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  • 301.
    Khosravi, Sharam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Round trip to Ithaca2011In: Exiled Ink Magazine, ISSN 1744-1498, no 14, p. 30-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 302.
    Khosravi, Sharam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Qashqai of Iran (1968)1995In: Kelk, no 60Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 303.
    Kikon, Dolly
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Fermenting Modernity: Putting Akhuni on the Nation's Table in India2015In: South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies, ISSN 0085-6401, E-ISSN 1479-0270, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 320-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I explore notions of modernity, citizenship, belonging and transgressions in South Asia through the fermented food, akhuni. Fermented soya beans, popularly known as akhuni in Nagaland, a state in Northeast India with a majority tribal population, has a distinct pungent aroma and taste. This food is relished across the eastern Himalayan societies, including Nagaland, but routinely causes conflict between akhuni consumers and those who find the smell revolting. In 2007, due to increasing akhuni conflict in New Delhi, the Delhi police produced a handbook t hat cautions students and workers from Northeast India and eastern Himalayan societies that they should refrain from cooking akhuni and other fermented foods. Such official directives reiterate how the state plays a significant role in legitimising or prohibiting certain foods that particular social groups in contemporary India consume, relegating these communities to a remote position in the national social and culinary order. Against the backdrop of such friction, this article examines why akhuni consumers of the eastern Himalayan societies assert that eating fermented food is an integral part of their culture and history. Conversations about eating cultures, I argue, have to be understood as expressions of resistance, negotiation and the anxieties of striving to be a modern tribal in contemporary India.

  • 304.
    Kofman Bos, Celesta
    et al.
    Leiden University.
    't Hart, Paul
    Leiden University.
    Ullberg, Susann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The long shadow of disaster:: Memory and politics in Holland and Sweden2005In: International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, ISSN 0280-7270, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 5-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 305. Krause-Jensen, Jakob
    et al.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introduction: neoliberal turns in higher education2014In: Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1755-2273, E-ISSN 1755-2281, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 306.
    Kulick, Don
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Meneley, Anne
    Fat: the anthropology of an obsession2005Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An eclectic and highly original examination of one of the most dynamic concepts-and constructs-in the world. With more than one billion overweight adults in the world today, obesity has become an epidemic. But fat is not as straightforward-or even as universally damned-as one might think. Enlisting thirteen anthropologists and a fat activist, editors and anthropologists Don Kulick and Anne Meneley have produced an unconventional-and unprecedented-examination of fat in various cultural and social contexts. In this anthology, these writers argue that fat is neither a mere physical state nor an inert concept. Instead, it is a construct built by culture and judged in courts of public opinion, courts whose laws vary from society to society.

    From the anthropology of "fat-talk" among teenage girls in Sweden to the veneration of Spam in Hawaii; from fear of the fat-sucking pishtaco vampire in the Andes to the underground allure of fat porn stars like Supersize Betsy-this anthology provides fresh perspectives on a subject more complex than love handles, and less easily understood than a number on a scale. Fat proves that fat can be beautiful, evil, pornographic, delicious, shameful, ugly, or magical. It all depends on who-and where-you are.

  • 307.
    Körling, Gabriella
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Comments on Ruben Andersson "Here Be Dragons: Mapping an Ethnography of Global Danger"2016In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 57, no 6, p. 2p. 723-724Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 308.
    Laggan, Sophie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    The power within social-ecological transformations: a case study of Bristol's food system, UK2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Urban civil society and community groups are experimenting with new ways to provide food that could reduce global dependence on industrial agriculture and make the food system more resilient in a time of change. Changing the way cities provide food is conceptualized as a social-ecological transformation because it requires a fundamental shift in the way cities connect to close-by and far away ecologies, but also a rebalancing of power relations in urban food provision. The literature identifies specific individuals or groups, so-called ‘agents of change’, as critical for igniting processes of social-ecological transformation but are seen as less important when processes and norms and rules formalise.

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate whether this assumption on agents of change holds in the context of urban food provision. Bristol was selected as a critical incident case as it has progressed far in such a transformation and is institutionalising its trajectory in urban politics and civil society. Interviews with agents of change were gathered to determine who these people are and what they do when on the surface ‘power’ seems more or less equal.

