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  • 51. Atzendorf, Josefine
    et al.
    Apfelbacher, Christian
    Gomes de Matos, Elena
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany; Eötvös-Loránd-Universität, Hungary.
    Piontek, Daniela
    Patterns of multiple lifestyle risk factors and their link to mental health in the German adult population: a cross-sectional study2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 12, article id e022184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Lifestyle risk factors, such as drinking or unhealthy diet, can expotentiate detrimental health effects. Therefore, it is important to investigate multiple lifestyle risk factors instead of single ones. The study aims at: (1) identifying patterns of lifestyle risk factors within the adult general population in Germany and (2) examining associations between the extracted patterns and external factors.

    Design Cross-sectional study.

    Setting General German adult population (aged 18–64 years).

    Participants Participants of the 2015 Epidemiological Survey of Substance Abuse (n=9204).

    Primary outcome measures Lifestyle risk factors (daily smoking, at-risk alcohol consumption, unhealthy diet, low physical activity, weekly use of pharmaceuticals, as well as consumption of cannabis and other illicit drugs).

    Results A latent class analysis was applied to identify patterns of lifestyle risk factors, and a multinomial logistic regression was carried out to examine associations between the extracted classes and external factors. A total of four classes were extracted which can be described as healthy lifestyle (58.5%), drinking lifestyle (24.4%), smoking lifestyle (15.4%) and a cumulate risk factors lifestyle (1.7%). Individuals who were male, at younger age and single as well as individuals with various mental health problems were more likely to show multiple lifestyle risk factors.

    Conclusions Healthcare professionals should be aware of correlations between different lifestyle risk factors as well as between lifestyle risk groups and mental health. Health promotion strategies should further focus especially on younger and single men.

    This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

  • 52. Atzendorf, Josefine
    et al.
    Aschenbrenner, Annika Berit
    de Matos, Elena Gomes
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. FT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany; Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary.
    Kroeger, Christoph
    Delle, Simone
    Piontek, Daniela
    E-Zigaretten: Einschätzung vonGesundheitsgefahren undNutzung zur Tabakentwöhnung2018In: Bundesgesundheitsblatt - Gesundheitsforschung - Gesundheitsschutz, ISSN 1436-9990, Vol. 61, no 11, p. 1415-1421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    BackgroundThe perception that e-cigarettes are less harmful than traditional tobacco products can influence the consumption of e-cigarettes.ObjectivesThree questions were examined: (1)How do different population groups perceive health risks of e-cigarettes? (2)Do sociodemographic variables explain differences in the risk assessment of e-cigarettes? (3)Does the perception of health risks predict the use of e-cigarettes for smoking cessation?MethodsData came from the 2015 Epidemiological Survey of Substance Abuse (ESA) with asample size of n=9204 participants, aged 18 to 64years (response rate 52.2%). Data were collected by telephone, online, or by written questionnaires. Assessments of risk perception of e-cigarettes and conventional cigarettes (more harmful, just as harmful, less harmful, do not know) were compared. Descriptive statistics and logistic regressions were performed.ResultsIndividuals with lower education rated e-cigarettes as more harmful. Older people and women perceived e-cigarettes as just as harmful. Smokers considered e-cigarettes to be more harmful than or just as harmful as conventional tobacco products. The likelihood of using e-cigarettes for smoking cessation was higher if people thought they were less harmful than conventional cigarettes.ConclusionsOnly one-third of the population knows that e-cigarettes are less harmful to health than conventional cigarettes. The perception of health risks is related to the usage of e-cigarettes for smoking cessation.

  • 53. Atzendorf, Josefine
    et al.
    Gomes de Matos, Elena
    Kröger, Christoph
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany; Eötvös-Loránd-Universität, Hungary.
    Piontek, Daniela
    Die Nutzung von E-Zigaretten in der deutschen Bevölkerung – Ergebnisse des Epidemiologischen Suchtsurvey 20152019In: Das Gesundheitswesen, ISSN 0941-3790, E-ISSN 1439-4421, Vol. 81, no 02, p. 137-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Estimates of e-cigarette consumption in Germany vary considerably. The use of e-cigarettes for tobacco cessation is critically discussed. Based on current data, the distribution of the consumption of e-cigarettes and their use in the adult general population of Germany will be presented.

    Methods The 2015 Epidemiological Survey of Substance Abuse, a nationwide survey of 18 to 64 year-old people in Germany (n=9,204, response rate: 52,2%), was used as data basis.

    Results E-cigarettes were known to most of the respondents (85,3%, 43,5 Mio.), whereas only 2,9% (1,5 Mio.) used e-cigarettes in the last 30 days. Higher risk of consuming e-cigarettes was seen in younger people (OR=0,95, 95%-KI=(0,93; 0,97)), men (OR=1,45, 95%-KI=(1,02; 2,07)) and smokers (OR=12,53, 95%-KI=(8,71; 18,03)). About a third of smokers and ex-smokers of conventional cigarettes (36,6%) who consumed e-cigarettes used these for tobacco cessation of which one fifth (21,3%) was able to quit smoking.

    Conclusion E-cigarette users seem to be more likely to be male, younger and smokers of conventional cigarettes. In addition to curiosity, the change in smoking behavior is an important motive for consumption. The results indicate that the use of e-cigarettes can contribute to tobacco cessation, the majority of users, however, continue to consume conventional and/or e-cigarettes.

  • 54. Auguer, Nathalie
    et al.
    Le Serbon, Emelie
    Rostila, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Leaving Sweden behind: gains in life expectancy in Canada2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 340-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Sweden and Canada are known for quality of living and exceedingly high life expectancy, but recent data on how these countries compare are lacking. We measured life expectancy in Canada and Sweden during the past decade, and identified factors responsible for changes over time. Methods: We calculated life expectancy at birth for Canada and Sweden annually from 2000 to 2010, and determined the ages and causes of death responsible for the gap between the two countries using Arriaga's method. We determined how population growth, ageing, and mortality influenced the number of deaths over time. Results: During 2000-2010, life expectancy in Canada caught up with Sweden for men, and surpassed Sweden by 0.4 years for women. Sweden lost ground owing to a slower reduction in circulatory and tumour mortality after age 65 years compared with Canada. Nonetheless, population ageing increased the number of deaths in Canada, especially for mental and nervous system disorders. In Sweden, the number of deaths decreased. Conclusions: In only one decade, life expectancy in Canada caught up and surpassed Sweden due to rapid improvements in circulatory and tumour mortality. Population ageing increased the number of deaths in Canada, potentially stressing the health care system more than in Sweden.

  • 55.
    Axelsson, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Sleep, appearance and social interactions2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Axelsson, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Sömn och fysisk aktivitet2016In: FYSS 2017: fysisk aktivitet i sjukdomsprevention och sjukdomsbehandling, Stockholm: Läkartidningen förlag AB , 2016, 3, p. 171-183Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Axelsson, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Lasselin, Julie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Lekander, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Man flu is related to health communication rather than symptoms and suffering2018In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 360, article id k450Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Axelsson, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Lekander, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Karshikoff, B.
    Hedman, E.
    Is health anxiety related to disease avoidance?2015In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 49, article id e47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Axelsson, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Rehman, Javaid-ur
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Ekman, Rolf
    Miller, Gregory E.
    Höglund, Caroline Olgart
    Lekander, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska institutet, Sweden.
    Effects of Sustained Sleep Restriction on Mitogen-Stimulated Cytokines, Chemokines and T Helper 1/ T Helper 2 Balance in Humans2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, article id e82291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recent studies suggest that acute sleep deprivation disrupts cellular immune responses by shifting T helper (Th) cell activity towards a Th2 cytokine profile. Since little is known about more long-term effects, we investigated how five days of sleep restriction would affect pro-inflammatory, chemotactic, Th1- and Th2 cytokine secretion. Methods: Nine healthy males participated in an experimental sleep protocol with two baseline sleep-wake cycles (sleep 23.00 - 07.00 h) followed by 5 days with restricted sleep (03.00 - 07.00 h). On the second baseline day and on the fifth day with restricted sleep, samples were drawn every third hour for determination of cytokines/chemokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL) -1 beta, IL-2, IL-4 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)) after in vitro stimulation of whole blood samples with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Also leukocyte numbers, mononuclear cells and cortisol were analysed. Results: 5-days of sleep restriction affected PHA-induced immune responses in several ways. There was a general decrease of IL-2 production (p<.05). A shift in Th1/Th2 cytokine balance was also evident, as determined by a decrease in IL2/IL4 ratio. No other main effects of restricted sleep were shown. Two significant interactions showed that restricted sleep resulted in increased TNF-alpha and MCP-1 in the late evening and early night hours (p's<.05). In addition, all variables varied across the 24 h day. Conclusions: 5-days of sleep restriction is characterized by a shift towards Th2 activity (i.e. lower 1L-2/IL-4 ratio) which is similar to the effects of acute sleep deprivation and psychological stress. This may have implications for people suffering from conditions characterized by excessive Th2 activity like in allergic disease, such as asthma, for whom restricted sleep could have negative consequences.

