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  • 351.
    Sörman, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ojala, Karin
    Southern bronzes in the North: exchange networks linking Scandinavia to Continental Europe in the mid-first millennium BC explored through the Hassle hoard, Sweden2023In: Matières premières en Europe au 1er Millénaire av. n. è. Exploitation, transformation, diffusion – La Europa de las materias primas en el Ier milenio a.n.e. Explotación, transformación y difusión: Actes du 45e colloque international de l’AFEAF, Gijón, 13-15 mai 2021 / [ed] Luis Valdés; Veronica Cicolani; Eneko Hiria, Paris: AFEAF , 2023, p. 453-456Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1936 an intriguing deposition dating to the Bronze Age - Iron Age transition (ca 600-500 BC) was found in a river bed in Hassle in southeastSweden. It contained a rare combination of exotic imports originating from Continental Europe and the Mediterranean world; two bent Hallstattswords of Mindelheim type, two rippenzisten/ciste a cordoni buckets, two small hooks and twelve ornamental bronze discs (probably decorationsfor a wagon) - all found inside a reworked and repaired cauldron, possibly originating from the Etruscan or Greek area. The closest parallel tothis find is the tripod cauldron from a 6th century tumulus in Sainte-Colombe-sur-Seine (Côte-d’Or), eastern France. How these objects reachedcentral Sweden is debated. The find is currently being revised and its origins, dates and possible routes to Scandinavia is now being re-assessed.This article briefly presents some new insights and questions of these objects's possible areas of production and history of use.

  • 352. Thomas, Gabor
    et al.
    Pluskowski, Aleks
    Gilchrist, Roberta
    García-Contreras Ruiz, Guillermo
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Augenti, Andrea
    Astill, Grenville
    Staecker, Jörn
    Valk, Heiki
    Religious Transformations in the Middle Ages: Towards a New Archaeological Agenda2017In: Medieval Archaeology, ISSN 0076-6097, E-ISSN 1745-817X, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 300-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    This paper lays the groundwork for a fundamental rethink of archaeological approaches to medieval religions, by adopting an holistic framework that places Christian, pagan, Islamic and Jewish case studies of religious transformation in a long-term, cross-cultural perspective.

  • 353.
    Thunholm Norén, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Kvinnorna i båtar: Båtgravarna vid Tuna i Västerljung2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 354.
    Underdal, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Skifferkulturens uppkomst2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Norrlandic Slate Culture was a hunter-gatherer culture that emerged in northern Sweden during the transition from the late Mesolithic to the early Neolithic, c. 4200 BC. This paper deals with the Slate Culture’s relation to its neighbouring, contemporary cultures in Norway and Finland, and examines three types of typical finds related to the Slate Culture: enclosures of fire-cracked stones (Swe. skärvstensvall), petroglyphs and slate objects. The conclusion is that the Slate culture found inspiration to these phenomena from its neighbouring cultures and turned them into something of their own.

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    skifferkulturens uppkomst
  • 355.
    Vajking, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Vråkulturens framträdande på Södertörn: En undersökning av relationen mellan senmesolitiska och tidigneolitiska lokaler2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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    Vråkulturens framträdande på Södertörn
  • 356.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Gustafsson, Christer
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Multi-Channel Ground-Penetrating Radar Array Surveys of the Iron Age and Medieval Ringfort Bårby on the Island of Öland, Sweden2020In: Remote Sensing, E-ISSN 2072-4292, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a part of the project “The Big Five”, large-scale multi-channel ground-penetrating radar surveys were carried out at Bårby ringfort (Swedish: borg), Öland, Sweden. The surveys were carried out using a MALÅ Imaging Radar Array (MIRA) system and aimed at mapping possible buried Iron Age and Medieval remains through the interior in order to better understand the purpose of the fort during its periods of use. An additional goal was to evaluate the impact of earlier farming on the preservation of the archaeological remains. The data provided clear evidence of well-preserved Iron Age and Medieval buildings inside the fort. The size and the pattern of the Iron Age houses suggest close similarities with, for example, the previously excavated fort at Eketorp on Öland. Given the presence of a substantial cultural layer together with a large number of artefacts recovered during a metal detection survey, it is suggested that Bårby borg’s primary function during the Iron Age was as a fortified village. The Medieval houses partly cover some of the Iron Age buildings. They are placed in a U-shape with an open square in the middle facing the edge of a limestone cliff. As in the case of Eketorp, it is suggested that the activities during Medieval times changed, but the precise purpose of the Medieval Bårby settlement is still a question open for debate. Future targeted archaeological investigations are needed in order to better understand its purpose. Rescue excavations may also be necessary, as the western steep cliff ledge is eroding and the well-preserved archaeological remains are at risk of being destroyed.

