Change search
Refine search result
6789101112 401 - 450 of 4037
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 401. Björkenstam, Emma
    et al.
    Cheng, Siwei
    Burström, Bo
    Pebley, Anne R.
    Björkenstam, Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. University of California, USA; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Kosidou, Kyriaki
    Association between income trajectories in childhood and psychiatric disorder: a Swedish population-based study2017In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 71, no 7, p. 648-654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Childhood family income variation is an understudied aspect of households' economic context that may have distinct consequences for children. We identified trajectories of childhood family income over a 12-year period, and examined associations between these trajectories and later psychiatric disorders, among individuals born in Sweden between 1987 and 1991 (n=534 294).

    Methods We used annual income data between the ages of 3-14 years and identified 5 trajectories (2 high-income upward, 1 downward and 2 low-income upward trajectories). Psychiatric disorders in the follow-up period after age 15 were defined from International Classification of Disease (ICD)-codes in a nationwide patient register. Multiadjusted risks for all psychiatric disorders, as well as for specific psychiatric diagnoses, were calculated as HRs with 95% CIs.

    Results Of the 5 identified income trajectories, the constant low and the downward trajectories were particularly associated with later psychiatric disorder. Children with these trajectories had increased risks for psychiatric disorder, including mood, anxiety, psychotic disorders and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The association remained, even after adjusting for important variables including parental psychiatric disorder. In contrast, the relationship was reversed for eating disorders, for which children in higher income trajectories had elevated risks.

    Conclusions Findings show that children growing up in a household characterised by low or decreasing family income have an increased risk for psychiatric disorder. Continued work is needed to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in psychiatric disorders. Policies and interventions for psychiatric disorders should consider the socioeconomic background of the family as an important risk or protective factor.

  • 402. Björkenstam, Emma
    et al.
    Dalman, Christina
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ringbäck Weitoft, Gunilla
    Walder, Deborah J.
    Burström, Bo
    Childhood household dysfunction, school performance and psychiatric care utilisation in young adults: a register study of 96 399 individuals in Stockholm County2016In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 70, no 5, p. 473-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Exposure to childhood household dysfunction increases the risk of psychiatric morbidity. Although school performance also has been linked with psychiatric morbidity, limited research has considered school performance as a mediating factor. To address this gap in the literature, the current register study examined whether school performance mediates the association between childhood household dysfunction (experienced between birth and age 14 years) and psychiatric care utilisation in young adulthood.

    Methods We used a Swedish cohort of 96 399 individuals born during 1987–1991. Indicators of childhood household dysfunction were familial death, parental substance abuse and psychiatric morbidity, parental somatic disease, parental criminality, parental separation/single-parent household, public assistance recipiency and residential instability. Final school grades from the 9th year of compulsory school were used to create five categories. Estimates of risk of psychiatric care utilisation (measured as inpatient, outpatient and primary care) after the age of 18 years were calculated as HRs with 95% CIs. Mediation was tested with the bootstrap approach.

    Results Cumulative exposure to childhood household dysfunction was positively associated with psychiatric care utilisation. Specifically, individuals exposed to three or more indicators with incomplete school grades had the highest risk (HR=3.7 (95% CI 3.3 to 4.1) after adjusting for demographics), compared to individuals exposed to no indicators with highest grades. School performance was found to mediate the relationship.

    Conclusions Our findings suggest that future efforts to prevent or mitigate the negative effects of childhood household dysfunction on psychiatric morbidity may benefit from integration of strategies that improve school performance among vulnerable youth.

  • 403. Björkenstam, Emma
    et al.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Burström, Bo
    Kosidou, Kyriaki
    Björkenstam, Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; University of California, USA.
    Association between childhood adversity and a diagnosis of personality disorder in young adulthood: a cohort study of 107,287 individuals in Stockholm County2017In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 721-731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Childhood adversity (CA) may increase the risk for later developing of personality disorder (PD). However, less is known about the association between cumulative CA and PD, and the role of childhood psychopathology and school performance. The current study examined the relationship between a range of CAs and a diagnosis of PD in young adulthood, and the roles of childhood psychopathology and school performance in this relationship. All individuals born in Stockholm County 1987-1991 (n = 107,287) constituted our cohort. Seven CAs were measured between birth and age 14: familial death, parental criminality, parental substance abuse and psychiatric morbidity, parental separation and/or single-parent household, household public assistance and residential instability. Individuals were followed from their 18th birthday until they were diagnosed with PD or until end of follow-up (December 31st 2011). Adjusted estimates of risk of PD were calculated as hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Associations were observed between cumulative CA and PD. During the follow-up 770 individuals (0.7%) were diagnosed with PD. Individuals exposed to 3+ CAs had the highest risks of being diagnosed with PD (HR 3.0, 95% CI 2.4-3.7). Childhood psychopathology and low school grades further increased the risk of PD among individuals exposed to CA. Cumulative CA is strongly associated with a diagnosis of PD in young adulthood. Our findings indicate that special attention should be given in schools and health services to children exposed to adversities to prevent decline in school performance, and to detect vulnerable individuals that may be on negative life-course trajectories.

  • 404. Björkenstam, Emma
    et al.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Björkenstam, Charlotte
    Kosidou, Kyriaki
    Association of Cumulative Childhood Adversity and Adolescent Violent Offending With Suicide in Early Adulthood2018In: JAMA psychiatry, ISSN 2168-6238, E-ISSN 2168-622X, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 185-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Childhood adversity (CA) is associated with an increased risk of suicide in young adulthood that might be explained by maladaptive trajectories during adolescence. Although adolescent violent offending is linked with suicide, little is known about its role in the association between CA and suicide. OBJECTIVE To examine whether adolescent violent offending mediates the association between CA and suicide in early adulthood. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This population-based, longitudinal cohort study with a follow-up time spanning 5 to 9 years included 476 103 individuals born in Sweden between 1984 and 1988. The study population was prospectively followed up from 20 years of age until December 31, 2013, with respect to suicide. Data analysis was performed from January 1, 1984, to December 31, 2013. EXPOSURES Register-based CAs included parental death, parental substance abuse and psychiatric disorder, parental criminal offending, parental separation, public assistance recipiency, child welfare intervention, and residential instability. Adolescent violent offending was defined as being convicted of a violent crime between the ages of 15 and 19 years. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Estimates of risk of suicide after 20 years of age (from 2004 if born in 1984 and from 2008 if born in 1988) until the end of 2013 were calculated as incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% CIs using Poisson regression analysis. Adjustments were made for demographics and psychiatric disorder. In addition, binary mediation analysis with logistic regression was used. RESULTS A total of 476 103 individuals (231 699 [48.7%] female) were included in the study. Those with a conviction for violent offending had been exposed to all CAs to a greater extent than those with no violent offending. Cumulative CA was associated with risk of suicide in nonconvicted (adjusted IRR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.5-3.9) and convicted youths, who had a higher risk of suicide (adjusted IRR, 8.5; 95% CI, 4.6-15.7). Adolescent violent offending partly mediated the association between CA and suicide. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Individuals with a history of CA who also engage in violent offending in adolescence have a high risk of suicide. Interventions to prevent externalizing behavior during childhood and increased support to youths with delinquent behavior may have the potential to prevent suicide related to CA.