  • 60.
    Axelsson, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Sundelin, Tina
    Olsson, Mats J.
    Sorjonen, Kimmo
    Axelsson, Charlotte
    Lasselin, Julie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Universitätsklinikum Essen, Germany.
    Lekander, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Identification of acutely sick people and facial cues of sickness2018In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 285, no 1870, article id 20172430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detection and avoidance of sick individuals have been proposed as essential components in a behavioural defence against disease, limiting the risk of contamination. However, almost no knowledge exists on whether humans can detect sick individuals, and if so by what cues. Here, we demonstrate that untrained people can identify sick individuals above chance level by looking at facial photos taken 2 h after injection with a bacterial stimulus inducing an immune response (2.0 ng kg-1 lipopolysaccharide) or placebo, the global sensitivity index being d' = 0.405. Signal detection analysis (receiver operating characteristic curve area) showed an area of 0.62 (95% confidence intervals 0.60-0.63). Acutely sick people were rated by naive observers as having paler lips and skin, a more swollen face, droopier corners of the mouth, more hanging eyelids, redder eyes, and less glossy and patchy skin, as well as appearing more tired. Our findings suggest that facial cues associated with the skin, mouth and eyes can aid in the detection of acutely sick and potentially contagious people.

  • 61.
    Axelsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    HR-medarbetares upplevelser kring spelprevention och policyimplementering på arbetsplatsen2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The complex concept regarding harmful use of different nature, could be related to the use of alcohol, drugs or gambling. Such activities could affect the efficiency and productivity of an employee in a workplace environment in a negative way. At the request of the Public Health Agency of Sweden, a group of scientist was given the task to evaluate a project regarding education concerning problematic gambling. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate a project regarding education concerning gambling and gambling prevention, and was carried out by the organization Alna. Thematic analysis was used and collection of data was done with semi structured interviews, with ten HR-employees whose five organisations was included in the project Gambling and gambling preventive efforts directed towards the labour market. The results show that the methods and tools used by Alna is perceived as efficient and valuable by the participants. Some obstacles which works against efficient implementation of updated policies and guidelines were identified and these could consist of time constraints, under staffing or subordinated priority of the gambling issue per se. Furthermore it seems that the education project regarding gambling prevention performed by Alna has contributed to the development of policies and guidelines regarding harmful use of different kinds with focus on the gambling issue.  

  • 62. Babor, Thomas
    et al.
    Caulkins, Jonathan
    Fischer, Benedikt
    Foxcroft, David
    Humphreys, Keith
    Medina-Mora, María Elena
    Obot, Isidore
    Rehm, Jürgen
    Reuter, Peter
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). University of Melbourne, Australia; AER Centre for Alcohol Policy Research, Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre, Australia.
    Rossow, Ingeborg
    Strang, John
    Drug Policy and the Public Good2018 (ed. 2)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drug Policy and the Public Good presents the accumulated scientific knowledge of direct relevance to the development of drug policy on local, national, and international levels. The book explores both illicit drug use and non-medical use of prescription medications within a public health perspective. A conceptual basis for a rational drug policy is presented, along with new epidemiological data on the global dimensions of drug misuse, significant trends in drug epidemics, and the global burden of disease attributable to drug misuse. The markets for both illicit and legally prescribed psychoactive substances are described, showing that these two sources of drug supply are becoming increasingly connected in many countries. The core of the book is a critical review of the cumulative scientific evidence in five general areas of drug policy: primary prevention programmes in schools and other settings; treatment interventions and harm reduction approaches; attempts to control the supply of illicit drugs, including drug interdiction and law enforcement; decriminalization and penal approaches; and control of the legal market through prescription drug regimes. The final chapters discuss the trend toward legalization of some psychoactive substances in different parts of the world and describe the need for a new approach to drug policy that is evidence-based, realistic, and coordinated. The evidence reviewed in this book suggests that an integrated and balanced approach to evidence-informed drug policy is more likely to benefit the public good than are uncoordinated efforts to reduce drug supply and demand.

  • 63. Babor, Thomas
    et al.
    Stenius, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Health services: Treatment of substance use disorders within health services2010In: ATLAS on substance use (2010): Resources for the prevention and treatment of substance use disorders / [ed] Wolrd Health Organization, WHO Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data , 2010, p. 23-25Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    http://www.who.int/substance_abuse/publications/treatment/en/index.html

  • 64. Bagattini, Francesco
    et al.
    Karlsson, Isak
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rebane, Jonathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Papapetrou, Panagiotis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    A classification framework for exploiting sparse multi-variate temporal features with application to adverse drug event detection in medical records2019In: BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, ISSN 1472-6947, E-ISSN 1472-6947, Vol. 19, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adverse drug events (ADEs) as well as other preventable adverse events in the hospital setting incur a yearly monetary cost of approximately $3.5 billion, in the United States alone. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to reduce the impact and prevalence of ADEs within the healthcare sector, not only since it will result in reducing human suffering, but also as a means to substantially reduce economical strains on the healthcare system. One approach to mitigate this problem is to employ predictive models. While existing methods have been focusing on the exploitation of static features, limited attention has been given to temporal features.

    Methods: In this paper, we present a novel classification framework for detecting ADEs in complex Electronic health records (EHRs) by exploiting the temporality and sparsity of the underlying features. The proposed framework consists of three phases for transforming sparse and multi-variate time series features into a single-valued feature representation, which can then be used by any classifier. Moreover, we propose and evaluate three different strategies for leveraging feature sparsity by incorporating it into the new representation.

    Results: A large-scale evaluation on 15 ADE datasets extracted from a real-world EHR system shows that the proposed framework achieves significantly improved predictive performance compared to state-of-the-art. Moreover, our framework can reveal features that are clinically consistent with medical findings on ADE detection.

    Conclusions: Our study and experimental findings demonstrate that temporal multi-variate features of variable length and with high sparsity can be effectively utilized to predict ADEs from EHRs. Two key advantages of our framework are that it is method agnostic, i.e., versatile, and of low computational cost, i.e., fast; hence providing an important building block for future exploitation within the domain of machine learning from EHRs.

  • 65. Bao, Cuiping
    et al.
    Yang, Rongrong
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Xu, Weige
    Xu, Hui
    Song, Ruixue
    Qi, Xiuying
    Xu, Weili
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Tianjin Medical University, China.
    Overweight in midlife and risk of cancer in late life: A nationwide Swedish twin study2019In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 144, no 9, p. 2128-2134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our study examined whether midlife overweight (body mass index [BMI] >= 25) is associated with late-life cancer risk and explored the role of genetic and early-life environmental factors in this association. The study included 14,766 individuals from the Swedish Twin Registry, whose midlife (30-50 years) height and weight were recorded. Information on cancer diagnoses in late life (>65 years) was derived from the National Patient Registry and Cancer Registry. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used to analyze unmatched case-control data (controlled for the clustering of twins within a pair). A co-twin matched case-control analysis used conditional logistic regression to compare cancer-discordant twins. Of all participants, 3968 (26.9%) were overweight and 4253 (28.8%) had cancer. In multi-adjusted GEE models using normal-weight (BMI 18.5-24.9) participants as the reference group, overweight was related to higher risk of colon cancer (OR 1.36, 95% CI: 1.00-1.84, p = 0.049), liver cancer (OR 2.00, 95% CI: 1.11-3.62), cervix uteri cancer (OR 2.86, 95% CI: 1.19-6.91) and corpus uteri cancer (OR 1.78, 95% CI: 1.14-2.78) but lower risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer (OR 0.77, 95% CI: 0.66-0.90). In conditional logistic regression analysis, these associations were attenuated becoming nonsignificance. The difference in ORs from the unmatched and matched analyses was not significant. In conclusion, midlife overweight is associated with increased risk of late-life colon, liver and uterine cancer but reduced risk of late-life nonmelanoma skin cancer. Further investigations are warranted to explore the role of genetic and early-life environmental factors in these associations.

  • 66. Barghadouch, Amina
    et al.
    Kristiansen, Maria
    Smith Jervelund, Signe
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Edith
    Norredam, Marie
    Refugee children have fewer contacts to psychiatric healthcare services: an analysis of a subset of refugee children compared to Danish-born peers2016In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 51, no 8, p. 1125-1136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies show a high level of mental health problems among refugee children. This study examined whether a subset of refugee children living in Denmark accessed psychiatric healthcare services more than those born in the country. This study compared 24,427 refugee children from Asia, The Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa and former Yugoslavia, who obtained residency in Denmark between 1 January 1993 and 31 December 2010 with 146,562 Danish-born children, matched 1:6 on age and sex. The study looked at contacts with psychiatric hospitals as well as psychologists and psychiatrists in private practice. Between 1 January 1996 and 30 June 2012, 3.5 % of the refugee children accessed psychiatric healthcare services compared to 7.7 % of the Danish-born children. The rate ratio of having any first-time psychiatric contact was 0.42 (95 % CI 0.40-0.45) among refugee boys and 0.35 (95 % CI 0.33-0.37) among refugee girls, compared to Danish-born children. Figures were similar for those accessing private psychologists or psychiatrists, emergency room, inpatient and outpatient services. Refugee children used fewer psychiatric healthcare services than Danish-born children. This may indicate that refugee children experience barriers in accessing psychiatric healthcare systems and do not receive adequate assessment of their mental health and subsequent referral to specialist services.

  • 67.
    Barrett, Damon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law. University of Essex, UK.
    Re: ‘Access to treatment with controlled medicines: rationale and recommendations for neutral, precise, and respectful language’2018In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 160, p. 156-156Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Barrett, Damon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law. University of Essex, UK.
    The Child's Right to Protection from Drugs: Understanding History to Move Forward2017In: Health and Human Rights: An International Journal, ISSN 1079-0969, E-ISSN 2150-4113, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 263-268Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Bartonek, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    The role of self-esteem for the relation between school performance and psychosomatic health in adolescence: Sex differences and gender theoretical interpretations2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    While socioeconomic inequalities in health seem to level out during adolescence, circumstances related to school appears to have increased in importance. Such circumstances include, for example, school performance. The primary aim of this study is to examine the relationship between school performance and psychosomatic health. The moderating role of self-esteem and the presence of any sex differences will additionally be investigated. Data from the Stockholm School Survey in 2004, covering a total sample of 5 135 adolescents in 9th grade, were used. Based on linear regression, a significant association between school marks and psychosomatic health was found where higher school performance was linked to better health. Moreover, lower self-esteem was linked to more health complaints. Self-esteem moderated the association between school marks and psychosomatic health but only among boys, for whom the effect of having both high marks and high self-esteem was not as beneficial for health as expected. While differences by sex were found in the distribution of school marks, self-esteem and psychosomatic health, none were found in the associations between self-esteem and school performance and psychosomatic health (the only exception being the moderating role of self-esteem among boys).

  • 70. Beccaria, Franca
    et al.
    Rolando, Sara
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Scavarda, Alice
    From housekeeper to status-oriented consumer and hyper-sexual imagery: images of alcohol targeted to Italian women from the 1960s to the 2000s2018In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 1012-1039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advertisements not only mirror ideals of masculinity and femininity that prevail in a specific place and time, but also contribute to influencing them. This article analyses alcohol-related advertisements published in women’s magazines from 1967 to 2008 in Italy. The main aim is to understand cultural processes that underlie gender differences in drinking and more generally in Italian society. The sample consists of 376 direct and indirect advertisements collected from well-established women’s magazines. The study identifies continuities and changes in women’s subject positions in alcohol-related advertisements. Italian advertisements of the 1960s and 1970s still reflect a female condition that entails no recognition of women’s own desires and tastes. Advertisements from the 1980s and 1990s reflect a more complex representation of female consumers, associating them with their own desires and pleasures. In the 2000s, the focus on women’s physical appearance and social image has become the prevailing feature. In conclusion, the study shows that changes in female representations in advertisements in the last 50 years do not represent a shift toward a more balanced gender representation. The insistence on women’s appearance, with a correlated predominance of bodily pleasures and attractiveness, reproduces old stereotypes about drinking women.

  • 71.
    Beckley, Amber L.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Duke University, North Carolina.
    Caspi, Avshalom
    Broadbent, Jonathan
    Harrington, Honalee
    Houts, Renate M.
    Poulton, Richie
    Ramrakha, Sandhya
    Reuben, Aaron
    Moffitt, Terrie E.
    Association of Childhood Blood Lead Levels With Criminal Offending2018In: JAMA pediatrics, ISSN 2168-6203, E-ISSN 2168-6211, Vol. 172, no 2, p. 166-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance  Lead is a neurotoxin with well-documented effects on health. Research suggests that lead may be associated with criminal behavior. This association is difficult to disentangle from low socioeconomic status, a factor in both lead exposure and criminal offending.

    Objective  To test the hypothesis that a higher childhood blood lead level (BLL) is associated with greater risk of criminal conviction, recidivism (repeat conviction), conviction for violent offenses, and variety of self-reported criminal offending in a setting where BLL was not associated with low socioeconomic status.

    Design, Setting, and Participants  A total of 553 individuals participated in a prospective study based on a population-representative cohort born between April 1, 1972, and March 31, 1973, from New Zealand; the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study observed participants to age 38 years (December 2012). Statistical analysis was performed from November 10, 2016, to September 5, 2017.

    Exposures  Blood lead level measured at age 11 years.

    Main Outcomes and Measures  Official criminal conviction cumulative to age 38 years (data collected in 2013), single conviction or recidivism, conviction for nonviolent or violent crime, and self-reported variety of crime types at ages 15, 18, 21, 26, 32, and 38 years.

    Results  Participants included 553 individuals (255 female and 298 male participants) who had their blood tested for lead at age 11 years. The mean (SD) BLL at age 11 years was 11.01 (4.62) μg/dL. A total of 154 participants (27.8%) had a criminal conviction, 86 (15.6%) had recidivated, and 53 (9.6%) had a violent offense conviction. Variety scores for self-reported offending ranged from 0 to 10 offense types at each assessment; higher numbers indicated greater crime involvement. Self-reported offending followed the well-established age-crime curve (ie, the mean [SD] variety of self-reported offending increased from 1.99 [2.82] at age 15 years to its peak of 4.24 [3.15] at age 18 years and 4.22 [3.02] at age 21 years and declined thereafter to 1.10 [1.59] at age 38 years). Blood lead level was a poor discriminator between no conviction and conviction (area under the curve, 0.58). Overall, associations between BLL and conviction outcomes were weak. The estimated effect of BLL was lower for recidivism than for single convictions and lower for violent offending than for nonviolent offending. Sex-adjusted associations between BLL reached statistical significance for only 1 of the 6 self-reported offending outcomes at age 15 years (r = 0.10; 95% CI, 0.01-0.18; P = .02).

