Change search
Refine search result
1234 51 - 100 of 153
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Hjelm, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Identifying Cross Language Term Equivalents Using Statistical Machine Translation and Distributional Association Measures2007In: Proceedings of Nodalida 2007, the 16th Nordic Conference of Computational Linguistics / [ed] Nivre, Heiki-Jaan Kaalep, Kadri Muischnek and Mare Koit, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a comparison of the accuracy of a number of different approaches for identifying cross language term equivalents (translations). The methods investigated are on the one hand associative measures, commonly used in word-space models or in Information Retrieval and on the other hand a Statistical Machine Translation (SMT) approach. I have performed tests on six language pairs, using the JRC-Acquis parallel corpus as training material and Eurovoc as a gold standard. The SMT approach is shown to be more effective than the associative measures. The best results are achieved by taking a weighted average of the scores of the SMT approach and disparate associative measures.

  • 52.
    Hjelm, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Buitelaar, Paul
    Multilingual Evidence Improves Clustering-based Taxonomy Extraction2008In: Proceedings of the 18th European Conference on Artificial Intelligence (ECAI 2008), 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Hjelm, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Schwarz, Christoph
    LiSa - Morphological Analysis for Information Retrieval2006In: Proceedings of the 15th NODALIDA conference, Joensuu 2005, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Hultin, Felix
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Phonotactic Structures in Swedish: A Data-Driven Approach2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Ever since Bengt Sigurd laid out the first comprehensive description of Swedish phonotactics in 1965, it has been the main point of reference within the field. This thesis attempts a new approach, by presenting a computational and statistical model of Swedish phonotactics, which can be built by any corpus of IPA phonetic script. The model is a weighted trie, represented as a finite state automaton, where states are phonemes linked by transitions in valid phoneme sequences, which adds the benefits of being probabilistic and expressible by regular languages. It was implemented using the Nordisk Språkteknologi (NST) pronunciation lexicon and was used to test against a couple of rulesets defined in Sigurd relating to initial two consonant clusters of phonemes and phoneme classes. The results largely agree with Sigurd's rules and illustrated the benefits of the model, in that it effectively can be used to pattern match against phonotactic information using regular expression-like syntax.

  • 55.
    Hägglöf, Hillevi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Tengstrand, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    A Random Indexing Approach to Unsupervised Selectional Preference Induction2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A selectional preference is the relation between a head-word and plausible arguments of that head-word. Estimation of the association feature between these words is important to natural language processing applications such as Word Sense Disambiguation. This study presents a novel approach to selectional preference induction within a Random Indexing word space. This is a spatial representation of meaning where distributional patterns enable estimation of the similarity between words. Using only frequency statistics about words to estimate how strongly one word selects another, the aim of this study is to develop a flexible method that is not language dependent and does not require any annotated resourceswhich is in contrast to methods from previous research. In order to optimize the performance of the selectional preference model, experiments including parameter tuning and variation of corpus size were conducted. The selectional preference model was evaluated in a pseudo-word evaluation which lets the selectional preference model decide which of two arguments have a stronger correlation to a given verb. Results show that varying parameters and corpus size does not affect the performance of the selectional preference model in a notable way. The conclusion of the study is that the language modelused does not provide the adequate tools to model selectional preferences. This might be due to a noisy representation of head-words and their arguments.

  • 56. Ibbotson, Paul
    et al.
    Hartman, Rose M.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Frequency filter: an open access tool for analysing language development2018In: Language, Cognition and Neuroscience, ISSN 2327-3798, E-ISSN 2327-3801, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1325-1339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an open-access analytic tool, which allows researchers to simultaneously control for and combine language data from the child, the caregiver, multiple languages, and across multiple time points to make inferences about the social and cognitive factors driving the shape of language development. We demonstrate how the tool works in three domains of language learning and across six languages. The results demonstrate the usefulness of this approach as well as providing deeper insight into three areas of language production and acquisition: egocentric language use, the learnability of nouns versus verbs, and imageability. We have made the Frequency Filter tool freely available as an R-package for other researchers to use at https://github.com/rosemm/FrequencyFilter.

  • 57.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Stylistic experiments for information retrieval2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Kurfali, Murathan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Noisy Parallel Corpus Filtering through Projected Word Embeddings2019In: Proceedings of the Fourth Conference on Machine Translation (WMT), Association for Computational Linguistics, 2019, Vol. 3, p. 279-283Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a very simple method for parallel text cleaning of low-resource languages, based on projection of word embeddings trained on large monolingual corpora in high-resource languages. In spite of its simplicity, we approach the strong baseline system in the downstream machine translation evaluation.

  • 59.
    Kurfali, Murathan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Zero-shot transfer for implicit discourse relation classification2019In: 20th Annual Meeting of the Special Interest Group on Discourse and Dialogue: Proceedings of the Conference, Association for Computational Linguistics, 2019, p. 226-231Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automatically classifying the relation between sentences in a discourse is a challenging task, in particular when there is no overt expression of the relation. It becomes even more challenging by the fact that annotated training data exists only for a small number of languages, such as English and Chinese. We present a new system using zero-shot transfer learning for implicit discourse relation classification, where the only resource used for the target language is unannotated parallel text. This system is evaluated on the discourse-annotated TEDMDB parallel corpus, where it obtains good results for all seven languages using only English training data.

  • 60.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The use of online fora in language teaching: The importance of task design2007In: IADIS International Conference Proceedings: E-Learning / [ed] Miguel Baptista Nunes and Maggie McPherson, 2007, p. 305-308Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses various ways in which online fora have been used in language teaching, focusing particularly on task design. Different studies reviewed here suggest that free online discussion cannot be relied on to achieve educational goals such as a collaborative construction of knowledge. When learners write in a foreign language, task design plays a fundamental role in fostering learning and collaboration. Following a review of previous research, this paper singles out the main factors to be considered in task design for online fora in language teaching.

  • 61.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Money Talks: The Power of Voice: A critical review of Mayew and Ventachalam’s The Power of Voice: Managerial Affective States and Future Firm Performance2012In: PERILUS, ISSN 0282-6690, p. 1-10Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues that the results presented by Mayew and Venkatachalam in “The Power of Voice: Managerial Affective States and Future Firm Performance” (Mayew & Venkatachalam, 2011) are void because the authors used an irrelevant technology (LVA technology, Nemesysco) that cannot measure emotions conveyed by voice and therefore does not produce valid results. The paper explains why LVA technology cannot work for this problem and suggests that subscribing to this methodology damages the reputation of finance and banking research. The authors are encouraged to reanalyze their speech materials using appropriate scientific methods to measure meaningful acoustic correlates of emotions conveyed by speakers’ voices.

  • 62.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Voice stress analyses: Science and pseudoscience2013In: Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics, ISSN 1939-800X, Vol. 19, article id 060003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Voice stress analyses could be relevant tools to detect deception in many forensic and security contexts. However, today's commercial voice-based lie-detectors are not supported by convincing scientific evidence. In addition to the scientific implausibility of their working principles, the experimental evidence invoked by the sellers is either anecdotal or drawn from methodologically flawed experiments. Nevertheless, criminal investigators, authorities and even some academics appear to be persuaded by the ungrounded claims of the aggressive propaganda from sellers of voice stress analysis gadgets, perhaps further enhanced by the portrays of "cutting-edge voice-analysis technology" in the entertainment industry. Clearly, because there is a serious threat to public justice and security if authorities adopt a naïve "open-minded" attitude towards sham lie-detection devices, this presentation will attempt to draw attention to plausibility and validity issues in connection with the claimed working principles of two commercial voice stress analyzers. The working principles will be discussed from a phonetics and speech analysis perspective and the processes that may lead naïve observers into interpreting as meaningful the spurious results generated by such commercial devices will be examined. Finally, the scope and limitations of using scientific phonetic analyses of voice to detect deception for forensic purposes will be discussed.

  • 63.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Klintfors, Eeva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ellen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Sundberg, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Emerging linguistic functions in early infancy2005In: Epigenetic and Robotics: Nara, Japan, 2005, 2005, p. 8-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents results from experimental studies on early language acquisition in infants and attempts to interpret the experimental results within the framework of the Ecological Theory of Language Acquisition (ETLA) recently proposed by (Lacerda et al., 2004a). From this perspective, the infant's first steps in the acquisition of the ambient language are seen as a consequence of the infant's general capacity to represent sensory input and the infant's interaction with other actors in its immediate ecological environment. On the basis of available experimental evidence, it will be argued that ETLA offers a productive alternative to traditional descriptive views of the language acquisition process by presenting an operative model of how early linguistic function may emerge through interaction.

  • 64.
    Lange, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Thesaurus Lex --- ett hyperlexikon med rötter hos Locke, Roget och Bring2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Rogets Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases är ett välkänt verk för skribenter av alla slag i den engelskspråkiga världen. Första utgåvan kom redan för 150 år sedan och nya upplagor har sedan dess fortlöpande sett dagens ljus. Ordförrådet har ständigt uppdaterats medan begreppssystemet som visat sig vara oerhört robust, har blivit föremål för endast lättare retuscher.

    Dess svenska motsvarighet – Sven Casper Brings Svenskt ordförråd ordnat i begreppsklasser (1930) kom aldrig att spela motsvarande roll här hemma. Dess ordförråd blev aldrig förnyat. Några nya upplagor kom aldrig ut. Icke desto mindre har vi valt att utgå från Brings begreppsordbok i skapandet av ett modernt digitalt hyperlexikon (Lange & Törnqvist 2003).

  • 65.
    Lindberg, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Education in Languages and Language Development.
    Johansson Kokkinakis, Sofie
    Word Type Grouping in Secondary School Textbooks.2008In: Proceedings on TaLC 8, the 8th Teaching and Language Corpora Conference, Lisbon, 2008, p. 4-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to second language research (Saville-Troike 1984), vocabulary size is the single most determinant factor for second language students in order to be successful in a school setting. This has to do with the close relationship between reading comprehension and vocabulary knowledge (Read 2000). The persistent gap between reading performance of first and second language students observed in many studies (Taube 2002) is thus intimately related to low vocabulary among second language students. According to some estimates, differences in vocabulary size between first and second language students at school start may amount to several thousand words and tend to increase over the school years (Verhoeven & Vermeer 1985). According to some researchers there is a yearly increase of approximately 3000 words in the vocabulary size of school children in general (Viberg 1993). This means that many second language students face the task of trying to close a gap in vocabulary size of thousands of words while at the same time trying to keep up with the extensive vocabulary growth of first language students.

    But much could be done to make vocabulary instruction more systematic and efficient if we knew more about the vocabulary needs for successful learning in different subjects at school. Schoolbook texts constitute important data for finding answers to questions like What characterizes the vocabulary of schoolbook texts in general and in different subjects at different levels? and Which words present particular problems for students studying in their second language? To answer such and other questions related to school related vocabulary and second language learning we have compiled and analyzed a corpus of secondary school textbooks of one million words (OrdiL) with texts from eight different school subjects (Lindberg & Johansson Kokkinakis 2007). To identify and categorize various types of words in textbooks from a second language perspective, we propose a model based on earlier research by Coxhead & Nation (2001) and Hyland & Tse (2007) modified to account for all the word types of potential difficulty for second language secondary school students.

  • 66.
    Lindström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Some Uses of Demonstratives in Spoken Swedish2000In: Corpus-based and Computational Approaches to Discourse Anaphora / [ed] Botley, S.P. & McEnery, A.M., Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2000, p. 107-128Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents work in progress on some aspects of the use of one set of demonstrative expressions in a corpus of conversational Swedish. The demonstratives under study are the compound forms den här and den där (Eng. approx. ‘this’, ‘that’), both as pronouns and determiners. These forms belong mainly to the spoken language, and have not received much attention in previous studies of Swedish. Typical cases of deictic, first-mention and anaphoric uses are illustrated, and cases that cause problems for the distinction between first mention and anaphor are discussed. A surprisingly large number of first mentions with demonstratives were found, many of which are used in what is here called the “you know” function of demonstratives, i.e., a means for the speaker of signalling his or her assumption of the listener having a previous representation of the intended referent. Among anaphoric uses, some interesting occurrences are discussed, which resemble cases previously described as ‘identificationally overspecified’ (Maes and Noordman, 1995).

  • 67.
    Ljung, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    It is believed that he is dead1998In: Explorations in corpus linguistics / [ed] Antoinette Renouf, Amsterdam: Rodopi , 1998, p. 113-122Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Ljung, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Proceedings from the Stockholm Conference on the Use of Computers in Language Research and Teaching: September 7-9, 19891990Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Ljunglöf, Peter
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Syntactic parsing2010In: Handbook of Natural Language Processing / [ed] Nitin Indurkhya & Fred J. Damerau, Boca Raton, Florida: Chapman & Hall/CRC , 2010, 2, p. 59-91Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents basic techniques for grammar-driven natural language parsing, that is, analyzing a string of words (typically a sentence) to determine its structural description according to a formal grammar. In most circumstances, this is not a goal in itself but rather an intermediary step for the purpose of further processing, such as the assignment of a meaning to the sentence. To this end, the desired output of grammar-driven parsing is typically a hierarchical, syntactic structure suitable for semantic interpretation (the topic of Chapter 5). The string of words constituting the input will usually have been processed in separate phases of tokenization (Chapter 2) and lexical analysis (Chapter 3), which is hence not part of parsing proper.

  • 70.
    Loftsson, Hrafn
    et al.
    Reykjaviks universitet, Island.
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Tagging a Morphologically Complex Language Using an Averaged Perceptron Tagger: The Case of Icelandic2013In: Proceedings of the 19th Nordic Conference of Computational Linguistics (NODALIDA 2013), Linköping University Electronic Press, Linköpings universitet, 2013, p. 105-119Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we experiment with using Stagger, an open-source implementation of an Averaged Perceptron tagger, to tag Icelandic, a morphologically complex language. By adding languagespecific linguistic features and using IceMorphy, an unknown word guesser, we obtain state-of- the-art tagging accuracy of 92.82%. Furthermore, by adding data from a morphological database, and word embeddings induced from an unannotated corpus, the accuracy increases to 93.84%. This is equivalent to an error reduction of 5.5%, compared to the previously best tagger for Icelandic, consisting of linguistic rules and a Hidden Markov Model.

  • 71.
    Loukanova, Roussanka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Acyclic Recursion with Polymorphic Types and Underspecification2016In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Agents and Artificial Intelligence, SciTePress, 2016, p. 392-399Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper extends Moschovakis higher-order type theory of acyclic recursion by adding type polymorphism. We extend the type system of the theory to model parametric information that pertains to underspecified types. Different kinds of type polymorphism are presented via type variables and recursion constructs for alternative, disjunctive type assignments. Based on the new type system, we extend the reduction calculus of the theory of acyclic recursion. We motivate the type polymorphism with examples from English language.

  • 72.
    Loukanova, Roussanka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Binding Operators in Type-Theory of Algorithms for Algorithmic Binding of Functional Neuro-Receptors2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 Federated Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems / [ed] Maria Ganzha, Leszek Maciaszek, Marcin Paprzycki, IEEE, 2017, p. 57-66Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper is on a new approach to mathematics of the notion of algorithm. We extend the higher-order, type-theory of situated algorithms. The primary applications are to computational semantics of formal and natural languages and to computational neuroscience. We investigate the properties of functions and relations that bind argument slots of other functions and relations across a recursion operator acting via mutually recursive assignments.

  • 73.
    Loukanova, Roussanka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Gamma-star Reduction in the Type-theory of Acyclic Algorithms2018In: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Agents and Artificial Intelligence (ICAART 2018) / [ed] Ana Paula Rocha, Jaap van den Herik, SciTePress, 2018, Vol. 2, p. 231-242Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper extends a higher-order type theory of acyclic algorithms by adding a reduction rule, which results in a stronger reduction calculus. The new reduction calculus determines a strong algorithmic equivalence between formal terms. It is very useful for simplifying terms, by eliminating sub-terms having superfluous lambda abstraction and corresponding spurious functional applications.

