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  • 451.
    Norberg, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Fostering self-reflection in translation students: The value of guided commentaries2014In: Translation and Interpreting Studies, ISSN 1932-2798, E-ISSN 1876-2700, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 150-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to examine students' understanding of the processes involved in translation if they are asked to write self-reflections on the strategies and procedures that they have employed and to submit these with their translations. The material analyzed in this study comprises retrospective, guided commentaries submitted during two terms by a group of undergraduate students studying translation. The results indicate that commentaries can foster heightened self-awareness of several aspects of the process, such as initial reading and revision. It is argued that the design of instructions for commentaries, including their variation and built-in progression, is of great importance for process-oriented translation teaching and deserves further experimental study.

  • 452.
    Norberg, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Translating humorous elements in children's books - Astrid Lindgren's Bill Bergson books in English and German2018In: Linguaculture, ISSN 2067-9696, no 2, p. 99-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research in the translation of humorous elements in children’s books is a complex subject, which cannot be reduced to studies of wordplay and of other highly humorous items. The translation of slightly humorous items can also influence the whole literary work if such elements are used frequently. This article analyses the ways in which such funny instances were dealt with in the English and German translations of the Bill Bergson books (original name: Kalle Blomkvist) by the Swedish author of children’s books Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002). More specifically, it discusses the translation of several funny words and expressions, repetitions and exaggerations.It is shown that the humorous effects in the English translation are sometimes less obvious than in the German translation, even if both translated texts rendered the majority of humorous instances in a very funny way.  

  • 453.
    Norberg, Ulf
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Stachl-Peier, Ursula
    Tiittula, Liisa
    Speech-to-text interpreting in Finland, Sweden and Austria2015In: Translation & Interpreting, ISSN 1836-9324, E-ISSN 1836-9324, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 36-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Speech-to-text (STT) interpreting is a type of intralingual interpreting mostly used by late deafened and hearing impaired persons who have a spoken language as their first language. In Finland, Sweden and Austria the speech-to-text transfer is performed in real-time by interpreters using a (specially adapted or standard) keyboard that is connected to a screen. As a result of different legislative frameworks governing services for the disabled, STT interpreting has developed differently in different countries and so far there has been little international cooperation. STT interpreting has also been largely ignored by Translation and Interpreting Studies. This paper examines the situation in Finland and Sweden, where STT interpreting training programmes have been available since the 1980s, and Austria, where the first training programme started in 2010, and investigates the norms, values and expectations that guide STT interpreters’ practice in the three countries. It also looks at the factors necessary for the development of a distinct ‘STT interpreting culture’.

  • 454.
    Norocel, Ovidiu Cristian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Heteronormative Constructions of Romanianness: A Genealogy of Gendered Metaphors in Romanian Radical-Right Populism 2000–20092011In: Debatte, ISSN 0965-156X, E-ISSN 1469-3712, Vol. 19, no 1-2, p. 453-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article investigates the recent history of the Romanian national construct as a matrix for gendered metaphors at the beginning of the twenty-first century, as it is heralded by the main radical-right populist party the Greater Romania Party (Partidul România Mare, PRM). Focusing on the Greater Romania Magazine (Revista România Mare, RRM) – the party's main media outlet – the analysis is centered on the PRM leader's editorials during a well-defined timeframe in the recent history of Romanian radical-right populism, from the preparations for presidential elections in 2000, which witnessed Tudor's surprising runoff, through the subsequent presidential elections in 2004, and up to EU parliamentary elections in 2009, which enabled the PRM to send three representatives to the EU Parliament. The staunchly restrictive definition of the family, portrayed as the exclusive heteronormative domain of the Romanian male, has been developed in time with the help of the “nation is a family” and the “strict father” conceptual metaphors to proscribe the existence of family narratives including ethnically diverse or any sexually different Others. The article accounts for the discursive (re-)definitions of Romanianness enabled by conceptual metaphors so as to accommodate centrally located heterosexist masculinities, and underlines the need for further explorations of the radical-right populist narratives of national purity.

  • 455.
    Norrby, Catrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Från God dag direktör Berg till Hej Ann!2014In: Klarspråk: bulletin från Språkrådet, no 4, p. 3-3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 456.
    Norrby, Catrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Warren, Jane
    Address Practices and Social Relationships in European Languages2012In: Language and Linguistics Compass, ISSN 1749-818X, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 225-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Address practices – the way people use second-person pronouns, first names, last names and titles, and other terms to address one another – are fundamental to expressing social relationships. They reflect cultural values and can tell us a great deal about social structures and change. This article gives an overview of recent research on address practices, focusing on three European languages – French, German and Swedish. It follows theoretical developments in the study of address from the 1960s onwards, and examines how address practices have evolved in French, German and Swedish since the socio-political upheavals of that decade. It is argued that the notions of social distance and common ground are central to an understanding of address choice in these languages.

  • 457.
    Norrby, Catrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Warren, Jane
    School of Languages and Linguistics, The University of Melbourne.
    Hajek, John
    School of Languages and Linguistics, The University of Melbourne.
    Business the IKEA way: How business regulates language in a globalised world2011In: The Linguist : journal of the Institute of Linguists, ISSN 0268-5965, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 14-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Regulating language use is not the sole domain of countries or states. Large private companies can also be involved in making language policy. One way they do this is through formal or informal guidelines on how staff use language with one another and with customers. This article focuses on one such multinational company, IKEA, and how its promotion of informal address practices on its local websites, can be viewed as a means of building a global company identity while at the same time negotiating diversity at the local level.

  • 458.
    Norrby, Catrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Wide, Camilla
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Lindström, Jan
    Helsinki University, Finland.
    Nilsson, Jenny
    Institute for Language and Folklore, Sweden.
    Interpersonal relationships in medical consultations: Comparing Sweden Swedish and Finland Swedish address practices2015In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 84, p. 121-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates how interpersonal relationships are expressed in medical consultations. In particular, we focus on how modes of address are used in the two national varieties of Swedish: Sweden Swedish and Finland Swedish, with the aim to compare the pragmatic routines in the two varieties. Thus the study contributes to the field of variational pragmatics, where national varieties of pluricentric languages are recognised as important research objects.  Address practices are analysed in two comparable corpora of video recordings from Sweden and Finland using both a quantitative and a qualitative CA-inspired method. There are several differences between the data sets: the Sweden Swedish data are characterised by exclusive use of the informal T pronoun (du ‘you’) and an overall higher frequency of direct address compared to the Finland Swedish data. In some medical consultations in the latter Swedish data the formal V pronoun (ni) is used. The qualitative analysis confirms these differences and the tendency is that the Sweden-Swedish medical consultations are more informal than the Finland-Swedish ones, which are characterised by more formality and maintenance of social distance between the interlocutors. The different pragmatic orientations at the micro level of communication can also be related to socio-cultural preferences at the macro level in society – the development towards greater informality and intimate language is more pronounced in Sweden than in Finland. 

  • 459.
    Norrman, Gunnar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    The irreversibility of sensitive period effects in language development: evidence from second language acquisition in international adoptees2016In: Developmental Science, ISSN 1363-755X, E-ISSN 1467-7687, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 513-520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of a sensitive period in language acquisition has been subject to extensive research and debate for more than half a century. While it has been well established that the ability to learn new languages declines in early years, the extent to which this outcome depends on biological maturation in contrast to previously acquired knowledge remains disputed. In the present study, we addressed this question by examining phonetic discriminatory abilities in early second language (L2) speakers of Swedish, who had either maintained their first language (L1) (immigrants) or had lost it (international adoptees), using native speaker controls. Through this design, we sought to disentangle the effects of the maturational state of the learner on L2 development from the effects of L1 interference: if additional language development is indeed constrained by an interfering L1, then adoptees should outperform immigrant speakers. The results of an auditory lexical decision task, in which fine vowel distinctions in Swedish had been modified, showed, however, no difference between the L2 groups. Instead, both L2 groups scored significantly lower than the native speaker group. The three groups did not differ in their ability to discriminate non-modified words. These findings demonstrate that L1 loss is not a crucial condition for successfully acquiring an L2, which in turn is taken as support for a maturational constraints view on L2 acquisition.

  • 460. Palm, Clara
    et al.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Language use and investment among children and adolescents of Somali heritage in Sweden2019In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, ISSN 0143-4632, E-ISSN 1747-7557, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 64-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores language use and investment among Somali-speaking children and adolescents in Sweden, through group interviews and survey data. Our findings indicate that there are incentives to invest in Somali language learning considering the reported language use patterns and the expressed positive attitudes towards Somali mother tongue instruction. The Somali language was perceived to be ‘naturally’ linked to Somali identity and to being able to claim ‘Somaliness’, not only by the adolescents but also by the surroundings. Thus, advanced Somali language proficiency was perceived as necessary for being able to pass as ‘culturally authentic’ (Jaffe, A. [2012]. “Multilingual Citizenship and Minority Languages.” In The Routledge Handbook of Multilingualism, edited by M. Martin-Jones, A. Blackledge, and A. Creese, 83–99. London: Routledge). Furthermore, being perceived as unproficient in Somali or unable to transmit the language to future generations was experienced as guilt-provoking. Nevertheless, the adolescents articulated a compliance with the dominant linguistic order in Sweden, and their school’s assimilatory language rules (‘Swedish-only’). This compliance was associated with good manners and moral behaviour, thus reflecting the potentially harmful and pervasive nature of assimilatory language ideology and policy for individual students. The findings exemplify in many ways the struggles it entails to maintain and develop a minoritised language in a majority language context and the complex ‘ideological enterprise’ of language learning with its educational and ethical dilemmas.

  • 461.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Access, prestige and losses in contact languages2013In: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1366-7289, E-ISSN 1469-1841, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 746-747Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 462.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Arabiska Sveriges näst största modersmål2018In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 463.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Avslöjar vårt språk att vi aldrig var smutsiga förr?2018In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 464.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Brief Note on Valdman (2005)2006In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 515-516Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 465.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Creolistics and the quest for creoleness: A reply to Claire Lefebvre2000In: Journal of Pidgin and Creole languages ( Print), ISSN 0920-9034, E-ISSN 1569-9870, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 147-151Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 466.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Du duger bra2007In: Språkvård, no 1, p. 49-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 467.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gör den stora språkdöden världen fattigare eller rikare?2017In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 468.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Handel och krig gynnar pidginisering2016In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 3, p. 26-30Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 469.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    ”Hen”-kulturer är inte mer jämställda2012In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 2001-3868, no 16 marsArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 470.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    How European is Esperanto?: A typological study2010In: Language Problems and Language Planning, ISSN 0272-2690, E-ISSN 1569-9889, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 63-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The typological similarities between Esperanto and other languages have long been a matter of debate. Assuming that foreign-language structures are more easily acquired when they resemble those of the learner's native tongue, any candidate for a global lingua franca obviously ought to be as typologically neutral as possible. One common criticism of Esperanto is that it is 'too European,' and thus less accessible to speakers of non-European languages. In order to provide a more solid base for such discussions, this paper makes an attempt to quantify the Eurocentricity of Esperanto, employing the features catalogued in the World Atlas of Language Structures. It is concluded that Esperanto is indeed somewhat European in character, but considerably less so than the European languages themselves.

  • 471.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Här går gränsen!2012In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no oktoberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 472.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Här var det mångfald!2016In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 3, p. 56-63Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 473.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    I rymden talas fler språk än man kan tro2015In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 27 december, p. 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 474.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Jos Suomi kuuluisi vielä Ruotsiin...2009In: Kieliviesti, ISSN 0280-350X, no 4, p. 13-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 475.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Kan ord få oss att gilla terrorister?2017In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 476.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Känslosvall som bara en ny ordbok kan skapa2015In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 17 aprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 477.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Nordisk och finländsk språkpolitik i ett globalt perspektiv2017In: Språk i Norden, E-ISSN 2246-1701, p. 82-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an attempt to on the one hand offer a brief survey of national langauges policies of the world, and on the other hand to situate those of the Nordic countries in general, and Finland in particular, in this global context. The impressive (albeit not always sucessful) measures of Finnish authori-ties to uphold bilingualism are highlighted, and argued to have few parallels world-wide.

  • 478.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    När språkpoliser larmade om tjej och käka2018In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 479.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    När två (eller flera) språk blir ett2017In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 4, p. 51-61Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 480.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Papiamentu as one of the most complex languages in the world: A reply to Kouwenberg2012In: Journal of Pidgin and Creole languages ( Print), ISSN 0920-9034, E-ISSN 1569-9870, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 159-166Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 481.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    R [ʁ]2007In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no septemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 482.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Romerskt fälttåg bakom ”felet” i våra kalendrar2017In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 483.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    ”Snuskexpertens” ordbok en riktig kulturgärning2018In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 484.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språken som saknar pynt2007In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no decemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 485.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språkluckan (artikelserie i 24 delar)2017In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 486.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språksituationen i Sverige och Finland om inte 1809 hade varit2010In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 1, p. 13-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 487.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Svenskan i Nya Sverige 1638–ca 1810: Fragment av en kortlivad dialekt2011In: Svenska landsmål och svenskt folkliv, ISSN 0347-1837, p. 77-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish in New Sweden, 1638–c. 1810. Fragments of a short-lived dialect

    Although the colony of New Sweden is fairly well documented, very little has been written about the linguistic situation there, and still less about the Swedish dialect that developed in the colony. Nonetheless, such a dialect was spoken by, at most, around 1,500 people between the middle of the 17th and the beginning of the 19th century. This article is an attempt to analyse the limited data available on the only truly indigenous Swedish dialect outside Europe.

    The Swedish of New Sweden probably deviated relatively little from the standard language of the time, although it seems to have had something of a Western Swedish flavour, as well as being influenced to some extent by the neighbouring languages of Dutch, English and Lenape. Both archaic and – for the period – modern features can be observed.

    Most documentation of the dialect is lexical in nature. The main source consists of the writings of Pehr Kalm, a disciple of Linnaeus, a fact reflected in the vocabulary recorded, which is made up largely of words from the plant and animal worlds. Certain conclusions can, however, be drawn regarding the morphology, syntax, phonology and pragmatics of the dialect.

  • 488.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Svenskar EU:s mest anglofila – utesluter nästan hela världen2018In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 489.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Säg det i toner – och samtidigt i ord, färger och knackningar!2009In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no aprilArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 490.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Så uppstår ett pidginspråk2016In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 4, p. 35-39Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 491.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Tvingade av grammatiken2014In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no juniArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 492.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Varför efterlyser många en auktoritär ledartyp?2018In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 493.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Världsspråket som försvann från den svenska skolan2018In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 494.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Which parts of language are the most stable?2008In: Sprachtypologie und Universalienforschung, ISSN 0942-2919, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 234-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an algorithm intended to quantify the diachronic stability of linguistic characteristics. It is argued that a linguistic feature whose presence or absence is best predicted by language families is a stable feature. Conversely, a feature that correlates better with geographical areas than with families is one that is sensitive to diffusion. Contrasting the structural heterogeneity within families with that found within geographical areas, it is thus possible to make a statement regarding the varying diachronic stability of specific features. While the main aim of the paper is methodological exploration, and while the method certainly not devoid of problems, I propose that the current approach can be useful in studies of language contact and long-range historical comparison.

  • 495.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Är en spanjor i Barcelona katalan?2017In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 496.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Bakker, Peter
    McWhorter, John H.
    Creoles and sociolinguistic complexity: Response to Ansaldo2018In: Language sciences (Oxford), ISSN 0388-0001, E-ISSN 1873-5746, Vol. 66, p. 226-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an earlier article in this journal, Umberto Ansaldo states that creoles are sociolinguistically the most complex of languages, equalled only by the situation in South India. In our article we show that this claim is not supported by facts about global multilingualism, creole societies, creole language structures and theories of language contact. The vast majority of the worlds population is multilingual: the average human speaks almost two languages. Nothing in the sociolinguistic situation of current creole societies is exceptional vis-a-vis situations of other minority languages. Yet, creoles differ structurally from the other languages of the world. That finding is supported by all empirical studies that include data on creoles and non-creoles, despite exceptionalists being accused of being inspired by ideology. The feature pool theory (cf. Mufwene 2001), analyzing creoles as simply language hybrids like a great many other languages, does not predict the relative analyticity of creole languages, since several equally analytic creoles and pidgins have come about from contact between morphologically rich languages. Crucially, adherents of this theory, including Ansaldo, have not responded to criticisms along these lines. Sudden language contact, as in situations of pidginization and creole genesis, leads to loss of irregularities and morphological paradigms. We argue that Ansaldo's claims are based on an insufficient familiarity with the relevant literature, as well as frequent misquotations.

  • 497.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Jacobs, Bart
    The genesis of Chavacano revisited and solved2018In: Lingua, ISSN 0024-3841, E-ISSN 1872-6135, Vol. 215, p. 53-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper revisits the origins of the Philippine Spanish Creole language Chavacano. Earlier work saw Chavacano as the result of relexification of an originally Portuguese-lexicon creole towards Spanish within an immigrant group known as the Mardikas in the 17th century. Their language would subsequently have spread from their new home town to the other locations where it is currently spoken. More recently, however, it has been claimed that Chavacano emerged independently in different places, in the second half of the 18th century, and that the creators were people of mixed Chinese-Filipino origin. We take issue with both the older and the more recent hypothesis, arguing the varieties are indeed related, and that proto-Chavacano emerged around the beginning of the 17th century in the Manila/Cavite area among Spanish military forces and various non-European groups in their service.

  • 498.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Jansson, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Simulating the genesis of Mauritian2013In: Acta Linguistica Hafniensia. International Journal of Structural Linguistics, ISSN 0374-0463, E-ISSN 1949-0763, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 265-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a computer simulation of the genesis of Mauritian Creole. The input consists of detailed demographic data and typological information on Mauritian as well as the languages which contributed to its birth. The simulation is deliberately a simplistic one – the idea is to have as few potentially controversial assumptions as possible built into the model, and add additional parameters only to the extent that its output differs from the real-world result. As it turns out, the model generates a language which is highly similar to Mauritian as it is spoken today, and thus, very little “tweaking” seems necessary. Most notably, the model produces the desired result without the postulation of targeted language acquisition, and while one cannot conclude that this was not a part of the creolisation process, our simulation suggests that it is not a necessary assumption.

  • 499.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Källgren, Gunnel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Kreolspråk över alla gränser1997In: Forskning och framsteg, ISSN 0015-7937, no 2, p. 38-43Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 500. Peck, Amiena
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa.
    Skinscapes2015In: Linguistic Landscape, ISSN 2214-9953, E-ISSN 2214-9961, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 133-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper argues for extending linguistic landscape studies to also encompass the body as a corporeal landscape, or ‘moving discursive locality’. We articulate this point within a narrative of a developing field of landscape studies that is increasingly attentive to the mobility and materiality of spatialized semiotics as performative, that is, as partially determining of how we come to understand ourselves ‘in place’. Taking Cape Town’s tattooing culture as an illustration, we unpack the idea of ‘the human subject as an entrepreneur of the self, as author of his or her being in the world’ (Comaroff & Comaroff, 2012: 23), by using a phenomenological methodology to explore the materiality of the body as a mobile and dynamic space of inscribed spatialized identities and historical power relations. Specifically, we focus on: how tattooed bodies sculpt future selves and imagined spaces, the imprint they leave behind in the lives of five participants in the study and ultimately the creation of bodies that matter in time and place. The paper will conclude with a discussion of what studies of corporeal landscapes may contribute to a broader field of linguistic landscape studies.

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