    Conclusions and Relevance  This study overcomes past limitations of studies of BLL and crime by studying the association in a place and time where the correlation was not confounded by childhood socioeconomic status. Findings failed to support a dose-response association between BLL and consequential criminal offending.

  • 72.
    Beckley, Amber L.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Kuja-Halkola, Ralf
    Lundholm, Lena
    Långström, Niklas
    Frisell, Thomas
    Association of height and violent criminality: results from a Swedish total population study2014In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 835-842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Violent criminality is at least moderately heritable, but the mechanisms behind this remain largely unexplained. Height, a highly heritable trait, may be involved but no study has estimated the effect of height on crime while simultaneously accounting for important demographic, biological and other heritable confounders. Methods: We linked nationwide, longitudinal registers for 760 000 men who underwent mandatory military conscription from 1980 through 1992 in Sweden, to assess the association between height and being convicted of a violent crime. We used Cox proportional hazard modelling and controlled for three types of potential confounders: physical characteristics, childhood demographics and general cognitive ability (intelligence). Results: In unadjusted analyses, height had a moderate negative relationship to violent crime; the shortest of men were twice as likely to be convicted of a violent crime as the tallest. However, when simultaneously controlling for all measured confounders, height was weakly and positively related to violent crime. Intelligence had the individually strongest mitigating effect on the height-crime relationship. Conclusions: Although shorter stature was associated with increased risk of violent offending, our analyses strongly suggested that this relationship was explained by intelligence and other confounding factors. Hence, it is unlikely that height, a highly heritable physical characteristic, accounts for much of the unexplained heritability of violent criminality.

  • 73. Beer, Netta
    et al.
    Ali, Abdullah S.
    Eskilsson, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jansson, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Abdul-Kadir, Faiza M.
    Rotllant-Estelrich, Guida
    Abass, Ali K.
    Wabwire-Mangen, Fred
    Björkman, Anders
    Kallander, Karin
    A qualitative study on caretakers' perceived need of bed-nets after reduced malaria transmission in Zanzibar, Tanzania2012In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 12, p. 606-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The elimination of malaria in Zanzibar is highly dependent on sustained effective coverage of bed-nets to avoid malaria resurgence. The Health Belief Model (HBM) framework was used to explore the perceptions of malaria and bed-net use after a noticeable reduction in malaria incidence. Methods: Nineteen in-depth interviews were conducted with female and male caretakers of children under five in North A district, Zanzibar. Deductive content analysis was used to identify meaning units that were condensed, coded and assigned to pre-determined elements of the HBM. Results: Awareness of malaria among caretakers was high but the illness was now seen as easily curable and uncommon. In addition to the perceived advantage of providing protection against malaria, bed-nets were also thought to be useful for avoiding mosquito nuisance, especially during the rainy season when the malaria and mosquito burden is high. The discomfort of sleeping under a net during the hot season was the main barrier that interrupted consistent bed-net usage. The main cue to using a bed-net was high mosquito density, and children were prioritized when it came to bed-net usage. Caretakers had high perceived self-efficacy and did not find it difficult to use bed-nets. Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS), which was recognized as an additional means of mosquito prevention, was not identified as an alternative for bed-nets. A barrier to net ownership was the increasingly high cost of bed-nets. Conclusions: Despite the reduction in malaria incidence and the resulting low malaria risk perceptions among caretakers, the benefit of bed-nets as the most proficient protection against mosquito bites upholds their use. This, in combination with the perceived high self-efficacy of caretakers, supports bed-net usage, while seasonality interrupts consistent use. High effective coverage of bed-nets could be further improved by reinforcing the benefits of bed-nets, addressing the seasonal heat barrier by using nets with larger mesh sizes and ensuring high bed-net ownership rates through sustainable and affordable delivery mechanisms.

  • 74. Beijer, Ulla
    et al.
    Scheffel Birath, Christina
    DeMartinis, Valerie
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Facets of Male Violence Against Women With Substance Abuse Problems: Women With a Residence and Homeless Women2018In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 33, no 9, p. 1391-1411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to investigate the type and extent to which women with substance abuse problems have been exposed to male violence during their lifetime, and to examine possible differences between women with a residence (WR) and homeless women (HW). The total sample included 79 women (WR, n = 35; HW, n = 44; M age = 47.8 years). Of the total sample, 72 women (91%) had experienced different kinds of male violence, 88% from former partners, and 26% from male friends or acquaintances. Of the 72 women, 71% further reported “Countless occasions of violent events,” and 36% had been forced to commit criminal acts. Abused women who had been forced to commit criminal acts were significantly more frequently found to be homeless, have reported parental alcohol and/or drug problems, have witnessed domestic violence in childhood, have been victims of sexual violence, have used illicit drugs as a dominant preparation, and have injected illicit drugs. Almost half of the abused women (46%) met criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), where HW showed an almost 4-time higher risk (RR 3.78) than WR. In conclusion there is a particular vulnerability in women with substance abuse to male violence, which has an important impact on their health status. Thus, from a public health perspective, it is suggested that for those women who have experienced male violence, treatment protocols need to include both assessing and addressing the impact of such experience in relation to substance abuse as well as concomitant health concerns.

  • 75. Beishuizen, Cathrien R. L.
    et al.
    Stephan, Blossom C. M.
    van Gool, Willem A.
    Brayne, Carol
    Peters, Ron J. G.
    Andrieu, Sandrine
    Kivipelto, Miia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Soininen, Hilkka
    Busschers, Wim B.
    van Charante, Eric P. Moll
    Richard, Edo
    Web-Based Interventions Targeting Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Middle-Aged and Older People: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis2016In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 18, no 3, article id e55Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Web-based interventions can improve single cardiovascular risk factors in adult populations. In view of global aging and the associated increasing burden of cardiovascular disease, older people form an important target population as well.

    Objective: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we evaluated whether Web-based interventions for cardiovascular risk factor management reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in older people.

    Methods: Embase, Medline, Cochrane and CINAHL were systematically searched from January 1995 to November 2014. Search terms included cardiovascular risk factors and diseases (specified), Web-based interventions (and synonyms) and randomized controlled trial. Two authors independently performed study selection, data-extraction and risk of bias assessment. In a meta-analysis, outcomes regarding treatment effects on cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1C), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, smoking status, weight and physical inactivity) and incident cardiovascular disease were pooled with random effects models.

    Results: A total of 57 studies (N=19,862) fulfilled eligibility criteria and 47 studies contributed to the meta-analysis. A significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (mean difference -2.66 mmHg, 95% CI -3.81 to -1.52), diastolic blood pressure (mean difference -1.26 mmHg, 95% CI -1.92 to -0.60), HbA1c level (mean difference -0.13%, 95% CI -0.22 to -0.05), LDL cholesterol level (mean difference -2.18 mg/dL, 95% CI -3.96 to -0.41), weight (mean difference -1.34 kg, 95% CI -1.91 to -0.77), and an increase of physical activity (standardized mean difference 0.25, 95% CI 0.10-0.39) in the Web-based intervention group was found. The observed effects were more pronounced in studies with short (<12 months) follow-up and studies that combined the Internet application with human support (blended care). No difference in incident cardiovascular disease was found between groups (6 studies).

    Conclusions: Web-based interventions have the potential to improve the cardiovascular risk profile of older people, but the effects are modest and decline with time. Currently, there is insufficient evidence for an effect on incident cardiovascular disease. A focus on long-term effects, clinical endpoints, and strategies to increase sustainability of treatment effects is recommended for future studies.

  • 76. Bengtsson, Linus
    et al.
    Lu, Xin
    Liljeros, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. The Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Thanh, Hoang Huy
    Thorson, Anna
    Strong propensity for HIV transmission among men who have sex with men in Vietnam: behavioural data and sexual network modelling2014In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no 1, article id e003526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Survey data from men who have sex with men (MSM) in Asian cities indicate ongoing and drastic increases in HIV prevalence. It is unknown which behavioural factors are most important in driving these epidemics. We aimed to analyse detailed sexual behaviour data among MSM in Vietnam and to model HIV transmission using improved assumptions on sexual network structure. Setting Vietnam. Participants Internet-using men who had ever had sex (any type) with a man, aged 18years and living in Vietnam. The study was cross-sectional, population-based and performed in 2012, using online respondent-driven sampling. The Internet-based survey instrument was completed by 982 participants, of which 857 were eligible. Questions included sociodemography and retrospective sexual behaviour, including number of unprotected anal sex (UAS) acts per partner. Primary and secondary outcome measures Estimated basic reproductive number over 3months as a function of transmission risk per UAS act; frequency distributions of number of UAS partners and UAS acts during last 3months. Results 36% (CI 32% to 42%) reported UAS at least once during the last 3months. 36% (CI 32% to 41%) had ever taken an HIV test and received the result. UAS partner numbers and number of UAS acts were both highly skewed and positively correlated. Using a weighted configuration model, taking into account partner numbers, frequency of UAS and their correlations, we estimated the basic reproductive number (R0) over 3months. The results indicated rapid transmission over a wide range of values of per-act transmissibility. Conclusions Men with multiple partners had unexpectedly high UAS frequency per partner, paired with low HIV testing rates. The study highlights the importance of collecting data on frequency of UAS acts and indicates the need to rapidly scale-up HIV prevention services and testing opportunities for MSM in Vietnam.

  • 77. Benson, Rebecca
    et al.
    Glaser, Karen
    Corna, Laurie M
    Platts, Loretta G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Di Gessa, Giorgio
    Worts, Diana
    Price, Debora
    McDonough, Peggy
    Sacker, Amanda
    Do work and family care histories predict health in older women?2017In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 1010-1015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Social and policy changes in the last several decades have increased women's options for combining paid work with family care. We explored whether specific combinations of work and family care over the lifecourse are associated with variations in women's later life health.

    Methods: We used sequence analysis to group women in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing according to their work histories and fertility. Using logistic regression, we tested for group differences in later life disability, depressive symptomology and mortality, while controlling for childhood health and socioeconomic position and a range of adult socio-economic circumstances and health behaviours.

    Results: Women who transitioned from family care to either part-time work after a short break from the labour force, or to full-time work, reported lower odds of having a disability compared with the reference group of women with children who were mostly employed full-time throughout. Women who shifted from family care to part-time work after a long career break had lower odds of mortality than the reference group. Depressive symptoms were not associated with women's work and family care histories.

    Conclusion: Women's work histories are predictive of their later life disability and mortality. This relationship may be useful in targeting interventions aimed at improving later life health. Further research is necessary to explore the mechanisms linking certain work histories to poorer later life health and to design interventions for those affected.

  • 78.
    Berg, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Bäck, Karin
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Parental alcohol-related disorders and school performance in 16 year olds - a national cohort study2016In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 111, no 10, p. 1795-1803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To study the links between parental alcohol-related disorders and offspring school performance and, specifically, whether associations vary by gender of parent or child and whether associations are mediated by other adverse psychosocial circumstances commonly appearing together with parental alcohol problems, such as parental mental health problems or criminal behaviour.

    Register study in a national cohort.

    Setting

    Sweden.

    740 618 individuals born in Sweden in 1990-1996.

    Parental hospital admissions for alcohol-related disorders and school performance in their offspring, in the final year of compulsory school at age 15-16, was analysed in relation to sociodemographic confounders and psychosocial covariates, using linear and logistic regressions.

    Both mothers’ and fathers’ alcohol-related hospital admissions were associated with lower z-scores of grades and national mathematic tests scores. After adjustment for parental education and sociodemographic confounders, beta-coefficients of z-scores of grades were -0.42 (95% CI -0.45, -0.39) and -0.42 (95 % CI -0.43,-0.40), and beta-coefficients of mathematic tests scores were -0.36 (95% CI -0.39, -0.33) and -0.31 (95% CI -0.33, -0.29), for mothers’ and fathers’ alcohol-related disorders, respectively. Adjusted ORs for not being eligible for secondary school were 1.99 (95% CI 1.84-2.15) and 2.04 (95% CI 1.95-2.15) for mothers’ and fathers’ alcohol-related disorders, respectively. Adjusting the analyses for psychosocial factors in the family almost eradicated the statistical effects of parental alcohol-related disorders on offspring school performance to beta-coefficients of 0.03 to -0.10 and ORs of 0.89 to 1.15. The effect of a mother's alcohol-related hospital admission on school performance was stronger in girls than in boys, whereas no gender differences were seen for a father's alcohol-related hospital admission.

    Conclusions

    In Sweden, alcohol-related disorders in both mothers and fathers are associated with lower school performance in their children at age 15-16, with most of the statistical effects being attributed to psychosocial circumstances of the family, such as parental psychiatric disorders, drug use, and criminality and receipt of social or child welfare interventions.

  • 79.
    Berg, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Barn till föräldrar med cancer – hur många berörs och vilka är konsekvenserna i ett livsloppsperspektiv?2016Report (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Berg, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Barn till separerade föräldrar: Hälsa, utbildning och sociala levnadsförhållanden i ett livsloppsperspektiv2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En halv miljon barn i Sverige har föräldrar som inte bor tillsammans. Syftet med den här studien, som utförts av CHESS på uppdrag av Socialstyrelsen, är att belysa hälsa och social situation under skolåren och tidig vuxen ålder för dessa barn. Rapporten baseras på information inhämtad från nationella register och surveyundersökningar om betyg och utbildningskarriär, arbete och inkomster, kriminalitet, psykisk ohälsa, missbruk samt kronisk sjukdom och dödlighet.

    Sammanfattningsvis visar resultaten från denna studie att barn till separerade föräldrar har en ökad risk för ohälsa, skolmisslyckande och ekonomisk utsatthet under skolåren, ungdomsåren och i ung vuxen ålder. Bland dessa barn har barn som bor enbart eller mest med en förälder det största behovet av förebyggande insatser från samhället, i synnerhet om separationen sker i tidig ålder.

  • 81.
    Berg, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Rostila, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Parental death during childhood and depression in young adults – a national cohort study2016In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 57, no 9, p. 1092-1098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There are few prospective, population-based studies on childhood parental death and psychiatric disorders in adulthood, and previous findings are inconclusive. This study investigated the association between parental death from natural and external (suicides, accidents or homicides) causes before 18 years and the risk of clinical depression in young adults, in relation to age at loss and gender of both child and parent.

    Methods

    In this register-based study, a national cohort born in Sweden during 1973–1982 (n = 862,554) was followed with regard to hospital admissions and outpatient care for depression during 2006–2013. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the impact of parental death, taking sociodemographic and parental psychosocial covariates into account.

    Results

    Maternal death from natural causes was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) of outpatient care for depression of 1.19 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02–1.40] in men and 1.15 (1.01–1.31) in women, after adjustment for sociodemographic confounders, with similar effect sizes for paternal natural death. Death from external causes consistently had higher effect size compared with natural deaths, in particular in relation to risk of hospital admissions for depression where they were as high as HR 3.23 (2.38–4.38) for men, and 1.79 (1.30–2.47) for women after a loss of a mother. Losing a parent in preschool age, compared with losing a parent as a teenager, was associated with higher risks of both hospitalization (p = .006) and outpatient care (p = .001) for depression.

