-Interpretations of Gotlandic Picture Stones Based on the Reflectance Transformation Imaging Method (RTI): Some Examples2019In: Myth, Materiality and Lived Religion: In Merovingian and Viking Scandinavia / [ed] Klas Wikström af Edholm, Peter Jackson Rova, Andreas Nordberg, Olof Sundqvist, Torun Zachrisson, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2019, p. 141-185Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 318.
    Ohlsson, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Att mura in det förflutna i Herrens hus: Återbruk av runstenar och tidigkristna gravmonument i medeltida kyrkobyggnader i Östergötland2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the medieval re-use of early Christian grave monuments and runestones in church buildings in the Swedish region of Östergötland is analysed in relation to contemporary church imagery and practices. Analysis of the practice show differences in application, especially during the early parts of the medieval period, which suggests differences in meaning. Although no single reason can explain the practice, the re-use of the monuments during the early medieval period is, in several cases, understood as different ways for the local elite to increase their social standing and for the Church to legitimise their new role as centre for social gatherings. During the later parts of the period the practice seems to be more standardised and may have become a local variation of the Church´s broader practice to re-use spolia. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 319.
    Ohlsson, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Varför ligger du i rännan?: Fallstudier av tidigmedeltida bengömmor i kantrännor till gravhögar från yngre järnålder i Dalarna2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Early medieval burials in ditches surrounding grave mounds from the Vendel Period and Viking Age are analyzed through three case studies from Dalarna in Sweden. The historical context during the late Iron Age and early Medieval Period is discussed to create an understanding of these graves. By making use of the theories constructed by Catherine Bell about ritualization as a strategic mode of practice to produce relationships of power, the early medieval graves are interpreted as an archaistic social strategy to justify the farm as the superior social unit during a time of change in Dalarna.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Varför ligger du i rännan?
  • 320. Ojala, Karin
    et al.
    Sörman, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Medelhavsbrons i Närke: Hasslefyndet kastar ljus över kontaktvägar, metallanvändning och offerskick under bronsålderns slutskede2020In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 28-34Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 321. Olsen, Björnar
    et al.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    DeSilvey, Caitlin
    Pétursdóttir, Thora
    After Discourse: An Introduction2020In: After Discourse: Things, Affects, Ethics / [ed] Björnar Olsen; Mats Burström; Caitlin DeSilvey; Thora Pétursdóttir, Abingdon: Routledge, 2020, p. 1-17Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After Discourse is an interdisciplinary response to the recent trend away from linguistic and textual approaches and towards things and their affects.

    The new millennium brought about serious changes to the intellectual landscape.Favoured approaches associated with the linguistic and the textual lost some oftheir currency, and were followed by a new curiosity and concern for things andtheir natures. Gathering contributions from archaeology, heritage studies, history,geography, literature, and philosophy, After Discourse offers a range of reflections on what things are, how we become affected by them, and the ethical concernsthey give rise to. Through a varied constellation of case studies, it explores ways of dealing with matters which fall outside, become othered from, or simply cannot begrasped through perspectives derived solely from language and discourse.

    After Discourse provides challenging new perspectives for scholars and studentsinterested in other-than-textual encounters between people and the objects withwhich we share the world. 

