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  • 451.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gör den stora språkdöden världen fattigare eller rikare?2017In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 452.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Handel och krig gynnar pidginisering2016In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 3, p. 26-30Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 453.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    ”Hen”-kulturer är inte mer jämställda2012In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 2001-3868, no 16 marsArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 454.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    How European is Esperanto?: A typological study2010In: Language Problems and Language Planning, ISSN 0272-2690, E-ISSN 1569-9889, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 63-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The typological similarities between Esperanto and other languages have long been a matter of debate. Assuming that foreign-language structures are more easily acquired when they resemble those of the learner's native tongue, any candidate for a global lingua franca obviously ought to be as typologically neutral as possible. One common criticism of Esperanto is that it is 'too European,' and thus less accessible to speakers of non-European languages. In order to provide a more solid base for such discussions, this paper makes an attempt to quantify the Eurocentricity of Esperanto, employing the features catalogued in the World Atlas of Language Structures. It is concluded that Esperanto is indeed somewhat European in character, but considerably less so than the European languages themselves.

  • 455.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Här går gränsen!2012In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no oktoberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 456.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Här var det mångfald!2016In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 3, p. 56-63Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 457.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    I rymden talas fler språk än man kan tro2015In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 27 december, p. 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 458.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Jos Suomi kuuluisi vielä Ruotsiin...2009In: Kieliviesti, ISSN 0280-350X, no 4, p. 13-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 459.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Kan ord få oss att gilla terrorister?2017In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 460.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Känslosvall som bara en ny ordbok kan skapa2015In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 17 aprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 461.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Nordisk och finländsk språkpolitik i ett globalt perspektiv2017In: Språk i Norden, E-ISSN 2246-1701, p. 82-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an attempt to on the one hand offer a brief survey of national langauges policies of the world, and on the other hand to situate those of the Nordic countries in general, and Finland in particular, in this global context. The impressive (albeit not always sucessful) measures of Finnish authori-ties to uphold bilingualism are highlighted, and argued to have few parallels world-wide.

  • 462.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    När språkpoliser larmade om tjej och käka2018In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 463.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    När två (eller flera) språk blir ett2017In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 4, p. 51-61Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 464.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Papiamentu as one of the most complex languages in the world: A reply to Kouwenberg2012In: Journal of Pidgin and Creole languages ( Print), ISSN 0920-9034, E-ISSN 1569-9870, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 159-166Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 465.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    R [ʁ]2007In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no septemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 466.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Romerskt fälttåg bakom ”felet” i våra kalendrar2017In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 467.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    ”Snuskexpertens” ordbok en riktig kulturgärning2018In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 468.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språken som saknar pynt2007In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no decemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 469.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språkluckan (artikelserie i 24 delar)2017In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 470.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språksituationen i Sverige och Finland om inte 1809 hade varit2010In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 1, p. 13-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 471.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Svenskan i Nya Sverige 1638–ca 1810: Fragment av en kortlivad dialekt2011In: Svenska landsmål och svenskt folkliv, ISSN 0347-1837, p. 77-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish in New Sweden, 1638–c. 1810. Fragments of a short-lived dialect

    Although the colony of New Sweden is fairly well documented, very little has been written about the linguistic situation there, and still less about the Swedish dialect that developed in the colony. Nonetheless, such a dialect was spoken by, at most, around 1,500 people between the middle of the 17th and the beginning of the 19th century. This article is an attempt to analyse the limited data available on the only truly indigenous Swedish dialect outside Europe.

    The Swedish of New Sweden probably deviated relatively little from the standard language of the time, although it seems to have had something of a Western Swedish flavour, as well as being influenced to some extent by the neighbouring languages of Dutch, English and Lenape. Both archaic and – for the period – modern features can be observed.

    Most documentation of the dialect is lexical in nature. The main source consists of the writings of Pehr Kalm, a disciple of Linnaeus, a fact reflected in the vocabulary recorded, which is made up largely of words from the plant and animal worlds. Certain conclusions can, however, be drawn regarding the morphology, syntax, phonology and pragmatics of the dialect.