  • 357.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Victor, Helena
    Fischer, Svante
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    A Room with a View: Archaeological Geophysical Prospection and Excavations at Sandby ringfort, Öland, SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeological investigations and clear aerial photographs have identified the presence of house foundations within several ring forts on the island of Öland, situated east of the Swedish mainland. One of them, Sandbyborg, was selected for further investigations by means of a ground-penetrating radar (GRP) and magnetometry survey. The purpose of the geophysical survey was to establish the fort’s spatial layout, to identify any internal constructions within the houses and to investigate whether the fort had multiple building phases. Targeted archaeological excavations was subsequently carried out to verify the validity of the geophysical results and to recover datable material that would enable the understanding of how Sandbyborg was chronologically related to the other ringforts of the island. This information could then be used to better understand the function of Sandbyborg. The results of the geophysical survey clearly show the presence of 36 or 37 stone foundations for houses situated radially aroundthe wall of the fort as well as 16 or 17 similar house foundations in a central building group. The geophysical results also provided information on the possible location of hearths, kilns and pits within the fort and also confirm the location of a third gate situated in the north-western part of the fort. The spatial layout and inner size of Sandbyborg is very similar to one of the other Migration Period ring forts on Öland, Eketorp II. However, there is no evidence of multiple building phases in the data from Sandbyborg. The subsequent excavations showed a very good correlation with the geophysical data. Datable finds, a 14C date from a human metatarsal found in one of the trenches and the lack of geophysical evidence of multiple building phases indicate that the ringfort was used for a limited period of time during thelate fourth century AD. Given the available evidence it is suggested that Sandbyborg primarily was used for military purposes or as a place of refuge intimes of unrest as its location in the outfields, far from arable lands, contradicts an interpretation of Sandbyborg as a fortified village, but as the evidence about the ringforts on Öland is restricted a continued use of geophysical prospection and excavations within the other forts is suggested as a means of obtaining a deeper understanding of the purpose and context of these highly interesting structures.

  • 358.
    Virtala, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Jämtländska reliefspännebärare: Ledande kvinnor under folkvandringstid2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with two women who wore relief brooches from Häste and Brunflo during the Migration period in Jämtland. The purpose of the essay is to investigate similarities and differences in the women’s relief brooches, graves and places in order to understand the women’s relations to each other and their time. The essay has implemented gender theory and a comparative method, complemented by a landscape analysis. The conclusion is that the women from Häste and Brunflo were leaders during their time. 

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  • 359.
    Virtala, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Kulturpåverkan i detaljplaneprocessen: En tillämpning av Pierre Bourdieus fältteori2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master’s thesis analyses cultural values in the detailed planning process based on two case studies regarding the development of Nybackakvarteret, Orminge in Nacka municipality and Marstrand 73:3, Marstrand in Kungälv municipality. Detailed development plans are documents designed by the municipality and utilized in the planning processes of a new area or an already existing one. This thesis has applied and interpreted the detailed development plans for Nybackakvarteret and Marstrand 73:3 according to Bourdieu's field theory and Fairclough's critical discourse analysis. As a complement the thesis has used both a qualitative and a quantitative analysis method in order to structure the written and pictorial language within, to better understand the frequency of words in these detailed development plans. The thesis purpose and research questions has been answered. Bourdieu’s field theory is applicable when studying detailed planning processes and the result has identified an antiquarian capital that is active during the process. Cultural environments are to a great extent described with emotive words when describing the sites preservative values. The conclusion is that the antiquarian capital is an important agent of how cultural values are dealt with during the detailed planning process. The antiquarian capital has to some extent an effect on new construction design.

  • 360.
    Wallgren, Josef
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    De dödas öar och stränder: Fågelbacken, Äs och Bollbacken - stenålderslokaler med många kulturer2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 361.
    Wikström af Edholm, Klas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions. Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Jackson Rova, PeterStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.Nordberg, AndreasStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.Sundqvist, OlofStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.Zachrisson, TorunStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Myth, materiality, and lived religion: in Merovingian and Viking Scandinavia2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors of the present volume, Myth, Materiality, and Lived Religion, focus on the material dimension of Old Norse mythology and the role played by myths in everyday life. More broadly expressed, the collection looks at the social, ceremonial and material contexts of myths. This topic has been underexplored in previous research on Old Norse myths, despite its important theoretical implications. However, discussions around materiality, in a more general sense, have for a long time been significant for historians of religion, especially archaeologists. Myth, Materiality, and Lived Religion seeks to make the case for the relevance of materiality to literary historians and philologists as well.

    Questions relating to the theme of materiality and lived religion are posed in this book, including:

    • What do myths tell us about the material culture of the periods in which they were narrated?