  • 322.
    Palmqvist, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Det tidigkristna gravskicket: Återkommande avvikelser och gemensamma drag2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis analyses inhumations in Late Viking Age and Early Middle Ages in Sweden and brings recognition to a material previously not delt with in a comprehensive study. The graves of the first Christians have long interested scholars. Some general characteristics are generally agreed upon, such as inhumations withan east-west orientation of the dead and fewer grave goods in relation to earlier periods. Some deviant materials are also found in the graves but have not been thoroughly analyzed. This thesis deals with this recurrent deviant material, arguing that it is an essential part of Conversion Era graves in southern Scandinavia. Furthermore, this recurrent deviant material is key for our understanding of the burial tradition during the Late Viking Age and Early Middle Ages. Parallels in both France and Britain put the material in perspective.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 323.
    Palmqvist, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Domarringarnas placering i landskapet: En studie av nordligaste Smålands järnåldersbygd2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this essay I analyze the stone circles known as domarringar in northern Småland. In order to understand the stone circles, one must understand the society that built them, I argue. Therefore I first date them so I can put them in a context. After dating them to late Roman Iron Age and Migration period, I discuss hill forts, gold bracteates and rotary querns as a starting point for understanding the society and ideology that built the stone circles. I argue that the stone circles are a product of the midgård-ideology and that they have to be understood in that light. The stone circles are always found close to a road and often relatively high in the landscape. They manifest boundaries in the landscape.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 324.
    Pantzar, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Hällbilder i Norrköping & Enköping: En jämförande studie av fotsulans betydelse under bronsåldern2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 325.
    Petré, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gravfältet Raä 13 Söderby, Lovö SN, Uppland: Ett gravfält med två familjer från yngre järnålder. Rapport, analys, tolkning.1999Book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 326.
    Qviström, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Demonen som inte kunde gå runt hörn: Fönster och fönsterlösa norrsidor i kyrkor på Gotland2019In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 189-191Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 327.
    Qviström, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Lysande frånvaro - om senmedeltida lampor2019In: Meta H: historiskarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 2002-0406, p. 163-178Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On the absence of late medieval lamps in Sweden. From a handful of written documents, we know that lamps were used in churches, and probably in castles, in late medieval Sweden. But the texts do not tell us what kinds of lamps were used, or if they were employed in other contexts. The relative lack of relevant archaeological finds from this period is discussed in this article, together with the forms of lamps and fuels that may have existed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 328.
    Rahm, Annabell
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Jordbruk och järnproduktion i Jämtland: Två näringar i södra Storsjöbygden under folkvandringstid2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay is about two areas called Hackås and Myrviken, situated in the middle of Sweden around the lake Storsjön. In Hackås we can see traces after an early agrarian settlement, and in Myrviken we find Jämtlands largest concentration of ironmaking sites from around 400 AD. There are no clear evidence of the agrarian settlement in Myrviken, and only two ironmaking sites in Hackås. These two economies functioned at the same time, but were clearly separated. My purpose is to discuss if it was the farmers of Hackås who made iron in Myrviken, or if it was somebody else.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Jordbruk och järnproduktion i Jämtland - två näringar i södra Storsjöbygden under folkvandringstid
  • 329. Riede, Felix
    et al.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Anthropology, weather and climate change2016In: The European Archaeologist, ISSN 1022-0135, Vol. 49, p. 24-27Article in journal (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 330.
    Röst, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ljunge, MagnusStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    I skuggan av solen: Nya perspektiv på bronsåldersarkeologier och bronsålderns arkeologiska källmaterial2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 331. Saag, Lehti
    et al.
    Laneman, Margot
    Varul, Liivi
    Malve, Martin
    Valk, Heiki
    Razzak, Maria A.
    Shirobokov, Ivan G.
    Khartanovich, Valeri I.
    Mikhaylova, Elena R.
    Kushniarevich, Alena
    Scheib, Christiana Lyn
    Solnik, Anu
    Reisberg, Tuuli
    Parik, Juri
    Saag, Lauri
    Metspalu, Ene
    Rootsi, Siiri
    Montinaro, Francesco
    Remm, Maido
    Magi, Reedik
    D'Atanasio, Eugenia
    Crema, Enrico Ryunosuke
    Diez-del-Molino, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Thomas, Mark G.
    Kriiska, Aivar
    Kivisild, Toomas
    Villems, Richard
    Lang, Valter
    Metspalu, Mait
    Tambets, Kristiina
    The Arrival of Siberian Ancestry Connecting the Eastern Baltic to Uralic Speakers further East2019In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 1701-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we compare the genetic ancestry of individuals from two as yet genetically unstudied cultural traditions in Estonia in the context of available modern and ancient datasets: 15 from the Late Bronze Age stone-cist graves (1200-400 BC) (EstBA) and 6 from the Pre-Roman Iron Age tarand cemeteries (800/500 BC-50 AD) (EstIA). We also included 5 Pre-Roman to Roman Iron Age Ingrian (500 BC450 AD) (IngIA) and 7 Middle Age Estonian (1200-1600 AD) (EstMA) individuals to build a dataset for studying the demographic history of the northern parts of the Eastern Baltic from the earliest layer of Mesolithic to modern times. Our findings are consistent with EstBA receiving gene flow from regions with strong Western hunter-gatherer (WHG) affinities and EstIA from populations related to modern Siberians. The latter inference is in accordance with Y chromosome (chrY) distributions in present day populations of the Eastern Baltic, as well as patterns of autosomal variation in the majority of the westernmost Uralic speakers [1-5]. This ancestry reached the coasts of the Baltic Sea no later than the mid-first millennium BC; i.e., in the same time window as the diversification of west Uralic (Finnic) languages [6]. Furthermore, phenotypic traits often associated with modern Northern Europeans, like light eyes, hair, and skin, as well as lactose tolerance, can be traced back to the Bronze Age in the Eastern Baltic.

