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  • 301. Kalmring, Sven
    et al.
    Holmquist, Lena
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    'The gleaming mane of the serpent': the Birka dragonhead from Black Earth Harbour2018Ingår i: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 92, nr 363, s. 742-757Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Birka dragon' symbol is synonymous with the famous Viking Age town of that name, an association born from the 1887 discovery of a casting mould depicting a dragonhead. Recent excavations in Black Earth Harbour at Birka have yielded a dress pin that can, almost 150 years later, be directly linked to this mould. This artefact introduces a unique Birka style' to the small corpus of known Viking Age dragonhead dress pins. The authors discuss and explore the artefact's manufacture, function and chronology, and its connections to ship figureheads.

  • 302.
    Karlén, Malin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Something fishy in Christians: Dietrekonstruktioner genom analys av stabila isotoper på tidigmedeltida skelett från Rambodal, Styrstad Sn, Östergötland2015Självständigt arbete på grundnivå (kandidatexamen), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary patterns has varied throughout history, both due to resource and cultural limitations. In this thesis, a study was conducted to establish the dietary patterns of eight individuals from an early Midieaval gravesite in Rambodal, Östergötland, in order to explain why they were buried there. This was done through stable isotope analysis on collagen extracted from bone and tooth on the buried individuals. The analysis showed that these indviduals had a diet that was mainly based on freshwater fish. This suggests that these people may have been christians, due to the fact that fish was not regarded as meat and therefore you did not have to abstain from it during periods of fasting. Fish also has a strong idealistic position in Christianity. However, the positions of the buried individulas does not correspond with catholic burial traditions. One explanation for this could be that these individuals were orthodox Christians, possibly from Finland or Russia.           

  • 303. Kashuba, Natalija
    et al.
    Kirdök, Emrah
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Damlien, Hege
    Manninen, Mikael A.
    Nordqvist, Bengt
    Persson, Per
    Götherstrom, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Ancient DNA from mastics solidifies connection between material culture and genetics of mesolithic hunter-gatherers in Scandinavia2019Ingår i: Communications Biology, E-ISSN 2399-3642, Vol. 2, artikel-id 185Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Human demography research in grounded on the information derived from ancient DNA and archaeology. For example, the study on the early postglacial dual-route colonisation of the Scandinavian Peninsula is largely based on associating genomic data with the early dispersal of lithic technology from the East European Plain. However, a clear connection between material culture and genetics has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate that direct connection by analysing human DNA from chewed birch bark pitch mastics. These samples were discovered at Huseby Klev in western Sweden, a Mesolithic site with eastern lithic technology. We generated genome-wide data for three individuals, and show their affinity to the Scandinavian hunter-gatherers. Our samples date to 9880-9540 calBP, expanding the temporal range and distribution of the early Scandinavian genetic group. We propose that DNA from ancient mastics can be used to study environment and ecology of prehistoric populations.

  • 304. Keighley, Xenia
    et al.
    Bro-Jørgensen, Maiken Hemme
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Jordan, Peter
    Tange Olsen, Morten
    Ancient Pinnipeds: What Paleogenetics Can Tell Us about Past Human-Marine Mammal Interactions2018Ingår i: SAA Archaeological Record, ISSN 1532-7299, Vol. 18, nr 4, s. 38-45Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 305.
    Kilinç, Gülşah Merve
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Koptekin, Dilek
    Atakuman, Çiğdem
    Sümer, Arev Pelin
    Dönertaş, Handan Melike
    Yaka, Reyhan
    Bilgin, Cemal Can
    Büyükkarakaya, Ali Metin
    Baird, Douglas
    Altinişik, Ezgi
    Flegontov, Pavel
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Togan, Inci
    Somel, Mehmet
    Archaeogenomic analysis of the first steps of Neolithization in Anatolia and the Aegean2017Ingår i: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 284, nr 1867, artikel-id 20172064Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Neolithic transition in west Eurasia occurred in two main steps: the gradual development of sedentism and plant cultivation in the Near East and the subsequent spread of Neolithic cultures into the Aegean and across Europe after 7000 cal BCE. Here, we use published ancient genomes to investigate gene flow events in west Eurasia during the Neolithic transition. We confirm that the Early Neolithic central Anatolians in the ninth millennium BCE were probably descendants of local hunter-gatherers, rather than immigrants from the Levant or Iran. We further study the emergence of post-7000 cal BCE north Aegean Neolithic communities. Although Aegean farmers have frequently been assumed to be colonists originating from either central Anatolia or from the Levant, our findings raise alternative possibilities: north Aegean Neolithic populations may have been the product of multiple westward migrations, including south Anatolian emigrants, or they may have been descendants of local Aegean Mesolithic groups who adopted farming. These scenarios are consistent with the diversity of material cultures among Aegean Neolithic communities and the inheritance of local forager know-how. The demographic and cultural dynamics behind the earliest spread of Neolithic culture in the Aegean could therefore be distinct from the subsequent Neolithization of mainland Europe.

  • 306.
    Kitzler Åhfeldt, Laila
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    3D-scanning at the Archaeological Research Laboratory 2006-20092010Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 307.
    Kitzler Åhfeldt, Laila
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Runstensfragmenten i Köpingsviks kyrka, Öland: Analys med optisk 3D-skanner2009Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 308.
    Kitzler Åhfeldt, Laila
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Work and worship: laser scanner analysis of Viking Age rune stones2002Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 309. Kjellberg, Joakim
    et al.
    Qviström, Linda
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Dubbla vapenhus vid Tierp, Bälinge och Alunda kyrkor? En rapport från ett forskningsprojekt2010Ingår i: Uppland, ISSN 0566-3059, s. 65-74Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    Projektet Nordliga vapenhus i Uppland genomfördes under hösten 2009 i syfte att med hjälpa av en georadarutrustning belägga förekomsten av nordliga vapenhus vid tre Uppländska kyrkor i Alunda, Tierp och Bälinge. Georadarresulten visar på ett tydligt nordligt vapenhus vid Alunda kyrka, något som även belagts vid tidigare arkeologiska undersökningar. Vid Bälinge och Tierps kyrkor påträffades osammanhängande radaranomalier som kan vara kopplade till eventuella vapenhus men dessvärre är dessa resultat inte lika tydliga som georadarresultaten från Alunda kyrka. De goda resultaten från Alunda kyrka visar dock att den icke-förstörande georadarmetoden kan vara ett mycket användbart redskap vid undersökningar av liknande strukturer i framtiden där traditionella arkeologiska undersökningsmetoder inte är lämpliga eller önskvärda.

  • 310.
    Kjellström, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Olofsson, Camilla
    Olson, Carina
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Stenbäck Lönnquist, Ulrika
    Welinder, Stig
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Barnen på Tibrandsholm2009Ingår i: Västerhus: Kapell, Kyrkogård och befolkning / [ed] Elisabeth, Iregren, Verner Alexandersen, Lars Redin, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademin , 2009, s. 236-243Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 311.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologi.
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, CharlotteStockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Own and be owned: archaeological approaches to the concept of possession2015Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
  • 312.
    Krooks, Beatrice
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Tankar kring Torsk: Isotopanalyser av torskkotor för att undersöka vikten av torskimport i medeltida Sverige2013Självständigt arbete på grundnivå (kandidatexamen), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay discusses the import of cod (Gadus morhua) in Sweden during the Middle Ages through isotope analysis of cod vertebrae. The isotope analysis is used to trace the cods origin to either the Baltic Sea or the Atlantic Ocean. The bones were subjected to d13C, d15N and d34S analysis; 64 of  the analyzed bones met the quality criteria. The isotop data showed that import of Atlantic cod was significant in medeval Sweden. The analysis suggests that there is no specific time or event that the sites start to import cod but this varies from site to site.

     

  • 313.
    Krooks, Beatrice
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Tankar kring Torsk: Isotopanalyser av torskkotor för att undersöka vikten av torskimport i medeltida Sverige2013Självständigt arbete på grundnivå (kandidatexamen), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay discusses the import of cod (Gadus morhua) in Sweden during the Middle Ages through isotope analysis of cod vertebrae. The isotope analysis is used to trace the cods origin to either the Baltic Sea or the Atlantic Ocean. The bones were subjected to d13C, d15N and d34S analysis; 64 of  the analyzed bones met the quality criteria. The isotop data showed that import of Atlantic cod was significant in medeval Sweden. The analysis suggests that there is no specific time or event that the sites start to import cod but this varies from site to site.

  • 314.
    Krzewińska, Maja
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. University of Oslo, Norway.
    Bjørnstad, Gro
    Skoglund, Pontus
    Olason, Pall Isolfur
    Bill, Jan
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hagelberg, Erika
    Mitochondrial DNA variation in the Viking age population of Norway2015Ingår i: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 370, nr 1660Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The medieval Norsemen or Vikings had an important biological and cultural impact on many parts of Europe through raids, colonization and trade, from about AD 793 to 1066. To help understand the genetic affinities of the ancient Norsemen, and their genetic contribution to the gene pool of other Europeans, we analysed DNA markers in Late Iron Age skeletal remains from Norway. DNA was extracted from 80 individuals, and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms were detected by next-generation sequencing. The sequences of 45 ancient Norwegians were verified as genuine through the identification of damage patterns characteristic of ancient DNA. The ancient Norwegians were genetically similar to previously analysed ancient Icelanders, and to present-day Shetland and Orkney Islanders, Norwegians, Swedes, Scots, English, German and French. The Viking Age population had higher frequencies of K*, U*, V* and I* haplogroups than their modern counterparts, but a lower proportion of T* and H* haplogroups. Three individuals carried haplotypes that are rare in Norway today (U5b1b1, Hg A* and an uncommon variant of H*). Our combined analyses indicate that Norse women were important agents in the overseas expansion and settlement of the Vikings, and that women from the Orkneys and Western Isles contributed to the colonization of Iceland.

  • 315.
    Larsson, Emelie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Gränser i Grödinge: Om hägnadsanläggningars funktion med utgångspunkt i en fosfatanalys av RAÄ 78 samt RAÄ 79 i Grödinge sn på Södertörn2014Självständigt arbete på grundnivå (kandidatexamen), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the question of when hill forts – or enclosed mountains – were built and to what purpose, by examining two enclosed mountains (RAÄ 78 and 79) in Grödinge parish in the province of Södermanland. A phosphate analysis was conducted to trace anthropogenic activities. The analysis showed only a slight elevation of phosphate content in the soil. A histogram indicated that the elevations were not normally distributed, which could suggest that they were caused by anthropogenic activities. A focus on boundaries is evident in the material, whether it is about erecting physical barriers or the boundary between life and death.

  • 316. Lazaridis, Iosif
    et al.
    Patterson, Nick
    Mittnik, Alissa
    Renaud, Gabriel
    Mallick, Swapan
    Kirsanow, Karola
    Sudmant, Peter H.
    Schraiber, Joshua G.
    Castellano, Sergi
    Lipson, Mark
    Berger, Bonnie
    Economou, Christos
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Bollongino, Ruth
    Fu, Qiaomei
    Bos, Kirsten I.
    Nordenfelt, Susanne
    Li, Heng
    de Filippo, Cesare
    Pruefer, Kay
    Sawyer, Susanna
    Posth, Cosimo
    Haak, Wolfgang
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Fornander, Elin
    Rohland, Nadin
    Delsate, Dominique
    Francken, Michael
    Guinet, Jean-Michel
    Wahl, Joachim
    Ayodo, George
    Babiker, Hamza A.
    Bailliet, Graciela
    Balanovska, Elena
    Balanovsky, Oleg
    Barrantes, Ramiro
    Bedoya, Gabriel
    Ben-Ami, Haim
    Bene, Judit
    Berrada, Fouad
    Bravi, Claudio M.
    Brisighelli, Francesca
    Busby, George B. J.
    Cali, Francesco
    Churnosov, Mikhail
    Cole, David E. C.
    Corach, Daniel
    Damba, Larissa
    van Driem, George
    Dryomov, Stanislav
    Dugoujon, Jean-Michel
    Fedorova, Sardana A.
    Romero, Irene Gallego
    Gubina, Marina
    Hammer, Michael
    Henn, Brenna M.
    Hervig, Tor
    Hodoglugil, Ugur
    Jha, Aashish R.
    Karachanak-Yankova, Sena
    Khusainova, Rita
    Khusnutdinova, Elza
    Kittles, Rick
    Kivisild, Toomas
    Klitz, William
    Kucinskas, Vaidutis
    Kushniarevich, Alena
    Laredj, Leila
    Litvinov, Sergey
    Loukidis, Theologos
    Mahley, Robert W.
    Melegh, Bela
    Metspalu, Ene
    Molina, Julio
    Mountain, Joanna
    Nakkalajarvi, Klemetti
    Nesheva, Desislava
    Nyambo, Thomas
    Osipova, Ludmila
    Parik, Jueri
    Platonov, Fedor
    Posukh, Olga
    Romano, Valentino
    Rothhammer, Francisco
    Rudan, Igor
    Ruizbakiev, Ruslan
    Sahakyan, Hovhannes
    Sajantila, Antti
    Salas, Antonio
    Starikovskaya, Elena B.
    Tarekegn, Ayele
    Toncheva, Draga
    Turdikulova, Shahlo
    Uktveryte, Ingrida
    Utevska, Olga
    Vasquez, Rene
    Villena, Mercedes
    Voevoda, Mikhail
    Winkler, Cheryl A.
    Yepiskoposyan, Levon
    Zalloua, Pierre
    Zemunik, Tatijana
    Cooper, Alan
    Capelli, Cristian
    Thomas, Mark G.
    Ruiz-Linares, Andres
    Tishkoff, Sarah A.
    Singh, Lalji
    Thangaraj, Kumarasamy
    Villems, Richard
    Comas, David
    Sukernik, Rem
    Metspalu, Mait
    Meyer, Matthias
    Eichler, Evan E.
    Burger, Joachim
    Slatkin, Montgomery
    Paeaebo, Svante
    Kelso, Janet
    Reich, David
    Krause, Johannes
    Ancient human genomes suggest three ancestral populations for present-day Europeans2014Ingår i: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 513, nr 7518, s. 409-+Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We sequenced the genomes of a similar to 7,000-year-old farmer from Germany and eight similar to 8,000-year-old hunter-gatherers from Luxembourg and Sweden. We analysed these and other ancient genomes(1-4) with 2,345 contemporary humans to show that most present-day Europeans derive from at least three highly differentiated populations: west European hunter-gatherers, who contributed ancestry to all Europeans but not to Near Easterners; ancient north Eurasians related to Upper Palaeolithic Siberians(3), who contributed to both Europeans and Near Easterners; and early European farmers, who were mainly of Near Eastern origin but also harboured west European hunter-gatherer related ancestry. We model these populations' deep relationships and show that early European farmers had similar to 44% ancestry from a 'basal Eurasian' population that split before the diversification of other non-African lineages.

  • 317.
    Leino, Matti W.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Linköping University, Sweden; Nordic Museum, Sweden.
    Solberg, Svein Ø
    Tunset, Hanna Maja
    Fogelholm, Jesper
    Karlsson Strese, Else-Marie
    Hagenblad, Jenny
    Patterns of Exchange of Multiplying Onion (Allium cepa L. Aggregatum-Group) in Fennoscandian Home Gardens2018Ingår i: Economic Botany, ISSN 0013-0001, E-ISSN 1874-9364, Vol. 72, nr 3, s. 346-356Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiplying onion (Allium cepa L. Aggregatum-Group), commonly known as shallot or potato onion, has a long tradition of cultivation in Fennoscandian home gardens. During the last decades, more than 80 accessions, maintained as vegetatively propagated clones, have been gathered from home gardens in all Fennoscandian countries. A genetic analysis showed regional patterns of accessions belonging to the same genetic group. However, accessions belonging to the same genetic group could originate in any of the countries. These results suggested both short- and long-distance exchange of set onions, which was confirmed by several survey responses. Some of the most common genetic groups also resembled different modern varieties. The morphological characterization illustrated that most characters were strongly influenced by environment and set onion properties. The only reliably scorable trait was bulb skin color. Neither our morphological nor genetic results support a division between potato onions and shallots. Instead, naming seems to follow linguistic traditions. An ethnobotanical survey tells of the Fennoscandian multiplying onions as being a crop with reliable harvest, excellent storage ability, and good taste. An increased cultivation of this material on both household and commercial scale should be possible.

  • 318. Lempiäinen-Avci, Mia
    et al.
    Lundström, Maria
    Huttunen, Sanna
    Leino, Matti W.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Swedish Museum of Cultural History, Sweden.
    Hagenblad, Jenny
    Archaeological and Historical Materials as a Means to Explore Finnish Crop History2018Ingår i: Environmental Archaeology, ISSN 1461-4103, E-ISSN 1749-6314Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In Northern Europe, barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) has been cultivated for almost 6000 years. Thus far, 150-year-old grains from historical collections have been used to investigate the distribution of barley diversity and how the species has spread across the region. Genetic studies of archaeobotanical material from agrarian sites could potentially clarify earlier migration patterns and cast further light on the origin of barley landraces. In this study, we aimed to evaluate different archaeological and historical materials with respect to DNA content, and to explore connections between Late Iron Age and medieval barley populations and historical samples of barley landraces in north-west Europe. The material analysed consisted of archaeological samples of charred barley grains from four sites in southern Finland, and historical material, with 33 samples obtained from two herbaria and the seed collections of the Swedish museum of cultural history.

    The DNA concentrations obtained from charred archaeological barley remains were too low for successful KASP genotyping confirming previously reported difficulties in obtaining aDNA from charred remains. Historical samples from herbaria and seed collection confirmed previously shown strong genetic differentiation between two-row and six-row barley. Six-row barley accessions from northern and southern Finland tended to cluster apart, while no geographical structuring was observed among two-row barley. Genotyping of functional markers revealed that the majority of barley cultivated in Finland in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century was late-flowering under increasing day-length, supporting previous findings from northern European barley.

  • 319.
    Lidén, K.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Nordqvist, B
    Götherström, A
    Bendixen, E
    “The wet and the wild followed by the dry and the tame” – or did they occur at the same time?: Diet in Mesolithic–Neolithic southern Sweden2004Ingår i: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 78, nr 299, s. 23-33Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 320. Lidén, K
    et al.
    Olsson, A
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Angerbjörn, A
    Nitrogen isotope analysis of deciduous teeth: A tool for tracing weaning patternsManuskript (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 321.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    A common language is the basis for sound collaboration2017Ingår i: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 50, nr 2, s. 124-126Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 322.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Arkeologisk framtid:Fri forskning på fria material2009Ingår i: Framtidens arkeologi: Arkeologisk framtid : rapport från Svenskt arkeologmöte 2008. - 2009 / [ed] Tore Artelius och Anna Källén, Lunds: Lunds universitet , 2009, s. 181-191Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 323.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Angerbjörn, A.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Dietary change and stable isotopes: a model of growth and dormancy in cave bears1999Ingår i: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B-Biological Sciences, Vol. 266, nr 1430, s. 1779-1783Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to discuss dietary change over time by the use of stable isotopes, it is necessary to sort out the underlying processes in isotopic variation. Together with the dietary signal other processes have been investigated, namely metabolic processes, collagen turnover and physical growth. However, growth and collagen turnover time have so far been neglected in dietary reconstruction based on stable isotopes. An earlier study suggested that cave bears (Ursus spelaeus) probably gave birth to cubs during dormancy. We provide an estimate of the effect on stable isotopes of growth and metabolism and discuss collagen turnover in a population of cave bears. Based on a quantitative model, we hypothesized that bear cubs lactated their mothers during their first and second winters, but were fed solid food together with lactation during their first summer. This demonstrates the need to include physical growth, metabolism and collagen turnover in dietary reconstruction. Whereas the effects of diet and metabolism are due to fractionation, growth and collagen turnover are dilution processes.

  • 324.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Archaeology vs. archaeological science: Do we have a case?2013Ingår i: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, s. 11-20Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 325.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Mångkultur redan på stenåldern2009Ingår i: Forskning och framsteg, ISSN 0015-7937, nr 7, s. 44-47Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 326.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Response to comments: Archaeology vs. Archaeological Science2013Ingår i: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, s. 49-50Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 327.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Walking on the wild side: On cultural diversity and the Pitted Ware Culture along the Swedish east coast during the Middle Neolithic2007Ingår i: From Stonehenge to the Baltic: Living with cultural diversity in the third millennium BC, Archaeopress, Oxford , 2007, s. 1-11Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    There was a rich diversity in material culture during the Middle Neolithic in Scandinavia and the Baltic region, and the archaeological remains have therefore generally been labelled as one out of several parallel archaeological cultures. What these “cultures” represent, and whether or not they correspond to actual groups of people has long been debated. Particularly the Pitted Ware Culture has given rise to various hypotheses. By applying stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses on human and faunal skeletal remains from Pitted Ware contexts, and to compare these data with stable isotope data derived from sites of other cultural attribution, we were able to demonstrate that the Pitted Ware Culture in fact represents a separate group of people, not only distinguished by their characteristic pottery, but also by their food culture, which was mainly based on the utilization of seal. On the basis of stable isotope, radiocarbon and archaeological data, various other hypotheses regarding the Pitted Ware Culture and its stance vis-à-vis the Funnel Beaker and Battle Axe (Corded Ware) Cultures could thus be refuted.

  • 328.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Fjellström, Markus
    Wallerström, Thomas
    Nya resultat från Eskil Olssons Rounala-utgrävning 19152018Ingår i: Kunglig makt och samiska bosättningsmönster: Studier kring Väinö Tanners vinterbyteori / [ed] Thomas Wallerström, Oslo: Novus Forlag, 2018, s. 282-308Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 329.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Götherström, Anders
    Pushing it back. Dating the CCR5-delta 32 bp deletion to the Mesolithic in Sweden and it's implications for the Meso/Neo transition2006Ingår i: Documenta Praehistorica, nr XXXIII, s. 29-37Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 330.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lindholm, Veronica
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Breastfeeding patterns and diet in five 17th-century children from Sund, Åland Islands2012Ingår i: Stones, Bones & Thoughts: Festschrift in Honour of Milton Núñez / [ed] Sirpa Niinimäki, Anna-Kaisa Salmi, Jari-Matti Kuusela, Jari Okkonen, Oulu: [Milton Núñezin juhlakirjan toimituskunta] , 2012, s. 166-174Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Breastfeeding patterns and diet in five 17th-century children from Sund on the Åland Islands were studied by means of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of bone and teeth. Although all individuals derive from the same burial context, the high-status location inside the church, they nevertheless show differences in diet and breastfeeding patterns. We found two dietary groups: one consuming almost exclusively terrestrial protein resources, and the other a mixture of marine and terrestrial resources, with a predominance of terrestrial protein. The individual breastfeeding patterns show great variability – from no breastfeeding at all, to exclusive breastfeeding for ten months. Weaning varied both with regard to onset and pace. The overall diet indicates that the analysed individuals originate from two different environments, possibly mainland Åland and the outer archipelago, respectively.

  • 331.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lindkvist, Jonas
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Both fish and fowl: Food practices in medieval Visby2019Ingår i: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, s. 239-241Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 332.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Schutkowski, Holger
    University of Bradford.
    Sporstoffer og isotopanalyser2008Ingår i: Bilogisk antropologi: med human osteologi / [ed] Lynnerup, N., Bennike, P. & Iregren, E., Köpenhamn: Gyldendal , 2008, 1, s. 257-274Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 333.
    Liebe-Harkort, Carola
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Från middagsbordet till soptunnan: Djurben från forna måltider i Pompeji2011Ingår i: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, nr 2Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 334.
    Lindberg, Tove
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Smörkullen- the forgotten cemetery: Dietary studies of a Roman Iron Age cemetery in Västra Tollstad parish, Östergötland2009Självständigt arbete på avancerad nivå (masterexamen), 30 poäng / 45 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with individuals buried at Smörkullen, Västra Tollstad parish, Östergötland, Sweden. The aim is to reconstruct the diet of the individuals through stable isotope analyses and then try to identify if social hierarchy correlates with the diet. To do this, 35 individuals were divided into different groups (males, females, high status graves, low status graves, young adults, adults, seniors and trepanned individuals) and then subjected to stable isotope analyses of carbon, nitrogen and sulphur. The results show that all individuals lived mainly on freshwater fish with a few exceptions that had a more mixed diet of terrestrial protein and freshwater fish. The sulphur analyses showed that one female (possibly two) has moved to the area sometime after the age of seven. Because of the homogenous diet of freshwater fish no social hierarchy based on diet could be established.

  • 335.
    Lindboe, Karin Kaldhussæter
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Universitetet i Oslo.
    Arkeologi på molekylnivå: Lipidanalyser av 8 keramikkskår fra Logården2014Självständigt arbete på grundnivå (kandidatexamen), 10 poäng / 15 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to study Neolithic culture of food and culinary art in southern Sweden.  Food lipid residues extracted from eight ceramic shards from the site Logården, Karleby in Västergötland Sverige, are analysed by using GC-MS, Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry. The ceramics belong to the Funnel beaker culture and the material is dated to about 3000-2900 BC cal. The goal is to figure out what the pots have been used for and how the results match up with earlier results on the use of ceramic vessels in the Neolithic. The results show that the ceramic shards contain a majority of lipids from terrestrial animals mixed with lipids from vegetables.  

  • 336.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen, Avdelningen för zoologisk ekologi.
    Envall, Ida
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Isaksson, Sven
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    An empirical study of cultural evolution: the development of European cookery from medieval to modern times2015Ingår i: Cliodynamics, ISSN 2373-7530, E-ISSN 2308-4294, Vol. 6, nr 2, s. 115-129Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We have carried out an empirical study of long-term change in European cookery to test if the development of this cultural phenomenon matches a general hypothesis about cultural evolution: that human cultural change is characterized by cumulativity. Data from seven cookery books, evenly spaced across time, the oldest one written in medieval times (~1200) and the most recent one dating from late modernity (1999), were compared. Ten recipes from each of three categories (‘poultry recipes’, ‘fish recipes,’ and ‘meat recipes’) were arbitrarily selected from each cookery book by selecting the first ten recipes in each category, and the numbers (per recipe) of steps, separate partial processes, methods, ingredients, semi-manufactured ingredients, compound semi-manufactured ingredients (defined as semi-manufactured ingredients containing no less than two raw products), and self-made semi-manufactured ingredients were counted. Regression analyses were used to quantitatively compare the cookery from different ages. We found a significant increase in the numbers (per recipe) of steps, separate partial processes, methods, ingredients, and semi-manufactured ingredients. These significant increases enabled us to identify the development of cookery as an example of the general trend of cumulativity in long-term cultural evolution. The number of self-made semi-manufactured ingredients per recipe, however, tended to decrease over time, which may reflect the cumulative characteristics of cultural evolution at the level of society, considering the accumulation of knowledge that is required to industrialize food production.

  • 337.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    The Genetics of the Neolithic Transition: New Light on Differences Between Hunter-Gatherers and Farmers in Southern Sweden2011Ingår i: HUMAN BIOARCHAEOLOGY OF THE TRANSITION TO AGRICULTURE / [ed] Pinhasi, R, Stock, J. T., Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2011, s. 385-402Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 338.
    Linderholm, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Fornander, Elin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Mörth, Carl-Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geologiska vetenskaper.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Increasing mobility at the Neolithic/ Bronze Age transition – sulphur isotope evidence from Öland, Sweden2014Ingår i: Internet Archaeology, ISSN 1363-5387, E-ISSN 1363-5387, Vol. 37Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this investigation is to look at the use of various aquatic, in this case marine, resources in relation to mobility during the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods. On the island of Öland, in the Baltic Sea, different archaeological cultures are represented in the form of material culture and skeletal remains at three sites. We have analysed δ34S values in human remains representing 36 individuals, as well as faunal remains. We investigated intra-individual patterns of mobility from childhood to adulthood, primarily focusing on a passage grave. Taking into account previously published dietary data that demonstrate a wide range of dietary practices involving aquatic resources, we applied a model to estimate the contribution of δ34S from terrestrial protein, to separate mobility from dietary changes, thereby identifying individuals who changed residence, as well as individuals with non-local origins. Evidence of mobility could be demonstrated at two sites. For the third site the consistently marine diet inhibits inferences on mobility based on δ34S analysis. Chronologically, the frequency of non-locals was highest during the Bronze Age, when the diet was very uniform and based on terrestrial resources.

  • 339. Linderholm, Anna
    et al.
    Fornander, Elin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Mörth, Carl-Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geologiska vetenskaper.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Increasing mobility at the Neolithic/Bronze Age transition: sulphur isotope evidence from Öland, SwedenIngår i: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 340.
    Linderholm, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Stable isotope analysis of a medieval skeletal sample indicative of systemic disease from Sigtuna Sweden2011Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 38, nr 4, s. 925-933Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sigtuna, Sweden, several medieval cemeteries have been excavated, from which approximately 800 skeletons have been excavated and analysed. Archaeological finds and anthropological analyses have exposed social differences between the cemeteries. Stable isotope analyses have shown that the inhabitants of the town consumed a mixed diet. Significant differences in dietary patterns between the cemeteries may be related to social stratification. In the outskirts of a churchyard excavated in 2006, bone changes showing systemic inflammatory disease indicative of leprosy were observed in six individuals. The burial location suggests that the affected belonged to a lower social stratum. Bone samples were taken from these six individuals, 19 other human skeletons and five animals from the same cemetery for analysis of the stable isotope composition of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S). The results showed no significant differences in delta(13)C and delta(15)N values between the groups, i.e. the seemingly healthy humans and the humans affected by severe inflammatory disease appear to have had similar diets. Nor was a significant difference observed in delta(34)S data between the six affected individuals and the rest of the sample, implying that no difference in origins could be observed between the two groups studied. However, a comparison between the present study and the previous analysis resulted in significant differences in carbon values. Based on the results obtained in this investigation it is suggested that if a dietary difference existed between people in the outskirts of a cemetery (for example those suffering from leprosy) and people buried in higher ranked regions, it was not a difference in food source but rather in other parameters. Instead dietary differences and possibly social variations are demonstrated between cemeteries. The results from the present study highlight the hierarchical arrangements of social classes in the early medieval society.

  • 341.
    Linderholm, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Malmstrom, Helena
    Liden, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Holmlund, Gunilla
    Gotherstrom, Anders
    Cryptic Contamination and Phylogenetic Nonsense2008Ingår i: PLOS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 3, nr 5, s. e2316-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Ancient human DNA has been treated cautiously ever since the problems related to this type of material were exposed in the early 1990s, but as sequential genetic data from ancient specimens have been key components in several evolutionary and ecological studies, interest in ancient human DNA is on the increase again. It is especially tempting to approach archaeological and anthropological questions through this type of material, but DNA from ancient human tissue is notoriously complicated to work with due to the risk of contamination with modern human DNA. Various ways of authenticating results based on ancient human DNA have been developed to circumvent the problems. One commonly used method is to predict what the contamination is expected to look like and then test whether the ancient human DNA fulfils this prediction. If it does, the results are rejected as contamination, while if it does not, they are often considered authentic. We show here that human contamination in ancient material may well deviate from local allele frequencies or the distributions to be found among the laboratory workers and archaeologists. We conclude that it is not reliable to authenticate ancient human DNA solely by showing that it is different from what would be expected from people who have handled the material.

  • 342. Lira, Jaime
    et al.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Olaria, C
    Brändström Durling, Michael
    Gilbert, Tom
    Ellegren, Hans
    Willerslev, Eske
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Arsuaga, JL
    Götherström, Anders
    Ancient DNA reveals traces of Iberian Neolithic and Bronze age lineages in modern Iberian horses2010Ingår i: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 19, nr 1, s. 64-78Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple geographical regions have been proposed for the domestication of Equus caballus. It has been suggested, based on zooarchaeological and genetic analyses that wild horses from the Iberian Peninsula were involved in the process, and the overrepresentation of mitochondrial D1 cluster in modern Iberian horses supports this suggestion. To test this hypothesis, we analysed mitochondrial DNA from 22 ancient Iberian horse remains belonging to the Neolithic, the Bronze Age and the Middle Ages, against previously published sequences. Only the medieval Iberian sequence appeared in the D1 group. Neolithic and Bronze Age sequences grouped in other clusters, one of which (Lusitano group C) is exclusively represented by modern horses of Iberian origin. Moreover, Bronze Age Iberian sequences displayed the lowest nucleotide diversity values when compared with modern horses, ancient wild horses and other ancient domesticates using nonparametric bootstrapping analyses. We conclude that the excessive clustering of Bronze Age horses in the Lusitano group C, the observed nucleotide diversity and the local continuity from wild Neolithic Iberian to modern Iberian horses, could be explained by the use of local wild mares during an early Iberian domestication or restocking event, whereas the D1 group probably was introduced into Iberia in later historical times.

  • 343. Lorentz-Meyer, Dagmar
    et al.
    Åsberg, Cecilia
    Fredengren, Christina
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Sõrmus, Maris
    Treusch, Pat
    Vehviläinen, Marja
    Zekany, Eva
    Žeková, Lucie
    Anthropocene Ecologies: Biogeotechnical Relationalities in Late Capitalism2015Övrigt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This position paper outlines a multidirectional approach to what we call Anthropocene ecologies, its diverse genealogies, and methodological and conceptual foci. Under the heading of Anthropocene ecologies we seek to fertilize the sciences of ecology with approaches of queer and feminist new materialisms, and engage in multiple collaborations across the humanities, sciences, and everyday ecological practices. Specifically we draw on ecology as the object of analysis and the methodology, building on concepts and approaches from the sciences, material feminisms, science and technology studies, human/animal studies and material ecocriticism. Five modes of attention become particularly salient for our analysis of the Anthropocene ecologies of solar energy, humananimal relations, organic food production, wetlands, and human-robot relations. First we attend to how these ecologies are generated within and affect the webs of multispecies ecologies in late capitalism. Second we suggest the concept of biogeotechno-power to capture the entanglements of the biological, the geologic and the technological in new formations of power that invest, regulate, enhance, and dispose of (more-than-)human bodies in particular ecological relationalities. Third we examine the multiplicities of ecological temporalities, including the deep time of mineralisation, fossilisation and past and future species survival. Fourth we attend to affect as an entangling force in ecological relations. And fifth we investigate an affirmative posthuman ethics of concern and response-ability in relations with living and nonliving materialities that might not be close by (spatially and/or temporally). Anthropocene ecologies thereby include the technical, informational, temporal, affective, and ethical as integral parts of ecological intra-actions, and remain attuned to the differential, paradoxical and unexpected.

  • 344. Lucquin, Alexandre
    et al.
    Gibbs, Kevin
    Uchiyama, Junzo
    Saul, Hayley
    Ajimoto, Mayumi
    Eley, Yvette
    Radini, Anita
    Heron, Carl P.
    Shoda, Shinya
    Nishida, Yastami
    Lundy, Jasmine
    Jordan, Peter
    Isaksson, Sven
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Craig, Oliver E.
    Ancient lipids document continuity in the use of earlyhunter–gatherer pottery through 9,000 years of Japanese prehistory2016Ingår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 113, nr 15, s. 3991-3996Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The earliest pots in the world are from East Asia and date to the LatePleistocene. However, ceramic vessels were only produced in largenumbers during the warmer and more stable climatic conditions ofthe Holocene. It has long been assumed that the expansion of potterywas linked with increased sedentism and exploitation of newresources that became available with the ameliorated climate, butthis hypothesis has never been tested. Through chemical analysis oftheir contents, we herein investigate the use of pottery across anexceptionally long 9,000-y sequence from the Jo¯mon site of Torihamainwestern Japan, intermittently occupied from the Late Pleistocene tothe mid-Holocene. Molecular and isotopic analyses of lipids from 143vessels provides clear evidence that pottery across this sequence waspredominantly used for cooking marine and freshwater resources,with evidence for diversification in the range of aquatic productsprocessed during the Holocene. Conversely, there is little indicationthat ruminant animals or plants were processed in pottery, althoughit is evident from the faunal and macrobotanical remains that thesefoods were heavily exploited. Supported by other residue analysisdata from Japan, our results show that the link between potteryand fishing was established in the Late Paleolithic and lasted wellinto the Holocene, despite environmental and socio-economic change.Cooking aquatic products in pottery represents an enduring socialaspect of East Asian hunter–gatherers, a tradition based on a dependabletechnology for exploiting a sustainable resource in an uncertainand changing world.

  • 345. Lucquin, Alexandre
    et al.
    Robson, Harry K.
    Eley, Yvette
    Shoda, Shinya
    Veltcheva, Dessislava
    Gibbs, Kevin
    Heron, Carl P.
    Isaksson, Sven
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Nishida, Yastami
    Taniguchi, Yasuhiro
    Nakajima, Shota
    Kobayashi, Kenichi
    Jordan, Peter
    Kaner, Simon
    Craig, Oliver E.
    The impact of environmental change on the use of early pottery by East Asian hunter-gatherers2018Ingår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 115, nr 31, s. 7931-7936Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The invention of pottery was a fundamental technological advancement with far-reaching economic and cultural consequences. Pottery containers first emerged in East Asia during the Late Pleistocene in a wide range of environmental settings, but became particularly prominent and much more widely dispersed after climatic warming at the start of the Holocene. Some archaeologists argue that this increasing usage was driven by environmental factors, as warmer climates would have generated a wider range of terrestrial plant and animal resources that required processing in pottery. However, this hypothesis has never been directly tested. Here, in one of the largest studies of its kind, we conducted organic residue analysis of >800 pottery vessels selected from 46 Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene sites located across the Japanese archipelago to identify their contents. Our results demonstrate that pottery had a strong association with the processing of aquatic resources, irrespective of the ecological setting. Contrary to expectations, this association remained stable even after the onset of Holocene warming, including in more southerly areas, where expanding forests provided new opportunities for hunting and gathering. Nevertheless, the results indicate that a broader array of aquatic resources was processed in pottery after the start of the Holocene. We suggest this marks a significant change in the role of pottery of hunter-gatherers, corresponding to an increased volume of production, greater variation in forms and sizes, the rise of intensified fishing, the onset of shellfish exploitation, and reduced residential mobility.

  • 346.
    Lundmark, Staffan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Neolithic farmers in Poland - A study of stable isotopes in human bones and teeth from Kichary Nowe in the south of Poland2016Självständigt arbete på avancerad nivå (masterexamen), 20 poäng / 30 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [en]

    The diet of the Stone Age cultures is a strong indicator to the social group, thus farmers and hunters can be distinguished through their diet.

    There is well-preserved and well excavated Polish skeletal material available for such a study but the material has not previously been subject to stable isotopes analyses and therefore the questions of diets has not been answered.

    This study aims to contribute to the understanding of the cultures in the Kichary Nowe 2 area in the Lesser Poland district in southern Poland. Through analysis of the stable isotopes of Carbon, Nitrogen and Sulphur in the collagen of teeth and skeletal bones from the humans in the Kichary Nowe 2 grave-field and from bones from the fauna, coeval and from the same area, the study will establish whether there were any sharp changes of diets.

    The material from the grave-field comes from cultures with an established agricultural economy, where their cultural belonging has been anticipated from the burial context.

    The results from my study of stable isotopes from the bone material will be grouped by various parameters, culture, attribution to sex and age. The groups will then be compared to each other to investigate patterns within and between the groups.

  • 347.
    Lundström, Fredrik
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Secrets of the Spearhead: Developing Continuum Mechanical Simulations and Organic Residue Analysis for the Study of Scandinavian Flint Spearhead Functionality2019Självständigt arbete på avancerad nivå (masterexamen), 20 poäng / 30 hpStudentuppsats (Examensarbete)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a pilot study, designed to test and develop methods suitable for the study of Scandinavian flint spearhead functionality. The functionality of projectile and lithic point armament has not been studied for almost 30 years in Scandinavia. Meanwhile, methods used to analyse lithic projectiles have developed considerably. However, few of these methods are precise enough to be used in conjunction with Scandinavian stone technological analyses that emphasize the societal aspect of lithic points. Consequently, two methods were chosen that could provide data for Scandinavian research issues: 3D-scanning/continuum mechanical simulations and organic residue analysis. The methods were tested on 6 experimental spearheads. The continuum mechanical simulation generated both visual and numerical data that could be used to create precise functional-morphological descriptions. The data could also potentially be used for projectile point classification. The organic residue analysis revealed promising results for the use of an artefact and activity specific analysis, with a sequential extraction protocol. In unison, the results from both analyses could be used to reveal how spearheads were functionally designed and used in Stone Age Scandinavia, even though there are methodological and technological issues that need solving.

  • 348. Lundström, Maria
    et al.
    Forsberg, Nils
    Heimdahl, Jens
    Hagenblad, Jenny
    Leino, Matti W.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Linköping University, Sweden; Swedish Museum of Cultural History, Sweden.
    Genetic analyses of Scandinavian desiccated, charred and waterlogged remains of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)2018Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 22, s. 11-20Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Barley, Hordeum vulgare L., has been cultivated in Fennoscandia (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland) since the start of the Neolithic around 4000 years BCE. Genetic studies of extant and 19th century barley landraces from the area have previously shown that distinct genetic groups exist with geographic structure according to latitude, suggesting strong local adaptation of cultivated crops. It is, however, not known what time depth these patterns reflect. Here we evaluate different archaeobotanical specimens of barley, extending several centuries in time, for their potential to answer this question by analysis of aDNA. Forty-six charred grains, nineteen waterlogged specimens and nine desiccated grains were evaluated by PCR and KASP genotyping. The charred samples did not contain any detectable endogenous DNA. Some waterlogged samples permitted amplification of endogenous DNA, however not sufficient for subsequent analysis. Desiccated plant materials provided the highest genotyping success rates of the materials analysed here in agreement with previous studies. Five desiccated grains from a grave from 1679 in southern Sweden were genotyped with 100 SNP markers and data compared to genotypes of 19th century landraces from Fennoscandia. The results showed that the genetic composition of barley grown in southern Sweden changed very little from late 17th to late 19th century and farmers stayed true to locally adapted crops in spite of societal and agricultural development.

  • 349. Lundström, Maria
    et al.
    Leino, Matti W.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Linköping University, Sweden; The Nordic Museum, Sweden.
    Hagenblad, Jenny
    Evolutionary history of the NAM-B1 gene in wild and domesticated tetraploid wheat2017Ingår i: BMC Genetics, ISSN 1471-2156, E-ISSN 1471-2156, Vol. 18, artikel-id 118Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The NAM-B1 gene in wheat has for almost three decades been extensively studied and utilized in breeding programs because of its significant impact on grain protein and mineral content and pleiotropic effects on senescence rate and grain size. First detected in wild emmer wheat, the wild-type allele of the gene has been introgressed into durum and bread wheat. Later studies have, however, also found the presence of the wild-type allele in some domesticated subspecies. In this study we trace the evolutionary history of the NAM-B1 in tetraploid wheat species and evaluate it as a putative domestication gene. Results: Genotyping of wild and landrace tetraploid accessions showed presence of only null alleles in durum. Domesticated emmer wheats contained both null alleles and the wild-type allele while wild emmers, with one exception, only carried the wild-type allele. One of the null alleles consists of a deletion that covers several 100 kb. The other null-allele, a one-basepair frame-shift insertion, likely arose among wild emmer. This allele was the target of a selective sweep, extending over several 100 kb. Conclusions: The NAM-B1 gene fulfils some criteria for being a domestication gene by encoding a trait of domestication relevance (seed size) and is here shown to have been under positive selection. The presence of both wild-type and null alleles in domesticated emmer does, however, suggest the gene to be a diversification gene in this species. Further studies of genotype-environment interactions are needed to find out under what conditions selection on different NAM-B1 alleles have been beneficial.

  • 350.
    López-Costas, Olalla
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Spain; University of Granada, Spain.
    Lantes-Suárez, Óscar
    Martínez Cortizas, Antonio
    Chemical compositional changes in archaeological human bones due to diagenesis: Type of bone vs soil environment2016Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 67, s. 43-51Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Diagenesis in human remains is a subject of growing interest due to the increase in bone chemical studies to reconstruct pre- and post-mortem features in archaeological and forensic sciences. The efforts made during the last decades have solidified our understanding of diagenetic processes; however, their high complexity demands more research to address them empirically, specifically considering factors such as types of soil substratum and skeletal element. In this work, a geochemical study of human remains from the archaeological site of A Lanzada (NW Spain) is performed to understand diagenesis (i.e. chemical alteration) and life environmental exposure. Three types of bone (thoracic, long and cranial) from 30 skeletons of two periods (9 Roman, 21 post-Roman) were analysed by X-ray fluorescence. Bones were recovered from burials located in slightly alkaline (Haplic Arenosol (calcaric)) and acidic (Cambic Umbrisol (humic)) soils. Principal components analysis was applied to extract the main chemical signatures, and analysis of variance to determine the influence of different factors. Bone composition was characterized by four chemical signals related to: i) alteration of bone bioapatite; ii) metal sorption from the soil solution; iii) presence of fine (silt-clay) soil particles; and iv) lead incorporation. Thoracic bones were found to be more sensitive to diagenesis and the burial environment; long bones and crania presented a similar response. Skeletons buried in the acidic soil were significantly poorly preserved. Lead content was higher in bones of the Roman period, which seems to be related to pre-mortem conditions. Previous investigations on palaeopollution in NW Spain enable us to hypothesize that Roman individuals may have been subjected to a high exposure of Pb due to elevated atmospheric metal contamination.

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