    • What role did myths or mythical beings play in connection to, for instance, illnesses and remedies during the Viking Period and the Middle Ages?

    • How did ordinary people experience participation in a more formal sacrificial feast led by ritual specialists?

  • 362.
    Willfors, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Skateholmsgåtan - Kan man döma hunden efter graven?: En studie av hundgravarna vid Skateholm, Trelleborg, Skåne2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 363. Williams, Howard
    et al.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Dialogues with the Dead in Vikings2019In: Vikings and the Vikings: Essays on Television's History Channel Series / [ed] Paul Hardwick, Kate Lister, McFarland, 2019, p. 128-152Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 364.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Anne-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Fornminnen. Det förflutnas roll i det förkristna och kristna Mälardalen2013In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 108, no 4, p. 288-290Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 365.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm: Fornminnen. Det förflutnas roll i det förkristna och kristna Mälardalen. Lund: Nordic Academic Press 20132014In: Namn och bygd, ISSN 0077-2704, Vol. 102, p. 250-256Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 366.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Arkeologin bakom Rimbert: Om Hergeirs och Gautberts kyrkor och om borgen i Birka2011In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 100-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his Vita Anskarii, Rimbert describes the Christian mission to the port of the Swedes in the 830s. He mentions two churches there, one built on the family estate of the port bailiff, the other built in the seaport itself by Bishop Gautbert. The loca- tions of these churches have long been discussed. Thanks to archaeological research excavations it is now possible to offer a new suggestion regarding the church of Gautbert. It is argued that the hillfort of Birka, Borg, may be the site of this church and the bishop’s fortified precinct. This would make Birka structurally similar to a number of coeval cities on the Continent, where there was a fortified cathedral hill and a market town at its foot. 9th century finds on and around Borg open up for such a possibility. 

  • 367.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Barneskallene ved Tviodlo2016In: Møt mennesket: Til jord skal vi bli? Skjeletters liv etter døden: Rogaland gjennom 11.000 år / [ed] Elna Siv Kristoffersen, Stavanger: Arkeologisk museum, Universitetet i Stavanger , 2016, p. 45-48Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kraniedelar av minst 4 spädbarn hittades på Bø på Jæren, västra Norge i en myr i samband med nyodling. I myren fanns en tvillingkälla med rödfärgat vatten och spädbarnsskallarna hade deponerats i en av dem någon gång under perioden år 1–400 e.Kr. Fyndet är unikt i ett nordiskt perspektiv, men har beröringspunkter med fynd från andra samtida våtmarker. Detta, liksom fyndets landskaps- och bebyggelsemässiga sammanhang, diskuteras i den korta artikeln.

  • 368.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    De heliga platsernas arkeologi: materiell kultur och miljöer i järnålderns Mellansverige2014In: Den heliga platsen: Handlingar från symposiet Den heliga platsen. Härnösand 15-18 september 2011 / [ed] Eva Nyman, Jörgen Magnusson & Elzbieta Strzelecka, Härnösand: Mittuniversitetet , 2014, p. 87-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett urval av järnålderns kultplatser i Mellansverige belyses. I fokus är kultplatsernas roll i den publika kulten. På vilken samhällelig nivå kan vi placera kultplatsen, hur många människor kan den ha betjänat och vilken karaktär har den haft?

  • 369.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Depositional Traditions in Iron Age Kormt2017In: Avaldsnes: A Sea-Kings' Manor in First-Millenium Western Scandinavia / [ed] Dagfinn Skre, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2017, p. 687-720Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores Iron Age depositions in wetlands and on dry ground in Kormt. The types of objects deposited and their contexts are discussed from a longterm perspective, and the emerging patterns are interpreted in cultural-historical terms.

    The early Iron Age depositions cluster on northeastern and southwestern Kormt, especially in the Avaldsnes and Ferkingstad areas. They indicate the presence of men of military rank and are placed at strategic maritime sites: Ferkingstad and northern Kormt. The depositional traditions of the early Iron Age resemble those of nearby Jæren and southernmost Hordaland, and indeed those of northern Jylland, Denmark. No depositions are known from the period AD 550–700. In the Viking Period, the depositional tradition in Kormt society seems to have played a more limited and less aristocratic role than previously. The depositional traditions differ from neighbouring as well as distant regions with which there formerly were similarities.

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  • 370.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Fjärran ting: Exotiska föremål och nya seder under mellersta järnåldern2011In: Förmodern globalitet: Essäer om rörelse, möten och fjärran ting under 10 000 år / [ed] Anders Andrén, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2011, p. 109-129Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Samhällsförändringen i Mellansverige under tiden 550-700 skisseras och diskuteras med hjälp av exotiska föremål, nya seder som jakten med dresserad rovfågel liksom utmarkernas betydelse i denna process.