  • 332.
    Sandberg, Nina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Offerträdet.: Spår av offer, blot och kult under vikingatiden på Frösön, Jämtland.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 333. Schjødt, Jens Peter
    et al.
    Lindow, JohnAndrén, AndersStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    The Pre-Chistian Religions of the North. History and Structures: Volume 1. Basic Premises and Consderation of Sources2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The product of an international interdisciplinary team, the History and Structures strand of the Pre-Christian Religion of the North series aims to approach the subject by giving equal weight to archaeological and textual sources, taking into consideration recent theories on religion within all the disciplines that are needed in order to gain a comprehensive view of the religious history and world view of pre-Christian Scandinavia from the perspective of the beginning of the twenty-first century. Volume I presents the basic premises of the study and a consideration of the sources: memory and oral tradition, written sources, religious vocabulary, place names and personal names, archaeology, and images. Volume II treats the social, geographical, and historical contexts in which the religion was practiced and through which it can be understood. This volume also includes communication between worlds, primarily through various ritual structures. Volume III explores conceptual frameworks: the cosmos and collective supernatural beings (notions regarding the cosmos and regarding such collective supernatural beings as the norns, valkyries, giants, and dwarfs) and also gods and goddesses (including Þórr, Óðinn, Freyr, Freyja, and many others). Volume IV describes the process of Christianization in the Nordic region and also includes a bibliography and indices for the entire four-volume work.

  • 334. Schjødt, Jens Peter
    et al.
    Lindow, JohnAndrén, AndersStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    The Pre-Christian Religions of the North. History and Structures: Volume II. Social, Geographical, and Historical Contexts, and Communication between Worlds2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The product of an international interdisciplinary team, the History and Structures strand of the Pre-Christian Religion of the North series aims to approach the subject by giving equal weight to archaeological and textual sources, taking into consideration recent theories on religion within all the disciplines that are needed in order to gain a comprehensive view of the religious history and world view of pre-Christian Scandinavia from the perspective of the beginning of the twenty-first century. Volume I presents the basic premises of the study and a consideration of the sources: memory and oral tradition, written sources, religious vocabulary, place names and personal names, archaeology, and images. Volume II treats the social, geographical, and historical contexts in which the religion was practiced and through which it can be understood. This volume also includes communication between worlds, primarily through various ritual structures. Volume III explores conceptual frameworks: the cosmos and collective supernatural beings (notions regarding the cosmos and regarding such collective supernatural beings as the norns, valkyries, giants, and dwarfs) and also gods and goddesses (including Þórr, Óðinn, Freyr, Freyja, and many others). Volume IV describes the process of Christianization in the Nordic region and also includes a bibliography and indices for the entire four-volume work.

  • 335. Schjødt, Jens Peter
    et al.
    Lindow, JohnAndrén, AndersStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    The Pre-Christian Religions of the North. History and Structures: Volume III. Conceptual Framworks. The Cosmos and Collective Supernatural Beings2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The product of an international interdisciplinary team, the History and Structures strand of the Pre-Christian Religion of the North series aims to approach the subject by giving equal weight to archaeological and textual sources, taking into consideration recent theories on religion within all the disciplines that are needed in order to gain a comprehensive view of the religious history and world view of pre-Christian Scandinavia from the perspective of the beginning of the twenty-first century. Volume I presents the basic premises of the study and a consideration of the sources: memory and oral tradition, written sources, religious vocabulary, place names and personal names, archaeology, and images. Volume II treats the social, geographical, and historical contexts in which the religion was practiced and through which it can be understood. This volume also includes communication between worlds, primarily through various ritual structures. Volume III explores conceptual frameworks: the cosmos and collective supernatural beings (notions regarding the cosmos and regarding such collective supernatural beings as the norns, valkyries, giants, and dwarfs) and also gods and goddesses (including Þórr, Óðinn, Freyr, Freyja, and many others). Volume IV describes the process of Christianization in the Nordic region and also includes a bibliography and indices for the entire four-volume work.

  • 336.
    Schjødt, Jens Peter
    et al.
    Aarhus universitet.
    Lindow, JohnUniversity of California, Berkeley.Andrén, AndersStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    The Pre-Christian Religions of the North. History and Structures: Volume IV. The Christianization Process2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The product of an international interdisciplinary team, the History and Structures strand of the Pre-Christian Religion of the North series aims to approach the subject by giving equal weight to archaeological and textual sources, taking into consideration recent theories on religion within all the disciplines that are needed in order to gain a comprehensive view of the religious history and world view of pre-Christian Scandinavia from the perspective of the beginning of the twenty-first century. Volume I presents the basic premises of the study and a consideration of the sources: memory and oral tradition, written sources, religious vocabulary, place names and personal names, archaeology, and images. Volume II treats the social, geographical, and historical contexts in which the religion was practiced and through which it can be understood. This volume also includes communication between worlds, primarily through various ritual structures. Volume III explores conceptual frameworks: the cosmos and collective supernatural beings (notions regarding the cosmos and regarding such collective supernatural beings as the norns, valkyries, giants, and dwarfs) and also gods and goddesses (including Þórr, Óðinn, Freyr, Freyja, and many others). Volume IV describes the process of Christianization in the Nordic region and also includes a bibliography and indices for the entire four-volume work.

  • 337.
    Schultzén, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    I Europas utmark: Sigtunas handelsvägar och kulturkontakter i äldsta medeltid2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the eastern silver crisisin the mid 10th century on the cultural connections and trade routes of the Late VikingAge Sveonic realm. By studying status symbols, such as weapons, glassand the decorative parts of the male and female dress, I expected to find that eastern influencesdeclined in favour of more western elements. This proved to beproblematic. The material indicates a continued strong cultural exchange between the Sveonic realmand theSlavic regions, even though trade clearly shifted westward. My explanation for this is thateven though, and perhaps because of, king and church favoured a shift towards west, the demand for western goods other than silverremained low during the late 10th and 11th century.In addition to this,even though the direction of trade shifted, it was still largely conducted within the Slavic cultural sphere. There is also very little indicating the presence of foreign merchantsother than Slavicand probablyFrisianin early Sigtuna. My explanation for this is that the Sveonsmainly went overseasto sell their merchandise, and that they were forced to do so since Sigtuna,as opposed to Birka, could offer no unique goods which wouldattract foreign merchants.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 338.
    Smith, Martina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Källor om källor: En studie av källkult i Uppland från järnålder till modern tid2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay researches cultural behaviour and rites surrounding wells in Uppland County, Sweden. The wells examined in this paper are mainly medieval with a few exceptions from Scandinavian Iron age (550 BC – 1050 AD). The material is compared with other forms of ritual activities surrounding water from the same area, as well as excerpts from the Poetic Edda. The purpose of this study was to find patterns of ritual behaviour surrounding the wells and argues for a ritual use spanning a longer time period than what previously has been assumed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 339.
    Solfeldt, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ett mesolitiskt gränsland: En GIS-baserad studie av Närkes kolonisationsprocess2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to understand the colonization process of the county Närke in relation to the surrounding archaeologically defined areas western Sweden and eastern central Sweden. By using a comparative analysis and a landscape analysis in combination with a theoretical framework that advocates for colonization as a process and not an event, I argue that Närke was colonized from within eastern central Sweden around 8 500 BC, based on the use of local raw material quartz. Further, I argue for the importance of the sea to the mesolithic people in the area around 7 500–4 500 BC as more than just an economic resource. Around 4 500 BC contact with groups in western Sweden increased which in time brought the idea of farming to the area. The late mesolithic sites in Närke show continuity into the early neolithic age, rejecting the idea of a Funnelbeaker migration in the area. 

  • 340.
    Spangen, Marte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    "It could be one thing or another" - on the construction of an archaeological category2013In: Fennoscandia Archaeologica, ISSN 0781-7126, Vol. XXX, p. 67-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the history of the archaeological category Sámi circular offering sites, which refers to certain dry wall structures in Finnmark and Troms in northern Norway. In recent years the term has been used more frequently outside this geographical area too, at times to refer to structures vastly different from those originally labelled as circular offering sites. Such interpretations may be questioned, but perhaps it is the category itself that needs to be re-evaluated; a study ofthe research history suggests that the term is a result of a mid-19th century hypothesis that was established due to a lack of other plausible explanations rather than based on indicative finds or on local traditions. This interpretation has later been adopted by key researchers and has never really been challenged by any alternative hypothesis. This article proposes that the stone structures in question could represent other cultural phenomena, and that this needs further investigation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    "It could be one thing or another"
  • 341.
    Spangen, Marte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Kerstin Eidlitz Kuoljok, Den samiska sitan och vinterbyarna. En utmaning. Institutionen for kulturantropologioch etnologi, Uppsala universitet 2011.105 s. ISBN 978-91-506-2181-5.2015In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, no 2, p. 141-144Article, book review (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Eidlitz Kuoljok, Den samiska sitan och vinterbyarna
  • 342.
    Spangen, Marte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Without a trace? The Sámi in the Swedish History Museum2015In: Nordisk Museologi, ISSN 1103-8152, no 2, p. 17-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Around 2005, the Swedish History Museum (SHM) in Stockholm reworked their Vikings exhibition, aiming to question simplistic and erroneous understandings of past group identities. In the process, all references to the Sámi were removed from the exhibition texts. This decision has been criticised by experts on Sámi pasts. In this article, it is argued that we can talk about a Sámi ethnic identity from the Early Iron Age onwards. The removal of references to the Sámi in the exhibition texts is discussed accordingly, as well as the implicit misrepresentations, stereotypes and majority attitudes that are conveyed through spatial distribution, choice of illustrations, lighting, colour schemes and the exhibition texts. Finally, some socio-political reasons for the avoidance of Sámi issues in Sweden are suggested, including an enduring colonialist relation to this minority.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Without a trace
  • 343.
    Spangen, Marte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Salmi, Anna-KaisaÄikäs, Tiina
    Arctic Anthropology2015Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While researchers within Sámi archaeology have dealt with issues closely related to postcolonial theory and critique since the 1970s onwards, this has rarely been done with explicit mention or coherent use of this theoretical complex. This somewhat paradoxical situation was addressed in a session at the 14th conference of the Nordic Theoretical Archaeology Group at Stockholm University in April 2014, an initiative that eventually resulted in the present collection of articles. In this introduction we briefly present the historiographical and discursive background for the debates that are outlined in the following contributions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Spangen et al. 2015 (guest eds) Arctic Anthropology 52-2 TOC and Front Matter
  • 344.
    Spangen, Marte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Salmi, Anna-Kaisa
    Äikäs, Tiina
    Sámi Archaeology and Postcolonial Theory - An Introduction2015In: Arctic Anthropology, ISSN 0066-6939, E-ISSN 1933-8139, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While researchers within Sámi archaeology have dealt with issues closely related to postcolonial theory and critique since the 1970s onwards, this has rarely been done with explicit mention or coherent use of this theoretical complex. This somewhat paradoxical situation was addressed in a session at the 14th conference of the Nordic Theoretical Archaeology Group at Stockholm University in April 2014, an initiative that eventually resulted in the present collection of articles. In this introduction we briefly present the historiographical and discursive background for the debates that are outlined in the following contributions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 345.
    Sörman, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    A place for crafting? Late Bronze Age metalworking in southern Scandinavia and the issue of workshops2017In: Artisans versus nobility? Multiple identities of elites and 'commoners' viewed though the lens of crafting from the Chalcolithic to the Iron Ages in Europe and the Mediterranean / [ed] Ann Brysbaert, Alexis Gorgues, Leiden: Sidestone Press, 2017, p. 53-78Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Workshops’ and ‘workshop production’ are central to archaeological understanding of metalworking in Bronze Age societies. In this article the concept of workshops is used as a starting point to review preconceptions about the social and spatial organisation of bronze crafting, focusing particularly on how it influences expectations of crafting evidence in the archaeological record. It argues that assumptions of a permanent, customised crafting place hosting the full manufacturing process, as often implied by the term ‘workshop’, are unsuitable for understanding the nature of bronze crafting in southern Scandinavia during the Late Bronze Age. Instead, drawing on evidence from south-eastern Sweden, the craft is characterised as flexible, embedded, and multi-locational. Furthermore, differences in crafting loci between ornaments and weapons are suggested to relate to the initiations of their intended bearers and to demonstrate the heterogeneous organisation of prestige goods production. Such user-oriented production provides an interesting example of the organisation of elite-motivated crafting outside the context of centralised states.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 346.
    Sörman, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Anna Röst: Fragmenterade platser, ting och människor: Stenkonstruktioner och depositioner på två gravfältslokaler i Södermanland, ca 1000–300 f.Kr.: [Fragmented Places, Things and People: Stone Constructions and Depositions in two Burial Grounds in Södermanland, c.1000–300 BC]2018In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 247-253Article, book review (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 347.
    Sörman, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Casting in the Longhouse: The Organization of Metalworking in Late Bronze Age Settlements in South-Eastern Sweden2019In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 27, p. 143-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traces of bronze casting – fragmented moulds and crucibles – frequently occur at Late Bronze Age settlements. These traces are often assumed to represent utilitarian domestic production, in contrast to more specialised workshop production at ritual or elite locations. Moreover, settlements have usually been reduced to overall production units, while actual arrangements for bronze casting within sites have remained unexplored. The aim of this paper is to provide new insight into the organization of metalworking from an empirical and ‘bottom up’ perspective by examining the spatial and social contexts of bronze casting. The analysis draws on ten excavated sites in south-eastern Sweden and addresses three spatial levels: site, setting and framing. The study shows that domestic arenas often hosted varied and complex metalworking staged at various indoor and outdoor hearths located in the core areas of settlements. Rather than being conceptualized as levels, the organization of Late Bronze Age metalworking was a multifaceted, communicative and user-oriented practice. These insights have consequences for excavation methods as well as for the interpretation of the role of metalworking in society.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 348.
    Sörman, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. LARA, Laboratoire de recherche ARchéologie et Architectures / UMR 6566 CReAAH, Nantes Université.
    Inventory of five Swedish Late Bronze Age ‘scrap hoards’ [Innehållet i fem svenska "skrotdepåer" från yngre bronsålder]2023Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dataset contains information about metal objects and fragments of metal objects from five Swedish hoard finds from the Late Bronze Age. The main purpose of this data collection was to create a basis for a study of fragmented bronze objects in the so-called ‘scrap hoards’ from this period. The research focus in the dataset is on describing the incomplete objects in these depositions, and to determine/estimate to what degree the fragmentation is due to prehistoric actions (broken during the Bronze Age) or if it might be recent. The questions in focus for this study was which object types were fragmented versus not fragmented, and, to what degree the original object type could be recognized from the fragments. This study is presented in a scientific paper in English. This pilot study is part of a larger project run by Anna Sörman, studying the circulation, use and deposition of fragmented bronze objects, based on studies in north-western France and southern Scandinavia.