  • 74.
    Loukanova, Roussanka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Partiality, Underspecification, Parameters and Natural Language2017In: Partiality and Underspecification in Information, Languages, and Knowledge / [ed] Henning Christiansen, M. Dolores Jiménez-López, Roussanka Loukanova, Lawrence S. Moss, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017, p. 109-150Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Loukanova, Roussanka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Relationships between Specified and Underspecified Quantification by the Theory of Acyclic Recursion2016In: ADCAIJ: Advances in Distributed Computing and Artificial Intelligence Journal, ISSN 2255-2863, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 19-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper introduces a technique for representing quantifier relations that can have different scope order depending on context. The technique is demonstrated by classes of terms denoting relations, where each of the arguments of a relation term is bound by a different quantifier. We represent a formalization of linking quantifiers with the corresponding argument slots that they bind, across lambda-abstractions and reduction steps. The purpose of the technique is to represent underspecified order of quantification, in the absence of a context and corresponding information about the order. Furthermore, it is used to represent subclasses of larger classes of relations depending on order of quantification or specific relations.

  • 76.
    Loukanova, Roussanka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Representing Parametric Concepts with Situation Theory2015In: Proceedings of the 2015 Federated Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems / [ed] Maria Ganzha, Leszek Maciaszek, Marcin Paprzycki, IEEE Computer Society, 2015, p. 89-100Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use higher-order, type-theoretic Situation Theory to model semantic concepts as situation-theoretic objects consisting of parametric information. Situation Theory contributes by representing concepts as classes of parametric objects, in a computational way. We use concepts that are often expressed by human language in taxonomy classifications, as a demonstration of the situation theoretic-approach to model parametric information in abstract concepts.

  • 77.
    Loukanova, Roussanka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Specification of Underspecified Quantifiers via Question-Answering by the Theory of Acyclic Recursion2016In: Flexible Query Answering Systems 2015: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference FQAS 2015, Cracow, Poland, October 26-28, 2015 / [ed] Troels Andreasen, Henning Christiansen, Janusz Kacprzyk, Henrik Larsen, Gabriella Pasi, Olivier Pivert, Guy De Tré, Maria Amparo Vila, Adnan Yazici, Slawomir Zadrozny, Springer, 2016, p. 57-69Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a technique for specifying quantifier scope distribution in formal terms that represent underspecified quantifier scopes. For this purpose, we extend the higher-order theory of acyclic recursion, by adding generalized quantifiers and terms for multiple quantifiers with underspecified scope. The specification of the quantifier scopes is by using interactive questions and answers that are also rendered into formal terms of the theory of acyclic recursion.

  • 78.
    Loukanova, Roussanka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Typed Theory of Situated Information and its Application to Syntax-Semantics of Human Language2017In: Partiality and Underspecification in Information, Languages, and Knowledge / [ed] Henning Christiansen, M. Dolores Jiménez-López, Roussanka Loukanova, Lawrence S. Moss, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017, p. 151-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Loukanova, Roussanka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Underspecified Relations with a Formal Language of Situation Theory2015In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Agents and Artificial Intelligence / [ed] Stephane Loiseau, Joaquim Filipe, Béatrice Duval, Jaap van den Herik, SciTePress, 2015, p. 298-309Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper is an introduction to a formal language of Situation Theory. The language provides algorithmic processing of situated information. We introduce specialized, restricted variables that are recursively constrained to satisfy type-theoretic conditions by restrictions and algorithmic assignments.  The restricted variables designate recursively connected networks of memory locations for `saving' parametric information that depends on situations and restrictions over objects. The formal definitions introduce richly informative typed language for classification and representation of underspecified, parametric, and partial information that is dependent on situations.

  • 80.
    Loukanova, Roussanka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Liefke, KristinaLudwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Germany.
    Proceedings of the Workshop on Logic and Algorithms in Computational Linguistics 2017 (LACompLing2017)2017Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computational linguistics studies natural language in its various manifestations from a computational point of view, both on the theoretical level (modeling grammar modules dealing with natural language form and meaning, and the relation between these two) and on the practical level (developing applications for language and speech technology). Right from the start in the 1950ties, there have been strong links with computer science, logic, and many areas of mathematics - one can think of Chomsky's contributions to the theory of formal languages and automata, or Lambek's logical modeling of natural language syntax. The workshop assesses the place of logic, mathematics, and computer science in present day computational linguistics. It intends to be a forum for presenting new results as well as work in progress.

  • 81. Megyesi, Beáta
    et al.
    Granstedt, Lena
    Johansson, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Prentice, Julia
    Rosén, Dan
    Schenström, Carl-Johan
    Sundberg, Gunlög
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Volodina, Elena
    Learner Corpus Anonymization in the Age of GDPR: Insights from the Creation of a Learner Corpus of Swedish2018In: Proceedings of the 7th Workshop on NLP for Computer Assisted Language Learning at SLTC 2018 (NLP4CALL 2018), Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2018, p. 47-56, article id 006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the status of learner corpus anonymization for the ongoing research infrastructure project SweLL. The main project aim is to deliver and make available for research a well-annotated corpus of essays written by second language (L2) learners of Swedish. As the practice shows, annotation of learner texts is a sensitive process demanding a lot of compromises between ethical and legal demands on the one hand, and research and technical demands, on the other. Below, is a concise description of the current status of pseudonymization of language learner data to ensure anonymity of the learners, with numerous examples of the above-mentioned compromises.

  • 82.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    SUC-CORE: A Balanced Corpus Annotated with Noun Phrase Coreference2013In: Northern European Journal of Language Technology (NEJLT), ISSN 2000-1533, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 19-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes SUC-CORE, a subset of the Stockholm Umeå Corpus and the Swedish Treebank annotated with noun phrase coreference. While most coreference annotated corpora consist of texts of similar types within related domains, SUC-CORE consists of both informative and imaginative prose and covers a wide range of literary genres and domains.This allows for exploration of coreference across different text types, but it also means that there are limited amounts of data within each type. Future work on coreference resolution for Swedish should include making more annotated data available for the research community.

  • 83.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    The MINGLE annotation scheme: Multimodal annotation of parent-child interation in a free play setting (version 1.0)2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A cognitive model of language learning must be dialogue-driven and multimodal to reflect how parent and child interact, using words, eye gaze, and object manipulation. We present a scheme for multimodal annotation of parent-child interaction. The purpose is to add verbal and non-verbal annotation to a corpus of longitudinal video and sound recordings of parent-child dyads. In this guideline, we describe the transcription of adult and child speech and vocalizations, and the annotation of both empty-hand gestures and object-related actions by both adults and children.

  • 84.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    What is a corpus and why are corpora important tools?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Björkstrand, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Grigonyté, Gintaré
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Gustafson-Capková, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Schönström, Krister
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Swedish as a Second Language for the Deaf.
    Wallin, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    SWE-CLARIN partner presentation: Natural Language Processing Resources from the Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University2014In: The first Swedish national SWE-CLARIN workshop: LT-based e-HSS in Sweden – taking stock and looking ahead / [ed] Lars Borin, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the CLARIN Research Infrastructure and SWE-CLARIN is to facilitate for scholars in the humanities and social sciences to access primary data in the form of natural language, and to provide tools for exploring, annotating and analysing these data. This paper gives an overview of the resources and tools developed at the Department of Linguistics at Stockholm University planned to be made available within the SWE-CLARIN project. The paper also outlines our collaborations with neighbouring areas in the humanities and social sciences where these resources and tools will be put to use.

  • 86.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Byström, Emil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    SUC-CORE: SUC 2.0 Annotated with NP Coreference2012In: Proceedings of the Fourth Swedish Language Technology Conference (SLTC), October 24-26, 2012, Lund / [ed] Pierre Nugues, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SUC-CORE is a subset of Stockholm Umeå Corpus 2.0 and Swedish Treebank, annotated with noun phrase coreference. While most coreference annotated corpora consist of texts of similar types within related domains, SUC-CORE consists of both informative and imaginative prose and covers a wide range of literary genres and domains.

  • 87.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Grigonyté, Gintaré
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Trump säger det igen, igen och igen2017In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 2, p. 24-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 88.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Gustafson Capková, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    The Stockholm University Strindberg Corpus: Content and Possibilities2014In: Strindberg on International Stages/Strindberg in Translation / [ed] Roland Lysell, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We have approached the works of August Strindberg from  a computational linguistic point of view, resulting in The Stockholm University Strindberg Corpus, consisting of seven of Strindberg's autobiographical works with linguistic annotation. The corpus is freely available for research. We use this corpus for three quantitative studies of Strindberg’s work: in the first, we describe the novels included in the corpus by keywords; in the second, we compare Strindberg’s use of emotionally charged words with selected prose of both his contemporaries and present-day authors; in the third, we explore the semantic prosody of KVINNA (“woman”) and MAN (“man”).

  • 89.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Multimodal annotation of parent-child interaction in a free-play setting2013In: Multimodal Corpora 2013: Beyond Audio and Video / [ed] J. Edlund, D. Heylen, P. Paggio, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the verbal, non-verbal, and discourse annotation of a longitudinal corpus of parent-child interaction. The verbal annotation includes transcription of child-directed speech and child vocalizations. The non-verbal annotation describes gestures and objectrelatedactions by both parent and child. The verbal and non-verbal annotation is combined in discourse annotation that distinguishes initial from subsequent mentions, and further categorizes initial mentions depending on initiative.

  • 90.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Multimodal Annotation of Synchrony in Longitudinal Parent–Child Interaction2014In: MMC 2014 Multimodal Corpora: Combining applied and basic research targets: Workshop at LREC 2014, European Language Resources Association, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the multimodal annotation of speech, gaze and hand movement in a corpus of longitudinal parent–child interaction,and reports results on synchrony, structural regularities which appear to be a key means for parents to facilitate learning of new conceptsto children. The results provide additional support for our previous finding that parents display decreasing synchrony as a function ofthe age of the child.

  • 91.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Reference to Objects in Longitudinal Parent-Child Interaction2012In: Workshop on Language, Action and Perception (APL), 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cognitive model of language learning needs to be dialogue-driven and multimodal to reflect how parent and child interact, using words, eye gaze, and object manipulation.

    In this paper, we present a scheme for multimodal annotation of parent-child interaction. We use this annotation for studying invariance across modalities. Our basic hypothesis is that perception of invariance (or synchrony) in multimodal patterns in auditory-visual speech is the device primarily used to reduce complexity in language learning.

    To this end, we have added verbal and non-verbal annotation to a corpus of longitudinal video and sound recordings of parent-child dyads. We use this data to try to determine if the amount of synchrony across modalities of parent-child interaction decreases as the child grows older and learns more language and gestures.

  • 92.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Variation sets in child-directed speech2015In: / [ed] Ellen Marklund, Iris-Corinna Schwarz, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Eklund, Robert
    Linköping University.
    Disfluency in Child-Directed Speech2013In: Proceedings of Fonetik 2013: The XXVIth Annual Phonetics Meeting 12–13 June 2013, Linköping University Linköping, Sweden / [ed] Robert Eklund, Linköping: Department of Culture a nd Communication, Linköping University, Sweden , 2013, p. 57-60Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report results from a longitudinal study of the rate and location of disfluencies in child-directed speech, using data for children between 0;6 and 2;9 years. We compare these results to adult-directed speech by the same speakers.

  • 94.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Modelling the informativeness and timing of non-verbal cues in parent–child interaction2016In: The 54th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Proceedings of the 7th Workshop on Cognitive Aspects of Computational Language Learning, Stroudsburg, PA, USA: Association for Computational Linguistics, 2016, p. 82-90Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do infants learn the meanings of their first words? This study investigates the informativeness and temporal dynamics of non-verbal cues that signal the speaker's referent in a model of early word–referent mapping. To measure the information provided by such cues, a supervised classifier is trained on information extracted from a multimodally annotated corpus of 18 videos of parent–child interaction with three children aged 7 to 33 months. Contradicting previous research, we find that gaze is the single most informative cue, and we show that this finding can be attributed to our fine-grained temporal annotation. We also find that offsetting the timing of the non-verbal cues reduces accuracy, especially if the offset is negative. This is in line with previous research, and suggests that synchrony between verbal and non-verbal cues is important if they are to be perceived as causally related.

