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  • 51.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ole Harck, Archäologische Studien zum Judentum in der europäischen Antike und dem zentraleuropäischen Mittelalter2016In: Germania, ISSN 0016-8874, Vol. 94, p. 421-424Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Places, Monuments, and Objects: The Past in Ancient Scandinavia2013In: Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 0036-5637, E-ISSN 2163-8195, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 267-281Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Servants of Thor? The Gotlanders and Thier Gods2012In: News from Other Worlds: Studies in Nordic Folklore, Mythology and Culture / [ed] Merrill Kaplan and Timothy R. Tangherlini, Berkeley and Los Angeles: North Pinehurst Press , 2012, p. 92-100Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study of the main pre-Christian god on Gotland

  • 54.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    The Importance of Foreign Young Men2013In: Counterpoint: Essays in Archaeology and Heritage Studies in Honour of Professor Kristian Kristiansen / [ed] Sophie Bergerbrant & Serena Sabatini, Oxford: Archeopress, 2013, 1, p. 565-571Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A discussion of the role of enrolled foreign warriors in early state organizations

  • 55.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The significance of places: the Christianization of Scandinavia from a spatial point of view2013In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 27-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of cult continuity from pagan temples' to Christian churches in Scandinavia is a classic issue in archaeology and history. In this paper the discussion is surveyed and new perspectives are outlined, based on the ritual differences between the two religious traditions. Churches were located in relation not so much to pagan ritual buildings as to different elements in multi-focused pagan ritual landscapes, for instance burial grounds. This means that the spatial patterns varied between different parts of Scandinavia.

  • 56.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Tomhetens arkeologi: spår av judarnas medeltida fördrivning2015In: I utkanter och marginaler: 31 texter om kulturhistoria: en vänbok till Birgitta Svensson / [ed] Marianne Larsson, Anneli Palmsköld, Helena Hörnfeldt, Lars-Eric Jönsson, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 2015, p. 217-227Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Tracing Old Norse Cosmology: The world tree, middle earth, and the sun in archaeological perspectives2014 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An archaeological investigation of three cosmological elements in Old Norse religion, namely the world tree, Midgard and the sun. The changing character of these elements are investigated via different forms of material representations from the Bronze Age to the Viking Age.

  • 58.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Un jardin parisien à Lund au XIVe siècle?2009In: Regards sur la France du Moyen Age: Mélanges offerts à Gunnel Engwall / [ed] Olle Ferm, Per Förnegård, Stockholm: Runica et Mediævalia , 2009, p. 10-19Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Interpretation of a medieval garden in Lund as inspired by contemporary gardens in Paris

  • 59.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Visby som en stadsarkeologisk utmaning2015In: Inn i fortida - ut i verden - i museet! / [ed] Jon Anders Risvaag, Ragnhild Berge, Terje Brattli, Trondheim: Museumsforlaget , 2015, p. 28-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Andrén, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Jennbert, KristinaLunds universitet.Raudvere, CatharinaKöpenhamns universitet.
    Hedendomen i historiens spegel: bilder av det förkristna Norden2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Eight articles, in Swedish, on the modern reception of Old Norse religion

  • 61.
    Andrén, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Jennbert, KristinaRaudvere, Catharina
    Old Norse religion in long-term perspectives: origins, changes, and interactions : an international conference in Lund, Sweden, June 3-7, 20042006Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Andrén, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Jennbert, Kristina
    Lunds universitet.
    Raudvere, Catharina
    Köpenhamns universitet.
    Old Norse religion: Some problems and prospects2011In: Old Norse religion in long-term perspectives: Origins, changes, and interactions / [ed] Anders Andrén, Kristina Jennbert, Catharina Raudvere, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2011, 2, p. 11-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Andrén, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Victor, Helena
    Kalmar Länsmuseum.
    Fischer, Svante
    Uppsala universitet.
    The ringfort by the sea: Archaeological geophysical prospection and excavations at Sandby borg (Öland)2014In: Archäologisches Korrespondenzblatt, ISSN 0342-734X, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 413-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeological investigations and clear aerial photos have identified the presence of house foundations within several ringforts on the island of Öland, east of the Swedish mainland. One of them, Sandby borg, was selected for further investigations by means of a ground-penetrating radar (GRP) and magnetometry survey. A subsequent excavation was carried out to validate the geophysical results. The results of the geophysical survey clearly show the presence of 36 or 37 stone foundations for houses situated radially around the wall of the fort as well as of 16 or 17 similar house foundations in a central building group. The geophysical results also provided information on other buried features within the fort and also confirm the location of a third gate situated in the north-western part of the fort. The available evidence indicates that the ringfort was used for military purposes, or as a place of refuge in times of unrest, for a limited period of time during the late 5th century.

  • 64.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Hersteinsson, P.
    Liden, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Nelson, E.
    Dietary Variation in Arctic Foxes (Alopex-Lagopus) - an Analysis of Stable Carbon Isotopes1994In: Oecologia, Vol. 99, no 3-4, p. 226-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used stable carbon isotopes to analyse individual variation in arctic fox diet. We extracted collagen from bones (the lower jaw), and measured stable carbon isotopes. The foxes came from three different localities: Iceland, where both microtines and reindeer are rare; west Greenland, where microtines are absent; and Sweden, where seat analyses showed the primary food to be microtine rodents and reindeer. The Icelandic samples included foxes from both coastal and inland habitats, the Swedish sample came from an inland area, and the Greenland sample from coastal sites. The spatial variation in the isotopic pattern followed a basic division between marine and terrestrial sources of protein. Arctic foxes from inland sites had delta(13)C values of -21.4 (Ice land) and -20.4 parts per thousand (Sweden), showing typical terrestrial values. Coastal foxes from Greenland had typical marine Values of -14.9 parts per thousand, whereas coastal foxes from Iceland had intermediate values of -17.7 parts per thousand. However, there was individual variation within each sample, probably caused by habitat heterogeneity and territoriality among foxes. The variation on a larger scale was related to the availability of different food items. These results were in accordance with other dietary analyses based on seat analyses. This is the first time that stable isotopes have been used to reveal individual dietary patterns. Our study also indicated that isotopic values can be used on a global scale.

  • 65.
    Anna, Kjellström
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Wikström, Anders
    Kyrkogården och det sakrala rummet2008In: På väg mot Paradiset: arkeologisk undersökning i kvarteret Humlegården 3 i Sigtuna 2006, 2008Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 66.
    Apel, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory. Lund University, Sweden.
    Wallin, Paul
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Possnert, Göran
    Early Holocene human population events on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea (9200-3800 cal. BP)2018In: Quaternary International, ISSN 1040-6182, E-ISSN 1873-4553, Vol. 465, p. 276-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The summed probability distribution of 162 radiocarbon dates from Gotland was analysed with reference to archaeological and environmental data in order to evaluate possible variations in settlement intensity on the island. The data indicated variations in demographic development on the island, with probably several different colonization events and external influences; the pioneer settlement reached the island around 9200 cal. BP. After the initial colonization, the radiocarbon dates were rather evenly distributed until around 7700–7600 cal. BP, then there was a drop in the number of dates between 8300 and 8000 cal. BP that may be associated with the 8200 cold event. A marked decline in the number of dates between 7600 and 6000 cal. BP may be associated initially with the Littorina I transgression, but this transgression cannot explain why the Late Mesolithic period is not well represented on Gotland: the climatic development was favourable but did not result in increased human activity. The number of radiocarbon dates indicated that the population size remained low until around 6000 cal. BP, after which there was a gradual increase that reached a first ‘threshold’ after 5600 cal. BP and a second ‘threshold’ after 4500 cal. BP. The first apparent population increase was associated with the appearance of the Funnel Beaker Culture (FBC) and the second with Pitted Ware Culture (PWC) complexes. A decline in the number of dates occurred after 4300 cal. BP, i.e. towards the Late Neolithic. There was an association between the frequency distributions of the radiocarbon dates and the number of stray finds from different time periods but any correlation was not straightforward.

  • 67. Arcini, Caroline
    et al.
    Price, Douglas
    Cinthio, Maria
    Drenzel, Leena
    Andersson, Mats
    Persson, Bodil
    Menander,, Hanna
    Vretemark, Maria
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Hedvall, Richard
    Tagesson, Göran
    Living conditions in times of plague2015In: Environment, Society and the Black Death: An interdisciplinary approach to the late-medieval crisis in Sweden / [ed] Per Lagerås, Oxbow Books, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Arleskär, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Hospital och Helgeandshus: En studie av omsorgsväsende i medeltidens Sverige2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to understand the differences and the similarities between leprosy hospitals and house of holy spirit hospitals (helgeandshus) and their status and function in the society of medieval Sweden.

  • 69.
    Arnberg, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Av jord är du kommen...: Tidig järnframställning på Gotland2009In: Äldre Järnålder 2008: Ett arkeologiskt symposium i samarbete mellan Arkeologisektionen i Stockholms läns hembygdsförbund och Stockholms läns museum / [ed] Bergström Hyenstrand, Eva, Stockholm: Stockholms läns museum , 2009, p. 31-41Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Arnberg, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Där människor, handling och tid möts: En studie av det förromerska landskapet på Gotland2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is concerned with the pre-Roman Iron Age on Gotland (500 BC–AD). The remains studied comprise artefacts, fossil field systems, ring-forts, burial localities, and places for iron-making, and more. The author focuses on the landscape formed by these remains, in an attempt to understand the people and society behind them. On the path to such an understanding, importance is attached to the acts and events leading up to the remains. The acts connected people and created relations between individuals and their surroundings. It is these relations, their materializations and the way they changed, that the study deals with.

    The period studied is presented as a time when people’s relations to the earth they lived by were vital for how they defined themselves and their relation to others. That earth attained this elevated position in the minds of people was not dependent on one feature solely. Cultivation and its material effects was one contributing aspect; the earthly origin of iron and the successive growth of burial grounds were two more. Archaeologically this mentality has resulted in vast systems of conjoined plots, in burial grounds, and in immense settlement areas that also had cemeteries.

    Further, the pre-Roman Iron Age is presented as a period when both the household and the local community were important factors for how people structured their lives, identities and surroundings. The institutions were complementary and people were often part of both. The institutions were upheld in different ways and have in turn given rise to different kinds of material culture. While the unity of the household was based on day-to-day activities and visualized by settlements with surrounding fields and small burial localities, the feelings of affinity within the local community were partly based on other factors and on activities carried out at other localities. Alongside ring-forts, vast burial grounds comprised such localities.

  • 71.
    Arnberg, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    To Make o Mark on Land: Fossil Field Systems and the Social Implication of Agriculture during the Pre-Roman Iron Age on Gotland, Sweden2009In: Archaeologia Baltica, ISSN 1392-5520, Vol. 12, p. 57-73Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Arnshav, Mirja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Pälshandlare, flyktingsmugglare och ingermanländare. Tre gåtfulla båtvrak utmed den bottniska kusten2019In: Bottnisk kontakt XIX / [ed] Marcus Lindholm, Staffan Beijar, Kenneth Gustavsson, Mariehamn: Ålands landskapsregering; Ålands museum , 2019, p. 104-123Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under andra världskriget kom tusentals båtflyktingar över Bottenhavet till den svenska norrlandskusten. Utifrån tre utpekade flyktingbåtsvrak diskuteras hur minnen och hörsägnen av flyktingarna - särskilt de baltiska - lever kvar i bygderna, och hur dessa relaterar till de fysiska båtlämningarna. 

  • 73.
    Arnshav, Mirja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    ‘The sea shall have our weapons’: small arms and forced migration across the Baltic Sea during the Second World War2020In: Journal of Conflict Archaeology, ISSN 1574-0773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the Second World War, a large number of guns were brought to Sweden by refugees escaping the occupation powers of the eastern Baltic countries. Most people had very limited space for bringing belongings with them, but small arms were apparently highly prioritised when setting out – yet, at the same time, they were usually disposed of in the course of the crossing. Informed by Latours’ thoughts on hybrid actors, this paper explores the relationship between humans and arms during the escape across the Baltic Sea in 1943–45. It is shown that although they were seldom fired, the physical presence of these arms directly affected human action, perception and identities, and that it did so in different ways during different phases of the crossing.

  • 74.
    Arrhenius, Birgit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Finds of treasure and their interpretation with special reference to some hoards found in Birka and on Björkö2013In: Early Medieval Art and Archaeology in the Northern World: Studies in Honour of James Graham-Campbell / [ed] Andrew Reynolds & Leslie Webster, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2013, p. 843-858Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Arrhenius, Birgit
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Gulldens hög i Husby-Långhundra2006Report (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Arrhenius, Birgit
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Jansson, Ingmar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Small items and major conclusions: A discussion of the findings from Gullhögen, Old Uppsala2015In: Small Things Wide Horizons: Studies in Honour of Birgitta Hårdh / [ed] Lars Larsson, Fredrik Ekengren, Bertil Helgesson and Bengt Söderberg, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2015, p. 141-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Arrhenius, Birgit
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    O'Meadhra, Uaninn
    Excavations at Helgö: 18, conclusions and new aspects2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Arrhenius, Brigit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Brisingamen and the Menet necklace2009In: Glaube, Kult und Herrschaft Phänomene des Religiösen im 1. Jahrtausend n. Chr.in Mittel- und NordeuropaAkten des 59. Internationalen Sachsensymposionsund derGrundprobleme der frühgeschichtlichen Entwicklung im Mitteldonauraum / [ed] Uta von Freeden, Herwig Friesinger & Egon Wamers, Berlin, 2009, p. 219-230Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the jewellery worn by the goddess Freyja, the Brisingamen. The author has previously claimed that brising (“glowing”) is a heiti for “garnet”, in Latin called carbunculus and in Greek ἄνθραξ. The word men has been compared by other authors to the Old German word menni meaning a collar for a dog. However, its origin may have been the Menet (alternatively Menat or Menit) – originally the necklace of the cow god Hathor which in the Greco-Roman time was taken over by the fertility goddess Isis. The Menet necklace was mostly used in ceremonies together with the musical instrument sistrum, when the rattling of the Menet was an important element. The late Roma like bracteates or coin imitations and garnet jewellery were important elements, too. Owing to its many metal pendants the Brisingamen could have produced a sound, though in this case not rattling but rather a sound more like jingle bells. This paper presents several precious items of jewellery representing Freyja’s Brisingamen from the Viking period, the most exquisite examples being the necklaces from Hoen in Norway and Eketorp in Sweden

  • 79.
    Audy, Florent
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Suspended Value: Using Coins as Pendants in Viking-Age Scandinavia (c. AD 800–1140)2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of coins as pendants is a common practice in the Scandinavian Viking Age (c. AD 800–1140). About three per cent of the coins circulating in Scandinavia show signs of having been adapted for suspension, either with a small hole or a loop. Modifying coins in this way changes the nature of the object. The pierced and looped coins move from having an economic function to having a display and symbolic function, at least temporarily. 

    After being long neglected by both archaeologists and numismatists, the reuse of coins as pendants has started to receive attention in recent years. This arises mainly from a desire to approach coins from perspectives other than purely economic ones. Coins, like any other archaeological object, are part of material culture. It is therefore also relevant and necessary to investigate their social and cultural significance.

    The aim of this thesis is to understand why coins were adapted for suspension and worn as personal ornaments in Viking-Age Scandinavia. Unlike most ornaments of the time, the production of which necessarily involved craft specialists, the Viking-Age coin-pendants could be produced directly by their owners. Their study can thus provide unique insights into how the coins of which they are made, and the messages they carry, were perceived by those using them. What made coins so meaningful that they were often turned into pendants?

    The point of departure adopted here is the object, the ‘coin-pendant’ itself, but this object does not exist in a vacuum. Particular attention is paid to the different contexts that the coin-pendants have navigated throughout their lives, such as minting, use as currency or use as ornament. This contextual approach is combined with a semiotic one, so as to better understand how the meaning of the object was constructed. 

    The relationship between coin-pendants and owners of coin-pendants can be explored by investigating several processes that reflect the owners’ intentions, such as coin selection, modification for suspension, orientation of the motives and combination with other ornaments. These processes allow us to understand how the coin-pendants were valued by those using them.  However, it is not possible to fully understand this relationship without putting it into perspective. This means studying: (1) the wider social, economic, cultural and religious framework in which the practice of reusing coins as pendants is situated; (2) the objects with which the coin-pendants are metaphorically associated.

    The material forming the basis for this study is both archaeological and numismatic. It consists of two main components: 134 Scandinavian graves containing coin-pendants and a random sample of 80 Scandinavian hoards. The hoard material is primarily intended for quantitative purposes while the grave catalogue is primarily intended for qualitative purposes. The importance of studying the Viking-Age coin-pendants both in graves and in hoards cannot be overemphasised. None of these contexts directly reflects the reality of the practice.

    The study shows that the practice of using coins as pendants was very diverse and could be adapted to individual tastes. Within this diversity, however, a common denominator emerges: the object ‘coin’. It is clear that there was something special about coins in Viking-Age Scandinavia and that the meaning of the coin-pendants was largely derived from the ideas with which coins were associated.

  • 80.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    A Rare Analogy: Contemporary Cremation Practices2009In: On the Threshold: Burial Archaeology in the Twenty-first Century / [ed] Back Danielsson, I.-M., Gustin, I., Larsson, A., Myrberg, N. and Thedéen, S., Stockholm: Stockholm Unviersity , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents four different examples of how studies of contemporary cremation practices are an important aspect of archaeological research, both as a focus of archaeological research into the recent and contemporary past and as a source of analogy and/or anti-analogy in the interpretation of prehistoric mortuary practices. I show that archaeology contributed in a most direct way to the introduction of modern cremations in Sweden, that an archaeological analysis may be made of the architecture of death, and that the very cremation act of today may be fruitfully contrasted to that of Late Iron Age Scandinavia. Lastly, I discuss the significance of the concepts of the body, identity and person.

  • 81.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Allmän arkeologi.
    Bodies and Identitities in Late Iron Age Scandinavia2008In: Prehistoric Europe.: Theory and Practice., Wiley-Blackwell , 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Engendering Performance in the Late Iron Age1999In: Current Swedish Archaeology, Vol. 7, p. 7-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Go Figure!: Creating Intertwined Worlds in the Scandinavian Late Iron Age (AD 550–1050)2010In: Anthropomorphic and Zoomorphic Miniature Figuresin Eurasia, Africa and Meso-AmericaMorphology, materiality, technology, function and context: Materiality, technology, function and context / [ed] Dragos Gheorghiu and Ann Cyphers, Oxford: Archaeopress , 2010, p. 79-90Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Scandinavian gold foil figures from the early part of the Late Iron Age (AD 550–1050). The author presents two major points of interest that have been neglected in previous research. The first highlights how the manipulations the figures have undergone must be taken into consideration, which is accomplished with the help of theatre theory, semiotics and anthropology. The second places an emphasis on how the context from which the figures have been retrieved must be analysed. Consequently, from the example of a ceremonial building at Uppåkra, Sweden, it is contended that the figures were made by artisans/smiths that, apart from expertly making the figures, also acted as ritual specialists when the structure was built or inaugurated. As such, they were responsible for depositing specific figures in particular, designated and pivotal places that needed protection or other ritual treatment. The gold foil figures further highlight the intertwinement between subject and object, human and nonhuman, as well as between the divine and the mundane. Therefore they contribute significantly to discussions on materiality.

  • 84.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Hagerman, M. Försvunnen värld: Om den största arkeologiska utgrävningen någonsin i Sverige2011In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Hemdrup-staven – ett nytt tolkningsförslag2001In: Fornvännen, p. 73-77Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Härjad hög i Hallunda.: Arkeologisk undersökning av anläggning 34 från yngre järnålder på gravfält RAÄ 75, Hallunda, Botkyrka sn, Södermanland.2000Report (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Ingenious Ignition: “Flame, I’m gonna live forever” and other movie rhythms shaking Late Iron Age bodies on the road2003In: Scandinavian archaeological practice – in theory: Proceedings from the 6th Nordic TAG, Oslo 2001, 2003, p. 40-57Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 88.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Liten lurifax i Lejre2010In: Arkaeologisk Forum, ISSN 1399-5545, no 22, p. 30-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den lilla figurin som återfanns i Lejre år 2009 utropades genast till att vara en man och dessutom asaguden Oden. Men stämmer det? Kan arkeologer verkligen vara säkra på att den vikingatida danska miniatyrfiguren är man och att det är Oden? I denna artikel diskuteras vilka konsekvenser enkla kategoriseringar får för vår förståelse av såväl förhistoria som nutid. Dessutom ges förslag till alternativa sätt att närma sig figurinen.

  • 89.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Masking Moments: The Transitions of Bodies and Beings in Late Iron Age Scandinavia2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores bodily representations in Late Iron Age Scandinavia (400–1050 AD). Non-human bodies, such as gold foil figures, and human bodies are analysed. The work starts with an examination and deconstruction of the sex/gender categories to the effect that they are considered to be of minor value for the purposes of the thesis. Three analytical concepts – masks, miniature, and metaphor – are deployed in order to interpret how and why the chosen bodies worked within their prehistoric contexts.

    The manipulations the figures sometimes have undergone are referred to as masking practices, discussed in Part One. It is shown that masks work and are powerful by being paradoxical; that they are vehicles for communication; and that they are, in effect, transitional objects bridging gaps that arise in continuity as a result of events such as symbolic or actual deaths.

    In Part Two miniaturization is discussed. Miniaturization contributes to making worlds intelligible, negotiable and communicative. Bodies in miniatures in comparison to other miniature objects are particularly potent. Taking gold foil figures under special scrutiny, it is claimed that gold, its allusions as well as its inherent properties conveyed numinosity. Consequently gold foil figures, regardless of the context, must be understood as extremely forceful agents.

    Part Three examines metaphorical thinking and how human and animal body parts were used in pro-creational acts, resulting in the birth of persons. However, these need not have been human, but could have been the outcomes of turning a deceased into an ancestor, iron into a steel sword, or clay into a ceramic urn, hence expanding and transforming the members of the family/household. Thus, bone in certain contexts acted as a transitional object or as a generative substance.

    It is concluded that the bodies of research are connected to transitions, and that the theme of transformation was one fundamental characteristic of the societies of study.

  • 90.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Much Ado about Nothing?: Gender Research in Journals during the last 30 Years within Archaeology2012In: To Tender Gender: The Pasts and Futures of Gender Research in Archaeology / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Susanne Thedéen, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, p. 17-32Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper accounts for the extent to which gender research is represented in leading archaeological journals throughout the 1980s to the present through the database Arts & Humanities Citation Index (ISI). The paper regards gender research as including gender, feminisms, masculinities, queer, intersectionality and embodiment. It is concluded that gender research, despite its alleged significance and progress in later years, is substantially marginalized within mainstream archaeology. Comparisons are also made between gender archaeology and mainstream archaeology and differences between the two are discussed. The paper further addresses current research trends within the humanities placing an increased emphasis on publications in leading peer-reviewed journals. Since the paper shows that gender research is poorly represented in such periodicals the author urges archaeologists interested in gender to publish in these journals.

  • 91.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Norsborg och Skrävsta i Botkyrka.: Makt i monument och materiell kultur.1998In: Aktuell arkeologi VI, Stockholms universitet , 1998, p. 31-40Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Om Pettersson, samiska trummor och Hitlers bunker. Bland annat.2000In: Texter om arkeologisk kulturmiljövård, Göteborgs universitet , 2000, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Presenting the past: On archaeologists and their influence on modern burial practices2011In: Mortality, ISSN 1357-6275, E-ISSN 1469-9885, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 98-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper demonstrates how antiquarians and archaeologists have influenced the burial practices of their times. They have encouraged the re-invention of prehistoric monuments in contemporary burial practices and also been involved in introducing the practice of modern cremation. Whereas antiquarians encouraged the upper-class stratum of society to reuse prehistoric material culture, their nineteenth century successors, archaeologists, turned to another audience. By focussing in greater detail on the earliest archaeologists and their endeavours to make archaeology a subject of public interest, it is revealed how they facilitated the re-invention of prehistoric material culture. For instance, bautas (a prehistoric memory stone for a deceased) became popular in the late nineteenth century, and it was also a category of sepulchral objects that the wealthier working class could afford. Hereby it is further shown how archaeology is an integral part of society, and not, as commonly argued within the history of archaeology, a discipline which in its interpretation of prehistory is influenced from a societal ‘outside’.

  • 94.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Review of “Prehistoric Pictures”2006In: Fornvännen, p. 45-47Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Review of the book “The Excavations at Wijnaldum. Reports on Frisia in Roman and Medieval Times”2002In: FornvännenArticle, book review (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Sense and Sensibility: Masking Practices in Late Iron Age Boat-Graves.2010In: Making Sense of Things.: Archaeologies of Sensory Perception. / [ed] Fahlander, Fredrik and Kjellström, Anna, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University , 2010, 400, p. 121-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish boat-graves, especially those from Valsgärde and Vendel, have been the subject of many investigations and extensive research since their discoveries in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (e.g. Stolpe & Arne 1912; Arwidsson 1942, 1954, 1977; Lindqvist 1950; Herschend 1997, 2003; Seiler 2001, Schönbäck 2002; Norr (ed.) 2008). The helmets retrieved from these burials are the focus of this paper, and these have been analysed with particular consideration for their role in sensory engagement – both for the person wearing the helmet and for those experiencing it from the outside.

    The paper starts off with a short presentation of the boat-graves and the helmets therein, after which follows an equally short introduction of masking practices and the significance of masking practices during the Late Iron Age in Scandinavia. A more detailed discussion of the helmets of the boat-graves and their connection with sensual activities, the main theme of the paper, follows. Finally, a broader interpretation of the boat-graves themselves is offered and, lastly, conclusions are presented.

  • 97.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The Rape of the Lock: Or a Comparison between Miniature Images of the Eighth and Eighteenth Centuries2012In: Encountering Imagery: Materialities, Perceptions, Relations / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Fredrik Fahlander, Ylva Sjöstrand, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, p. 29-49Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Scandinavian gold foil figures from the early part of the Scandinavian Late Iron Age (AD 550-1050) as well as miniature portrait pendants of the eighteenth century. The paper examines the possibility of comparing the two categories of objects, and what may be gained by contrasting historic and prehistoric images. The comparison is made through using Mitchell’s concept meta-picture as a theoretical tool. It is highlighted that the relationality between image and beholder is decisive for how respective objects were comprehended and treated. However, despite the fact that the two analyzed materials were part of different scopic regimes and regimes of practice, they share vitalistic and/or animistic characteristics.

  • 98.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    (Un)Masking Gender: Gold Foil (Dis)Embodiments in Late Iron Age Scandinavia2002In: Thinking Through the Body, 2002Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Fahlander, FredrikStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.Sjöstrand, YlvaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Encountering Imagery: Materialities, Perceptions, Relations2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pictorial and visual elements are special types of archaeological data that transgress boundaries: between us and the past and between the material and immaterial. Traditionally, images have been discussed in terms of what they represent, mean or symbolize. In this volume, the authors explore other ways in which images aect and engage the beholder and the modes in which they are entangled in past worlds. The articles comprise examples from various regions and time periods and include a diverse array of topics including northern European rock art of the Neolithic and Bronze Age, anthropomorphic aspects of ceramic pots and figures in gold, erotic themes on children’s burial vessels, and nineteenth-century rock art created by quarantined sailors in Australia.

  • 100.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Sjöstrand, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Imagery beyond Representation2012In: Encountering Imagery: Materialities, Perceptions, Relations / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Fredrik Fahlander, Ylva Sjöstrand, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
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