    The dataset gathers information about the contents of these hoards which have previously been published by Andreas Oldeberg (1927, 1928, 1929, 1934), and the images and details about the finds available in the inventory catalogue (online) of the Swedish History Museum. In one case (the Härnevi hoard), the finds have also been studied first-hand by Anna Sörman, in the storage of the Swedish History Museum. As the focus of the project is on the metalwork objects, the few finds of other materials present in some of these hoards (stone, ceramics, organic materials) have not been included in the dataset.

  • 349.
    Sörman, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Made in Håga: Om bronsgjutning vid kulthus och om metallhantverkets organisation under bronsåldern2022In: Bronsålderns Håga: Fornlämningar, fynd och förbindelser / [ed] Karin Ojala; Terje Østigård, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2022, p. 141-182Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 350.
    Sörman, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Noterman, AstridStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Fjellström, MarkusStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Broken Bodies, Places and Objects: New Perspectives on Fragmentation in Archaeology2023Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Broken Bodies, Places and Objects demonstrates the breadth of fragmentation and fragment use in prehistory and history and provides an up-to-date insight into current archaeological thinking around the topic.

    A seal broken and shared by two trade parties, dog jaws accompanying the dead in Mesolithic burials, fragments of ancient warships commodified as souvenirs, parts of an ancient dynastic throne split up between different colonial collections… Pieces of the past are everywhere around us. Fragments have a special potential precisely because of their incomplete format – as a new matter that can reference its original whole but can also live on with new, unrelated meanings. Deliberate breakage of bodies, places and objects for the use of fragments has been attested from all time periods in the past. It has now been over 20 years since John Chapman’s major publication introducing fragmentation studies, and the topic is more present than ever in archaeology. This volume offers the first European-wide review of the concept of fragmentation, collecting case studies from the Neolithic to Modernity and extending the ideas of fragmentation theory in new directions.

    The book is written for scholars and students in archaeology, but it is also relevant for neighbouring fields with an interest in material culture, such as anthropology, history, cultural heritage studies, museology, art and architecture.

45678 301 - 350 of 400
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf