Change search
Refine search result
1234567 51 - 100 of 1323
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51. Babor, Thomas
    et al.
    Stenius, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Quality guidelines for addiction journals: Nomenclature and terminology2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 52. Babor, Thomas
    et al.
    Stenius, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Romelsjö, Anders
    Alcohol and drug treatment systems in public health perspective:: mediators and moderators of population effects2008In: International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research 17(S1): S50-S59, Vol. 17(S1), p. S50-S59Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Babor, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Stenius, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Romelsjö, Anders
    Päihdehuollon järjestelmät kansanterveyden näkökulmasta: hoidon väestövaikutusten välittäjät ja taustatekijät2009In: Irti päihdeongelmista. Tutkimuksia hoidon ja ehkäisyn menetelmistä / [ed] T. Tammi, M. Aalto, A. Koski-Jännes, Helsinki: Edita , 2009Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 54. Babor, Thomas
    et al.
    Stenius, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Savva, Susan
    O`Reilly, Jean
    Publishing Addiction Science. A guide for the perplexed. 2nd Edition2008Book (Other academic)
  • 55. Backhans, M.
    et al.
    Leifman, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Vem blir nykterist? Om nykteristen som avvikare2001In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, no 1, p. 58-91Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 56. Balldin, Jan
    et al.
    Berglund, Kristina J.
    Berggren, Ulf
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Fahlke, Claudia
    TAQ1A1 Allele of the DRD2 Gene Region Contribute to Shorter Survival Time in Alcohol Dependent Individuals When Controlling for the Influence of Age and Gender. A Follow-up Study of 18 Years2018In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 216-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate the influence of the A1 allele of the TAQ1A polymorphism in the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene region on mortality in adult individuals with alcohol dependence. Methods: The study sample consisted of 359 alcohol-dependent individuals treated for severe alcohol withdrawal symptoms in 1997. Years of survival was studied in an 18-year follow-up. In the analyses, gender and age were controlled for. Results: At the 18-year follow-up, 53% individuals had deceased. The analyses showed that older age (P < 0.001), male gender (P < 0.05) and carrying the A1 allele (P < 0.01) all significantly and independently contributed to shorten years of survival. Among the deceased individuals, the genotype A1+ was the only significant contributor to shorten years of survival. Conclusions: An important contribution of the present study is that in alcohol dependence the Taq1A1 allele of the DRD2 gene region is a risk factor for premature death of similar importance as the well-known risk factors of age and gender. Short Summary: We investigated the influence of A1 allele of the TAQ1A polymorphism in DRD2 receptor gene region on mortality in alcohol-dependent individuals in an 18-year follow-up. Age, gender and the A1 allele contributed to shorten years of survival. Among the deceased, the A1+ was the only contributor to shorten years of survival.

  • 57. Beccaria, Franca
    et al.
    Prina, Franco
    Rolando, Sara
    Simonen, Jenni
    Tigerstedt, Christoffer
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Introduction2010In: Alcohol and generationsIntro: Changes in style and changing styles in Italy and Finland / [ed] Franca Beccaria, Carocci editore , 2010, 1, p. 11-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 58. Beccaria, Franca
    et al.
    Prina, Franco
    Rolando, Sara
    Tigerstedt, Christoffer
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Conclusion: Continuity and change in two drinking cultures. In Franca Beccaria (ed.): Alcohol and generations2010In: Alcohol and generations: Changes in style and changing styles in Italy and Finland / [ed] Franca Beccaria, Carocci editore , 2010, 1, p. 224-251Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 59. Beccaria, Franca
    et al.
    Rolando, Sara
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Scavarda, Alice
    From housekeeper to status-oriented consumer and hyper-sexual imagery: images of alcohol targeted to Italian women from the 1960s to the 2000s2018In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 1012-1039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advertisements not only mirror ideals of masculinity and femininity that prevail in a specific place and time, but also contribute to influencing them. This article analyses alcohol-related advertisements published in women’s magazines from 1967 to 2008 in Italy. The main aim is to understand cultural processes that underlie gender differences in drinking and more generally in Italian society. The sample consists of 376 direct and indirect advertisements collected from well-established women’s magazines. The study identifies continuities and changes in women’s subject positions in alcohol-related advertisements. Italian advertisements of the 1960s and 1970s still reflect a female condition that entails no recognition of women’s own desires and tastes. Advertisements from the 1980s and 1990s reflect a more complex representation of female consumers, associating them with their own desires and pleasures. In the 2000s, the focus on women’s physical appearance and social image has become the prevailing feature. In conclusion, the study shows that changes in female representations in advertisements in the last 50 years do not represent a shift toward a more balanced gender representation. The insistence on women’s appearance, with a correlated predominance of bodily pleasures and attractiveness, reproduces old stereotypes about drinking women.