    The results from this study demonstrate that:

    1) Institutionalisation can empower the community and its networks to become agents of change

    2) The ability to transform is not an exclusive property of leaders, but is embodied by ordinary people

    3) There are different types of agents of change that manifest their ability to transform resources and relations through networks.

    4) Conflicts between the food movement and authorities are not to put food on the agenda, but rather to make sure community-led development is prioritised and allocated resources.

    Given the right resources the food movement can support sustainable resource management and spaces for citizen planning and grassroots democracy, which could help rebalance power in the food system. 

  • 309.
    Lalander, Rickard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Retorno de los Runakuna: Cotacachi y Otavalo2010 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [es]

    En 1996 el movimiento político Pachakutik –asociado a la confederación indígena CONAIE- participó electoralmente por primera vez y desde entonces el movimiento indígena se ha establecido como una importante fuerza a nivel local, entre otros, en Cotacachi y Otavalo. Estos dos cantones se identifican como la cuna intelectual del movimiento indígena ecuatoriano. En este libro se analiza el proceso político local desde las perspectivas indígenas, principalmente durante el período entre 1996 y 2010. Un enfoque principal está en lo que el autor denomina el dilema intercultural del movimiento indigena, es decir, los desafíos político-electorales asociados a la interculturalidad y las alianzas establecidas más allá de la definición étnica.  Igualmente se problematizan analíticamente las implicaciones de los avances del movimiento político del Presidente Rafael Correa a partir de 2006 dentro del movimiento indígena. Asimismo, se examina el faccionalismo dentro de las organizaciones indígenas en Cotacachi y Otavalo. A través del análisis de las percepciones e interpretaciones por parte de los actores indígenas, se intenta captar la dinámica y las tensiones dentro de esta complejidad al nivel cantonal. Es extremadamente importante ofrecer espacio académico a los protagonistas políticos. Por ende, metodológicamente, se incluye una gran cantidad de entrevistas con los actores. La segunda parte del libro consiste en una selección de 16 conversaciones entre el autor y destacados personajes indígenas, entre otros, los tres alcaldes protagonistas del estudio; Auki Tituaña y Alberto Anrango en Cotacachi, así como Mario Conejo en Otavalo, lo que por sí contribuye a llenar un vacío de documentación académica del movimiento indígena ecuatoriano y la historia política local.

    Rickard Lalander es politólogo, Doctor y Catedrático en Estudios Latinoamericanos, investigador y profesor en las universidades de Helsinki y  Estocolmo. Es investigador asociado de la Universidad Andina Simón Bolívar, Quito. En Ecuador ha colaborado con la FLACSO, el Centro Andino de Acción Popular/CAAP y la Escuela de Gobierno y Políticas Públicas para las Nacionalidades y Pueblos del Ecuador/ESGOPP. Es autor de Suicide of the Elephants? Venezuelan Decentralization between Partyarchy and Chavismo (2004), editor y co-autor de Política y Sociedad en la Venezuela del Chavismo (2006) y ha publicado ampliamente sobre la democracia en los países andinos, inclusive varios artículos sobre el movimiento indígena ecuatoriano.

  • 310.
    Lalander, Rickard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies, Institute of Latin American Studies.
    Gustafsson, Maria-Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies. Latinamerika-Institutet.
    Movimiento indígena y liderazgo político local en la Sierra ecuatoriana:: ¿Actores políticos o proceso social?2008In: Provincia: Revista venezolana de estudios territoriales, ISSN 1317-9533, no 19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The indigenous movement in Ecuador has combined social mobilization with political institutionalization. The organic relation between the social movement CONAIE and the political party (or movement) Pachakutik has been successful, but also complicated, giving rise to internal conflicts and fragmentation. In this study the relations between Pachakutik and CONAIE are analyzed at the local level in Otavalo and Cotacachi. The authors argue for the importance to analyze the organizational structures locally, since the indigenous movements has been strongest at this level. In Otavalo the ethnic tensions have been clearly manifested through rupture of the mayor, Mario Conejo who left Pachakutik and created a new political movement – Minga Intercultural-. The case of Cotacachi is likewise particular since an alliance is established between the mayor Auki Tituaña and the peasant movement, UNORCAC (with links to the Socialist Party). Drawing on an analytical framework of collective action and decentralization the authors argue that it is impossible to draw an exact line between what is the social and the political movement.

  • 311.
    Lalander, Rickard
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Velásquez-Atehortúa, Juan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    El Protagonismo Femenino en la Radicalización de la Democracia Venezolana Bolivariana2013In: Revista Latino-Americana de Geografia e Gênero, ISSN 2177-2886, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 29-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Feminine Protagonism in the Radicalization of Bolivarian Venezuelan Democracy

    The aim of this article is to examine the growing protagonism of women in the recently developed participatory structures within the framework of democratic transition in Venezuela, during thepresidency of Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías, mainly from 2006 onwards. While the degree of personalized political symbolic power has deepened during the period, at the same time the political system has changed, towards a model characterizedby broader political participation and social inclusion at grassroots level. The insurgence ofpopular sector women in the local political structures will be emphasized, as well as the female protagonism and empowerment in the radical participatory democracy in progress. In order to make this issue visible, the analytical focus will be placed mainly on one participatory model of the so called Bolivarian Revolution: the Community Councils, although other relevant mechanisms anddimensions of popular participation will be dealt with. Through these frameworks, a growing number of women from the popular sectors have found their own space of empowerment. Theoretically, this research connects to radical and participatory democracy debates, changing StateCitizenshiprelations and the empowerment of women who were previously excluded from the public spheres.

  • 312.
    Lansing, John Stephen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Murray, P. Cox
    The Domain of the Replicators: cultural Evolution and the Neutral Theory2011In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 105-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do cultural phenomena undergo evolutionary change, in a Darwinian sense? If so, is evolutionary game theory (EGT) the best way to study them? Opinion on these questions is sharply divided. Proponents of EGT argue that it offers a unified theoretical framework for the social sciences, while critics even deny that Darwinian models are appropriately applied to culture. To evaluate these claims, we examine three facets of cultural evolution: (i) cultural traits that evolve by Darwinian selection, (ii) cultural traits that affect biological fitness, and (iii) coevolution of culture and biology, where selection in one affects evolutionary outcomes in the other. For each of these cases, the relevance of EGT depends on whether its assumptions are met. Those assumptions are quite restrictive: selection is constant, time horizons are deep, the external environment is not part of the game, and neutral processes such as drift are irrelevant. If these conditions are not met, other evolutionary models such as neutrality, coalescence theory, or niche construction may prove more appropriate. We conclude that Darwinian processes can occur in all three types of cultural or biological change. However, exclusive reliance on EGT can obscure the respective roles of selective and neutral processes.

  • 313.
    Larssen, Urban
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Call for Protection: Situating Journalists in Post-Cold War Romania in a Global Media Development Discourse2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with the development of journalism in post-Cold War Romania, and it does so with a particular interest in the transnational dimension this entails.

    Many NGOs and international organizations are currently seeking to monitor journalists’ situations in countries around the world, while at the same time aiming at having the whole world aligned with international standards of the journalistic profession. Much attention is put on the safety of individual journalists and on the need to protect them from both legal and physical harm. Reports are continuously launched, frequently worded to impart a sense of emergency, effectively linking putative universal values of journalism with the image of vulnarable journalists carrying out dangerous work for the benefit of large publics.

    Romania is a fertile place for this kind of global activism, partly due to the country’s totalitarian past and to what many commentators see as an unfulfilled process of democratization where powerful media owners and executives influence journalistic standards with business interests foremost in mind, and where harassments of journalists have been on the rise during the last decade.

    By combining an ethnographic account of the journalism field with an exploration of how global media development activities are operating in contemporary Romania, the prime question of the thesis is how journalism is constructed and made meaningful in a transnational context.

    The study is based on ethnographic material collected during the period of 2000-2002 among journalists and NGO activists in Bucharest, Romania.

  • 314.
    Larssen, Urban
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Samtidsvittne: antropologiska reflektioner kring en historiker2004In: Antropologi/Journalistik: om sätt att beskriva världen / [ed] Ulf Hannerz, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 315.
    Larsson, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    'When Women Unite!': The Making of the Anti-Liquor Movement in Andhra Pradesh, India2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1991, women from Dubagunta, Nellore District in the state of Andhra Pradesh forced the liquor traders to leave the area. This incident is believed to have been the origin of the Anti-Liquor Movement, which finally led to alcoholic beverages being prohibited in the state. The main participants in the early struggle were unprivileged, rural low-caste women. They were supported by voluntary organisations and later by politicians from the opposition parties.

    The study presents an analysis of the process whereby the political and private endeavours of individuals were integrated into a broader social movement. It discusses discourses on gender and household relations in rural Andhra Pradesh and the involvement of urban activists as organisers, leaders and translators of the struggle. The attention is on how politicians, representatives of the state administration, and liquor traders either sided with the temperance movement or worked against it, and on the blurred boundary between 'friend' and 'foe'. It demonstrates how the media coverage and the gathering of participants in collective activities - such as demonstrations, meetings, sit-ins, and protest travelling - were vital for the formation of an 'imagined community' of protest.

    The Anti-Liquor Movement of Andhra Pradesh is shaped by global processes. The Indian economy opened up to global market forces in the 1980s and at the same time local activists became involved in transnational debates on feminism, Gandhianism, and Marxism. Even so, as the study reveals, the movement as such was mainly confined to Andhra Pradesh.

  • 316.
    Larsson, Marie E M
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Transnational solidarity and microenterprises: home-based workers in Ahmedabad, India2012In: Global civil society: shifting powers in a shifting world / [ed] Heidi Moksnes and Mia Melin, Uppsala: Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development (CSD) , 2012, p. 212-219Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 317.
    Lazoroska, Daniela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Suburb United Will Never Be Defeated: Youth Organization, Belonging, and Protest in a Million Program Suburb of Stockholm2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines the continually reconfiguring response of a youth organization towards a renovation project, Järvalyftet, run by the City of Stockholm in the Million Program suburbs. By analyzing this relationship, I aim to discuss how the youth organization works to mediate inclusion in political and representational spheres. More specifically, I will discuss the intersections between Järvalyftet’s development and the claims of belonging made by the youths upon the particular suburb, Husby, where they resided. My interest lies in understanding the conjuncture and disjuncture of claims that have been made to community, locality, and local knowledge in the interaction between the youth organization and the project Järvalyftet. I argue that the forms of community instigated by the youth organization, which were based on locality and “blackness”, allowed them to position themselves as key proponents of social and political change, as well as mobilize allies in others who identified with those experiences.

  • 318.
    Leivestad, Hege Høyer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Lives on Wheels: Caravan Homes in Contemporary Europe2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the public imaginary the caravan has time and again been associated with stigmatised groups in society. Nevertheless, this vehicle-home has held a visible position in Western Europe’s leisure landscape in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries as a potent symbol of working-class tourism. But what happens when presumably mobile caravans are used for long-term and full-time ‘static’ housing? Based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted on campsites in Spain and Sweden, as well as within the camping industry, this study depicts how the caravan and the campsite’s ambiguous material qualities both come to fit and to challenge conventional domestic ideals. Among lower-middle-class and working-class Europeans, a growing use of mobile dwellings is closely related to issues concerning lifestyle changes and retirement and ideal notions of domestic downsizing. The thesis thus tunes in on what is identified as an emergence of an alternative housing form in a Western European context, wherein materiality and mobility become interrelated through a temporal, spatial and social notion of potential mobility. By addressing how the caravan, as a potentially mobile domestic form, produces specific spatiotemporal imaginations and practices, this thesis demonstrates how it furthermore comes to be incorporated into a multifaceted withdrawal to a ‘good life’ in times of uncertainty.

  • 319.
    Leivestad, Hege
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Thedvall, Renita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Evaluation by Colors: Assessing “Joy at Work” in Preschools by the Colors Green, Yellow and Red2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 320.
    Leivestad Høyer, Hege
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Beyond Informality: Intimacy and Commerce at the Caravanning Trade Fair2017In: Ethnographies of conferences and trade fairs: shaping industries, creating professionals / [ed] Hege Høyer Leivestad, Anette Nyqvist, Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2017, p. 129-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 321.
    Leivestad Høyer, Hege
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Campsite Migrants: British Caravanners and Homemaking in Benidorm2017In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 181-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on ethnographic fieldwork amongst British migrants on a Spanish Camping and caravan site, this article argues that the home is a productive entrance point for understanding the dynamics of this form of migration. Whilst campsites are planned and legally regulated as leisure spheres for mobile camping, touring caravans provide an affordable option for migrants otherwise excluded from the Spanish property market. In this article, I show how economic activities are centred on the caravan homemaking wherein mobile dwellings are transformed into - and used as - immobile living units. The making of the caravan home is furthermore central to the shaping and maintenance of social networks of support that are based on ‘handyman’ manual labour and a cash economy.

  • 322.
    Leivestad Høyer, Hege
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Caravans: Lives on Wheels in Contemporary Europe2018Book (Refereed)
  • 323.
    Leivestad Høyer, Hege
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Inventorying mobility: methodology on wheels2017In: Methodologies of mobility: ethnography and experiment / [ed] Alice Elliot, Roger Norum, Noel B. Salazar, Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2017, p. 47-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 324.
    Leivestad Høyer, Hege
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Anette, Nyqvist
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Tunestad, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Individuals and Industries: Large-Scale Professional Gatherings as Ethnographic Fields2017In: Ethnographies of Conferences and Trade Fairs: Shaping Industries, Creating Professionals / [ed] Hege Høyer Leivestad, Anette Nyqvist, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 1-21Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conferences and trade fairs have during the past decades become a significant global industry in and of itself. Here the authors of this volume claim that such large-scale professional gatherings have become key sites for the making and negotiation of both industries and professions. The anthology is an attempt to make sense of conferences and trade fairs as phenomena in contemporary society. Large-scale professional gatherings are here understood as organized and particular events, bound by place and time, where a large number of professionals within defined industries assemble to network and to exchange information.

  • 325.
    Leivestad Høyer, Hege
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nyqvist, AnetteStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ethnographies of Conferences and Trade Fairs: Shaping Industries, Creating Professionals2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 326.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Silverstein, Merril
    Fritzell, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Time-for-Money Exchanges Between Older and Younger Generations in Swedish Families2010In: Journal of family issues, ISSN 0192-513X, E-ISSN 1552-5481, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 189-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the maturation of welfare states, family solidarity continues to be strong and a growing body of research has shown that substantial financial transfers are passed from older to younger generations within the family. At the same time, family solidarity in terms of instrumental and social support is found to be mutual. This study examines eventual reciprocity in time-for-money exchanges, by combining two large-scale Swedish representative longitudinal studies. It analyzes how earlier social contacts (time) are related to financial transfers (money) and to what extent social class and gender differentials are visible. The findings indicate that parents provide economic transfers if they have more frequent social contact with any of their children, and that these time investments pay off for children who were of higher social class origins. In contrast, no support for gender-specific patterns is found. In conclusion, family solidarity seems to have different bases in different social strata.

  • 327. Lin, Weiqiang
    et al.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Xiang, Biao
    Yeoh, Brenda S. A.
    Migration infrastructures and the production of migrant mobilities2017In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the proclamation of a mobility turn in the 2000s, scholars have populated the field with invaluable insights on what it means to move, and what the politics of movement are. One particularly useful thread revolves around the issue of infrastructures, which have generally been taken to mean the manifest forms of moorings and fixities that help order and give shape to mobilities. Yet, while significant inroads have been made in delineating the morphologies of transport infrastructures, mobilities research has been relatively reticent about the organisational structures, orders and arrangements that give rise to another key mobile phenomenon of our time international migration. In this editorial introduction, we lay down some groundwork on the productive and political nature of infrastructures that likewise affect and inform the way (im)mobilities are contingently created and parsed in migration. Looking through the prism of East and Southeast Asia and its migration infrastructures, we take advantage of the new' infrastructural configurations in an emerging empirical context to point to some directions by which mobilities researchers can more rigorously interrogate migration' as another socially meaningful and specific form of mobility that exceeds a mere displacement of people or change in national domicile.

  • 328.
    Lindblad, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Metro barriers in the making: The political and sociotechnical milieu of public transport in Stockholm2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines processes through which the barriers in the Stockholm metro are continuously rearranged. The barriers are in place with the purpose of securing income, while simultaneously enabling the flow of passengers into the metro. First, I examine the technical components and capacities of the barriers. Second, I outline a variety of actors involved with planning, manufacturing, and maintaining them, and analytically link these actors as comprising an ‘apparatus of public transport’. More specifically, this study focuses on how metro users’ practices are both influenced by, and influence how the barriers are rearranged. I show how this dynamic is enacted in the barrier milieu in metro stations, where also the tension between the purposes of securing income and allowing mobility is negotiated. The ethnographic material includes encounters with metro users, technicians, officials, and politicians in metro stations and other settings, as well as written documentations.

    In public discussions, the barriers are commonly at issue in relation to fare evasion. From a standpoint where technical, social, and political dimensions are understood as intermeshed, this study casts attention to a variety of practices occurring in the barrier milieu. By exploring how a technical arrangement influences social relations, I aim to raise questions of responsibility with regards to technology.

  • 329.
    Lindell, Ilda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Hedman, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Verboomen, Kyle-Nathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    ‘“The World Cup, ‘World Class Cities,’ and Street Vendors in South Africa”2013In: Street economies in the urban Global South / [ed] Karen Tranberg Hansen, Walter E. Little, and B. Lynne Milgram, Santa Fe: School for Advanced Research Press , 2013, 1.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 330.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    The Genetics of the Neolithic Transition: New Light on Differences Between Hunter-Gatherers and Farmers in Southern Sweden2011In: HUMAN BIOARCHAEOLOGY OF THE TRANSITION TO AGRICULTURE / [ed] Pinhasi, R, Stock, J. T., Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2011, p. 385-402Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 331.
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Auspicious Beginnings for the Anthropology of Finance: American Anthropological Association session review2001In: Economic Sociology Newsletter, Vol. JanuaryArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 332.
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Bailadores and the Mines. The Conflict over Mining in an Andean Farming Community1993In: Green Arguments and Local Subsistence, Stockholm University, Stockholm , 1993Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 333.
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Constructing Shareholders: Images of Individual Investors in Stockholm2002In: Culture and Economy: Contemporary Perspectives, Ashgate Press , 2002Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 334.
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Culture, Ideology and the Financial Market: Examining pension plan reform in Sweden2004In: Market Matters: Exploring Cultural Processes in the Global Marketplace, Palgrave MacMillan, Basingstoke , 2004Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 335.
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Den Nya Aktiekulturen2002In: Ekonomien i Samhället, Studentlitteratur , 2002Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 336.
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Driven Entrepreneurs: A case study of taxi owners in Caracas2004In: New Practices of Entrepreneurship Research, Edward Elgar , 2004Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 337.
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Entrepreneurship and Culture: The Case of Freddy, the Strawberry Man2000In: Entrepreneurship: The Social Science View, Oxford University Press, Oxford , 2000Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 338.
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Looking Into the Future: Anthropology and Financial Markets2002In: Development Beyond the 20th Century: A Critical Discussion in Economic Anthropology, Altavista Press , 2002Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 339.
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Market as mirror or model: how traders reconfigure economic and social transactions in a rural economy1999In: Ethnos, Vol. 64, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 340.
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    New Directions in Economic Anthropology2000In: Economic Sociology Newsletter, Vol. JuneArticle, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 341.
    Lindh de Montoya, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Progress, Hunger and Envy: Commercial Agriculture, Marketing and Social Transformation in the Venezuelan Andes1996Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 342.
    Lindh, Kristofer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Performance at the Edge of Apocalypse: An ethnographic study of collective identity construction in a neo-nationalist social movement in Sweden2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In several countries of the Global North, right-wing parties are successfully mobilizing public support, influencing political debates and introducing arguments and rhetorics that draw on xenophobia, populism and ethnocentrism, ostensibly with a purpose to amplify the “national order of things” (Malkki 1992). This thesis addresses this development by providing an ethnography, based fieldwork, of the Swedish social movement Folkets Demonstration, which arranges anti-government manifestations on squares most usually in Stockholm. Drawing on classical theories on performance by Victor Turner and Erving Goffman, I investigate how the demonstrations of the movement facilitate the construction of a collective identity of “the people”, which also includes exploring the world view of the demonstrators.

    As I argue, through the socio-emotionality of the demonstrations, the movement conducts a cultural performance of national cohesion vis-à-vis the Swedish national community, cosmologically perceived as on the edge of an apocalypse due to immigration and the alleged cosmopolitanist agenda of the government. In addition, I argue that the demonstrations can be understood as strategically managed towards idealized performances of democracy. Hence, the demonstrations can be considered regressive-utopian performances of a national-democratic community, furthermore embedded in a polarization between “the people” and “the elite” and through which the collective identity of “the people” is constructed.

  • 343.
    Lindquist, Galina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Shamanic performances on the urban scene: neo-shamanism in contemporary Sweden1997Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with neo-shamanism, a set of notions and techniques that originated in the non-Western tribal societies and, within the framework of New Age spirituality, were adapted for the life of contemporary urban dwellers. Neo-shamanic practices are based on consciousness-altering techniques, when the Self is perceived to leave the body, to journey in other realities and to interact with the spiritual beings, enlisting their help for social, psychological, and physical healing.

    The study shows how a group of people appropriates a set of new meanings, grounded in unusual bodily experience, validated by interpersonal narrative, and embodied in dramatic performance in both the physical and the imaginal realms. Through the media of performance the abstract meanings become lived reality turned into a common resource for creating culture. The creation of culture is seen as an interplay between individual experience and orchestrated expressions, whereby the imported notions and cultural forms are filled with personal and shared meaning.

    The special character of thus created neo-shamanic culture lies in the fact that it emerges in the interstices betwixt and between the established social institutions, as a domain of imagination and play. Through performance and play the disembedded cultural systems, imported from distant times and places, get re-embedded in the local contexts and come to constitute community, locality, and tradition.

    Fieldwork was carried out in 1992 - 1996 in Sweden, Denmark, England, and France. The main methods used were participant observation, reading printed matter, and interviews.

  • 344.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    An Interview with James Siegel2013In: Public culture, ISSN 0899-2363, E-ISSN 1527-8018, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 559-573Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 345.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Beyond Anti-Anti Trafficking2013In: Dialectical Anthropology, ISSN 0304-4092, E-ISSN 1573-0786, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 319-323Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 346.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Brokers and Brokerage, Anthropology of2015In: International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Science / [ed] James D. Wright, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2015, 2, p. 870-874Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 347.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Brokers, channels, infrastructure: moving migrant labor in the Indonesian-Malaysian oil palm complex2017In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 213-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article problematizes the dichotomy between fluid mobility and fixed infrastructure through a case study of migrant labor recruitment from Indonesia to the Malaysian oil palm industry. Channels of low-skilled transnational migration must be understood in relation to other forms of mobility, most notably that of brokers, who move along adjacent and overlapping routes. Broker mobility is not only shaped by relatively immobile moorings, but also by more fluid moorings', notably mobile communication, low-cost airlines, and emergent social relationships. In order to understand how the migration process is arranged it is critical to pay attention to the logistical practices that make mobility possible. The article argues that broker mobility, diverse forms of moorings, and logistics come to shape a socio-technical system that can be understood in terms migration infrastructure.

  • 348.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Field Agent (Petugas Lapangan)2014In: Figures of Southeast Asian Modernity / [ed] Joshua Barker, Erik Harms and Johan Lindquist, Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press , 2014, p. 154-156Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 349.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Images and Evidence: Human Trafficking, Auditing, and the Production of Illicit Markets in Southeast Asia and Beyond2010In: Public culture, ISSN 0899-2363, E-ISSN 1527-8018, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 223-236Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 350.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Labour Recruitment, Circuits of Capital and Gendered Mobility: Reconceptualizing the Indonesian Migration Industry2010In: Pacific Affairs, ISSN 0030-851X, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 115-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade there has been a marked shift in the structure of migration from Indonesia with the deregulation of the transnational labour recruitment market after the fall of Suharto and a broader attempt across the region to regulate migrant flows to and from receiving countries in the wake of the Asian economic crisis. In this process, hundreds of Indonesian labour recruitment agencies have come to function as brokers in an increasingly government-regulated economy that sends documented migrants to countries such as Malaysia and Saudi Arabia. Based primarily on fieldwork on the island of Lombok, one of the major migrant-sending areas in Indonesia, the article considers the gendered aspects of this state market relationship by focusing ethnographic attention on the initial stages of recruitment, as informal labour brokers deliver migrants to formal agencies. Critically, the article describes how capital increasingly flows ""down"" towards female migrants and ""up"" from male migrants i.e., men must go into debt while women do not pay (or are even offered money) to travel abroad thus highlighting the gendered dimensions of the current economy of transnational migration. More generally, the article argues for a renewed focus on the migration industry as a way of reconceptualizing Indonesian transnational migration in the context of contemporary forms of globalization.

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