  • 472.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Svenskar EU:s mest anglofila – utesluter nästan hela världen2018In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 473.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Säg det i toner – och samtidigt i ord, färger och knackningar!2009In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no aprilArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 474.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Så uppstår ett pidginspråk2016In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 4, p. 35-39Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 475.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Tvingade av grammatiken2014In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no juniArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 476.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Varför efterlyser många en auktoritär ledartyp?2018In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 477.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Världsspråket som försvann från den svenska skolan2018In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 478.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Which parts of language are the most stable?2008In: Sprachtypologie und Universalienforschung, ISSN 0942-2919, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 234-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an algorithm intended to quantify the diachronic stability of linguistic characteristics. It is argued that a linguistic feature whose presence or absence is best predicted by language families is a stable feature. Conversely, a feature that correlates better with geographical areas than with families is one that is sensitive to diffusion. Contrasting the structural heterogeneity within families with that found within geographical areas, it is thus possible to make a statement regarding the varying diachronic stability of specific features. While the main aim of the paper is methodological exploration, and while the method certainly not devoid of problems, I propose that the current approach can be useful in studies of language contact and long-range historical comparison.

  • 479.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Är en spanjor i Barcelona katalan?2017In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 480.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Bakker, Peter
    McWhorter, John H.
    Creoles and sociolinguistic complexity: Response to Ansaldo2018In: Language sciences (Oxford), ISSN 0388-0001, E-ISSN 1873-5746, Vol. 66, p. 226-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an earlier article in this journal, Umberto Ansaldo states that creoles are sociolinguistically the most complex of languages, equalled only by the situation in South India. In our article we show that this claim is not supported by facts about global multilingualism, creole societies, creole language structures and theories of language contact. The vast majority of the worlds population is multilingual: the average human speaks almost two languages. Nothing in the sociolinguistic situation of current creole societies is exceptional vis-a-vis situations of other minority languages. Yet, creoles differ structurally from the other languages of the world. That finding is supported by all empirical studies that include data on creoles and non-creoles, despite exceptionalists being accused of being inspired by ideology. The feature pool theory (cf. Mufwene 2001), analyzing creoles as simply language hybrids like a great many other languages, does not predict the relative analyticity of creole languages, since several equally analytic creoles and pidgins have come about from contact between morphologically rich languages. Crucially, adherents of this theory, including Ansaldo, have not responded to criticisms along these lines. Sudden language contact, as in situations of pidginization and creole genesis, leads to loss of irregularities and morphological paradigms. We argue that Ansaldo's claims are based on an insufficient familiarity with the relevant literature, as well as frequent misquotations.

  • 481.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Jacobs, Bart
    The genesis of Chavacano revisited and solved2018In: Lingua, ISSN 0024-3841, E-ISSN 1872-6135, Vol. 215, p. 53-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper revisits the origins of the Philippine Spanish Creole language Chavacano. Earlier work saw Chavacano as the result of relexification of an originally Portuguese-lexicon creole towards Spanish within an immigrant group known as the Mardikas in the 17th century. Their language would subsequently have spread from their new home town to the other locations where it is currently spoken. More recently, however, it has been claimed that Chavacano emerged independently in different places, in the second half of the 18th century, and that the creators were people of mixed Chinese-Filipino origin. We take issue with both the older and the more recent hypothesis, arguing the varieties are indeed related, and that proto-Chavacano emerged around the beginning of the 17th century in the Manila/Cavite area among Spanish military forces and various non-European groups in their service.

  • 482.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Jansson, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Simulating the genesis of Mauritian2013In: Acta Linguistica Hafniensia. International Journal of Structural Linguistics, ISSN 0374-0364, E-ISSN 1949-0763, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 265-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a computer simulation of the genesis of Mauritian Creole. The input consists of detailed demographic data and typological information on Mauritian as well as the languages which contributed to its birth. The simulation is deliberately a simplistic one – the idea is to have as few potentially controversial assumptions as possible built into the model, and add additional parameters only to the extent that its output differs from the real-world result. As it turns out, the model generates a language which is highly similar to Mauritian as it is spoken today, and thus, very little “tweaking” seems necessary. Most notably, the model produces the desired result without the postulation of targeted language acquisition, and while one cannot conclude that this was not a part of the creolisation process, our simulation suggests that it is not a necessary assumption.

  • 483.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Källgren, Gunnel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Kreolspråk över alla gränser1997In: Forskning och framsteg, ISSN 0015-7937, no 2, p. 38-43Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 484. Peck, Amiena
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa.
    Skinscapes2015In: Linguistic Landscape, ISSN 2214-9953, E-ISSN 2214-9961, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 133-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper argues for extending linguistic landscape studies to also encompass the body as a corporeal landscape, or ‘moving discursive locality’. We articulate this point within a narrative of a developing field of landscape studies that is increasingly attentive to the mobility and materiality of spatialized semiotics as performative, that is, as partially determining of how we come to understand ourselves ‘in place’. Taking Cape Town’s tattooing culture as an illustration, we unpack the idea of ‘the human subject as an entrepreneur of the self, as author of his or her being in the world’ (Comaroff & Comaroff, 2012: 23), by using a phenomenological methodology to explore the materiality of the body as a mobile and dynamic space of inscribed spatialized identities and historical power relations. Specifically, we focus on: how tattooed bodies sculpt future selves and imagined spaces, the imprint they leave behind in the lives of five participants in the study and ultimately the creation of bodies that matter in time and place. The paper will conclude with a discussion of what studies of corporeal landscapes may contribute to a broader field of linguistic landscape studies.

  • 485. Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Types of student intertextuality and faculty attitudes2012In: Journal of second language writing, ISSN 1060-3743, E-ISSN 1873-1422, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 149-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intertextuality is a prominent feature of academic writing, and the ability to use sources effectively and appropriately is an essential skill which novice writers must acquire. It is also a complex skill, and student performance is not always successful. It is presumably beneficial for students to receive consistent messages about what source use is and is not appropriate, but some evidence suggests that university teachers and other gatekeepers may fall short of this consistency. This paper reports the findings of semi-structured text-based interviews aimed at understanding the basis of teacher attitudes and responses to intertextuality in academic writing. Teachers who were asked to evaluate the same examples from student texts differed in their judgments about whether the examples were appropriate, and provided different types of explanation for their judgments. These explanations enable us to develop a four-part typology of intertextuality which allows analytic discussion of differing judgments. The implications both of the teacher judgments and of the typology for second language writing instruction are discussed and an assessment of the relevance of our findings for the theme of this special issue is provided.

  • 486. Perego, Elisa
    et al.
    Del Missier, Fabio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. University of Trieste, Italy.
    Bottiroli, Sara
    Dubbing versus subtitling in young and older adults: cognitive and evaluative aspects2015In: Perspectives: studies in translatology, ISSN 0907-676X, E-ISSN 1747-6623, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical evidence on the cognitive and evaluative effects of viewing a dubbed versus a subtitled film is limited, theoretical views on the subject are mainly speculative, and age-related differences have not been investigated in this sphere. To fill these gaps, we carried out two studies contrasting the effects of viewing a dubbed versus subtitled version of the same film excerpt in young and older adults, using a comprehensive array of verbal and visual measures. The findings clearly show that dubbing does not provide a cognitive or evaluative advantage over subtitling. Moreover, subtitling seems to be more effective than dubbing in supporting the lexical aspects of performance. Finally, although older adults always performed worse than young adults on all cognitive measures, they did not show a specific impairment in the subtitling condition. The results support the view that subtitled films are processed effectively and appreciated equally by both young and older adults.

  • 487. Perreault, Charles
    et al.
    Mathew, Sarah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Dating the origin of language using phonemic diversity2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 4, p. e35289-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Language is a key adaptation of our species, yet we do not know when it evolved. Here, we use data on language phonemic diversity to estimate a minimum date for the origin of language. We take advantage of the fact that phonemic diversity evolves slowly and use it as a clock to calculate how long the oldest African languages would have to have been around in order to accumulate the number of phonemes they possess today. We use a natural experiment, the colonization of Southeast Asia and Andaman Islands, to estimate the rate at which phonemic diversity increases through time. Using this rate, we estimate that present-day languages date back to the Middle Stone Age in Africa. Our analysis is consistent with the archaeological evidence suggesting that complex human behavior evolved during the Middle Stone Age in Africa, and does not support the view that language is a recent adaptation that has sparked the dispersal of humans out of Africa. While some of our assumptions require testing and our results rely at present on a single case-study, our analysis constitutes the first estimate of when language evolved that is directly based on linguistic data.

  • 488.
    Persson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Dialektnivellering i Färs härad2010In: Svenska landsmål och svenskt folkliv, ISSN 0347-1837, no 336Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article it is discussed whether the phonological changes involved in dialect levelling occur in a certain order. To explore the issue, the author has analysed the pronunciation of four generations of a family in southern Skåne. The variables studied have been divided into two groups. In the first, the difference between standard Swedish and traditional dialect is at a phonemic level, as for example in the word pairs ett/itt 'one and ut/ud 'out'. In the second group, the difference is instead at the phonetic level: front or back r, and long vowels realised as monophthongs or diphthongs.

    The study suggests that phonemic adaption (which is complete in the youngest generation) precedes phonetic adaption (which has only just begun in the data examined).

  • 489.
    Peters, Stanley
    et al.
    Stanford University.
    Westerståhl, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    The semantics of possessives2013In: Language, ISSN 0097-8507, E-ISSN 1535-0665, Vol. 89, no 4, p. 713-759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate what possessives mean by examining a wide range of English examples, pre- and postnominal, quantified and non-quantified, to arrive at general, systematic truth conditions for them. In the process, we delineate a rich class of paradigmatic possessives having cross-linguistic interest, exploiting  characteristic semantic properties. One is that all involve (implicit or explicit) quantification over possessed entities. Another is that this quantification always carries existential import, even when the  quantifier over possessed entities itself doesn't. We show that this property, termed possessive existential import, is intimately related to the notion of narrowing \cite{barker95}. Narrowing has implications for compositionally analyzing possessives' meaning. We apply the proposed semantics to the issue of definiteness of possessives, negation of possessives, partitives and prenominal possessives, postnominal possessives and complements of relational nouns, freedom of the possessive relation, and the semantic relationship between pre- and postnominal possessives.

  • 490.
    Piispanen, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Finnish.
    Evaluating the Uralic-Yukaghiric word-initial, proto-sibilant correspondence rules: Sibilant correspondences of Proto-Uralic and Late Proto-Yukaghir2015In: Suomalais-Ugrilaisen Seuran Aikakauskirja / Journal de la Société Finno-Ougrienne, ISSN 0355-0214, E-ISSN 1798-2987, Vol. 95, p. 237-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper evaluates and expands upon previously suggested sound rules governing the phonological outcome of early root-initial proto-sibilants (*s- and *ś-) and proto-affricates (*š-, *ć- and *č-) in Late Proto-Yukaghir (PY), as shown by cognate correspondences in Proto-Uralic (PU) and by Tungusic and Turkic borrowings. The proto-sibilant *s- underwent deletion (*Ø-), retention (*s-) or lateralization (*l-); *ś- was retained unchanged and earlier *š- had changed into *č- in PY. Universally, PY proto-sibilants and proto-affricates find regular lexical correspondences in PU as described by a set of non-trivial phonological rules:

    Pre-PY *sVr/k/γ- > PY *lVr/k/γ-: a regular lateralization of the sibilant in Yukaghiric occurred with back vowels and *-r-, *-k- and possibly *- γ -, but not *-q-, through an intermediary hypothetical *θ- stage.

    Pre-PY *sVl/ŋ- > PY *ØVl/ŋ-: a sibilant deletion rule occurred with any vowel and *-l- or *- ŋ-.

    However, all structures of the intermediate type Pre-PY *sV1ŋ/l/m/n-k/q-V2-, where V1 is a back vowel, pose an exception wherein sibilant deletion was blocked, and the sibilant was either retained or changed into a lateral. Sibilant deletion still occurred in these cases if V1 was a front vowel.

    Pre-PY *ś- > PY *ś- > KY š- & TY s-: the Yukaghir lexicon in these cases likely developed through intermediate *š’-/*θ’- from Old Yukaghir. Furthermore, Pre-PY *š- > PY *č- regularly.

    All of these sound changes are controlled by phonology and affect borrowings as well as inherited vocabulary from before PY, but do not affect post-PY borrowings. The sibilant-deletion rule is clearly an influence from extensive language contacts with Yakut-speakers, and certain roots show that the Yukaghir rules of synharmonism were already in effect prior to sibilant deletion. In addition, the results are concurrent with several older cognate suggestions between Uralic and Yukaghiric and further add to this corpus. Identifying these historical processes also strengthens the evidence that the Yukaghir languages are genetically related to the Uralic language family.

  • 491.
    Piispanen, Peter Sauli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    A description of Finnish male hypocoristics: an optimality theory approach2014In: Studia Anthroponymica Scandinavica, ISSN 0280-8633, Vol. 32, p. 139-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of standard Finnish male nicknames in terms of Optimality Theory (OT) is described. Formation of these nicknames is subject to phonological, morphological, segmental and prosodic restrictions and often proceeds via suffixation of a truncated, left-anchoredstem, invariably producing a disyllabic, semantically narrow nicknamewith no coda, long vowels or diphthongs. Such foot binary-restricted items never include a second syllable onset. Disyllabic names are regularly shortened (CV.CV), while mono- and trisyllabic names often become geminate nicknames (CVC.CV) through expressive marking. Geminate names lose the coda consonant in the nickname. Very long names are truncated and sometimes take an additional suffix. Nicknames and their suffixes are strictly controlled to have either mixed harmonic back (a, o, u) and neutral front vowels (e, i), or only harmonic front vowels (y, ö, ä). Curious exceptions to the rules are found with names containing a word-internal sonorant, which therefore become uniquely suffixed nicknames through a Sonorant Sequencing Principle (SSP) constraint, leading to a three-consonant cluster and a shift of the sonorant from the syllable edge (CVCC.CV). Some nicknames have a limited geographical distribution (i.e. they are dialectal only), while a few others exhibit traces of diminutive markings. The data suggest the following ranking order for nickname formation in Finnish according to OT: FtBin >> SSP for resonant-containing or RlzRed for trisyllabic >>AnchorLeftBT >> NoLong-Vowel >> NoDiphthong >> NoCoda >>MaximalityBT.

  • 492.
    Piispanen, Peter Sauli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    A prosody-controlled semi-vowel alternation in Yukaghir2016In: Journal of Historical Linguistics, ISSN 2210-2116, E-ISSN 2210-2124, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 247-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article shows that Yukaghir underwent a regular sound change whereby all word-internal and word-final w phonemes became j, probably in Early Proto-Yukaghir. After degemination had occurred, possibly in Middle Proto-Yukaghir, any j in an intervocalic position of disyllabic roots was followed by an epenthetic l, as it still is in the modern Yukaghir languages. Palatalization, labialization, uvularization, and assimilative effects finally formed the Late Proto-Yukaghir forms from which the modern languages have arisen. Word-class prosody controls epenthesis, vowel lengthening, and any further word-final vowel changes. Identifying these historical processes also strengthens the evidence that Yukaghir is genealogically related to Uralic. The Uralic and Yukaghiric correspondences are carefully analyzed as to phonology and semantics, resulting in over fifty new or revised cognate suggestions. Further, Yukaghiric shows a trend towards a reduction of the number of root syllables in the comparison. The semi-vowel w remained unchanged word-initially in Tundra Yukaghir and has thus been a continuous part of the Yukaghir phonemic register. Lexemes containing the semi-vowel w found in modern Yukaghir in word-internal and final positions arose from other sources only after the semi-vowel alternation sound change rule.

  • 493.
    Piispanen, Peter Sauli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Further lexical borrowings from (Pre-)Yakut into the Yukaghiric Languages2013In: Turkic languages, ISSN 1431-4983, Vol. 17, no 1/2, p. 115-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents twelve newly found suggested borrowings from (Pre-)Yakut, a Turkic language previously known to be a considerable source of borrowings, into the Yukaghiric languages of far northeastern Siberia. All suggestions are given both with solid phonologicaland semantic considerations, and the chronology of the borrowings is considered. Several of the new borrowings are quite recent and relate to hunting and wandering and surprisingly many are semantically connected to elementary phenomena, actions and perceptions, while a few others clearly find their etymological origins as borrowed from the tales of the surrounding tribes.

  • 494.
    Piispanen, Peter Sauli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Statistical Dating of Uralic Languages through Comparative Linguistics with added Sound Change Law Analyses2012In: Fenno-Ugrica Suecana - Nova Series, ISSN 1504-1921, E-ISSN 2001-6204, Vol. 14, p. 61-74Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The planned and currently ongoing research by the author at the Stockholm University related to modern and ancient Finnish language history as well as Uralic and comparative linguistics - focusing on lexicon, sound changes, dating, language contact situations, archaeology and genetics - is briefly summarized and presented.

  • 495.
    Piispanen, Peter Sauli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Suomalaisten miesten lempinimistä2012In: Kieliviesti, ISSN 0280-350X, no 2, p. 4-8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 496.
    Piispanen, Peter Sauli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    The Uralic-Yukaghiric connection revisited: Correspondences of Geminate Clusters2013In: Suomalais-Ugrilaisen Seuran Aikakauskirja / Journal de la Société Finno-Ougrienne, ISSN 0355-0214, E-ISSN 1798-2987, Vol. 94, p. 165-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents and discusses regular correspondences between Uralic geminate items and Yukaghiric with proposed sound change laws and new and some modified older cognate suggestions (twenty-four nouns and eight verbs). Geminate items were found to contain surprisingly stable, relatively unchanging vowels in Yukaghiric in regard to the Proto-Uralic form. The results suggest that degemination – taking place in all cases except in a few forms that can otherwise be explained – was an early process in Yukaghiric and occurred after or while many vowel changes had already taken place in the Yukaghiric vocabulary. The data shows that the relationship between Uralic and Yukaghiric is more extensive than previously believed. Some very early possible sound changes are discussed. Furthermore, a correspondence to Proto-Uralic *-ü- has been found in Late Proto-Yukaghiric *-ö-. Also, it is shown that the early suffixation in Yukaghir to Uralic-like stems has produced several modern words through grammaticalization.

  • 497. Portin, Marja
    et al.
    Lehtonen, Minna
    Harrer, Gabor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German, Finnish.
    Wande, Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German, Finnish.
    Niemi, Jussi
    Laine, Matti
    L1 effects on the processing of inflected nouns in L22008In: Acta Psychologica, ISSN 0001-6918, E-ISSN 1873-6297, Vol. 128, no 3, p. 452-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effect of L1 on the recognition of L2 Swedish inflected nouns. Two groups of late L2 learners with typologically very different native languages, Hungarian (agglutinative) and Chinese (isolating), participated in a visual lexical decision experiment. The target words were matched inflected vs. monomorphemic nouns from three frequency levels. The Hungarian group showed it morphological processing cost (longer reaction times for the infected words) for low and medium frequency words but not for high frequency words, suggesting morphological decomposition of low and medium frequency Swedish inflected nouns. In contrast, for the Chinese group the reaction times of the inflected vs. monomorphemic words were similar at all frequency levels, indicating full-form processing of all the inflected nouns. This cross-language difference suggests that L1 can exert an effect on the morphological processing in L2. The application of full-form processing for the Swedish inflected nouns in the Chinese group might reflect strategy transfer from their isolating native language to Swedish.

  • 498.
    Premat, Christophe
    Institut d´études politiques de Bordeaux.
    Alphabétisation et insertion des apprenants dans leur environnement local: recherche-action et analyse transactionnelle2008In: Anthropopages, Vol. 7-8, p. 73-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Il s’agit de montrer comment l’alphabétisation, en tant qu’enseignement fondé sur l’acquisition de la lecture et de l’écriture se renforce grâce à l’utilisation des éléments situés dans l’environnement local direct des apprenants. Par environnement local, nous entendons l’espace de référence commun aux apprenants dans le temps de l’apprentissage (la ville, le quartier et ses animations culturelles). L’enjeu de cet article est de penser le cours d’alphabétisation comme un véritable « chronotope » , c’est-à-dire un espace-temps au cours duquel les apprenants racontent leur quotidien, découvrent leur environnement local et influent sur lui grâce à la préparation d’un événement du quartier.

  • 499. Pålsson, Erik
    et al.
    Söderlund, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Klamer, Daniel
    Bergquist, Filip
    Noise benefit in prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex2011In: Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0033-3158, E-ISSN 1432-2072, Vol. 214, no 3, p. 675-685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Under some conditions, external sensory noise enhances cognitive functions, a phenomenon possibly involving stochastic resonance and/or enhanced central dopamine transmission. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex is a robust measure of sensorimotor gating and can be modulated by activity in the cortex and basal ganglia, including the central dopamine pathways. Previous empirical studies suggest a differential effect of acoustic noise in normal children and children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study investigated the effect of acoustic noise on PPI and if dopamine transmission interacts with acoustic noise effects in a rat ADHD model. The effect of background acoustic noise on acoustic startle response and PPI were measured with a constant prepulse to background noise ratio of 9 dB(A). Spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats were used as the ADHD model and compared with Wistar and Sprague-Dawley rats. Microdialysis, methylphenidate treatment and 6-OHDA lesions were used to investigate interaction with dopamine transmission. Background noise facilitated PPI differently in SH rats and controls. The prefrontal cortex in SH rats had low basal dopamine concentrations, a high DOPAC/dopamine ratio and blunted dopamine release during PPI testing. Methylphenidate had small, but strain-specific, effects on startle and PPI. Bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions did not alter startle or PPI. Prefrontal dopamine transmission is altered in SH rats during the sensorimotor gating task of PPI of the acoustic startle, indicating increased dopamine reuptake in this ADHD rat model. We propose that noise benefit could be explored as a non-pharmacological alternative for treating neuropsychiatric disorders.

  • 500.
    Renner, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Sambandet mellan fonologi och lexikon i den tidiga språkutvecklingen2013In: Dyslexi, ISSN 1401-2480, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
78910111213 451 - 500 of 657
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