    Conclusions

    This study indicates that parental loss to death from natural causes during childhood is associated with a small increased risk of long-term consequences for psychological health. Children who lose their parents to death from external causes, that is suicides, accidents or homicides, and children losing a parent in young ages are, however, at particular risk and should be given priority in preventive interventions after parental loss.

  • 82. Bergh Johannesson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Bondjers, Kristina
    Arnberg, Filip
    Nilsson, Doris
    Ängarne-Lindberg, Teresia
    Rostila, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Utvärdering av Barntraumateamet i Norrköping2014Report (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Bergström, Malin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Fransson, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Fabian, Helena
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Salari, Raziye
    Preschool children living in joint physical custody arrangements show less psychological symptoms than those living mostly or only with one parent2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 2, p. 294-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    Joint physical custody (JPC), where children spend about equal time in both parent's homes after parental separation, is increasing. The suitability of this practice for preschool children, with a need for predictability and continuity, has been questioned.

    Methods

    In this cross-sectional study, we used data on 3656 Swedish children aged three to five years living in intact families, JPC, mostly with one parent or single care. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, completed by parents and preschool teachers, as the outcome measure.

    Results

    Children in JPC showed less psychological problems than those living mostly (adjusted B 1.81; 95% CI [0.66 to 2.95]) or only with one parent (adjusted B 1.94; 95% CI [0.75 to 3.13]), in parental reports. In preschool teacher reports, the adjusted Betas were 1.27, 95% CI [0.14 to 2.40] and 1.41, 95% CI [0.24 to 2.58], respectively. In parental reports, children in JPC and those in intact families had similar outcomes, while teachers reported lower unadjusted symptom scores for children in intact families.

    Conclusion

    Joint physical custody arrangements were not associated with more psychological symptoms in children aged 3–5, but longitudinal studies are needed to account for potential preseparation differences.

  • 84.
    Bergström, Malin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Fransson, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Berlin, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. National Board of Health and Welfare, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Fifty moves a year: is there an association between joint physical custody and psychosomatic problems in children?2015In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 69, no 8, p. 769-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In many Western countries, an increasing number of children with separated parents have joint physical custody, that is, live equally much in their parent's respective homes. In Sweden, joint physical custody is particularly common and concerns between 30% and 40% of the children with separated parents. It has been hypothesised that the frequent moves and lack of stability in parenting may be stressful for these children.

    Methods: We used data from a national classroom survey of all sixth and ninth grade students in Sweden (N=147839) to investigate the association between children's psychosomatic problems and living arrangements. Children in joint physical custody were compared with those living only or mostly with one parent and in nuclear families. We conducted sex-specific linear regression analyses for z-transformed sum scores of psychosomatic problems and adjusted for age, country of origin as well as children's satisfaction with material resources and relationships to parents. Clustering by school was accounted for by using a two-level random intercept model.

    Results: Children in joint physical custody suffered from less psychosomatic problems than those living mostly or only with one parent but reported more symptoms than those in nuclear families. Satisfaction with their material resources and parent–child relationships was associated with children's psychosomatic health but could not explain the differences between children in the different living arrangements.

    Conclusions: Children with non-cohabitant parents experience more psychosomatic problems than those in nuclear families. Those in joint physical custody do however report better psychosomatic health than children living mostly or only with one parent. Longitudinal studies with information on family factors before and after the separation are needed to inform policy of children's postseparation living arrangements.

  • 85.
    Bergström, Malin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Fransson, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Wells, Michael B.
    Köhler, Lennart
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Children with two homes: Psychological problems in relation to living arrangements in Nordic 2- to 9-year-olds2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Joint physical custody, children spending equal time in each parents’ respective home after a parental divorce, is particularly common in Nordic compared with other Western countries. Older children have been shown to fare well in this practice but for young children there are few existing studies. The aim of this paper is to study psychological problems in 2- to 9-year-old Nordic children in different family forms. Methods: Total symptom score according to the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire as well as scores showing externalizing problems were compared among 152 children in joint physical custody, 303 in single care and 3207 in nuclear families through multiple linear regression analyses. Results: Children in single care had more psychological symptoms than those in joint physical custody (B = 1.08; 95% CI 0.48 to 1.67) and those in nuclear families had the least reported symptoms (B = −0.53; 95% CI −0.89 to −0.17). Externalizing problems were also lower in nuclear families (B = −0.28, 95% CI −0.52 to −0.04) compared with joint physical custody after adjusting for covariates. Conclusions: Young children with non-cohabiting parents suffered from more psychological problems than those in intact families. Children in joint physical custody had a lower total problem score than those in single care after adjusting for covariates. Longitudinal studies with information on family factors before the separation are needed to inform policy of young children’s post-separation living arrangements.

  • 86.
    Bergström, Malin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Fransson, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Rajmil, Luis
    Berlin, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Living in two homes-a Swedish national survey of wellbeing in 12 and 15 year olds with joint physical custody2013In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, article id 868Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The practice of joint physical custody, where children spend equal time in each parent's home after they separate, is increasing in many countries. It is particularly common in Sweden, where this custody arrangement applies to 30 per cent of children with separated parents. The aim of this study was to examine children's health-related quality of life after parental separation, by comparing children living with both parents in nuclear families to those living in joint physical custody and other forms of domestic arrangements.

    Methods Data from a national Swedish classroom study of 164,580 children aged 12 and 15-years-old were analysed by two-level linear regression modelling. Z-scores were used to equalise scales for ten dimensions of wellbeing from the KIDSCREEN-52 and the KIDSCREEN-10 Index and analysed for children in joint physical custody in comparison with children living in nuclear families and mostly or only with one parent.

    Results Living in a nuclear family was positively associated with almost all aspects of wellbeing in comparison to children with separated parents. Children in joint physical custody experienced more positive outcomes, in terms of subjective wellbeing, family life and peer relations, than children living mostly or only with one parent. For the 12-year-olds, beta coefficients for moods and emotions ranged from -0.20 to -0.33 and peer relations from -0.11 to -0.20 for children in joint physical custody and living mostly or only with one parent. The corresponding estimates for the 15-year-olds varied from -0.08 to -0.28 and from -0.03 to -0.13 on these subscales. The 15-year-olds in joint physical custody were more likely than the 12-year-olds to report similar wellbeing levels on most outcomes to the children in nuclear families.

    Conclusions Children who spent equal time living with both parents after a separation reported better wellbeing than children in predominantly single parent care. This was particularly true for the 15-year-olds, while the reported wellbeing of 12-years-olds was less satisfactory. There is a need for further studies that can account for the pre and post separation context of individual families and the wellbeing of younger age groups in joint physical custody.

  • 87.
    Berlin, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. National Board of Health and Welfare (Socialstyrelsen), Sweden.
    Mensah, Tita
    Lundgren, Frida
    Klingberg, Gunilla
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Cederlund, Andreas
    Dental healthcare utilisation among young adults who were in societal out-of-home care as children: A Swedish National Cohort Study2018In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 325-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used Swedish national registers to analyse dental health care among young adults with childhood experience of out-of-home care (OHC), in Cox regression analyses. All 1.7 million Swedish residents born in 1980-1994 were included, of whom 4% had been in OHC. The population was followed up in the Dental Health Register from age 20 to 29, during the period 2009-2014. We found that persons with short or long OHC experience made emergency dental care visits more often than their majority-population peers: 17-23% versus 9-10%, (adjusted Hazard ratios [HR:s] 1.60-2.02); they more often had tooth extractions, 9-12% versus 3% (HR:s 2.33-3.03); but less regularly visited a dentist for planned check-ups, 61-77% versus 80-87% (HR:s 0.76-0.78). Since dental health in young adulthood reflects dental health and dental care in childhood, the findings of this study call for improved preventive dental health care for children in OHC.

  • 88. Bernard, H.
    et al.
    Faber, M.
    Wilking, H.
    Haller, S.
    Höhle, Michael
    Robert Koch Institute, Germany.
    Schielke, A.
    Ducomble, T.
    Siffczyk, C.
    Merbecks, S. S.
    Fricke, G.
    Hamouda, O.
    Stark, K.
    Werber, D.
    Large multistate outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis associated with frozen strawberries, East Germany, 20122014In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 19, no 8, article id pii=20719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From 20 September through 5 October 2012, the largest recorded food-borne outbreak in Germany occurred. Norovirus was identified as the causative agent. We conducted four analytical epidemiological studies, two case–control studies and two surveys (in total 150 cases) in secondary schools in three different federal states. Overall, 390 institutions in five federal states reported nearly 11,000 cases of gastroenteritis. They were predominantly schools and childcare facilities and were supplied almost exclusively by one large catering company. The analytical epidemiological studies consistently identified dishes containing strawberries as the most likely vehicle, with estimated odds ratios ranging from 2.6 to 45.4. The dishes had been prepared in different regional kitchens of the catering company and were served in the schools two days before the peaks of the respective outbreaks. All affected institutions had received strawberries of one lot, imported frozen from China. The outbreak vehicle was identified within a week, which led to a timely recall and prevented more than half of the lot from reaching the consumer. This outbreak exemplifies the risk of large outbreaks in the era of global food trade. It underlines the importance of timely surveillance and epidemiological outbreak investigations for food safety.

  • 89. Bernard, Helen
    et al.
    Werber, Dirk
    Höhle, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics. Robert Koch Institute, Germany.
    Estimating the under-reporting of norovirus illness in Germany utilizing enhanced awareness of diarrhoea during a large outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O104:H4 in 2011 - a time series analysis2014In: BMC Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1471-2334, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 14, article id 116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Laboratory- confirmed norovirus illness is reportable in Germany since 2001. Reported case numbers are known to be undercounts, and a valid estimate of the actual incidence in Germany does not exist. An increase of reported norovirus illness was observed simultaneously to a large outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O104: H4 in Germany in 2011 - likely due to enhanced (but not complete) awareness of diarrhoea at that time. We aimed at estimating age- and sex-specific factors of that excess, which should be interpretable as (minimal) under-reporting factors of norovirus illness in Germany. Methods: We used national reporting data on laboratory-confirmed norovirus illness in Germany from calendar week 31 in 2003 through calendar week 30 in 2012. A negative binomial time series regression model was used to describe the weekly counts in 8.2 age- sex strata while adjusting for secular trend and seasonality. Overall as well as age- and sex- specific factors for the excess were estimated by including additional terms (either an O104: H4 outbreak period indicator or a triple interaction term between outbreak period, age and sex) in the model. Results: We estimated the overall under- reporting factor to be 1.76 (95% Cl 1.28- 2.41) for the first three weeks of the outbreak before the outbreak vehicle was publicly communicated. Highest under-reporting factors were here estimated for 20- 29 year-old males (2.88, 95% Cl 2.01- 4.11) and females (2.67, 95% Cl 1.87- 3.79). Under-reporting was substantially lower in persons aged < 10 years and 70 years or older. Conclusions: These are the first estimates of (minimal) under- reporting factors for norovirus illness in Germany. They provide a starting point for a more detailed investigation of the relationship between actual incidence and reporting incidence of norovirus illness in Germany.

  • 90. Bernehäll Claesson, Inger
    et al.
    Brodin, Jane
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    What families with children with brittle bones want to tell2002In: Child: Care, Health and Development, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 309-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interviews with parents of children with brittle bones and questionnaires answered by 30 families about everyday life.

  • 91. Bernhard-Oettel, C.
    et al.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    The temporaries, theself-employed and the permanent staff: A Swedish study comparing work characteristics and individual well-being over time2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Beronius, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Vandenberg, Laura N.
    Using systematic reviews for hazard and risk assessment of endocrine disrupting chemicals2016In: Reviews in endocrine and metabolic disorders (Print), ISSN 1389-9155, E-ISSN 1573-2606, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 273-287Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility that endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in our environment contribute to hormonally related effects and diseases observed in human and wildlife populations has caused concern among decision makers and researchers alike. EDCs challenge principles traditionally applied in chemical risk assessment and the identification and assessment of these compounds has been a much debated topic during the last decade. State of the science reports and risk assessments of potential EDCs have been criticized for not using systematic and transparent approaches in the evaluation of evidence. In the fields of medicine and health care, systematic review methodologies have been developed and used to enable objectivity and transparency in the evaluation of scientific evidence for decision making. Lately, such approaches have also been promoted for use in the environmental health sciences and risk assessment of chemicals. Systematic review approaches could provide a tool for improving the evaluation of evidence for decision making regarding EDCs, e.g. by enabling systematic and transparent use of academic research data in this process. In this review we discuss the advantages and challenges of applying systematic review methodology in the identification and assessment of EDCs.

  • 93. Berthelsen, Hanne
    et al.
    Muhonen, Tuija
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Mälardalens högskola, Sverige.
    Vad händer med arbetsmiljön när man inför aktivitetsbaserade kontor inom akademin?2017In: Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 9-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Aktivitetsbaserade kontor är fortfarande ovanliga för forskare och lärare inom akademin, men nu verkar flera lärosäten vara igång att införa den här typen av arbetsplatser. Det finns begränsat med kunskap om vad som händer vid flyttprocesser från egna rum till aktivitetsbaserade kontor i akademin och hur personalen upplever arbetsmiljön i denna typ av kontorsmiljöer. I den här artikeln redovisas resultat från en enkätundersökning före och efter flytt till aktivitetsbaserade kontor på en svensk högskola.

  • 94. Bharadwaj, Prashant
    et al.
    Lundborg, Petter
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Birth Weight in the Long Run2018In: The Journal of human resources, ISSN 0022-166X, E-ISSN 1548-8004, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 189-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the effect of birth weight on long-run outcomes using data on Swedish twins born between 1926 and 1958 linked to administrative records spanning entire life-time labor market histories. We find that birth weight positively affects permanent income and income across large parts of the lifecycle. The timing of the birth weight–income relationship is in line with the role of birth weight in determining takeup of sickness benefits and morbidity. The effect of birth weight on labor market outcomes even for cohorts born 30 years apart are similar; for short run health outcomes, birth weight plays a decreasing role over time.

  • 95. Bijlsma, Maarten J.
    et al.
    Tarkiainen, Lasse
    Myrskylä, Mikko
    Martikainen, Pekka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Germany: University of Helsinki,, Finland.
    Unemployment and subsequent depression: A mediation analysis using the parametric G-formula2017In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 194, p. 142-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of unemployment on depression are difficult to establish because of confounding and limited understanding of the mechanisms at the population level. In particular, due to longitudinal interdependencies between exposures, mediators and outcomes, intermediate confounding is an obstacle for mediation analyses. Using longitudinal Finnish register data on socio-economic characteristics and medication purchases, we extracted individuals who entered the labor market between ages 16 and 25 in the period 1996 to 2001 and followed them until the year 2007 (n = 42,172). With the parametric G-formula we estimated the population averaged effect on first antidepressant purchase of a simulated intervention which set all unemployed person years to employed. In the data, 74% of person-years were employed and 8% unemployed, the rest belonging to studying or other status. In the intervention scenario, employment rose to 85% and the hazard of first antidepressant purchase decreased by 7.6%. Of this reduction 61% was mediated, operating primarily through changes in income and household status, while mediation through other health conditions was negligible. These effects were negligible for women and particularly prominent among less educated men. By taking complex interdependencies into account in a framework of observed repeated measures data, we found that eradicating unemployment raises income levels, promotes family formation, and thereby reduces antidepressant consumption at the population-level.

  • 96.
    Billingsley, Sunnee
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Intragenerational social mobility and cause-specific premature mortality2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 2, article id e0211977Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores whether there is a short-term relationship between intragenerational social mobility and mortality while individuals are working and whether it is widespread across different causes of death. Net of accumulated advantages and disadvantages, social mobility may influence mortality through health selection or changes in well-being. Men and women working in 1996 up to age 65 are observed annually until 2012 in Swedish register data. Time-varying covariates and origin and destination status are controlled for in discrete time event-history analyses. Results show that when men were upwardly mobile, mortality was lower due to cancer, CVD, IHD, and suicide. Upward mobility was only associated with lower odds of suicide for women. When downwardly mobile, cancer mortality was higher for both men and women and smoking-related cancer mortality was higher for men. Social mobility was not linked to deaths related to accidents and poisoning or alcohol-related mortality. The results may support a relationship between social mobility and mortality characterized by health selection: Only in the case of a chronic illness (cancer) was downward mobility associated with higher mortality. The widespread relationship between upward mobility and lower mortality for men may also indicate positive health selection into attaining a higher class and that individuals with poor health may be less likely to search for better positions or receive promotions.

  • 97. Biswas, Dan
    et al.
    Toebes, Brigit
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Nordic School of Public Health, Sweden.
    Ascher, Henry
    Norredam, Marie
    ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE FOR UNDOCUMENTED MIGRANTS FROM A HUMAN RIGHTS PERSPECTIVE: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DENMARK, SWEDEN, AND THE NETHERLANDS2012In: Health and Human Rights: An International Journal, ISSN 1079-0969, E-ISSN 2150-4113, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 49-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Undocumented migrants’ access to health care varies across Europe, and entitlements on national levels are often at odds with the rights stated in international human rights law. The aim of this study is to address undocumented migrants’ access to health care in Denmark, Sweden, and the Netherlands from a human rights perspective.

    Methods

    Based on desk research in October 2011, we identified national laws, policies, peer-reviewed studies, and grey literature concerning undocumented migrants’ access to health care in the three involved countries. Through treaties and related explana-tory documents from the United Nations and the Council of Europe, we identified relevant international laws concerning the right to health and the rights of different groups of undocumented migrants. A synopsis of these laws is included in the analysis of the three countries.

    Results

    Undocumented migrants in Denmark have the right to emergency care, while addition-al care is restricted and may be subject to payment. Undocumented migrants in Sweden have the right to emergency care only. There is an exception made for former asylum-seeking children, who have the same rights as Swedish citizens. In the Netherlands, undocumented migrants have greater entitlements and have access to primary, second-ary and tertiary care, although shortcomings remain. All three countries have ratified international human rights treaties that include right of access to health care services. We identified international treaties from the United Nations and the Council of Europe that recognize a right to health for undocumented migrants and embrace gov-ernmental obligations to ensure the availability, accessibility, acceptability, and quality of health services, in particular for specific groups such as women and children.

    Conclusion

    In the Netherlands, undocumented migrants’ right to health care is largely acknowl-edged, while in Denmark and Sweden, there are more restrictions on access. This reveals major discrepancies in relation to international human rights law.

  • 98.
    Björkenstam, Charlotte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. University of California, USA; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Andersson, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Dalman, Christina
    Cochran, Susan
    Kosidou, Kyriaki
    Suicide in married couples in Sweden: Is the risk greater in same-sex couples?2016In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 685-690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Minority sexual orientation is a predictor of suicide ideation and attempts, though its association with suicide mortality is less clear. We capitalize on Sweden's extensively linked databases, to investigate whether, among married individuals, same-sex marriage is associated with suicide. Using a population-based register design, we analyzed suicide risk among same-sex married women and men (n = 6456), as compared to different-sex married women and men (n = 1181723) in Sweden. We selected all newly partnered or married individuals in the intervening time between 1/1/1996 and 12/31/2009 and followed them with regard to suicide until 12/31/2011. Multivariate Poisson regression was used to calculate adjusted incidence risk ratios (IRR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI). The risk of suicide was higher among same-sex married individuals as compared to different-sex married individuals (IRR 2.7, 95 % CI 1.5-4.8), after adjustment for time at risk and socioeconomic confounding. Sex-stratified analyses showed a tentatively elevated risk for same-sex married women (IRR 2.5, 95 % CI 0.8-7.7) as compared to different-sex married women. Among same-sex married men the suicide risk was nearly three-fold greater as compared to different-sex married (IRR 2.895 % CI 1.5-5.5). This holds true also after adjustment for HIV status. Even in a country with a comparatively tolerant climate regarding homosexuality such as Sweden, same-sex married individuals evidence a higher risk for suicide than other married individuals.

  • 99.
    Björkenstam, Charlotte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; University of California, USA.
    Kosidou, Kyriaki
    Björkenstam, Emma
    Dalman, Christina
    Andersson, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Cochran, Susan
    Self-reported suicide ideation and attempts, and medical care for intentional self-harm in lesbians, gays and bisexuals in Sweden2016In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 70, no 9, p. 895-901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Minority sexual orientation is a robust risk indicator for self-reported suicidal ideation and attempts. However, little is known about patterns of medical care for intentional self-harm in this vulnerable population. We investigate sexual orientation-related differences in self-reported lifetime suicide symptoms and medical care for intentional self-harm between 1969 and 2010, including age at initial treatment and recurrence. Methods We used data from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort, a population-based sample of 874 lesbians/gays, 841 bisexuals and 67980 heterosexuals, whose self-administered surveys have been linked to nationwide registers. Estimates of risk for medical care were calculated as incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95% CIs. Results Both suicidal ideation and attempts were more commonly reported by lesbian/gay and bisexual (LGB) individuals. Adjusting for risk-time and confounding, lesbians (IRR 3.8, 95% CI 2.7 to 5.4) and bisexual women (IRR 5.4, 95% CI 4.4 to 6.6) experienced elevated risk for medical care for intentional self-harm, as compared to heterosexual women. Gay men evidenced higher risk (IRR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3 to 3.4) as compared to heterosexual men. Recurrent medical care was more frequent in LGB individuals, especially in bisexual women and gay men. Lesbian and bisexual women were also younger than heterosexual women when they first received medical care for intentional self-harm. Conclusions Positive histories of suicidal ideation, attempts and medical care for intentional self-harm, including higher levels of recurrence, are more prevalent among LGB individuals in contrast to heterosexuals. Lesbian/bisexual women evidence an earlier age of onset of treatment. Tailored prevention efforts are urgently needed.

  • 100. Björkenstam, Emma
    et al.
    Cheng, Siwei
    Burström, Bo
    Pebley, Anne R.
    Björkenstam, Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. University of California, USA; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Kosidou, Kyriaki
    Association between income trajectories in childhood and psychiatric disorder: a Swedish population-based study2017In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 71, no 7, p. 648-654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Childhood family income variation is an understudied aspect of households' economic context that may have distinct consequences for children. We identified trajectories of childhood family income over a 12-year period, and examined associations between these trajectories and later psychiatric disorders, among individuals born in Sweden between 1987 and 1991 (n=534 294).

    Methods We used annual income data between the ages of 3-14 years and identified 5 trajectories (2 high-income upward, 1 downward and 2 low-income upward trajectories). Psychiatric disorders in the follow-up period after age 15 were defined from International Classification of Disease (ICD)-codes in a nationwide patient register. Multiadjusted risks for all psychiatric disorders, as well as for specific psychiatric diagnoses, were calculated as HRs with 95% CIs.

    Results Of the 5 identified income trajectories, the constant low and the downward trajectories were particularly associated with later psychiatric disorder. Children with these trajectories had increased risks for psychiatric disorder, including mood, anxiety, psychotic disorders and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The association remained, even after adjusting for important variables including parental psychiatric disorder. In contrast, the relationship was reversed for eating disorders, for which children in higher income trajectories had elevated risks.

    Conclusions Findings show that children growing up in a household characterised by low or decreasing family income have an increased risk for psychiatric disorder. Continued work is needed to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in psychiatric disorders. Policies and interventions for psychiatric disorders should consider the socioeconomic background of the family as an important risk or protective factor.

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