  • 371.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Fullerö: Roman reflections in the rural countryside of Uppland2017In: Interaktionen ohne Grenzen/Interaction without borders: Beispiele archeologischer Forschungen am Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts/Exemplary archaeological research at the beginning of the 21st century. Festschrift für Claus von Carnap-Bornheim zum 60. Geburtstag / [ed] Berit Valentin Eriksen, Angelika Abegg-Wigg, Ralf Bleile & Ulf Ickerodt, Schleswig: Wachholtz Verlag Neumünster , 2017, p. 239-248Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 372.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gamla Uppsala: på nytt2013In: Gamla Uppsala i ny belysning / [ed] Olof Sundqvist, Per Vikstrand, Uppsala: Swedish Science Press , 2013, p. 161-205Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Gamla Uppsalas historia och landskapet ikring rymmer många svar på varför Uppsala i äldsta vendeltid blev ett ryktbart säte med monumentala gravhögar och höga imposanta hallar. Yngre järnålderns kungsgårdsmiljö med sina äldre historiska rötter är en av de mest komplexa som går att finna i Norden, komplex i avseendet att den avtecknar sig i så många olika typer av källmaterial, något som diskuteras i artikeln.

  • 373.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Helgö: mer än ett vi2011In: Makt, kult, plats: Högstatusmiljöer under den äldre järnåldern. Kultplatser / [ed] Peter Bratt; Richard Grönwall, Stockholm: Stockholms länsmuseum , 2011, p. 69-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Helgö i Mälaren bär många spår av religiösa ritualer inom- och utomhus. Här jämförs dessa jämförs med materiella lämningar från järnålderns kultplatser i Mellansverige 

  • 374.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Händelser vid vatten: om näcken vid Lutbron och de förkristna dödsoffren i sjön Bokaren, Uppland2014In: Saga och sed: Kungl. Gustav Adolfs akademiens årsbok. 2014 / [ed] Maj Reinhammar, Uppsala: Kungliga Gustav Adolfs Akadmien , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The oral traditions and the archaeological context of the lake Bokaren are in focus in this article. During the Late Iron Age a cultic site where humans and animals were ritually killed was placed in the lake. Nearby was a contemporaneous elite settlement called Hov, marked by a concentration of large burial mounds. Many hundreds of years later a master fiddler was born and bred by the lake. He learnt his extraordinary musical skills from näcken. This occurred at the stream running out of lake and thus by the waters that had passed through platform in the lake with the remains of human and animals. This is viewed as no coincidence, instead it is argued that the oral traditions of näcken can be understood in a deeper time perspective than has formerly been applied.

  • 375.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Håkon Jarl Ivarsson and Rodr: 2009In: Á austrvega.: Saga and East Scandinavia. Preprint papers of The 14th International Saga Conference. Uppsala 9-15th August 2009. / [ed] Agneta Ney, Henrik Williams & Fredrik Charpentier-Ljungqvist, Gävle: University of Gävle , 2009, p. 1072-1073Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 376.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    I vendelkrigarnas gravkammare Krigarna från Valsgärde: Glimtar från en guld- och granatskimrande forntidKent Andersson2017In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 4, p. 32-34Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 377.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    II: 31 Sites2019In: Handbook of Pre-Modern Nordic Memory Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches / [ed] Jürg Glauser, Pernille Hermann, Stephen A. Mitchell, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2019, p. 620-626Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study demonstrates how the great mounds and halls in Old Uppsala in central Sweden, erected AD 550–650, were used for expressing cultural memory. By the construction of monumental halls, rulers created arenas for expressing both power and authority, as well as for memory production. The halls left material traces, which makes possible consideration of whether they were also maintained and used in the Viking Age, or if they were abandoned and either remembered or forgotten.

  • 378.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Kungsämnen i Söderby och kungens Sigtuna: Om den materiella kulturen i och kring Söderby i Danmarks socken2010In: Situne Dei, ISSN 1653-8498, Vol. 5, p. 163-174Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 379.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Medial storm och kollegiala morranden: Om könsbestämningen av krigaren i Birka, grav Bj. 581 på Björkö, Uppland2020In: Saga och Sed / [ed] Gunnar Ternhag, Uppsala: Kungl. Gustav Adolfs Akademien , 2020, p. 53-72Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Forskningen om gammalt DNA kan ibland ge resultat som ruskar om gamla sanningar. Det hände när mina kollegor och jag år 2017 publicerade en artikel om en av de mest berömda gravarna från vikingastaden Birka. Den innehöll en person, fullt krigarutrustad, som lagts till vila i en gravkammare tillsammans med två hästar. Alltsedan graven undersöktes på slutet av 1800-talet hade man förutsatt att graven varit uppförd över en man. Men den genetiska könsbestämningen av skelettet visar att individen är en kvinna. 

    Nyheten mötte mycket stort intresse och for som en löpeld över snart sagt hela världen, men blev också omgående ifrågasatt. Var det verkligen rätt ben som könsbestämts? Hade graven inte också innehållit en man? Kunde kvinnan rent fysiskt haft kapacitet att hantera de vapen som fanns i graven? Nedan diskuteras mottagandet som vår artikel fick, varför den väckte sådan enorm uppmärksamhet, liksom själva graven som sådan och den gravlagda.

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  • 380.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Property and Honour: Social Change in Cemtral Sweden 200-700 Mirrired in the Area around Old Uppsala2011In: Det 61. Internationale Sachsensymposion 2010 Haderslev, Danmark: Arkeologi i Slesvig / [ed] Linda Boye; Per Ethelberg; Lene Heidemann-Lutz; Sunhild Kleingärtner; Pernille Kruse; Lilian Mathers; Anne Birgitte Sørensen, Neumünster: Wachholtz Verlag Neumünster , 2011, p. 141-156Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social change in Midsweden is mirrored against the development of agrarian landscape around Old Uppsala and the establishment of the royal manor

  • 381.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ritual Space and Territorial Boundaries in Scandinavia2020In: Making the profane sacred in the Viking age: essays in honur of Stefan Brink / [ed] Irene García Losquino, Olof Sundqvist, Deaclan Taggart, Turnhout: Brepols, 2020, p. 85-98Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether cultic sites were part of the formation of tribal boundaries, or if cultic sites were placed in liminal spaces that were later turned into territorial border zones is a question very much like that of the chicken and the egg - which came first? It seems impossible to answer with certainty and needs to be approached through interdisciplinary research, but it is worth noting that archaeologically dated cultic sites very often highlight borders known from much later times from written sources. THis article discusses certain examples to address this question.

  • 382.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Rotary querns and bread: A social history of Sweden2014In: Seen through a millstone / [ed] Lotte Sellsing, Stavanger: Arkeologisk museum, Universitetet i Stavanger , 2014, p. 181-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rotary querns were introduced at the same as the oldest known bread appeared in the Nordic countries, c. AD 200. Since these type of querns were very efficient, bread could have been baked and consumed in most social milieus. But this was not the case. The rotary querns first appear at elite settlements, so-called central places, were the cultic dimensions are marked. Altogether the social acceptance for bread in Iron Age Sweden seems to have been slow.

    Kvarnberget in Sala, Västmanland in the region north of Mälaren, is a millstone quarry mountain known from a written source from AD 1490. The quarry was located on the grounds of a lost settlement called Onsala, later split into the villages Ösby and Åby. Onsala might be interptreted as the god Odin's hall or sal. The lost settlement is situated next to a settlement called Hov, a place name that can be interpreted as a settlement where cultic rituals took place. A quarry mountain on the grounds of a Late Iron Age settlement bearing a name connected with the god Odin is an unexpected combination in this region of Sweden, where the plains transitions into the wooded area Bergslagen, renowned for its production of silver, copper, iron and other minerals. Kvarnberget is poorly known but can contribute to a general discussion on the social contexts for the production sites for rotary querns, as well as reflect on the milieus were bread was eaten.

  • 383.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Scandinavian figurines: relatives of the gold foil figures, and a new find from Old Uppsala2019In: Gold foil figures in focus: a Scandinavian find group and related objects and images from ancient and medieval Europe: papers from an international and interdisciplinary workshop organized by the Centre for Baltic and Scandianvian Archaeology (ZBSA) in Schleswig, Schloss Gottorf, October 23rd-25th 2017 / [ed] Alexandra Pesch, Michaela Helmbrecht, München: Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil , 2019, p. 105-129Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues that figurines of gold or (gilded) copper alloy, particularly from the 5th to 7th centuries, can contribute to a better understanding of the gold foil figures. It discusses examplars dating from Late Roman Iron Age, Migration, and Vendel period Scandinavia, especially those from Slipshavn in Funen, Gudum in Zealand, and Guldhullet/Smørenge in Bornholm, all in Denmark, as well as those from Kymbo in Västergötland and Lunda in Södermanland, Sweden, and compares them with gold foil figures. A unique gilded example from the late 7th or early 8th century – so small that it is equal in size to a gold foil figure – recently found in a female burial situated near the royal seat of Old Uppsala in Uppland, Sweden, is also discussed in detail. The figurines relate in posture, gesture, and attributes to the single gold foil figures but not to gold foil figural pairs. Pendants from the 6th to 8th centuries on the other hand, such as those from Kville in Bohuslän and Tuna in Alsike in Uppland and Norsborg in Södermanland, Sweden, allude in gesture, dress, and attributes to both single gold foil figures as well as to gold foil figures depicting pairs. The attributes and gestures of the figurines connect with the pre-Christian cult. If considered in a contemporary Christian European iconography, they would have signalled awe and divine epiphany.

  • 384.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Sigtuna: An Urban Hub in the Viking World and Its Roots2020In: Viking Encounters: proceedings of the eighteenth Viking Congress, Denmark, August 6-12, 2017 / [ed] Anne Pedersen, Søren M Sindbæk, Århus: Aarhus University Press , 2020, p. 268-285Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The town of Sigtuna was established, according to dendrochronological dates from the bottom of the trenches of the large-scale excavation in the Trädgårdsmästaren block, c. AD 970-985, and most probably around 980. It has been argued that Sigtuna was founded on ‘virgin land’. This expression usually refers to sites that do not have a previous settlement history, and thus were placed on marginal land or in the outlands. But was this untouched, unsettled land? And if not, are there any traces of an earlier history? This article addresses this question and expands upon it.

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  • 385.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Stockholm före Stockholm: en oväntat spännande historia2013In: Yngre järnålder i Stockholms län - aktuell forskning / [ed] Jan Owe, Stockholm: Stockholms läns museum , 2013, p. 11-19Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att Stockholm är en intressant medeltida stad vet vi. Men vad anläggs den egentligen på för plats? Topografiskt har den särskilda kvaliteter, en ö belägen i mötet mellan en brant åsrygg och vatten. Historien börjar i romersk järnålder med ett unikt romerskt fynd, deponerat i de nära omgivningarna. En betalningsring av guld från folkvandringstid funnet i ett tjockt, mörkt kulturlager på krönet av ön talar för att där fanns bebyggelse av speciellt slag. Under 900-talet hettade det till på och runt ön med föremål som indikerar närvaron av en elit. I senvikingatid finns rester av en dendrokronologiskt daterad spärr i strömmen. Samtidigt deponeras en rad silverskatter i trakten. Öns belägenhet och lösfyndens särskilda karaktär gör det befogat att fråga sig om ön varit en helgö? en fredad ö avsedd för handels-, kult- och tingsmöten.

  • 386.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Tamkatten – en nykomling under tidig järnålder2017In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 112, no 2, p. 32-34Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 387.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    The Archaeology of Rimbert: The Churches of Hergeir and Gautbert and Borg in Birka2011In: Viking Settlements & Viking Society: Papers from the Proceedings of the Sixteenth Viking Congress / [ed] Svavar Sigmundsson, Reykjavik: Hid islenzka fornleifafelag & University of Iceland Press , 2011, p. 469-493Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his Vita Anskarii, Rimbert describes the Christian mission to the port of the Swedes in the 830s. He mentions two churches there, one built on the family estate of the port bailiff, the other built in the seaport itself by Bishop Gautbert. The locations of these churches have long been discussed. Thanks to archaeological research excavations it is now possible to offer a new suggestion regarding the church of Gautbert. It is argued that the hillfort of Birka, Borg, may be the site of this church and the bishop’s fortified precinct. This would make Birka structurally similar to a number of coeval cities on the Continent, where there was a fortified cathedral hill and a market town at its foot. 9th century finds on and around Borg open up for such a possibility.

  • 388.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    The background of the odal rights: an archaeological discussion2017In: Danish Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 2166-2282, E-ISSN 2166-2290, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 118-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The age and origin of the odal rights known from medieval times in Sweden and Norway are debated. Archaeologists tend to view them as old and a part of the pre-Christian society, whereas historians and legal historians view them as established after Christianity was introduced, mirroring canonical laws. In Viking Age runic inscriptions from the eleventh century in the lake Mälaren valley in Sweden, from late tenth to eleventh century in south-western Norway, the term odal, inherited family land occurs together with other expressions concerning landed property. Furthermore, two runestones in Småland and Hälsingland in Sweden, c. 650 km apart, each enumerate five earlier ancestors in a male lineage, the sponsor himself being the sixth generation. As these runic inscriptions were made in different parts of Scandinavia during the late tenth and eleventh century, this indicates that the term and concept odal was widespread already before the canonic laws of the early medieval period were introduced, and quite possibly belongs to an older inheritance structure. The aim of this article is a renewed discussion focussing on the runological sources where the term and concept odal can be found in the Viking Age Scandinavian society (c. 750–1050 CE), but also early medieval written sources. Thereafter, archaeological sources from the Late Iron Age are addressed (c. 550–1050 CE).

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  • 389.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    The Enigmatic Stone Faces: Cult images from the Iron Age?2017In: Life on the Edge: Social, Political and Religious Frontiers in Early Medieval Europe / [ed] Sarah Semple, Celia Orsini, Sian Mui, Wendeburg: Verlag Uwe Krebs , 2017, p. 355-363Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 390.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    THe martial function of the central places2020In: Vikings across boundaries: Viking-age transformations. Volume II / [ed] Hanne Lovise Aannestad, Unn Pedersen, Marianne Moen, Elise Naumann, Heidi Lund Berg, London: Routledge, 2020, p. 212-235Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What was the role of central places in Viking Age Scandinavia? This paper discusses this question by examining the central places in a historical perspective. They often have a remarkable site continuity with roots in the Roman Iron Age, or slightly earlier, where certain buildings were superimposed, i.e. erected on the same spot, for generations. This speaks in favour of the idea that several of the functions/structures that were there in the early history of the central places still were important in the Viking Age. Therefore, to fully encompass the role of central places it is important to shed light upon both the early group established in the Early Iron Age and the late group that arise in the beginning of the Late Iron Age, in the late 6th/7th century. In this article the Roman influences are underlined and it is argued that these could be the root of the martial functions of the central places. 

  • 391.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    The mirage and the hill-fort: Iron Age landscape and material culture on Stora Karlsö2009In: Journal of Nordic Archaeological Science, ISSN 1650-1519, Vol. 16, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 392.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Trälar fanns: att synliggöra ofria 550-1200 e.Kr. i Sverige2014In: Att befolka det förflutna: Fem artiklar om hur vi kan synliggöra människan och hennes handlingar i arkeologiskt material. Från Nordic Tag mötet 2011 på Linnéuniversitetet, Kalmar / [ed] Anne Carlie, Stockholm: Riksantikvarieämbetet , 2014, p. 72-91Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thralls. Making bonded people visible 550-1200 AD in Sweden. To be free or unfree was crucial in the Nordic society. A thrall was a person in social isolation, lacked honour, without family, belonging to the owner. The awareness of the role of the bonded people has slowly increased. By a reinterpretation of various archaeological sources it is possible to make bonded people visible to a larger extent, thereby increasing the knowledge of the material culture of bondage. The physical remains of thralls in skeletal as well as cremation graves are discussed. The finds of shackels from Birka and the royal manor of Adelsö that are put forward, can probably be an indication of slave trade. The tools and products of female thralls such as rotary querns and the widespread Baltic ceramics are touched upon. Finally milieus were Late Viking Age runic inscriptions commemorating bonded people, both stewards and homeborn thralls as well as a freed person are discussed. 

  • 393.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Vetenskapligt program2009In: Stiftelsen Kulturmiljövård Mälardalen Vetenskapligt program 2009 / [ed] Anna Lihammer, Västerås: Kulturmiljövård Mälardalen , 2009, Vol. 1, p. 23-143Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 394.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Viking Age society, its realms and the importance of iron: Reflections on the historical background and emerging networks2020In: Iron and the Transformation of Society: Reflexion of Viking Age Metallurgy / [ed] Catarina Karlsson, Gert Magnusson, Stockholm: Jernkontoret , 2020, p. 89-140Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Viking Age c. 750–1050 was an era when huge quantities of iron were produced. The simple question how this iron found its way from the production sites out into the wider Viking society is easy to pose, but difficult to answer. To demonstrate how the iron bars through exchange, middle-men and various markets reached the customers is demanding from an archaeological perspective. Furthermore, written contemporaneous sources are lacking, both in Scandinavia and on the Continent. The social structure of the period, and the traditions of the various networks that transported the iron, as well as the rise and fall of harbour sites, central places and early towns add to the complexity. Even harder is trying estimate the demand of iron from abroad. However, through various archaeological materials and sites there are indications, although not full answers to the question. This paper will discuss some of these as well as give a historical background.

     

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  • 395.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Volund was here: A Myth Archaeologically Anchored in Viking Age Scania2018In: Old-Norse Mythology: Comparative Perspectives / [ed] Pernille Hermann, Stephen A. Mitchell, Jens Peter Schjødt, Amber J. Rose, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2018, p. 139-162Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recently discovered object from the Viking Age shows a winged human figure. It has been interpreted as a representation of Volund the smith and more specifically to the version of the legend found in Þiðreks saga. The context for the object is the center Uppåkra in Sweden, is compared with the context presented in saga. The article concludes that an audience in Viking Age Uppåkra would have felt at home with the winged man and the version in Þiðreks saga, but less familiar with the social setting for Volund presented in Vǫlundarkviða that represents a setting that would have been more easily understood further north in Mid-Sweden.

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  • 396.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Öland during the Late Iron Age and Early Middle Ages (550-1200 AD): A donkey between two strips of hay2020In: Relations and Runes: The Baltic Islands and Their Interactions During the Late Iron Age and Early Middle Ages / [ed] Laila Kitzler Åhfeldt, Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Per Widerström Ben Raffield, Visby: Riksantikvarieämbetet, 2020, p. 107-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 397.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ritual Space2020In: The Pre-Christian Religions of the North. History and Structures: Social, Geographical, and Historical Contexts, and Communication between Worlds / [ed] Jens Peter Schjødt, John Lindow, Anders Andrén, Turnhout: Brepols, 2020, 1, p. 671-723Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An overview of ritual places in Old Norse religion

  • 398.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Krzewinska, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    The "Lynx Ladies": Burials Furnished with Lynx Skins from the Migration and Merovingian Periods found in Present-day Sweden2019In: Sächsische Leute und Länder: Benennung und Lokalisierung von Gruppenidentitäten im ersten Jahrtausend / [ed] Melanie Augstein, Matthias Hardt, Wendeburg: Verlag Uwe Krebs , 2019, p. 103-119Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graves furnished with lynx skin from Iron Age Sweden represents an interesting group of individuals. These burials cluster in time and space and consist mainly of adult or older cremated individuals from the Migration and Merovingian period, c. 400-800 AD. This tradition is especially marked in in Uppland and Gotland, i.e. eastern Sweden. The individuals consist of adult or older women with brooches interred in well furnished burials. In Uppland these women belong to settlements of social standing and memorial rituals were performed at their graves. In Gotland, these women are present at the burial sites of harbours. Some of them were buried with small children. It is concluded that the women would have belonged to a group of ladies, mistresses of wealthy households. Furthermore, the role of the lynx and its possible connection to a female deity is discussed. It is suggested that these "lynx ladies" could have stood under the protection of the godess Freyja and been especially associated with her.

  • 399.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Ljung, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Anna, Kjellström
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Skärningspunkt Sigtuna – en första presentation av ett forskningsprojekt2017In: Situne Dei: årsskrift för Sigtunaforskning, ISSN 2002-4215, p. 52-63Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a new research project: Skärningspunkt Sigtuna – de första människorna i Sveriges äldsta stad (Intersection Sigtuna – the first inhabitants of Sweden’s oldest town), which runs from 2017 to 2020 and is sponsored by  the Swedish Research Council. The project aims to understand cultural transformation in the town’s earliest periods by studying the people who lived and died there. The main source material comprises c. 330 excavated graves dating from the town’s foundation in AD 970/80 until AD 1100. These derive both from five early churchyards as well as so-called “graveyards” (Sw. gravgård) – where individuals were buried in accordance with Christian practice, but not in the proximity of a church building. These early “graveyards” are unique to Scandinavia, but the phenomenon has yet to be subjected to in-depth analysis. Different kinds of burial grounds were partly in use simultaneously in Sigtuna and it is unclear how the interred individuals relate to one another, or what kind of social, cultural and religious communities they represent.

    The project combines archaeological and osteological data with regard to burial-place topography and location, burial custom including grave goods and relation to rune-inscribed stone monuments, isotopic analysis and ancient DNA-analysis of selected individuals. Sigtuna’s material culture in general indicates that it was a cosmopolitan town. The project will extend our knowledge in this regard by focusing on the backgrounds of the  first generations of town dwellers. Our main objective is to understand urbanization, migration, cultural interaction between groups and individuals, early church organization, networks and transnational relations.

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  • 400. Äikäs, Tiina
    et al.
    Spangen, Marte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    New Users and Changing Traditions—(Re)Defining Sami Offering Sites2016In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 95-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sami are indigenous people of Northern Fennoscandia. Some Sami offering sites have been used for over a thousand years. During this time, the offering traditions have changed and various people have started using the places based on different motivations. Present day archaeological finds give evidence of both continuing traditions and new meanings attached to these sites, as well as to sites that were probably not originally used for rituals in the Sami ethnic religion. In some cases, the authenticity of the place seems to lie in the stories and current beliefs more than in a historical continuity or any specifically sacred aspects of the topography or nature it is situated in. Today's new users include, for example, local (Sami) people, tourists, and neo-pagans. This paper discusses what informs these users, what identifies certain locations as offering sites, and what current users believe their relationship to these places should be. What roles do scholarly traditions, heritage tourism, and internal culture have in (re)defining Sami offering sites and similarly what roles do ‘appropriate’ rituals have in ascribing meaning to particular places? How do we mediate wishes for multivocality with our professional opinions when it comes to defining sacredness?

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    New Users and Changing Traditions—(Re)Defining Sami Offering Sites
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