  • 95.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Modelling the informativeness of different modalities in parent-child interaction2015In: Workshop on Extensive and Intensive Recordings of Children's Language Environment / [ed] Alex Cristia, Melanie Soderstrom, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Hybrid Methods for Coreference Resolution in Swedish2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to improve coreference resolution in Swedish by providing a hybrid approach based on combining data-driven methods and linguistic knowledge. Coreference resolution here consists in identifying all expressions in a text that have the same referent, for example, a person or an object.

    The linguistic knowledge is based on Accessibility Theory (Ariel 1990). This is used for guiding the  selection of likely anaphor-antecedent pairs from the set of all possible such pairs in a text. The data-driven method adopted is Memory-Based Learning (MBL), a supervised method based on the idea that learning means storing experiences in memory, and that new problems are solved by reusing solutions from similar experiences (Daelemans and Van den Bosch 2005).

    The referring expressions covered by the system are names, definite descriptions, and pronouns. In order to maximize performance, we use different classifiers with a specific set of linguistically motivated features for each type of expression. The great majority of features used for classification are domain- and language-independent.

    We demonstrate two ways of using this method of linguistically motivated selection of anaphor-antecedent pairs.

    First, the amount of training examples stored in memory  is reduced. We find that for coreference resolution of definite descriptions and names, the amount of training data can thereby be reduced with only a minor loss in performance, but for pronoun resolution there is a negative effect.

    Second, selection can be used for improving on coreference resolution results. This is the first step in our hybrid approach to coreference resolution, where the second step is the application of an MBL classifier for determining coreference between the selected pairs. Results indicate that this hybrid approach is advantageous for coreference resolution of definite descriptions and names. For pronoun resolution, there is a negative effect on recall along with a positive effect on precision.

  • 97.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Borin, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Living off the land:The Web as a source of practice texts for learners of less prevalent languages2002In: Third International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation. Proceedings. Vol II. Las Palmas, Spain: ELRA. 2002., 2002, p. 411-418Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on how to automatically locate text sources published on the World Wide Web in order to produce adequate and upto-date learning materials for second language learners of Nordic languages. The Web is an excellent source of authentic text materials.However, the large amount of information available on the Web makes search services necessary. Hence, we are developing Squirrel, aprototype Web meta-search service, described in this paper, which collects text material in the Nordic languages according to language,topic and difficulty level. Our primary target group consists of exchange students to Nordic institutions of higher education, and theirlanguage teachers, although in the longer perspective, we would also like to be able to do something for minority language communities. We describe the basic implementation of Squirrel, and present preliminary results from trying it out. Finally we discuss the (lack of) Web resources in less prevalent languages, and how we imagine that applications like Squirrel could fit into a second or foreign languagelearning situation.

  • 98.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Hjelm, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Using Semantic Features Derived from Word-Space Models for Swedish Coreference Resolution2009In: Proceedings of the 17th Nordic Conference of Computational Linguistics NODALIDA 2009. NEALT Proceedings Series, Vol. 4 (2009), 134-141. / [ed] Kristiina Jokinen and Eckhard Bick, Tartu, Estonia: Northern European Association for Language Technology (NEALT) , 2009, p. 134-141Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Hjelm, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Oxhammar, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    SUiS - Cross-language Ontology-driven Information Retrieval in a Restricted Domain2006In: Proceedings of the 15th NODALIDA conference, Joensuu 2005, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Nilsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Malmgren, Aisha
    Towards automatic recognition of product names: an exploratory study of brand names in economic texts2006In: Proceedings of the 15th NODALIDA conference, Joensuu 2005 / [ed] Stefan Werner, Joensuu: Ling@JoY : University of Joensuu electronic publications in linguistics and language technology 1 , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
1234 51 - 100 of 153
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf