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  • 301.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Datorstödd dialektgeografi1985Book (Other academic)
  • 302.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Diplom - det medeltida brevet2010In: Den medeltida skriftkulturen i Sverige: Genrer och texter / [ed] Inger Larsson, Rune Palm m fl, Stockholm: Runica et mediaevalia , 2010, p. 123-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 303.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Encyklopedisk litteratur2010In: Den medeltida skriftkulturen i Sverige: Genrer och texter / [ed] Inger Larsson, Rune Palm m fl, Stockholm: Runica et mediaevalia , 2010, p. 200-220Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 304.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Millefolium, rölika, näsegräs: Medeltidens svenska växtvärld i lärd tradition. Vernacular Plant-names and Plants in Medieval Sweden2010 (ed. Andra reviderade och utökade upplagan)Book (Other academic)
  • 305.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Millefolium, rölika och näsegräs: Medeltidens svenska växtvärld i lärd tradition2009Book (Other academic)
  • 306.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Några oväntade arkeobotaniska fynd2012In: Medeltida klostergrunder på Island – vegetation och flora, kultur- och relikväxter, samtida växtnamn: rapport från ett forskningsprojekt 2009–2011, Alnarp: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences , 2012, p. 76-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 307.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Pragmatic Literacy and the Medieval Use of the Vernacular: The Swedish example2009Book (Other academic)
  • 308.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Skriftliga källor och äldre isländska växtnamn2012In: Medeltida klostergrunder på Island – vegetation och flora, kultur- och relikväxter, samtida växtnamn: rapport från ett forskningsprojekt 2009–2011 / [ed] Inger Larsson, Per Arvid Åsen, Steinunn Kristjánsdottír, Kjell Lundquist, Alnarp: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences , 2012, p. 49-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 309.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Skriðuklaustur och Viðeyjarklaustur – spår av medeltida klosterträdgårdar?2012In: Medeltida klostergrunder på Island – vegetation och flora, kultur- och relikväxter, samtida växtnamn: rapport från ett forskningsprojekt 2009–2011 / [ed] Inger Larsson, Per Arvid Åsen, Steinunn Kristjánsdottír, Kjell Lundquist, Alnarp: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences , 2012, p. 81-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 310.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The Role of the Swedish Lawman in the Spread of Lay Literacy2010In: Along the Oral-Written Continuum. Types of Texts, Relations and their Implications. / [ed] Slávica Rankovic, Turnhout: Brepols , 2010, p. 411-427Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 311.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Tätmjölk, tätgräs, surmjölk och skyr: en datorstödd ordgeografisk studie över nordiska ord rörande äldre tiders mjölkhushållning1988Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 312.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Örta- och läkeböcker i den Bröndegaardska boksamlingen2010In: Nycklar till kunskap: Om människans bruk av naturen / [ed] Håkan Tunón och Anna Dahlström, Stockholm, Uppsala: CBM, KSLA , 2010, p. 137-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 313.
    Larsson, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Andersson, Roger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Kyrkans och klostrens texter : Inledning : Encyklopedisk litteratur2010In: Den medeltida skriftkulturen i Sverige: Genrer och texter / [ed] Inger Larsson, Rune Pal m fl, Stockholm: Runica et mediaevalia , 2010, p. 152-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 314.
    Larsson, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Palm, RuneStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Den medeltida skriftkulturen i Sverige: Genrer och texter2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 315.
    Larsson, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Åsen, Per Arvid
    Kristjánsdottír, Steinunn
    Lundquist, Kjell
    Medeltida klostergrunder på Island - vegetation och flora, kultur och reliktväxter, samtida växtnamn: rapport från ett forskningsprojekt 2009-20112012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Icelandic medieval monastic sites – vegetation and flora, cultural- and relict plants, contemporary plant-names The colonization of Iceland began in the late 9th century and in the year 1000 the Althing chose Christianity to replace paganism as the religion of the country. The bishopric of Skálholt was established in 1056 and Hólar in 1106. There are traces of twelve to fifteen monasteries, of which nine are recognized as having lasted for some time. Of these only Skriðuklaustur has been fully excavated, exhibiting a European building model. Viðeyjarklaustur and Kirkjubaejarklaustur have been partly excavated not revealing any specific monastic buildings as yet. Archaeobotanical investigations have only been undertaken on Viðey and at Skriðuklaustur. The exact localisation of the monastic buildings, or possible monastic cultivation. are only presumptions at all other places, as is the type of monastic building, whether traditional Icelandic farm type or continental monastery building type. The questions that this project seeks to answer are which cultivated plants on the whole, and garden plants in particular, were known and used in the medieval Icelandic monastic context, and whether it is possible to find medieval relict plants in connection with the Icelandic monastic sites. All monastic sites were surveyed for landscape and plants, and complete lists of the plants found are published in Bilaga 1. Medicinal, utility and ornamental plants, known in Iceland and abroad, have been recorded, but their status as true medieval monastic relict plants cannot be fully determined at this stage of research. The very special conditions in which a hitherto uninhabited island was colonized in some hundred years by people bringing and adapting their knowledge of farming, cultivating and using plants for both utility and pleasure led inevitably to a situation where common knowledge became integrated with the specific uses of plants and plant medicine in a monastic context. Many of the plants found today, such as Angelica, Alchemilla, Allium, Filipendula, Plantago or Sanguisorba have a medieval past as medicinal herbs. We cannot, however, establish for sure whether some of these plants’ properties were not common knowledge to the Icelanders of the Middle Ages but were specific monastic plants. The Icelandic monastic sites, as well as all Iceland, are today dominated by farming leaving little space for herbs to grow and survive. There are however traces of deliberate use and possibly cultivation of plants at Skriðuklaustur and Viðeyjarklaustur, although more archaeobotanical evidence from monastic sites is needed as well as an archeological search for traces of cultivation. This is required not only at these two sites but at all monastic sites in Iceland. Medieval plant-names tell us little since most of the medico-botanical literature are translations of the Dane Henrik Harpestræng’s works. The Icelandic laws, another source for plant-names, are heavily influenced by Norwegian law and therefore may only be used with caution for the documentation of Icelandic matters. Later historic plant-names, however, reveal many interesting details about the local use of some plants, although some of these names are loans from or translations of Scandinavian or German names and may not reveal anything about their local Icelandic use.

  • 316.
    Larsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Från tjeckiska till svenska: Översättningsregler för litterärt talspråk1992Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to determine the most efficient strategies to reproduce spoken language in direct speech in Swedish literary prose texts. The main problem is how a Czech literary text, Bohumil Hrabal’s short story Taneinf hodiny pro starSl a pokroôilé (Dancing Lessons for Older and Advanced Pupils), strongly coloured by the spoken language, is to be translated into Swedish. The Swedish supply of codified extrastructural markers, i.e. archaisms, provincialisms and vulgarisms, is limited, whereas the Czech language has an exceptionally rich system of extrastructural markers at all linguistic levels. My hypothesis is that extrastructural markers on the phonological/morphologic and syntactic level are stylistically more effective to mark the spoken language of the translated text. The effect of extrastructural markers, their acceptability and their degree of conventionalization in Swedish texts is then described. In order to fulfill my aim, two main investigations are made: a translation investigation and a readers’ investigation. The attained results indicate what type of markers and what number of markers should be used in the translation of Tanecni hodiny pro stars i a pokroîilé. The results also suggest general strategies for the translation of spoken language in direct speech. The use of vulgarisms is to be spread to all linguistic levels and should be fairly abundant. Markers of the phonological/morphologic level appear to be stylistically the most effective. Noncodified markers at this level are, moreover, fairly easy to accept, from a normative point of view, and these markers thus seem to be conventionalized to a certain degree.

  • 317.
    Larsson, Nils
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Ett möte mellan två skrivkulturer: Några högstadieungdomars syn på och bruk av skrift vid skol- respektive privatskrivande2011Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to shed light on and describe a number of secondary school students’ writing practices and their attitudes towards these practices.

    The material used in the study comes from a secondary school in a suburb of Stockholm where most of the students are bilingual. The entire study comprises five different smaller studies: a questionnaire, a number of interviews, classroom observations, observations of one particular boy’s writing practices and studies of the same boy’s texts.

    The results of these smaller studies show that a form of encounter between two different writing cultures probably takes place in school. These two writing cultures are, on the one hand, one that is concerned with the students’ school work and, on the other, one that constitutes the private writing culture in which young people indulge when they are not occupied with school work. The study shows that there are obvious differences between these two cultures when it comes to students’ attitudes to writing. Their attitudes to private writing are far more positive than to school writing. A further finding of the study is that there are evident differences between the attitudes of girls and boys to writing, although these are most obvious in the students’ school writing. In private writing the differences are smaller, although some boys claim not to write at all in private, even though they send a great many text messages.

    One possible implication of the study is that school writing would probably benefit from a widening of the concept of writing to become amore communicative form of writing.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Mins 63 Nils Larsson, 2011
  • 318.
    Larsson (red.), Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Leve mångfalden!: Tjugo uppsatser om språk tillägnade Barbro Söderberg1992 (ed. 500)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 319.
    Larsson (red.), Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Nordiska språk minns - från 1800-tal till 2000-tal: Jubileumsskrift 20032003 (ed. 400)Book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Mins 55. Nordiska språk minns - från 1800-tal till 2000-tal
  • 320.
    Larsson (red.), Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Till Sten Malmström: 30 oktober 19771977Book (Other academic)
  • 321.
    Larsson, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    De fyra elementen: En semantisk motivstudie i Gunnar Ekelöfs En Mölna-Elegi2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to examine the semantic architecture of the motif complex the four elements, i.e. fire, air, water and earth, in the Swedish poet Gunnar Ekelöf’s poem A Mölna Elegy (1960). The poem belongs to the same polyphonic and quotative-allusive tradition as T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land and Ezra Pound’s Cantos. The four elements may be regarded both as four separate motifs and as constituting one semantically coherent motif complex. The latter reading has to do with the fact that the phrase the four elements is not itself present in the text. Thus, the thesis includes the assumption that this motif complex, heavily suggested by items in the text but still omitted, might function as a text matrix, from which a number of themes emerge such as life–death and time.

    The thesis has a theoretical anchoring in ideas about semantic frames (Barsalou) when discussing semantic relations between the different element-related words in the poem, and how these words may be linked to the concepts ‘fire’, ‘air’, water’ and ‘earth’ respectively. Traditional lexical relations such as hyponymy, antonymy and meronymy only catch the more obvious relations such as fire–glow, warm–cold and tree–branch, but are unable to explain pragmatically based relations between words linked to the same conceptual domain, such as sea–jetty, water–sink, fly–air and the like. To some extent, the thesis also draws upon Riffaterre’s theories about a poem’s matrix and how meaning arises in such texts.

    A major finding of the study is the heavy lexical presence of the four elements in the poem, expressed and suggested by a great number of semantically heterogeneous words. This semantic pattern is analysed in detail with the aid of semantic frame theory. A further discovery is that most of the element words imply dichotomies such as motion–repose, warmth–cold, light–dark or soft–hard. The elements have most of the dichotomies in common, which strongly suggests a union of all the four elements. Such a union is also suggested by several conspicuous compounds never earlier recorded in Swedish, such as glödstänk (‘glowspray’), vindstänk (‘windspray’), eldsus (‘fire sough’) and vågsus (‘wave sough’). The meetings of element are also described at the syntactic level as an explicit amalgamation of all four elements, which suggests a theme not earlier noticed. This theme may tentatively be called the cyclical amalgamation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 322.
    Ledin, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Arbetarnes är denna tidning: textförändringar i den tidiga socialdemokratiska pressen1995Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 323.
    Lim Falk, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Svenska i engelskspråkig skolmiljö: Ämnesrelaterat språkbruk i två gymnasieklasser2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to determine how English-language teaching in Sweden influences the subject-based communicative competence and language development in Swedish of upper secondary students. The focus is thus on the students’ mother tongue, i.e. the language which gets limited in the teaching practice within so-called content- and language-integrated learning (CLIL).

    Data was primarily collected by participatory observation in two science program classes, one taught in English and one in Swedish, during their three years in upper secondary school. Additional data was collected through interviews, questionnaires, audio taping of classroom interaction and writing tasks. This created conditions for a comprehensive and nuanced description and interpretation of the linguistic behaviour of teachers and students in the CLIL practice, as well as of the experiences and perceptions they report.

    Studies were carried out on classroom practice, student texts, and teacher and student experiences of CLIL instruction. These were linked to activity analysis, systemic-functional linguistics and ethnography of communication, i.e. research areas that emphasise the interplay between language, communication and social situation.

    The general conclusions are: (1) CLIL students use less relevant subject-based language in speech and writing than do control students. This holds for all subjects except Swedish, where both CLIL and control students share linguistic conditions; (2) Swedish is a prerequisite for the students’ own active, subject-based participation in classroom interaction. There is almost no interaction when the language of instruction is English; (3) English is an obstacle, and is also considered as such. The students avoid using English, and the teachers consistently use code-switching strategies in response to the policy that “language should not be an obstacle”.

    The results suggest that the CLIL environment is less conducive to learning, given current learning theories that focus on active participation. In the already teacher-dominated classroom, the linguistic and interactional demands that come with CLIL teaching seem to add to the challenge of assimilating advanced subject instruction.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 324.
    Lim Falk, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Strand, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Sprint och svenskan i skolan: Om språkets betydelse för lärande och *språkutveckling* [kunskapsutveckling]2009In: Resultatdialog 2009: Aktuell forskning om lärande, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2009, p. 157-162Conference paper (Other academic)
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    Resultatdialog
  • 325.
    Lindahl, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Skogsberg, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Söderberg, Tobias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Insändare, fjällhandböcker och Ni-tilltal: Tre kandidatuppsatser i svenska2007Book (Refereed)
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    Mins_58_Insandare_fjallhandbocker_och_Ni_tilltal_Lindahl_Skogsberg_Soderberg
  • 326.
    Lindberg, Ebba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Beskrivande svensk grammatik1990Book (Other academic)
  • 327.
    Lindell, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Birgittas uppenbarelser2010In: Den medeltida skriftkulturen i Sverige: Genrer och texter / [ed] Inger Larsson, Sven-Bertil Jansson, Rune Palm, Barbro Söderberg, Stockholm: Sällskapet Runica et Mediaevalia , 2010, p. 186-199Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 328.
    Lindell, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Brev i Vadstena klosters arkiv 1368-13752010Book (Other academic)
  • 329.
    Lindell, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Christina Hansdotter Brask: A Vadstena Nun and Her Use of Writing2010In: Saint Birgitta, Syon and Vadstena: Papers from a Symposium in Stockholm 4-6 october 2007 / [ed] Claes Gejrot, Sara Risberg & Mia Åkestam, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhetsakademien och antikvitets akademien , 2010, p. 177-187Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 330.
    Lindell, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    En medeltida ordspråkssamling på fornsvenska2011Book (Other academic)
  • 331.
    Lindqvist, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Översättning som social praktik: Toni Morrison och Harlequinserien Passion på svenska2002Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 332. Linell, Per
    et al.
    Hofvendahl, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Lindholm, Camilla
    Multi-unit questions in institutional interactions: Sequential organizations and communicative functions2003In: Text, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 539-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with multi-unit questioning turns used in different genres of institutional interactions. Analyzing in detail a corpus of about 400 multiunit questions from health care interactions, court trials, police interrogations, and social welfare office talks from Sweden and Finland (all in the Swedish language), a number of sequential patterns are established. Some of these sequential organizations revolve around the interplay between declarative and interrogative units. Several interrogatives in a series usually narrow down questions, for example, by suggesting candidate answers to the initial more general questions. However, many multi-unit questioning turns are concluded with an appended generalizing question. The communicative functions of these different question delivery structures are summarized. We argue that the theory must be sensitive to differences between communicative activity types. However, on the general level, we propose that designing a multi-unit question is an attempt at solving a complex communicative task, which typically involves several, possibly mutually conflicting, demands on the speaker. For example, in court trials, the avoidance of leading questions must be balanced against the need for precise answers. At the same time, the use of an appended generalizing unit might be formulated to secure anything that could count as an acceptable response.

  • 333.
    Lombnæs, Andreas G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Tekstens stemmer: Forsøk på metodisk lesning av Johan Falkbergets novelle "Den gyldne sten" (1924)1980Book (Other academic)
  • 334.
    Magnusson Petzell, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Coordination and word order in the history of Swedish2010In: Transactions of the Philological Society, ISSN 0079-1636, E-ISSN 1467-968X, ISSN 0079-1636, Vol. 108, no 2, p. 178-212Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 335.
    Magnusson Petzell, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Form och innehåll: Mattsson, Komenský och den syntetiska dualismen2010In: Bo65: Festskrift till Bo Ralph / [ed] Jóhannesson, Kristinn, Ida Larsson, Erik Magnusson Petzell, Sven-Göran Malmgren, Lena Rogström, Emma Sköldberg, Göteborg: Meijerbergs institut för svensk etymologisk forskning , 2010, p. 458-467Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 336.
    Magnusson Petzell, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Konkreta och abstrakta minnesmärken2011In: Sverigekontakt, ISSN 0346-2439, Vol. 98, no 2, p. 4-5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 337.
    Magnusson Petzell, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Minnesmärken och nationell identitet2011In: Sverigekontakt, ISSN 0346-2439, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 6-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 338.
    Magnusson Petzell, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    OV and V-to-I in the history of Swedish2012In: Historical Linguistics 2009: Selected papers from the 19th International Conference on Historical Linguistics, Nijmegen, 10-15 August 2009 / [ed] Ans van Kemenade, Nynke de Haas, Amsterdam: John Benjamins , 2012, p. 211-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 339.
    Magnusson Petzell, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    OV-ordföljd i svenskans historia2011In: Arkiv för nordisk filologi, ISSN 0066-7668, Vol. 126, p. 141-191Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 340.
    Magnusson Petzell, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Vad är ett minnesmärke?2011In: Sverigekontakt, ISSN 0346-2439, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 6-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 341.
    Magnusson Petzell, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Jóhannesson, KristinnInst. för svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet.Larsson, IdaInst. för svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet.Malmgren, Sven-GöranInst. för svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet.Rogström, LenaInst. för svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet.Sköldberg, EmmaInst. för svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet.
    Bo65: Festskrift till Bo Ralph2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 342.
    Magnusson Petzell, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Rogström, LenaInstitutionen för svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet.
    Studier i svensk språkhistoria 10: Språkhistoria - hur och för vem?2010Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 343.
    Mattsson, Nicklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Pronominell antecipering och fundamentsplacering av att-satsen i fornsvenska och äldre nysvenska2002Book (Refereed)
  • 344.
    Melin, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Experimentell språkvård2006In: Språkvård, no 4, p. 4-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 345.
    Melin, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Studentens skrivhandbok2007Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 346.
    Melin, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Symmetrimysteriet - ett fall för språkpolisen2007In: Språkets roll och räckvidd: Festskrift till 'Staffan Hellberg den 18 februari 2007, 2007Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 347.
    Melin, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Vad är det för fel på ett fel?2007In: Forskning och framsteg, no 1, p. 6-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 348.
    Melin, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Vett och etifkett i språket2007Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 349.
    Melin, Lars & Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Maktspråk - boken med jävlar anamma2007Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 350.
    Melin, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Melin, Martin
    Språket - så funkar det2006Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
45678910 301 - 350 of 686
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