  • 405. Björkenstam, Emma
    et al.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Adverse childhood experiences and disability pension in early midlife: results from a Swedish National Cohort Study2017In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 472-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few studies have examined the association between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and disability pension (DP). The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between different ACEs, cumulative ACEs, and DP, and the mediating role of school performance. Methods: We used a Swedish cohort of 522 880 individuals born between 1973 and 1978. ACEs included parental death, parental substance abuse and psychiatric disorder, substantial parental criminality, household public assistance, parental DP and child welfare intervention. Estimates of risk of DP in 2008 were calculated as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: A total of 2.3% (3.0% females, 1.7% males) received DP in 2008. All studied ACEs increased the odds for DP, particularly child welfare intervention and household public assistance. Cumulative ACEs increased the odds of DP in a graded manner. Females exposed to 4+ ACEs had a 4-fold odds (OR: 4.0, 95% CI 3.5-4.5) and males a 7-fold odds (OR: 7.1, 95% CI: 6.2-8.1). School performance mediated the ACEs-DP association. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that ACEs is associated with increased odds of DP, particularly when accumulated. The effects of ACEs should be taken into account when considering the determinants of DP, and when identifying high-risk populations.

  • 406. Björkenstam, Emma
    et al.
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Impact of childhood adversities on depression in early adulthood: A longitudinal cohort study of 478,141 individuals in Sweden2017In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 223, p. 95-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Although the relationship between childhood adversity (CA) and depression is widely accepted, there is little information on what proportion of depression is attributable to CA. Method: We used a Swedish cohort of 478,141 individuals born in 1984-1988 in Sweden. Register-based CA indicators included parental death, parental substance abuse and psychiatric morbidity, parental criminality, parental separation, public assistance recipiency, child welfare intervention, and residential instability. Estimates of risk of depression, measured as retrieval of prescribed antidepressants and/or psychiatric care with a clinical diagnosis of depression, between 2006 and 2012 were calculated as Hazard Ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), using a Cox regression analysis. Results: All CAs predicted depression in early adulthood. Furthermore, the predictive association between the CA indicators and depression was graded, with highest HRs observed for 4+ CAs (HR: 3.05 (95% CI 2.83-3.29)) for a clinical diagnosis for depression and HR: 1.32 (95% CI 1.25-1.41) for antidepressant medication after adjustments were made for important confounding factors. Of the studied CAs, child welfare intervention entailed highest HR for depression. Conclusion: Regardless of causality issues, children and youth with a history of multiple CA should be regarded as a high-risk group for depression by professionals in social, and health service's that come into contact with this group.

  • 407.
    Björklund, Asa K
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Light, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Hedin, Linnea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Elofsson, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Quantitative assessment of the structural bias in protein-protein interaction assays.2008In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 8, no 22, p. 4657-46667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With recent publications of several large-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI) studies, the realization of the full yeast interaction network is getting closer. Here, we have analysed several yeast protein interaction datasets to understand their strengths and weaknesses. In particular, we investigate the effect of experimental biases on some of the protein properties suggested to be enriched in highly connected proteins. Finally, we use support vector machines (SVM) to assess the contribution of these properties to protein interactivity. We find that protein abundance is the most important factor for detecting interactions in tandem affinity purifications (TAP), while it is of less importance for Yeast Two Hybrid (Y2H) screens. Consequently, sequence conservation and/or essentiality of hubs may be related to their high abundance. Further, proteins with disordered structure are over-represented in Y2H screens and in one, but not the other, large-scale TAP assay. Hence, disordered regions may be important both in transient interactions and interactions in complexes. Finally, a few domain families seem to be responsible for a large part of all interactions. Most importantly, we show that there are method-specific biases in PPI experiments. Thus, care should be taken before drawing strong conclusions based on a single dataset.

  • 408.
    Björklund, Catarina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jansson, Katarina
    Lindberg, Jimmy
    Vrang, Lotta
    Hallberg, Anders
    Rosenquist, Åsa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Discovery of Potent BACE-1 Inhibitors Containing a New Hydroxyethylene (HE) Scaffold: Exploration of P1’ Alkoxy Residues and an Aminoethylene (AE) Central Core2010In: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0968-0896, E-ISSN 1464-3391, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 1711-1723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a preceding study we have described the development of a new hydroxyethylene (HE) core motif displaying P1 aryloxymethyl and P1’ methoxy substituents delivering potent BACE-1 inhibitors. In a continuation of this work we have now explored the SAR of the S1’ pocket by introducing a set of P1’ alkoxy groups and evaluated them as BACE-1 inhibitors. Previously the P1 and P1’ positions of the classical HE template have been relatively little explored due to the complexity of the chemical routes involved in modifications at these positions. However, the chemistries developed for the current HE template renders substituents in both the P1 and P1’ positions readily available for SAR exploration. The BACE-1 inhibitors prepared displayed IC50 values in the range of 4-45 nM, where the most potent compounds featured small P1’ groups. The cathepsin D selectivity which was high for the smallest P1’ sustituents (P1’=ethoxy, fold selectively >600) dropped for larger groups (P1’=benzyloxy, fold selectivity of 1.6). We have also confirmed the importance of both the hydroxyl group and its stereochemistry preference for this HE transition state isostere by preparing both the deoxygenated analogue and by inverting the configuration of the hydroxyl group to the R-configuration, which as expected resulted in large activity drops. Finally substituting the hydroxyl group by an amino group having the same configuration (S), which previously have been described to deliver potent BACE-1 inhibitors with advantageous properties, surprisingly resulted in a large drop in the inhibitory activity.

  • 409.
    Björklund, Catarina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Benkestock, Kurt
    Borkakoti, Neera
    Jansson, Katarina
    Lindberg, Jimmy
    Vrang, Lotta
    Hallberg, Anders
    Rosenquist, Åsa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Design and synthesis of potent and selective BACE-1 inhibitors2010In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 1458-1464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several highly potent BACE-1 protease inhibitors have been developed from an inhibitor series containing a novel hydroxyethylene (HE) core structure displaying aryloxymethyl or benzyloxymethyl P1 side chains and a methoxy P1’ side chain. The target molecules were readily synthesized from chiral carbohydrate starting materials, furnishing the inhibitor compounds in good overall yields. The inhibitors show both high BACE-1 potency and good selectivity against cathepsin D, where the most potent inhibitor furnish a BACE-1 IC50 value of 0.32 nM and displays > 3000 fold selectivity over cathepsin D.

  • 410.
    Björklund, Justina A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Sellström, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    de Wit, Cynthia A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Aune, M.
    Lignell, S.
    Darnerud, P. O.
    Comparisons of polybrominated diphenyl ether and hexabromocyclododecane concentrations in dust collected with two sampling methods and matched breast milk samples2012In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 279-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Household dust from 19 Swedish homes was collected using two different sampling methods: from the occupants own home vacuum cleaner after insertion of a new bag and using a researcher-collected method where settled house dust was collected from surfaces above floor level. The samples were analyzed for 16 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners and total hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD). Significant correlations (r = 0.600.65, Spearman r = 0.470.54, P < 0.05) were found between matched dust samples collected with the two sampling methods for ?OctaBDE and ?DecaBDE but not for ?PentaBDE or HBCD. Statistically significantly higher concentrations of all PBDE congeners were found in the researcher-collected dust than in the home vacuum cleaner bag dust (VCBD). For HBCD, however, the concentrations were significantly higher in the home VCBD samples. Analysis of the bags themselves indicated no or very low levels of PBDEs and HBCD. This indicates that there may be specific HBCD sources to the floor and/or that it may be present in the vacuum cleaners themselves. The BDE-47 concentrations in matched pairs of VCBD and breast milk samples were significantly correlated (r = 0.514, P = 0.029), indicating that one possible exposure route for this congener may be via dust ingestion. Practical Implications The statistically significant correlations found for several individual polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners, ?OctaBDE and ?DecaBDE between the two dust sampling methods in this study indicate that the same indoor sources contaminate both types of dust or that common processes govern the distribution of these compounds in the indoor environment. Therefore, either method is adequate for screening ?OctaBDE and ?DecaBDE in dust. The high variability seen between dust samples confirms results seen in other studies. For hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), divergent results in the two dust types indicate differences in contamination sources to the floor than to above-floor surfaces. Thus, it is still unclear which dust sampling method is most relevant for HBCD as well as for ?PentaBDE in dust and, further, which is most relevant for determining human exposure to PBDEs and HBCD.

  • 411.
    Björklund, Åsa K.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ekman, Diana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Elofsson, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Expansion of Protein Domain Repeats2006In: PloS Computational Biology, ISSN 1553-734X, E-ISSN 1553-7358, Vol. 2, no 8, p. 959-970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e. g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  • 412.
    Björling, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Synthesis and characterisation of Zintl hydrides2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis, structural characterisation and the properties of the Zintl hydrides AeE2H2 and AeAlSiH (Ae = Ba, Ca, Sr; E = Al, Ga, In, Si, Zn) are reported. The first hydride in this class of compounds is SrAl2H2 which was discovered under an experiment by Gingl, who hydrogenated SrAl2 at various temperatures. (Gingl et al, Journal of Alloys and Compounds 306 (2000) 127-132). The intention was to form alanates, e.g. AlH4-, by terminating the three dimensional four connected aluminium network in SrAl2. The new hydride, SrAl2H2, has a partially conserved aluminium network. The three dimensional anionic network in SrAl2 is reduced to two dimensions in the hydride, with aluminium bonded to both aluminium and hydrogen. This type of bonding configuration has not been observed before.

    The hydrogenation of SrAl2 is straight forward, 190 oC and 50 bar, compared to the difficult synthesis of alanates and alane, AlH3. The latter synthesises uses aluminium in its zero oxidation state in contrast to the synthesis of SrAl2H2 from SrAl2. (In the SrAl2-precursor aluminium is reduced by the electropositive metal to -I.) Thus, the discovery shows a different route to alanates by using precursors with aluminium in a reduced state. If SrAl2H2 is further hydrogenated at 250 oC the two dimensional network breaks and Sr2AlH7 forms.

    We wanted to investigate if SrAl2H2 was a singularity or if other similar compounds exist. We wanted to study how hydrogenation of precursors similar to the aluminide result in 1) new routes to compounds with high hydrogen content, as alanates, 2) to investigate how the E-H bond is affected as function of the network composition among different ternary hydrides, in particular BaAlxSi2-xHx, and choice of active metal.

    BaGa2H2 and SrGa2H2, two hydrides isostructural with SrAl2H2, were synthesized from its precursors BaGa2 and SrGa2. In addition three ternary hydrides BaAlSiH, CaAlSiH and SrAlSiH were manufactured from their related AeAlSi precursors.

    All powders were characterized by neutron and x-ray diffraction methods.

    An increased stability towards water/moisture compared to ordinary saline hydrides was noticed, especially for the ternary hydrides. Heat stability was measured with DSC (differential scanning calorimetry). The hydrides BaGa2H2 and SrGa2H2 decompose around 300 oC at 1 atm. This is similar to isostructural SrAl2H2. The ternary hydrides BaAlSiH and SrAlSiH decompose at 600 oC, at 1 atm, which is the highest noticed temperature for compounds with Al-H bonds. Inelastic neutron scattering experiments showed that these hydrides Al-H and Sr-H bonds are really weak, even weaker then the Al-H interactions in alanates and alanes. These hydrides are probably stabilized be their lattices. The electric properties among the ternary hydrides were measured with IR-spectroscopy (diffuse reflectance). The ternary hydrides, AeAlSiH, are indirect semi conductors. BaGa2H2 and SrGa2H2 are conductors. The ternary hydrides, AeAlxSi2-xHx, may have adjustable band gaps, which we were not able to determine.

    This work is leading into a new research area within the field of metal hydrides.

  • 413. Blair, Mitch
    et al.
    Stewart-Brown, Sarah
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Bremberg, Sven
    Barnhälsovetenskap2013 (ed. 1.)Book (Other academic)
  • 414. Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Richter, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Hallsten, Lennart
    Svedberg, Pia
    The associations between job insecurity, depressive symptoms and burnout: The role of performance-based self-esteem2018In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 48-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite agreement on the negative effects of job insecurity, more knowledge needs to be generated on the health effects in terms of burnout and depressive symptoms and for whom job insecurity has these negative effects. The present study aims to investigate the associations between job insecurity and burnout and depressive symptoms respectively, by studying the moderation influences of performance-based self-esteem (PBSE), a form of contingent self-esteem. A population-based sample with 4145 twins was used. The results showed that job insecurity was significantly associated with both burnout and depressive symptoms, and that PBSE acted as a moderator, so that the associations were stronger for individuals with high PBSE than for individuals with low PBSE. The study contributes by including a personality characteristic to gain more knowledge about the mechanisms of job insecurity on mental ill-health, and by illustrating that job insecurity has an impact on severe health outcomes in terms of burnout and depressive symptoms.

  • 415. Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Svedberg, Pia
    Work-Home Interference and Burnout A Study Based on Swedish Twins2014In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 361-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study sets out to investigate the impact of work-home interference on burnout in women and men, while taking genetic and family environmental factors into account. Methods: A total of 4446 Swedish twins were included in the study. The effects of work-home conflict (WHC) and home-work conflict (HWC) on burnout between and within pairs were analyzed with co-twin control analyses. Results: Both WHC and HWC were significantly associated with burnout. Genetic factors may be involved in the association between HWC and burnout in women. Familial factors were not involved for WHC and burnout, neither for women nor for men. Conclusions: This study shows the importance to encounter WHC per se to prevent burnout. Because of genetic confounding in HWC and burnout in women, preventive efforts may also take into account individual characteristics.

  • 416.
    Blomqvist, Helen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Magnesium ions stabilizing solid-state transition metal hydrides2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is focused on hydrides containing first-row transition metal–hydrido complexes counterbalanced by magnesium. In particular, fundamental properties of the promising hydrogen storage material Mg2NiH4 have been studied. Results presented in the thesis provide detailed knowledge of the electronic structure and bonding mechanisms and are of significance for improving the hydrogen desorption process of complex transition metal hydrides in general.Two competing stabilization mechanisms in Mg2NiH4 have been identified; presence of microtwinning in the structure and the extra Mg added to the melt-cast Mg2Ni starting alloys, which acts as stabilizing dopant in the Mg2NiH4 system. When eliminating both stabilization mechanisms, the hydrogen release pressure was doubled at 453 K. Mg2NiH4 behaves like a heavily doped semiconductor at lower temperatures, but the conductivity is counteracted by the introduction of microtwinning in the structure at elevated temperatures, which makes the hydride non-conducting at » 400 K. The conductivity can be regained by reducing the amount of microtwinning with an applied mechanical pressure. Size, coordination and type of cation framework have decisive roles in determining the structure type of complex metal hydrides, as shown by ab initio total-energy calculations. Compared to the rich variety of Pd-based complex hydrides, the few Ni hydrido complexes hitherto found only contain Mg2+, solely or in combination with Ca2+, Sr2+, Yb2+, Eu2+ or La3+. Apparently the rather weak Ni–H bond needs a small and polarizing cation, e.g. Mg2+, to be stabilized in the solid state. The rather strong Mg–H interaction makes Mg2NiH4 a hybrid of ionic and complex transition metal hydride. This stabilization mechanism where electron density is redistributed by the polarizable hydrido ligand explains why Mg2NiH4 is very sensitive to disturbances of the crystal ordering, e.g. doping and ball milling, which profoundly affect stability, conductivity, color, structure and phasetransition conditions. Mg2+ also has the ability to stabilize Mn hydrido complexes, as observed in the novel Mg3MnH~6 compound, synthesized at GPa pressure in the solid state.