  • 60. Been, Frederic
    et al.
    Bifisma, Lubertus
    Benaglia, Lisa
    Berset, Jean-Daniel
    Botero-Coy, Ana M.
    Castiglioni, Sara
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany.
    Zobel, Frank
    Schaub, Michael P.
    Buecheli, Alexander
    Hernandez, Felix
    Delemont, Olivier
    Esseiva, Pierre
    Ort, Christoph
    Assessing geographical differences in illicit drug consumption-A comparison of results from epidemiological and wastewater data in Germany and Switzerland2016In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 161, p. 189-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Wastewater analysis is an innovative approach that allows monitoring illicit drug use at the community level. This study focused on investigating geographical differences in drug consumption by comparing epidemiological, crime and wastewater data. Methods: Wastewater samples were collected in 19 cities across Germany and Switzerland during one week, covering a population of approximately 8.1 million people. Self-report data and consumption offences for the investigated areas were used for comparison and to investigate differences between the indicators. Results: Good agreement between data sources was observed for cannabis and amphetamine-type stimulants, whereas substantial discrepancies were observed for cocaine. In Germany, an important distinction could be made between Berlin, Dortmund and Munich, where cocaine and particularly amphetamine were more prevalent, and Dresden, where methamphetamine consumption was clearly predominant. Cocaine consumption was relatively homogenous in the larger urban areas of Switzerland, although prevalence and offences data suggested a more heterogeneous picture. Conversely, marked regional differences in amphetamine and methamphetamine consumption could be highlighted. Conclusions: Combining the available data allowed for a better understanding of the geographical differences regarding prevalence, typology and amounts of substances consumed. For cannabis and amphetamine-type stimulants, the complementarity of survey, police and wastewater data could be highlighted, although notable differences could be identified when considering more stigmatised drugs (i.e. cocaine and heroin). Understanding illicit drug consumption at the national scale remains a difficult task, yet this research illustrates the added value of combining complementary data sources to obtain a more comprehensive and accurate picture of the situation.

  • 61. Berglund, Kristina
    et al.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Typologisering av alkoholberoende individer i relation till kön och genus2014In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 91, no 6, p. 624-631Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 62. Berglund, Kristina
    et al.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    UIV- en intervju som redovisar kvalitet utifrån brukares och socialsekreterares bedömningar2014In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 91, no 6, p. 614-623Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 63. Berman, Anne H.
    et al.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sinadinovic, Kristina
    Changes in Mental and Physical Well-Being Among Problematic Alcohol and Drug Users in 12-Month Internet-Based Intervention Trials2015In: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, ISSN 0893-164X, E-ISSN 1939-1501, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 97-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twelve-month well-being outcomes were investigated for 835 participants in 1 of 2 randomized controlled trials offering online assessment and brief intervention for either problematic alcohol (n = 633) or drug use (n = 202). The well-being of participants who had reduced their substance use to a less problematic level (regardless of intervention) over 12 months was compared with that of participants who had maintained or increased their use. At a 12-month follow-up, the 227 alcohol trial participants with reduced use showed better well-being in comparison to the 406 with stable or increased use, in physical health and sleep quality, as well as general well-being, ability to concentrate, lower stress, better social life satisfaction and sense of control, and a lower rate of depressed mood. Among the 70 drug trial participants who had reduced their drug use over 12 months, 80% had ceased all drug use, and at follow-up they had fewer alcohol-related problems than the stable group. No differences in well-being between these groups were identified. Self-reported access to additional treatment modalities beyond the trial interventions (e.g., speaking to someone about problematic use and accessing additional Internet-based interventions) was higher among participants in both cohorts with reduced substance use in comparison to those with stable/increased use. Drug users who reduced their use accessed prescribed medication to a larger extent than those whose use remained stable or increased. Points to consider when conducting future research on well-being and problematic substance use are discussed.

  • 64. Berman, Anne
    et al.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Källmen, Håkan
    AUDIT och DUDIT – Att identifiera problem med alkohol och droger2012Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Formulären AUDIT och DUDIT är evidensbaserade och lättillgängliga verktyg som identifierar problematiskt alkohol- och drogbruk och ger ett bra underlag för dialog mellan behandlare och klient/patient. AUDIT och DUDIT rekommenderas som förstahandsval för screening (identifiering) i Socialstyrelsens riktlinjer för missbruks- och beroendevård.

    Det här är en handbok som tar upp användning, poängsättning och tolkning av formulären samt olika alternativ för att gå vidare vid positivt utfall. Den presenterar också hur man kan samtala kring resultatet och hur vidare utredning, diagnostisering och uppföljning går till.

    Boken AUDIT och DUDIT - identifiera problem med alkohol och droger vänder sig till behandlare och rådgivare inom bland annat hälso- och sjukvård, elevhälsa, mödravård, socialtjänst, beroendevård, kriminalvård och psykiatri.

  • 65.
    Bernhardsson, Josefin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Drink Sluts, Brats and Immigrants as Others: An analysis of Swedish media discourse on gender, alcohol and rape2011In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on an analysis of the media debate on two Swedish rape cases involving alcohol, the present article argues that social norms and power structures are made visible both when debaters ascribe explanatory power to alcohol and when they do not. Using feminist intersectional theory,we argue that when debaters employ the concepts of “foreign culture” and “jet-set drinking culture,” respectively, to explain the rapes, they simultaneously (re)produce stereotypical discourses on gender, sexuality, class and ethnicity/nationality. The troublesome positions of the Immigrant, the Drink Slut and the Brat symbolize how these discourses intersect in the specific cases. To understand why alcohol is central in explaining rape in a fashionable area, but not in a socially disadvantaged area, we suggest that the official image of Sweden as a gender-equal, sexually liberal and multicultural society with small class differences blocks discussion of existing inequalities within the country. When rape happens in a place constructed as a “Swedish middle and upper-class area,” alcohol and intoxication are used to symbolize the “uncivilized,” unpleasant and malicious among Swedish men. When rape happens in “socially disadvantaged neighbourhoods” populated by “immigrants,” the unpleasant instead resides in the “foreign culture.”

  • 66. Billieux, Joël
    et al.
    van Rooij, Antonius J.
    Heeren, Alexandre
    Schimmenti, Adriano
    Maurage, Pierre
    Edman, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Blaszczynski, Alexander
    Khazaal, Yasser
    Kardefelt‐Winther, Daniel
    Behavioural Addiction Open Definition 2.0—using the Open Science Framework for collaborative and transparent theoretical development2017In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 112, no 10, p. 1723-1724Article in journal (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 67. Bjerge, Bagga
    et al.
    Houborg, Esben
    Edman, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Perälä, Riikka
    Concepts and policies directed at drug use i Denmark, Finland and Sweden2016In: Concepts of Addictive Behaviours across Time and Place / [ed] Matilda Hellman, Virginia Berridge, Karen Duke, Alex Mold, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nordic countries are often thought of in terms of social democratic welfare regimes with numerous shared cultural aspects. Based on research from Denmark, Finland, and Sweden, this chapter explores how historical developments, specific ways of constructing policies, and welfare institutions articulate specific conceptions of what drug-related issues are and how they should be managed in three seemingly very similar welfare states. The Nordic welfare states are often described as quite alike and fairly open and inclusive in their approach to welfare policies and concerns, but the chapter demonstrates that similar political systems adopt different policy responses to similar conditions. To explore the similarities and differences, we are inspired by the analytical concepts of policy space and political rationalities; we use this approach to provide an overview of drug policy history in the three countries and present a closer examination of the topics of sanctions against drug users, coercive treatment, and substitution treatment nationally as well as cross-nationally.

  • 68.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alkohol- och narkotikaproblem: några aktuella utmaningar för vårdsystemet: Kunskapsöversikt 42007Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 69.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Att lägga sitt missbruk bakom sig: om ”spontanläkning” och betydelsen av behandling2001In: Nordisk Alkohol- og narkotikatidsskrift (NAT), ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 163-174Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Att sluta med narkotika – med och utan behandling2002Report (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Att sluta missbruka - med eller utan samhällets hjälp2011In: Narkotika. Om problem och politik. / [ed] Börje Olsson, Stockholm: Norstedts Juridik , 2011, p. 161-185Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Av egen kraft - med andras stöd2013In: Hjälpande möten i vård och omvärld: brukare, praktiker och forskare reflekterar / [ed] Ingemar Ljungqvist, Håkan Jenner, Stockholm: Liber, 2013, p. 182-210Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Behövs behandling?: Om "självläkning" och dess implikationer för hjälpsystemet.2009In: Alkohol och droger.: Samhällsvetenskapliga perspektiv. / [ed] K. Billinger & L. Hübner, Malmö: Gleerups , 2009, 1:a, p. 137-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Brauchen wir wirklich mehr Behandlung – oder sogar "bessere Methoden"?: Aktuelle Herausforderungen für den Umgang mit Suchtproblemen – der Fall Schweden. 2010In: AbhängigkeitenArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Bruk, missbruk och bemötande: Om olika sociala bilder av rusmedelsproblem och deras konsekvenser2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 76.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Dogmer som dödar: Vägval för svensk narkotikapolitik2017In: Dogmer som dödar: Vägval för svensk narkotikapolitik / [ed] Niklas Eklund, Mikaela Hildebrand, Stockholm: Verbal , 2017, p. 291-311Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Fenomenet självläkning vid missbruksproblem - en kort historik2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 78.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    From faith to knowledge? Reflections on some prerequisites for evidence-based addiction care in Sweden2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    It has often been claimed that the historical development of addiction care reflects ideological, political, and economical changes, and/or shifting therapeutic crazes, constantly failing to live up to what they offer, rather than the continuous march of progress in science. During the past decades, however, evidence-based practice (EBP) has become a well established doctrine in many parts of the health and welfare field, including addiction care. A recent example of this is the National guidelines for addiction care and treatment, issued by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare in spring 2007. According to the most eager proponents, the acceptance of the EBP doctrine will bring an end to ideological and religious beliefs, self-assured convictions, and pure guesswork as a ground for treatment practice, replacing them with valid empirical facts and certain scientific proof. However, these claims have not gone uncontested, and some have claimed the new doctrine to represent just another “promise for the future” that will never be fulfilled. For one thing, evidence-based medicine (EBM), which is often described as the root of EBP, typically distinguishes three important sources for informing practice, namely dependable clinical experience, external scientific proof, and patients’ needs and wishes. However, many critics have claimed that EBP in the general welfare field has often come to mean “based on RCT studies”, thus considering mainly or only one of these sources. To a large extent, this critique can be claimed to be valid in the case of the Swedish National guidelines. Other objections that have been directed at these guidelines have concerned flawed and partly contradictory scientific underpinning, partial lack of references for conclusions drawn, inconsistencies with regard to the use of various review methods and so on. Valid as these objections may be claimed to be, this contribution will rather scrutinize the same guidelines from the point of view of the practice field. Based on an appraisal of (i) the historical role of the treatment system, (ii) the predominating views of the character of the problems attended to, (iii) who the clients cared for by the system are, (iv) the typical modus operandi of the same system, and (v) what we know about how recovery from addiction problems actually comes about, some obvious problems and drawbacks, but also some potential benefits of the new guidelines will be highlighted.

  • 79.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Is it really more treatment or ’better methods’ that we need?2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    After years of relative neglect addiction care and treatment has, during the new millennium, again come to the attention of authorities and policy makers in Sweden. To a large part, this new interest has taken the form of developing addiction care into an “evidence-based practice” by the implementation of scientifically underpinned treatment methods. Another part has been the allocation of special resources to increase the use of coercive care. Based on results from topical research on the state-of-art of the Swedish addiction care system, and on “self-change” from various forms of addiction problems, the presentation will argue that neither “more resources” nor “better methods” are necessarily what is most urgently needed to develop more responsive and better-working means to counter addiction problems in Sweden. Among topics that will be discussed in the presentation is the “revolving-door” character of the present care system, why the majority of problem substance users refrain from seeking contact with the system, and some problems attached to the EBP concept as a basis for addiction care. As an alternative, the presentation will point to the need for broader and more flexible social strategies to counter addiction problems.

  • 80.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Långtidsförlopp vid narkotikamissbruk2006In: Faktaunderlag till Nationella riktlinjer för missbruks- och beroendevård, Stockholm: Socialstyrelsen , 2006, p. 87-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Metodens roll i mötet med klienten2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 82.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Models of helping and coping: Alcohol and drug problems in Sweden in a historical perspective2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 83.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Mot bättre vetande – och en bättre praktik?: Om problem, och möjligheter med några aktuella initiativ inom missbrukarvården2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 84.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Mot en bättre missbrukarvård?: Om problem och möjligheter med riktlinjer och andra aktuella initiativ inom missbrukarvården2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 85.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Mot en evidensbaserad missbrukarvård? Problem och möjligheter2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 86.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    “Mötet mellan forskning och praktik – går det att hitta en balans?”2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 87.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Mötet mellan forskning och praktik – går det att hitta en balans?2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 88.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Nationella riktlinjer för missbrukarvården – problem och möjligheter2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 89.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Nya metoder, andra förhållningssätt eller bättre organisation?2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 90.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Några utmaningar för det svenska hjälpsystemet2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 91.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Om historiska tendenser och aktuella utmaningar vad gäller samhällets insatser för människor med missbruksproblem2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 92.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Om rehabiliteringsförlopp utanför vårdsystemet och deras relevans i riktlinjesammanhang2006In: Faktaunderlag till Nationella riktlinjer för missbruks- och beroendevård, Stockholm: Socialstyrelsen , 2006, p. 233-252Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Perceptions of addiction and recovery in Sweden: The influence of respondent characteristics2012In: Addiction Research and Theory, ISSN 1058-6989, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 435-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Respondents to a representative population survey were asked to rate four psychoactive substances (tobacco, alcohol, cannabis and ‘hard’ drugs) with regard to their severity to society and addictiveness, as well as the options for recovery, with and without treatment, from an addiction to the same substances. This article explores if and how these ratings differ with regard to respondents’ socio-demographic characteristics, their own and close persons’ substance use experiences, and, their attitudes towards people with substance use problems. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and logistic or linear regressions. Although the main difference goes between respondents’ perceptions of various substances and addictions, the results also point to some interesting differences with regard to respondents’ experiences and characteristics. Thus for example, women and respondents with no personal substance use experiences, tend to play up the severity and addictiveness of most substances, and to play down the options for untreated recovery from an addiction, whereas current risk users tend to take an opposite view. Main interpretations are that there is a general tendency to exaggerate the hazards of and risks with habits that are perceived as unfamiliar and alien, that current risk users at the same time dwell on a ‘false hope’ of being able to quit, and that women are, for various reasons, more inclined than men to worry about their own substance use habits, as well as those in their close environment. Potential implications, for further research as well as for policy and prevention, are discussed.

  • 94.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Perspektiv på missbruk och beroende.2009In: Mot en bättre missbrukarvård.: En undersökning om förutsättningar för att evidensbasera missbrukarvården i fyra organisationer. / [ed] I. Christophs, Stockholm: Stockholms universitet , 2009Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 95.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Perspektiv på missbruk och beroende - från Magnus Huss till Robert West2012In: Handbok i missbrukspsykologi - teori och tillämpning / [ed] Claudia Fahlke, Malmö: Liber, 2012, 1:1, p. 152-169Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Projektet Mot en bättre missbrukarvård. Bakgrund och utgångspunkter.2009In: Mot en bättre missbrukarvård?: En undersökning om förutsättningar för att evidensbasera missbrukarvården i fyra organisationer. / [ed] I. Christophs, Stockholm: Stockholms universitet , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Research & Development, Social Services Administration, City of Stockholm, Sweden.
    Recovery with and without treatment: A comparison of resolutions of alcohol and drug problems2002In: Addiction Research and Theory, ISSN 1058-6989, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 119-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An earlier Swedish study compared assisted and unassisted misusers of alcohol, with different long-term drinking outcomes, with regard to drinking patterns, significant life events, and attributions as to what initiated and maintained recovery. It was found that environmental influences had a great, albeit somewhat different impact on the recovery processes in both assisted and unassisted subjects. A subsequent replication of this study, but on drug misusers, produced similar findings. The present paper uses data from both those studies to explore substance-specific characteristics in treated and untreated recovery from addiction problems. Comparisons include background data, substance use and life event data over an extended period surrounding the resolution, and subjects' perceived reasons for the resolution and for being able to maintain an alcohol problem-free or a drug-free lifestyle. The results are discussed from the perspective of differences in the social significance of drinking and drug use and the institutionalised response in Sweden to alcohol- and drug-related problems.Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/16066350290017248?journalCode=art

  • 98.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Self-Change from Alcohol and Drug Abuse: Often-Cited Classics2007In: Promoting Self-Change from Addictive Behaviors: Practical Implications for Policy, Prevention, and Treatment, New York: Springer , 2007, p. 31-57Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many are addicted. Few are treated. Yet many who are not treated recover. Promoting Self-Change from Addictive Behaviors examines natural recovery as a clinical phenomenon, a field of inquiry, and a vital component of therapy. It also brings clinicians and counselors to a new understanding of addiction and recovery. One of the few books on the topic, this updated edition offers alternatives to disease models of addiction by exploring personal pathways to recovery. Focusing on alcohol and drug problems, it provides a literature review of 40 years of studies on self-change with particular emphasis on the current decade and methodological issues (starting with how much or how little treatment constitutes "treatment").

  • 99.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sjukdom, dålig vana, livsstil eller social konstruktion?: Om olika uppfattningar om missbruk och beroende och deras konsekvenser.2012In: Samhället, alkoholen och drogerna.: Politik, konstruktioner och dilemman. / [ed] Jessica Storbjörk, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag , 2012, p. 14-43Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Societal images of addiction and recovery – first results from a Swedish representative study2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown that long-term recovery from addiction problems – whether assisted or unassisted – is strongly influenced by other people’s actions and reactions. However, although we know that the “governing images” of various addictions vary with time and place, we lack a systematic understanding of the views and beliefs that underlie the way in which people who are trying to move out of an addiction are met, by professionals and by those in their “natural environment”. This paper present first results from a study aimed at “mapping” lay and professional attitudes to and images of addiction and recovery in Sweden. The paper gives a descriptive first overview of the “social representation” of various addictions in Sweden, the perceived odds for recovery from these addictions – with and without treatment – and of how varying images and attitudes are related to, e.g. demographic factors, political-ideological orientation and personal experiences in the addiction field. Later analyses will look deeper into these relations and also compare lay and professional views on addiction and recovery.

1234567 51 - 100 of 1323
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf