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  • 51.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Lekander, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Nilsonne, Gustav
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Fischer, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    d'Onofrio, Paolo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Gruber, G.
    Schwarz, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Women sleep better and have a stronger response to late night curtailed sleep than men, particularly in older individuals - effects on polysomnographical sleep2016In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, p. 156-156, article id P206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Higher age is associated with poorer sleep and women report more sleep problems than men, despite indications of better physiological sleep. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether a common daily life sleep problem, late night curtailed sleep, would have different effects depending on gender and age. Methods: 60 healthy individuals (equal groups of gender and age (20–30 and 65–75 years)) participated in an experiment with a full night’s sleep and one night with reduced sleep between 0400 h and 0700 h, in a balanced design. Sleep was recorded through standard polysomnography (PSG) at home. Results: The results showed the expected main effect of sleep loss. Older participants had a lower TST, N3%, sleep efficiency, but more N1%, longer N3 latency, and fewer awakenings. Women had more N3%, more REM%, more N3%, and shorter N3 latency compared with men. The curtailed late night sleep caused a stronger increase in N3%, and more pronounced reductions in REM%, a stronger reduction in N1%, and N3 latency in women than men. In the higher age group the N3% response in men was strongly attenuated compared to that of women. Conclusions: The results show that women, apart form getting more N3% and less N1% even in the normal sleep condition, have a stronger response to late night sleep, particularly in higher age groups.

  • 52.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Lekander, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Nilsonne, Gustav
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Tamm, Sandra
    D'onofrio, Paolo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Fischer, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Schwarz, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Effects of late-night short-sleep on in-home polysomnography: relation to adult age and sex2018In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 27, no 4, article id e12626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bedtime is frequently delayed by many factors in life, and a homeostatic response to the delay may compensate partly for increased time awake and shortened sleep. Because sleep becomes shorter with age and women complain of disturbed sleep more often than men, age and sex differences in the homeostatic response to a delayed bedtime may modify the homeostatic response. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of late-night short-sleep (3 h with awakening at about 07:00 hours) on in-home recorded sleep in men and women in two age groups (20-30 and 65-75 years). Results (N = 59) showed that late-night short-sleep was associated with an increase in percentage of N3 sleep and a decrease in percentage of rapid eye movement sleep, as well as decreases in several measures of sleep discontinuity and rapid eye movement density. Men showed a smaller decrease in percentage of rapid eye movement sleep than women in response to late-night short-sleep, as did older individuals of both sexes compared with younger. Older men showed a weaker percentage of N3 sleep in response to late-night short-sleep than younger men. In general, men showed a greater percentage of rapid eye movement sleep and a lower percentage of N3 sleep than women, and older individuals showed a lower percentage of N3 sleep than younger. In particular, older men showed very low levels of percentage of N3 sleep. We conclude that older males show less of a homeostatic response to late-night short-sleep. This may be an indication of impaired capacity for recovery in older men. Future studies should investigate if this pattern can be linked to gender-associated differences in morbidity and mortality.

  • 53.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Schwarz, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Gruber, Georg
    Lindberg, Eva
    Theorell-Haglöw, Jenny
    The relation between polysomnography and subjective sleep and its dependence on age - poor sleep may become good sleep2016In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 565-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women complain more about sleep than men, but polysomnography (PSG) seems to suggest worse sleep in men. This raises the question of how women (or men) perceive objective (PSG) sleep. The present study sought to investigate the relation between morning subjective sleep quality and PSG variables in older and younger women. A representative sample of 251 women was analysed in age groups above and below 51.5 years (median). PSG was recorded at home during one night. Perceived poor sleep was related to short total sleep time (TST), long wake within total sleep time (WTSP), low sleep efficiency and a high number of awakenings. The older women showed lower TST and sleep efficiency and higher WTSP for a rating of good sleep than did the younger women. For these PSG variables the values for good sleep in the older group were similar to the values for poor sleep in the young group. It was concluded that women perceive different levels of sleep duration, sleep efficiency and wake after sleep onset relatively well, but that older women adjust their objective criteria for good sleep downwards. It was also concluded that age is an important factor in the relation between subjective and objective sleep.

  • 54.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Trolle-Lagerros, Ylva
    Widman, Linnea
    Ye, Weimin
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Bellocco, Rino
    Sleep duration and mortality, influence of age, retirement, and occupational group2021In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, article id e13512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous work has shown that both long and short sleep duration is associated with increased mortality, with lowest risk around 7 hr. This has had widespread impact on views on the optimal sleep duration. However, age, being employed/retired, and blue-/white-collar status, may influence the time available for sleep and thus, confound the association. We investigated the role of these factors on the association between sleep duration and mortality. We used employed and retired participants (N = 25,430) from the Swedish National March Cohort and Cox proportional hazards regression to model the shape of the association. We found a significant U-shaped association in a multivariable model with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.24 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10, 1.39) for <5-hr sleep duration, and a HR of 1.30 (95% CI 1.12, 1.51) for >= 9-hr sleep duration, with the lowest HR for 7 hr, but with a span of low HRs from 5 to 8 hr. Unadjusted values showed a pronounced U-shape. Adjusting for age accounted for most of the attenuation in the multivariable model. Stratification into five age groups showed a significant U-shape only in those aged >60.3 years at baseline. The shape of the association did not differ between blue-/white-collar workers, nor between employed and retired groups. We conclude that the U-shaped association between sleep duration and mortality is present only in older individuals.

12 51 - 54 of 54
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