  • 417.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Av egen kraft - med andras stöd2013In: Hjälpande möten i vård och omvärld: brukare, praktiker och forskare reflekterar / [ed] Ingemar Ljungqvist, Håkan Jenner, Stockholm: Liber, 2013, p. 182-210Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 418.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Dogmer som dödar: Vägval för svensk narkotikapolitik2017In: Dogmer som dödar: Vägval för svensk narkotikapolitik / [ed] Niklas Eklund, Mikaela Hildebrand, Stockholm: Verbal , 2017, p. 291-311Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 419. Blomqvist, Jan
    et al.
    Raitasalo, Kirsimarja
    Koski-Jännes, Anja
    Klingemann, Justyna
    Melberg, Hans Olov
    Schreckenberg, Dirk
    Peschel, Christine
    Popular Images of Adiction in five European Countries2014Report (Other academic)
  • 420. Blomqvist, My
    et al.
    Ek, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    Holmberg, Kirsten
    Westerlund, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Dahlloö, Göran
    Cognitive ability and dental fear and anxiety2013In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 121, no 2, p. 117-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dental fear and anxiety (DFA), as well as dental behavior management problems, are common in children and adolescents. Several psychological factors in the child, and parental DFA, have been studied and found to correlate to the child's DFA. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cognitive ability and DFA in a population-based group of children with identified behavior and learning problems. In conjunction with a dental examination at 11yr of age, 70 children were assessed with regard to DFA using the Children's Fear Survey Schedule Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS), and their cognitive ability was assessed using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children. In addition, parental DFA was measured using the Corah Dental Anxiety Scale. The results revealed that DFA was significantly correlated to verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) but not to any other cognitive index. A significant correlation was found between parental DFA and child DFA. The results indicate that the child's verbal capacity may be one factor of importance in explaining dental fear in children.

  • 421. Bloomfield, Kim
    et al.
    Grittner, Ulrike
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany.
    Piontek, Daniela
    Drinking patterns at the sub-national level: What do they tell us about drinking cultures in European countries?2017In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 342-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    A drinking pattern is not only a major drinking variable, but is also one indicator of a country's drinking culture. In the present study, we examine drinking patterns within and across the neighbouring countries of Denmark and Germany. The aim of the research is to determine to what extent drinking patterns differ or are shared at the sub-national level in the two countries.

    Method:

    Data came from the German 2012 Epidemiological Survey of Substance Use (n = 9084) 18-64 years (response rate 54%), and the Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research's 2011 Danish national survey (n = 5133) 15-79 years (response rate 64%), which was reduced to a common age range, producing a final n = 4016. The drinking pattern variable included abstention, moderate drinking, heavy drinking, risky single occasion drinking (RSOD), and was investigated with bivariate statistics and gender-specific hierarchical cluster analysis.

    Results:

    For men three clusters emerged: one highlighting abstention and RSOD, moderate/heavy drinking, RSOD and RSOD + heavy drinking. For women, two clusters appeared: one highlighting abstention and moderate/heavy drinking and the other highlighting RSOD and RSDO + heavy drinking. The clusters revealed different geographical patterning: for men, a west vs. east divide; for women, a north-south gradient.

    Conclusions:

    The analysis could identify for each gender clusters representing both separate and shared drinking patterns as well as distinctive geographical placements. This new knowledge can contribute to a new understanding of the dynamics of drinking cultures and could indicate new approaches to prevention efforts and policy initiatives.

  • 422. Boccardi, Virginia
    et al.
    Calvani, Riccardo
    Limongi, Federica
    Marseglia, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Mason, Alexandra
    Noale, Marianna
    Rogoli, Domenico
    Veronese, Nicola
    Crepaldi, Gaetano
    Maggi, Stefania
    Consensus paper on the executive summary of the international conference on Mediterranean diet and health: a lifelong approach an Italian initiative supported by the Mediterranean Diet Foundation and the Menarini Foundation2018In: Nutrition, ISSN 0899-9007, Vol. 51-52, p. 38-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mediterranean Diet Foundation, in collaboration with the International Menarini Foundation, organized the International Conference on Mediterranean Diet and Health: A Lifelong Approach. The Conference was held in Ostuni (Puglia, Italy) from March 30 to April 1, 2017. The event received the endorsement of the American Federation for Aging Research, the Research Consortium Luigi Amaducci, the European Nutrition for Health Alliance, the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, the Clinical Section of the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics European Region, the National Research Council Research Project on Aging, the Italian Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics, and the Italian Society of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.During the conference, results were presented from major studies on dietary interventions aiming to assess the efficacy of the Mediterranean diet in the prevention of chronic diseases and the potential underlying mechanisms. Twenty-six international speakers, in seven different sessions, discussed the biological basis, clinical impact, health policy, and behavioral implications of the Mediterranean diet, and its use in potential interventions for health promotion.

  • 423.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    An explorative review of the Lean office concept2013In: Journal of Corporate Real Estate, ISSN 1463-001X, E-ISSN 1479-1048, Vol. 15, no 3/4, p. 167-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The concept of Lean office design has emerged, claiming to support an efficient labour process. This article aims to investigate how the two main perspectives identified in the Lean office: the neo-Tayloristic approach and the team-based approach, based in different historical backgrounds, use the office design to shorten lead time and free up time.

    Design/methodology/approach – An extensive review is done in the article of what the Lean office concept means for different research areas and to practitioners.

    Findings – The study presents the two Lean office perspectives in relation to each other, something that has not been done before since it is only recently the team-based Lean office was introduced. The study also presents possible risk and benefits of two perspectives from an employee and organizational perspective.

    Research limitations/implications – Since this is a first exploratory review of the Lean office concept based on theories and examples from design practice, further empirical studies are needed to determine risks and benefits of the concept.

    Practical implications – The clarifying examples in the article make it useful for people involved in the design and building process of offices.

    Originality/value – The article brings together the fields of labour process, office research and facility management with the design practice and presents the two perspectives Lean office design in relation to each other, which has not been done before since the team-based Lean office has only recently been introduced.

  • 424.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Are you sitting comfortably? Office design and worker wellbeing2014In: Safety Management, ISSN 1069-2118, Vol. 16, p. 17-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 425.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Lean i arbetslivet: Lean inom kontorsdesign2013In: Lean i arbetslivet / [ed] Per Sederblad, Stockholm: Liber, 2013, 1, p. 162-189Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 426.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    L'impact de la conception architecturale des bureaux sur le confort et le bien-être desemployés (Eng. The impact of architectural design offices in the comfort andwell-being of employees): Le confort au travail : Quenous apprend la psychologie environnementale? (Eng. Comfort at work: What canwe learn from environmental psychology?)2013In: L'impact de la conception architecturale des bureaux sur le confort et le bien-être desemployés / [ed] L. Rioux, J. Le Roy, L. Rubens & J. Le Conte, Quebec City,Canada: Presses Universitaires de Laval , 2013, 1, p. 17-39Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 427.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. School of Architecture, School of Architecture & Built Environment, The Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Office type's association to employees' welfare: Three studies2016In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 779-790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The workplace is important for employees' daily life and well-being. This article investigates exploratory the office design's role for employees' welfare from different perspectives.

    OBJECTIVE: By comparing different studies of the office, type's influence on different factors of employees' welfare the aim is to see if any common patterns exist in office design's impact.

    METHODS: The three included studies investigate office type's association with employees' welfare by measuring its influence on: a) perception of leadership, b) sick leave, and c) job satisfaction.The sample consists of office employees from a large, national representative work environment survey that work in one of the seven identified office types in contemporary office design: (1) cell-offices; (2) shared-room offices; (3) small, (4) medium-sized and (5) large open-plan offices; (6) flex-offices and (7) combi-offices. Statistical method used is multivariate logistic and linear regression analysis with adjustment for background factors.

    RESULTS: Overall results show that shared-room office, traditional open plan offices and flex-office stand out negatively, but to different degree(s) on the different outcomes measured.

    CONCLUSIONS: This explorative comparison of different studies finds a pattern of office types that repeatedly show indications of negative influence on employees' welfare, but further studies are needed to clarify this.

  • 428.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Chungkham, Holendro Singh
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Wulff, Cornelia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Office design's impact on sick leave rates:  2014In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 139-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of office type on sickness absence among office employees was studied prospectively in 1852 employees working in (1) cell-offices; (2) shared-room offices; (3) small, (4) medium-sized and (5) large open-plan offices; (6) flex-offices and (7) combi-offices. Sick leaves were self-reported two years later as number of (a) short and (b) long (medically certified) sick leave spells as well as (c) total number of sick leave days. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used, with adjustment for background factors. A significant excess risk for sickness absence was found only in terms of short sick leave spells in the three open-plan offices. In the gender separate analysis, this remained for women, whereas men had a significantly increased risk in flex-offices. For long sick leave spells, a significantly higher risk was found among women in large open-plan offices and for total number of sick days among men in flex-offices. Practitioner Summary: A prospective study of the office environment's effect on employees is motivated by the high rates of sick leaves in the workforce. The results indicate differences between office types, depending on the number of people sharing workspace and the opportunity to exert personal control as influenced by the features that define the office types.

  • 429. Bodin, Maja
    et al.
    Stern, Jenny
    Käll, Lisa Folkmarson
    Centre for Gender Research, Humanistiskt centrum, Uppsala, Sweden; Centre for Dementia Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Larsson, Margareta
    Coherence of pregnancy planning within couples expecting a child2015In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 31, no 10, p. 973-978Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 430.
    Bognar, Greg
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy. La Trobe University, Australia.
    Is disability mere difference?2016In: Journal of Medical Ethics, ISSN 0306-6800, E-ISSN 1473-4257, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 46-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 431.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol short-circuits important part of the brain': Swedish newspaper representations of biomedical alcohol research2017In: Addiction Research and Theory, ISSN 1606-6359, E-ISSN 1476-7392, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 177-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The media has a central role in communicating and constructing health knowledge, including communicating research findings related to alcohol consumption. However, research on news reporting about alcohol is still a relatively small field; in particular, there are few studies of the reporting of biomedical alcohol and drug research, despite the assumed increasing popularity of biomedical perspectives in public discourse in general. The present article addresses the representational `devices' used in Swedish press reporting about biomedical alcohol research, drawing on qualitative thematic analysis of the topics, metaphors, and optimist versus critical frames used in presenting biomedical research findings. In general, the press discourse focuses on genetic factors related to alcohol problems, on the role of the brain and the reward system in addiction, and on medication for treating alcohol problems. Metaphors of `reconstruction' and `reprograming' of the reward system are used to describe how the brain's function is altered in addiction, whereas metaphors of `undeserved reward' and `shortcuts' to pleasure are used to describe alcohol's effects on the brain. The study indicates that aspects of the Swedish press discourse of biomedical alcohol research invite reductionism, but that this result could be understood from the point of view of both the social organization of reporting and the intersection of reporting, science, and everyday understandings rather than from the point of view of the news articles only. Moreover, some characteristics of the media portrayals leave room for interpretation, calling for research on the meanings ascribed to metaphors of addiction in everyday interaction.

  • 432. Bohman, H
    et al.
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Päären, A
    Jonsson, U
    Somatic symptoms in adolescence as a predictor of inpatient care for mental disorders in adulthood2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 433. Bohman, Hannes
    et al.
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Cleland, Neil
    Lundberg, Mathias
    Päären, Aivar
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Somatic symptoms in adolescence as a predictor of severe mental illness in adulthood: a long-term community-based follow-up study2018In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, ISSN 1753-2000, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 12, article id 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Somatic symptoms are common and costly for society and correlate with suffering and low functioning. Nevertheless, little is known about the long-term implications of somatic symptoms. The objective of this study was to assess if somatic symptoms in adolescents with depression and in their matched controls predict severe mental illness in adulthood by investigating the use of hospital-based care consequent to different mental disorders. Methods: The entire school population of 16-17-year-olds in the city of Uppsala, Sweden, was screened for depression in 1991-1993 (n = 2300). Adolescents with positive screenings (n = 307) and matched non-depressed controls (n = 302) participated in a semi-structured diagnostic interview for mental disorders. In addition, 21 different self-rated somatic symptoms were assessed. The adolescents with depression and the matched non-depressed controls were engaged in follow-up through the National Patient Register 17-19 years after the baseline study (n = 375). The outcome measures covered hospital-based mental health care for different mental disorders according to ICD-10 criteria between the participants' ages of 18 and 35 years. Results: Somatic symptoms were associated with an increased risk of later hospital-based mental health care in general in a dose-response relationship when adjusting for sex, adolescent depression, and adolescent anxiety (1 symptom: OR = 1.63, CI 0.55-4.85; 2-4 symptoms: OR = 2.77, 95% CI 1.04-7.39; >= 5 symptoms: OR = 5.75, 95% CI 1.98-16.72). With regards to specific diagnoses, somatic symptoms predicted hospital-based care for mood disorders when adjusting for sex, adolescent depression, and adolescent anxiety (p<0.05). In adolescents with depression, somatic symptoms predicted later hospital-based mental health care in a dose-response relationship (p<0.01). In adolescents without depression, reporting at least one somatic symptom predicted later hospital-based mental health care (p<0.05). Conclusions: Somatic symptoms in adolescence predicted severe adult mental illness as measured by hospital-based care also when controlled for important confounders. The results suggest that adolescents with somatic symptoms need early treatment and extended follow-up to treat these specific symptoms, regardless of co-occurring depression and anxiety.

  • 434. Bohman, Hannes
    et al.
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Päären, Aivar
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Parental separation in childhood as a risk factor for depression in adulthood: a community-based study of adolescents screened for depression and followed up after 15 years2017In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 17, article id 117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Earlier research has investigated the association between parental separation and long-term health outcomes among offspring, but few studies have assessed the potentially moderating role of mental health status in adolescence. The aim of this study was to analyze whether parental separation in childhood predicts depression in adulthood and whether the pattern differs between individuals with and without earlier depression. Methods: A community-based sample of individuals with adolescent depression in 1991-93 and matched non-depressed peers were followed up using a structured diagnostic interview after 15 years. The participation rate was 65% (depressed n = 227; non-depressed controls n = 155). Information on parental separation and conditions in childhood and adolescence was collected at baseline. The outcome was depression between the ages 19-31 years; information on depression was collected at the follow-up diagnostic interview. The statistical method used was binary logistic regression. Results: Our analyses showed that depressed adolescents with separated parents had an excess risk of recurrence of depression in adulthood, compared with depressed adolescents with non-separated parents. In addition, among adolescents with depression, parental separation was associated with an increased risk of a switch to bipolar disorder in adulthood. Among the matched non-depressed peers, no associations between parental separation and adult depression or bipolar disorder were found. Conclusions: Parental separation may have long-lasting health consequences for vulnerable individuals who suffer from mental illness already in adolescence.

  • 435. Bojner Horwitz, Eva
    et al.
    Hogstedt, Christer
    Wistén, Pelle
    Theorell, Töres
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Kulturen – en viktig insats för hållbar folkhälsa: seminarier, antologi och underlag för fortsatta insatser2015In: Kultur & folkhälsa: antologi om forskning och praktik / [ed] Eva Bojner Horwitz, Christer Hogstedt, Pelle Wistén och Töres Theorell, Stockholm: Tolvnitton förlag , 2015, p. 9-11Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 436. Bojner Horwitz, Eva
    et al.
    Hogstedt, Christer
    Wistén, Pelle
    Theorell, Töres
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Varför har inte fler studier publicerats? Reflektioner om seminarieserien om kultur och folkhälsa2015In: Kultur & folkhälsa: antologi om forskning och praktik / [ed] Eva Bojner Horwitz, Christer Hogstedt, Pelle Wistén, Töres Theorell, Stockholm: Tolvnitton förlag , 2015, p. 239-246Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 437. Bojner Horwitz, Eva
    et al.
    Osika, Walter
    Theorell, Töres
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Hållbarhetstestning och implementering av kulturaktiviteter – forskarsamhällets roll2015In: Kultur & folkhälsa: antologi om forskning och praktik / [ed] Eva Bojner Horwitz, Christer Hogstedt, Pelle Wistén, Töres Theorell, Stockholm: Tolvnitton förlag , 2015, p. 107-114Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 438. Bokenberger, Kathleen
    et al.
    Ström, Peter
    Aslan, Anna K. Dahl
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Shift work and cognitive aging: a longitudinal study2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 485-493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The few studies of shift work and late life cognitive functioning have yielded mixed findings. The aim of the present study is to estimate the association between shift-work experience and change in cognitive performance before and after retirement age among older adults who were gainfully employed. Methods Five hundred and ninety five participants with no dementia were followed up for a mean of 17.6 standard deviation (SD) 8.8 years from a Swedish population-based sample. Participants had self-reported information on any type of shift-work experience (ever/never) in 1984 and measures of cognitive performance (verbal, spatial, memory, processing speed, and general cognitive ability) from up to 9 waves of cognitive assessments during 1986-2012. Night work history (ever/never) from 1998-2002 was available from a subsample (N = 320). Early adult cognitive test scores were available for 77 men. Results In latent growth curve modeling, there were no main effects of any-type or night shift work on the mean scores or rate of change in any of the cognitive domains. An interaction effect between any-type shift work and education on cognitive performance at retirement was noted. Lower-educated shift workers performed better on cognitive tests than lower-educated day workers at retirement. Sensitivity analyses, however, indicated that the interactions appeared to be driven by selection effects. Lower-educated day workers demonstrated poorer cognitive ability in early adulthood than lower-educated shift workers, who may have selected jobs entailing higher cognitive demand. Conclusion There was no difference in late-life cognitive aging between individuals with a history of working shifts compared to those who had typical day work schedules during midlife.

  • 439. Bokenberger, Kathleen
    et al.
    Ström, Peter
    Dahl Aslan, Anna K.
    Johansson, Anna L. V.
    Gatz, Margaret
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Association Between Sleep Characteristics and Incident Dementia Accounting for Baseline Cognitive Status: A Prospective Population-Based Study2017In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 134-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although research has shown that sleep disorders are prevalent among people with dementia, the temporal relationship is unclear. We investigated whether atypical sleep characteristics were associated with incident dementia while accounting for baseline cognitive functioning.

    METHODS: Screening Across the Lifespan Twin (SALT) study participants were 11,247 individuals from the Swedish Twin Registry who were at least 65 years at baseline (1998-2002). Sleep and baseline cognitive functioning were assessed via the SALT telephone screening interview. Data on dementia diagnoses came from national health registers. Cox regression was performed to estimate hazard ratios for dementia.

    RESULTS: After 17 years of follow-up, 1,850 dementia cases were identified. Short (≤6 hours) and extended (>9 hours) time in bed (TIB) compared to the middle reference group (hazard ratio = 1.40, 95% confidence interval = 1.06-1.85; hazard ratio = 1.11, 95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.24, respectively) and rising at 8:00 AM or later compared to earlier rising (hazard ratio = 1.12, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.24) were associated with higher dementia incidence. Bedtime, sleep quality, restorative sleep, and heavy snoring were not significant predictors. Findings stratified by baseline cognitive status indicated that the association between short TIB and dementia remained in those cognitively intact at the start.

    CONCLUSIONS: Short and extended TIB and delayed rising among older adults predicted increased dementia incidence in the following 17 years. The pattern of findings suggests that extended TIB and late rising represent prodromal features whereas short TIB appeared to be a risk factor for dementia.

  • 440. Bolad, Ahmed
    et al.
    Farouk, Salah E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Israelsson, Elisabeth
    Dolo, Amagana
    Doumbo, Ogobara K.
    Nebié, Issa
    Maiga, Boubacar
    Kouriba, Bourema
    Luoni, Gaia
    Sirima, Bienveu S.
    Distinct interethnic differences in IgG class/subclass and IgM antibody responses to malaria antigens but not in IgG responses to non-malarial antigens in sympatric tribes living in West Africa2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 380-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The well-established relative resistance to malaria observed in the Fulani as compared with other sympatric tribes in West Africa has been attributed to their higher levels of serum immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies to malarial antigens. In this study, we confirm and extend the previous findings by analyses of the levels of IgM, IgG and IgG subclasses of anti-malarial antibodies in asymptomatic individuals of different sympatric tribes in Burkina Faso (Fulani/Mossi) and Mali (Fulani/Dogon). The Fulani showed significantly higher median concentrations of anti-malarial IgG and IgM antibodies than the sympatric tribes at both locations. Although the overall subclass pattern of antibodies did not differ between the tribes, with IgG1 and IgG3 as dominant, the Fulani showed consistently significantly higher levels of these subclasses as compared with those of the non-Fulani individuals. No significant differences were seen in the levels of total IgG between the tribes, but the Fulani showed significantly higher levels of total IgM than their neighbours in both countries. While the antibody levels to some nonmalarial antigens showed the same pattern of differences seen for antibody levels to malaria antigens, no significant such differences were seen with antibodies to other nonmalarial antigens. In conclusion, our results show that the Fulani in two different countries show higher levels of anti-malarial antibodies than sympatric tribes, and this appears not to be a reflection of a general hyper-reactivity in the Fulani.

  • 441. Bolad, Ahmed
    et al.
    Farouk, Salah E.
    Modiano, David
    Berzins, Klavs
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Troye-Blomberg, Marita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Israelsson, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Dolo, Amagana
    Doumbo, Ogobara K.
    Nebié, Issa
    Maiga, Boubacar
    Kouriba, Bourema
    Luoni, Gaia
    Sirima, Bienveu Sodiomon
    Distinct interethnic differences in IgG class/subclass and IgM antibody responses to malaria antigens but not in IgG responses to non-malarial antigens in sympatric tribes living in West Africa2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 380-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The well-established relative resistance to malaria observed in the Fulani ascompared with other sympatric tribes in West Africa has been attributed totheir higher levels of serum immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies to malarialantigens. In this study, we confirm and extend the previous findings by analysesof the levels of IgM, IgG and IgG subclasses of anti-malarial antibodies inasymptomatic individuals of different sympatric tribes in Burkina Faso(Fulani/Mossi) and Mali (Fulani/Dogon). The Fulani showed significantlyhigher median concentrations of anti-malarial IgG and IgM antibodies thanthe sympatric tribes at both locations. Although the overall subclass pattern ofantibodies did not differ between the tribes, with IgG1 and IgG3 as dominant,the Fulani showed consistently significantly higher levels of these subclasses ascompared with those of the non-Fulani individuals. No significant differenceswere seen in the levels of total IgG between the tribes, but the Fulani showedsignificantly higher levels of total IgM than their neighbours in both countries.While the antibody levels to some nonmalarial antigens showed the same patternof differences seen for antibody levels to malaria antigens, no significant suchdifferences were seen with antibodies to other nonmalarial antigens. In conclusion,our results show that the Fulani in two different countries show higherlevels of anti-malarial antibodies than sympatric tribes, and this appears not tobe a reflection of a general hyper-reactivity in the Fulani.

  • 442.
    Bolad, Ahmed Kamal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Wenner-Gren Institute for Experimental Biology.
    Antibody responses in Plasmodium falciparum malaria and their relation to protection against the disease2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Protective immunity against Plasmodium falciparum may be obtained after repeated exposure to infection. Several studies indicate that immunity against the blood stages of the P. Falciparum infection is mainly antibody mediated. Protective antibodies may act either on their own, mediate antibody-dependent phagocytosis and/or cell-mediated neutralization of parasites. This thesis describes several aspects of humoral immune responses to P. falciparum infection in individuals of different age groups, different genetic background and with different degrees of malaria exposure.

    Several target antigens for antibody-mediated inhibition of parasite growth or invasion have been identified. One such antigen is Pf332, which appears on the surface of parasitized erythrocytes at late trophozoite and schizont stage. This surface exposure makes the antigen a possible target for opsonizing antibodies. We optimized an in vitro assay for studying cellmediated parasite neutralization in the presence of Pf332-reactive antibodies. Our data demonstrate that, Pf332 specific antibodies are able to inhibit parasite growth on their own and in cooperation with human monocytes.

    The P. falciparum parasites have evolved several mechanisms to evade the host neutralizing immune responses. In this thesis, we show that freshly isolated P. falciparum parasites from children living in a malaria endemic area of Burkina Faso were less sensitive for growth inhibition in vitro by autologous immunoglobulins (Ig) compared with heterologous ones. Analyses of two consecutive isolates taken 14 days apart, with regard to genotypes and sensitivity to growth inhibition in vitro, did not give any clear-cut indications on possible mechanisms leading to a reduced inhibitory activity in autologous parasite/antibody combinations. The frequent presence of persisting parasite clones in asymptomatic children indicates that the parasite possesses as yet undefined mechanisms to evade neutralizing immune responses.

    Transmission reducing measures such insecticide treated nets (ITNs) have been shown to be effective in reducing morbidity and mortality from malaria. However, concerns have been raised that ITNs usage could affect the acquisition of malaria immunity. We studied the effect of the use of insecticide treated curtains (ITC) on anti-malarial immune responses of children living in villages with ITC since birth. The use of ITC did neither affect the levels of parasite neutralizing immune responses nor the multiplicity of infection. These results indicate that the use of ITC does not interfere with the acquisition of anti-malarial immunity in children living in a malaria hyperendemic area.

    There is substantial evidence that the African Fulani tribe is markedly less susceptible to malaria infection compared to other sympatrically living ethnic tribes. We investigated the isotypic humoral responses against P. falciparum asexual blood stages in different ethnic groups living in sympatry in two countries exhibiting different malaria transmission intensities, Burkina Faso and Mali. We observed higher levels of the total malaria-specific-IgG and its cytophilic subclasses in individuals of the Fulani tribe as compared to non-Fulani individuals. Fulani individuals also showed higher levels of antibodies to measles antigen, indicating that the intertribal differences are not specific for malaria and might reflect a generally activated immune system in the Fulani.

  • 443. Bolelli, K.
    et al.
    Musdal, Yaman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Aki-Yalcin, E.
    Mannervik, Bengt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Yalcin, I.
    Synthesis and activity mechanism of some novel 2-substituted benzothiazoles as hGSTP1-1 enzyme inhibitors2017In: SAR and QSAR in environmental research (Print), ISSN 1062-936X, E-ISSN 1029-046X, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 927-940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human GSTP1-1 is one of the most important proteins, which overexpresses in a large number of human tumours and is involved in the development of resistance to several anticancer drugs. So, it has become an important target in cancer treatment. In this study, 12 benzothiazole derivatives were synthesized and screened for their in vitro inhibitory activity for hGSTP1-1. Among these compounds, two of them (compounds #2 and #5) have been found to be the leads when compared with the reference drug etoposide. In order to analyse the structure-activity relationships (SARs) and to investigate the binding side interactions of the observed lead compounds, a HipHop pharmacophore model was generated and the molecular docking studies were performed by using CDocker method. In conclusion, it is observed that the lead compounds #2 and #5 possessed inhibitory activity on the hGSTP1-1 by binding to the H-site as a substrate in which the para position of the phenyl ring of the benzamide moiety on the benzothiazole ring is important. Substitution at this position with a hydrophobic group that reduces the electron density at the phenyl ring is required for the interaction with the H side active residue Tyr108.

  • 444.
    Bolsi, Alessandra
    et al.
    Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland.
    Peroni, Marta
    Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland.
    Amelio, Dante
    Proton Therapy Centre Azienda Provinciale per I Servizi Sanitari (APSS), Italy.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    The Skandion Clinic, Sweden.
    Stock, Markus
    MedAustron Ion Therapy Center, Austria.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Witt Nyström, Petra
    The Skandion Clinic, Sweden; Danish Centre for Particle Therapy, Denmark.
    Hoffmann, Aswin
    Technische Universität Dresden, Germany; OncoRay, Germany.
    Practice patterns of image guided particle therapy in Europe: A 2016 survey of the European Particle Therapy Network (EPTN)2018In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 128, no 1, p. 4-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: Image guidance is critical in achieving accurate and precise radiation delivery in particle therapy, even more than in photon therapy. However, equipment, quality assurance procedures and clinical workflows for image-guided particle therapy (IGPT) may vary substantially between centres due to a lack of standardization. A survey was conducted to evaluate the current practice of IGPT in European particle therapy centres.

    Material and methods: In 2016, a questionnaire was distributed among 19 particle therapy centres in 12 European countries. The questionnaire consisted of 30 open and 37 closed questions related to image guidance in the general clinical workflow, for moving targets, current research activities and future perspectives of IGPT.

    Results: All centres completed the questionnaire. The IGPT methods used by the 10 treating centres varied substantially. The 9 non-treating centres were in the process to introduce IGPT. Most centres have developed their own IGPT strategies, being tightly connected to their specific technical implementation and dose delivery methods.

    Conclusions: Insight into the current clinical practice of IGPT in European particle therapy centres was obtained. A variety in IGPT practices and procedures was confirmed, which underlines the need for harmonisation of practice parameters and consensus guidelines.

  • 445. Boman, Krister K
    et al.
    Lindblad, Frank
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Hjern, Anders
    Long-term outcomes of childhood cancer survivors in Sweden: A population-based study of education, employment, and income2010In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 116, no 5, p. 1385-1391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

     Studies of different national populations were indispensable for estimating the impact of illness-related disability on social outcomes in adult childhood cancer survivors. The effects of childhood cancer on educational attainment, employment, and income in adulthood in a Swedish setting were studied. METHODS:: The study population was a national cohort of 1.46 million Swedish residents, including 1716 survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed before their 16th birthday, followed up in 2002 in registries at >25 years of age. Main outcomes were educational attainment, employment, and net income. Markers of persistent disability were considered, and outcomes were analyzed with multivariate linear and logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, and socioeconomic indicators of the childhood households. RESULTS:: Non-central nervous system (CNS) cancer survivors had similar education, employment, and income as the general population in adjusted models, whereas survivors of CNS tumors more often had no more than basic (</=9 years) education (relative risk [RR], 1.80 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.45-2.23]), less often attained education beyond secondary school (RR, 0.69 [95% CI, 0.58-0.81]), and less often were employed (RR, 0.85 [95% CI, 0.77-0.94]). Predicted net income from work was lower in CNS tumor survivors (P <.001) than in the general population, even after the exclusion of individuals who received economic disability compensation. CONCLUSIONS:: CNS tumor survivors had poorer social outcomes compared with the general population, whereas outcomes for survivors of other childhood cancers were similar to the general population. Established late effects highlighted the importance of improved, safer pediatric CNS tumor treatment protocols and surveillance that identified individual needs for preventive and remedial measures.

  • 446.
    Bonath, Franziska
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Domingo-Prim, Judit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Tarbier, Marcel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Friedländer, Marc
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Visa, Neus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Next-generation sequencing reveals two populations of damage- induced small RNAs at endogenous DNA double-strand breaksIn: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 447. Bonde, Jens Peter
    et al.
    Hansen, Johnni
    Kolstad, Henrik A.
    Mikkelsen, Sigurd
    Olsen, Jorgen H.
    Blask, David E.
    Harma, Mikko
    Kjuus, Helge
    de Koning, Harry J.
    Olsen, Jorn
    Moller, Morten
    Schernhammer, Eva S.
    Stevens, Richard G.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Work at night and breast cancer - report on evidence-based options for preventive actions2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 380-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified shift work involving circadian disruption as probably carcinogenic to humans (group 2A), primarily based on experimental and epidemiologic evidence for breast cancer. In order to examine options for evidence-based preventive actions, 16 researchers in basic, epidemiological and applied sciences convened at a workshop in Copenhagen 26-27 October 2011. This paper summarizes the evidence from epidemiological and experimental studies and presents possible recommendations for prevention of the effects of night work on breast cancer. Among those studies that quantified duration of shift work, there were statistically significant elevations in risk only after about 20 years working night shift. It is unclear from these studies whether or not there is a modest but real elevated risk for shorter durations. Hence, restriction of the total number of years working night shift could be one future preventive recommendation for shift workers. The diurnal secretion of melatonin by the pineal gland with peak in secretory activity during the night is a good biochemical marker of the circadian rhythm. Disruption of the diurnal melatonin secretion pattern can be diminished by restricting the number of consecutive night shifts. Reddish light and reduced light intensity during work at night could potentially help diminish the inhibitory activity of light with strong intensity on the melatonin secretion, but further mechanistic insight is needed before definite recommendations can be made. Earlier or more intensive mammography screening among female night shift worker is not recommended because the harm benefit ratio in this age group may not be beneficial. Preventive effects of melatonin supplementation on breast cancer risk have not been clearly documented, but may be a promising avenue if a lack of side effects can be shown even after long-term ingestion. Women with previous or current breast cancer should be advised not to work night shifts because of strong experimental evidence demonstrating accelerated tumor growth by suppression of melatonin secretion. Work during the night is widespread worldwide. To provide additional evidence-based recommendations on prevention of diseases related to night shift work, large studies on the impact of various shift schedules and type of light on circadian rhythms need to be conducted in real work environments.

  • 448. Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    et al.
    Zheng, Tenghao
    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    Bujanda, Luis
    Bresso, Francesca
    Agreus, Lars
    Andreasson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Lindberg, Greger
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Karling, Pontus
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Simren, Magnus
    Walter, Susanna
    Nardone, Gerardo
    Cuomo, Rosario
    Usai-Satta, Paolo
    Galeazzi, Francesca
    Neri, Matteo
    Portincasa, Piero
    Bellini, Massimo
    Barbara, Giovanni
    Latiano, Anna
    Hübenthal, Matthias
    Thijs, Vincent
    Netea, Mihai G.
    Jonkers, Daisy
    Chang, Lin
    Mayer, Emeran A.
    Wouters, Mira M.
    Boeckxstaens, Guy
    Camilleri, Michael
    Franke, Andre
    Zhernakova, Alexandra
    D'Amato, Mauro
    Female-Specific Association Between Variants on Chromosome 9 and Self-Reported Diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome2018In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 155, no 1, p. 168-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & aims

    Genetic factors are believed to affect risk for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but there have been no sufficiently powered and adequately sized studies. To identify DNA variants associated with IBS risk, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the large UK Biobank population-based cohort, which includes genotype and health data from 500,000 participants.

    Methods

    We studied 7,287,191 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms in individuals who self-reported a doctor's diagnosis of IBS (cases; n = 9576) compared to the remainder of the cohort (controls; n = 336,499) (mean age of study subjects, 40-69 years). Genome-wide significant findings were further investigated in 2045 patients with IBS from tertiary centers and 7955 population controls from Europe and the United States, and a small general population sample from Sweden (n = 249). Functional annotation of GWAS results was carried out by integrating data from multiple biorepositories to obtain biological insights from the observed associations.

    Results

    We identified a genome-wide significant association on chromosome 9q31.2 (single nucleotide polymorphism rs10512344; P = 3.57 x 10(-8)) in a region previously linked to age at menarche, and 13 additional loci of suggestive significance (P < 5.0 x 10(-6)). Sex-stratified analyses revealed that the variants at 9q31.2 affect risk of IBS in women only (P = 4.29 x 10(-10) in UK Biobank) and also [GRAPHICS] associate with constipation-predominant IBS in women (P = .015 in the tertiary cohort) and harder stools in women (P = .0012 in the population-based sample). Functional annotation of the 9q31.2 locus identified 8 candidate genes, including the elongator complex protein 1 gene (ELP1 or IKB-KAP), which is mutated in patients with familial dysautonomia.

    Conclusions

    In a sufficiently powered GWAS of IBS, we associated variants at the locus 9q31.2 with risk of IBS in women. This observation may provide additional rationale for investigating the role of sex hormones and autonomic dysfunction in IBS.

  • 449. Boraxbekk, C. J.
    et al.
    Hagkvist, Filip
    Lindner, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Umeå University, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Motor and mental training in older people: Transfer, interference, and associated functional neural responses2016In: Neuropsychologia, ISSN 0028-3932, E-ISSN 1873-3514, Vol. 89, p. 371-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning new motor skills may become more difficult with advanced age. In the present study, we randomized 56 older individuals, including 30 women (mean age 70.6 years), to 6 weeks of motor training, mental (motor imagery) training, or a combination of motor and mental training of a finger tapping sequence. Performance improvements and post-training functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were used to investigate performance gains and associated underlying neural processes. Motor only training and a combination of motor and mental training improved performance in the trained task more than mental-only training. The fMRI data showed that motor training was associated with a representation in the premotor cortex and mental training with a representation in the secondary visual cortex. Combining motor and mental training resulted in both premotor and visual cortex representations. During fMRI scanning, reduced performance was observed in the combined motor and mental training group, possibly indicating interference between the two training methods. We concluded that motor and motor imagery training in older individuals is associated with different functional brain responses. Furthermore, adding mental training to motor training did not result in additional performance gains compared to motor-only training and combining training methods may result in interference between representations, reducing performance.

  • 450. Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Lundquist, Anders
    Nordin, Annelie
    Nyberg, Lars
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Free Recall Episodic Memory Performance Predicts Dementia Ten Years prior to Clinical Diagnosis: Findings from the Betula Longitudinal Study2015In: Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders extra, E-ISSN 1664-5464, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 191-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Early dementia diagnosis is a considerable challenge. The present study examined the predictive value of cognitive performance for a future clinical diagnosis of late-onset Alzheimer's disease or vascular dementia in a random population sample. Methods: Cognitive performance was retrospectively compared between three groups of participants from the Betula longitudinal cohort. Group 1 developed dementia 11-22 years after baseline testing (n = 111) and group 2 after 1-10 years (n = 280); group 3 showed no deterioration towards dementia during the study period (n = 2,855). Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the predictive value of tests reflecting episodic memory performance, semantic memory performance, visuospatial ability, and prospective memory performance. Results: Age-and education-corrected performance on two free recall episodic memory tests significantly predicted dementia 10 years prior to clinical diagnosis. Free recall performance also predicted dementia 11-22 years prior to diagnosis when controlling for education, but not when age was added to the model. Conclusion: The present results support the suggestion that two free recall-based tests of episodic memory function may be useful for detecting individuals at risk of developing dementia 10 years prior to clinical diagnosis.

6789101112 401 - 450 of 4037
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf