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  • 51.
    Emanuelsson-Paulson, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Regional development of architectural styles – polygonal column in sanctuaries around Argos2022Conference paper (Refereed)
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    omslag
  • 52.
    Emanuelsson-Paulson, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The Queen’s choice or the son’s political propaganda: the introduction of the Pergamene style of architecture2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inscription on the Sanctuary of Demeter in Pergamon states that it was dedicated by Queen Apollonis, spouse of king Attalus I and the mother of the two succeeding kings Eumenes II and Attalus II. Exactly when this building project was constructed and if it was really constructed by the queen, or her sons has long been discussed, but it was probably built slightly earlier than Eumenes II’s large construction program. It was a fitting building project to undertake as a queen, being both a sanctuary and to a female goddess. The construction of sanctuary introduces a new column shaft shape, the polygonal column. Polygonal columns quickly became fashionable and commonly used in Pergamon, both the town and the newly largely expanded kingdom. Even if the Queen’s constructions of the sanctuary still remains unfinished, the stoa and the propylon introduces this new architectural style of polygonal columns in Pergamon, which under Queen Apollonis son Eumenes II becomes part his grand project of creating the new royal architectural style used in the large expansions of the town to become a metropole befitting for his greatly expanded kingdom. The largely used polygonal columns in the Pergamene architectural style was therefore probably selected and introduced by a woman, the Queen Apollonis.

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    sammanfattning
  • 53.
    Enevång Viklund, Lina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Making Sense of Material Culture: A Sensory Approach to Bird-Shaped Vessels in Imperial Age Greece2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this thesis is Roman bird-shaped glass vessels from the 1 st and 2 nd centuries AD. The vessels were containers for cosmetics and distinguished themselves from other types of unguentaria in that once they had been filled with cosmetic powder, the vessels were reheated and sealed shut by fire. The only way to extract the content was to break the tip of the bird’s tail; only then could the powder be sprinkled out. While ancient glass is a well-established field of research, studies concerning bird-shaped vessels are scarce. The present study, situated in Roman age Greece, is concerned with the sensory experiences that these objects evoked in their users and attempts to reflect the ancient lived experience of the vessels. In order to speculate on possible sensory stimuli, contextual aspects concerning where, why, and by whom these vessels were used are explored. Based on these contextual aspects, the bird-shaped vessels are studied in hypothetical scenarios where potential multisensory experiences are explored.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Making Sense of Material Culture: A Sensory Approach to Bird-Shaped Vessels in Imperial Age Greece
  • 54.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    An etymological safari to Aigyptos2018In: Studien zur Altägyptischen Kultur, ISSN 0340-2215, Vol. 47, p. 1-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an overview of various ideas since Antiquity surrounding the etymology of Αἴγυπτος. A citation graph illustrates how the bibliographical items that refer to the term relate to one another.

  • 55.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Ancient Place-names in the Governorate of Kafr el-Sheikh2021Book (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Aux confins de l'étymologie: Rakotis, le nom indigène d'Alexandrie2016In: Études d'onomastique égyptienne: méthodologie et nouvelles approches / [ed] Yannis Gourdon, Åke Engsheden, Le Caire: Institut français d'archéologie orientale , 2016, p. 87-100Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Champollion och hieroglyferna: egyptologin 200 år2022Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 58.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Creating an Etymology for Coptic tamio2014In: Journal of Ancient Civilizations, ISSN 1004-9371, Vol. 29, p. 31-35Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Dual Zootoponyms in Ancient Egyptian2016In: Décrire, imaginer, construire l'espace: Toponymie égyptienne de l'Antiquité au Moyen Âge / [ed] Sylvain Dhennin, Claire Somaglino, Kairo: Institut français d'archéologie orientale du Caire, 2016, p. 117-135Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Efterhängsen farao2021In: Populär arkeologi, ISSN 0281-014X, Vol. 6, p. 43-43Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Recension av Dick Harrison, "Tutankhamon", Historisk media: Lund, 2021.

  • 61.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Egyptens hieroglyfer i de klassiska författarnas våld2015In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 17-24Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 62.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Egyptiska röster på Medelhavsmuseet2020Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 63.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Egyptologins kvinnliga pionjärer2016In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 7-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 64.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Ett koptiskt brev om fisk mot svält och död2017In: Kirjuri, ISSN 1459-7985, no 2, p. 13-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 65.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Everything Is Not What It Seems: A New Examination of a Purported Naos Fragment from the 4th Century BCE in Verona2023In: Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections, ISSN 1944-2815, Vol. 38 & 39, p. 117-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The author makes three observations about a purported naos fragment from the 4th century BCE, now in the Museo Archeologico in Verona. First, he refutes the long-held assumption that it represents a naos. Second, he observes that the cartouche on its front face does not belong to Nectanebo I. Third, he argues that its original location might have been in the Temple of the Escarpment at Saqqara, and perhaps within the precinct commonly called the Bubastieion, noting that there are no certain attestations of the name ‘Bubastieion’ in ancient texts.

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    fulltext
  • 66.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Fredrik Thomasson, Rosettastenens förste tolkare: Johan David Åkerblads liv i Orienten och Europa, 20152017In: Dragomanen: Årsskrift utgiven av Svenska Forskningsinstitutet i Istanbul, ISSN 1402-358X, Vol. 19, p. 129-131Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Från sentid till senantik: Föremål ur Medelhavsmuseets egyptiska samling2016Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 68.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Gamla rikets pyramider2018In: Populär arkeologi, ISSN 0281-014X, no 3, p. 10-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 69.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Jan Retsö, Legenderna om förbundsarken, Appell förlag, 20212022In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 2, p. 40-41Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 70.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Le naos de Sopdou à Saft el-Henneh (CG 70021): paléographie2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [fr]

    Le présent ouvrage est consacré à l’étude paléographique du naos Caire CG 70021, autrement nommé «le naos de Sopdou» d’après son dieu tutélaire. Il provient de Saft el-Henneh, chef-lieu de la XXe province de Basse-Egypte dans l’Antiquité. Ce monument date de la XXXe dynastie, période de transition ayant laissé peu d’inscriptions monumentales. Outre le fait de présenter un intérêt remarquable pour la connaissance de la théologie d’un centre régional du Delta égyptien, ce naos se distingue par l’abondance des hiéroglyphes, souvent insolites, qui composent ses textes. L’analyse approfondie de sa paléographie, réalisée signe par signe, contribue à établir la transition entre la renaissance saïte et le style ptolémaïque naissant.

  • 71.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Liv i spillror: Koptiska ostraka i Sverige2020In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 14-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 72.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Mumiemasker inifrån2020In: Populär arkeologi, ISSN 0281-014X, no 2, p. 6-6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 73.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Mummies and moonlight at Karnak: On José-Maria de Heredia's Egyptianising poem.2023In: Images, perceptions and productions of and in Antiquity / [ed] Trindade Lopes; Maria Helena, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2023, p. 276-288Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The sonnet cycle “La Vision de Khèm”, published by José-Maria de Herediain its final form in 1893, drew on pharaonic influences with its final sceneevoking a nightly procession of gods and resurrected pharaohs in moonlittemple ruins. According to my interpretation, it is naïve to characterise that feature of the poem simply as an Egyptian-style resurrection. One should not forget that the mummy inspired quite different imagery in 19th-century French literature than in the familiar horror films from Hollywood. Instead, it should be regarded as developing the theme of nightly transformations in literature and lore. Furthermore, I suggest that the setting of the final scene might have been influenced by travellers’ accounts of Karnak in the moonlight. “La Vision de Khèm” is thematically linked to other Egyptianizing poems by contemporary authors, belonging to the so-called Parnassian school of literature, as well as to other poems by Heredia, which thematise remembrance versus oblivion.

  • 74.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Note onomastique sur Tell al-Farācīn2019In: Recherches sur les ateliers romains de Bouto: prospection et sondages (2001-2006) / [ed] Pascale Ballet, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2019, p. 37-39Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Onomastic Miscellanies from the North-Central Delta2015In: Bulletin de la Sociéte d'Égyptologie de Genève, ISSN 0255-6286, Vol. 30, p. 25-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four different place-names from the north-central Delta are discussed in the article: (1) thename of the town of Disūq, suggested here to derive from an ancient Egyptian expression,possibly ‘the land of Sobek’; (2) Diminka, which may be a compound meaning ‘the new landof Nechao’; (3) idb.wy rx.ty, whose westward location seems supported by a passage in theTemple of Edfu; and finally (4) srn, a hapax, read on a Saite donation stela (Uppsala VM 3208),where the geographical context indicates a location near Buto.

  • 76.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Recension av J. Gonzalez & S. Pasquali (utg.) — Au-dela du toponyme. Une approche territoriale. Egypte et Mediterranee antiques. (Textes et documents de l’ENiM, 1). Montpellier, 20192020In: Bibliotheca Orientalis, ISSN 0006-1913, E-ISSN 1875-659X, Vol. 77, p. 496-498Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Recension av J.-L. Fournet, The rise of Coptic. Egyptian versus Greek inLate Antiquity (The Rostovzeff Lectures), Oxford & Princeton:Princeton University Press 2020. 224 pp.2020In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 20, p. 243-244Article, book review (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 78.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Resenärer. Dragomanen 23/2021. Olof Heilo (red.)2022In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 3, p. 49-50Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 79.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Speransky, Nina: Transitivity and Aspect in Sahidic Coptic, Studies in the Morphosyntax of Native and Greek-Origin Verbs, Hamburg: Widmaier Verlag 20222023In: Orientalistische Literaturzeitung, ISSN 0030-5383, E-ISSN 2196-6877, Vol. 118, no 4-5, p. 288-291Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    TOP 9: An Index of Toponyms in Coptic Papyrological Texts2023Book (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Torgny Säve-Söderbergh2022In: Svenskt biografiskt lexikon / [ed] Åsa Karlsson, Stockholm: Riksarkivet, 2022, p. 213-217Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Towards a List of Place Names in Coptic2023In: Proceedings of the 27th International Congress of Onomastic Sciences: Onomastics in Interaction With Other Branches of Science, Volume 1 / [ed] Bijak; U.; Swoboda; P.; & Walkowiak; J. B., Krakow: Jagielonian University Press , 2023, p. 123-141Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a report on a project aiming to create a list of place names from Coptic textual sources.After an overview of the history of research concerning Coptic place names, I describe mymethod and the material on which the list is based. So far it consists mainly of attestationsthat have been extracted from the indexes of text editions of documentary texts. The relevantbibliography has been compiled by consulting the “Checklist of Editions” used in papyrologicalstudies. Attestations from literary texts will hopefully be added later. I discuss also how bestto alphabetize Coptic place names and argue for the use of an alphabetical order instead of theconsonantal sorting order which is normally used in modern Coptic dictionaries. A samplepage from the name list is provided. Finally, I suggest that a synchronic point of view shouldbe taken in the subsequent onomastic analysis which is based on the list resulting from thisproject.

  • 83.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Traditional Egyptian II (Ptolemaic, Roman)2016In: UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology / [ed] Julie Stauder-Porchet, Andréas Stauder & Willeke Wendrich, Los Angeles: UCLA , 2016, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From 404 BCE - 394 CE hieroglyphic texts were in general composed in the high-status language variety termed Traditional Egyptian. This was used exclusively in religious and sacerdotal contexts and is as such opposed to Demotic, which served both as a spoken and as a written language. Traditional Egyptian is a reflex of how the late scribes perceived the classical language. The result is a morphologically impoverished Egyptian (in comparison with the classical language), in combination with a phonology that corresponds largely to Demotic. Traditional Egyptian served as a vehicle for many new compositions, in particular religious inscriptions in temples and on papyri, but also funerary, historical, and autobiographical texts. Meanwhile, older texts in the classical language continued to be copied: as long as there are no reliable means of dating texts according to linguistic criteria, it remains difficult to establish the exact corpus of texts written in Traditional Egyptian.

  • 84.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Tutankhamon utan graven2022In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 4, p. 35-40Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 85.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Une lettre inédite de Champollion à Migliarini2015In: Revue d'égyptologie, ISSN 0035-1849, E-ISSN 1783-1733, Vol. 66, p. 261-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A letter of Champollion to Arcangelo Michele Migliarini, dated to November 1824, and as yet unpublished, gives, indeed, further testimony as to the progression of Egyptology around that time. It deals with the scarab collection of Dámaso Puertas, the tomb of Sôter and the discovery of the Turin King-list.

  • 86.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Verbal semantics and differential object marking in Lycopolitan Coptic2018In: Diachrony of differential argument marking / [ed] Ilja A. Serzant, Alena Witzlack-Makarevich, Berlin: Language Science Press, 2018, p. 153-182Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to clarify the role of affectedness for the marking of direct objects through an analysis of a corpus of Lycopolitan Coptic texts (4th to 5th centuries AD). Whereas previ- ous research has shown the importance of definiteness for the use of the direct object marker n with the so-called imperfective tenses (present and imperfect), it has proven more diffi- cult to establish why it alternates in the non-imperfective with a zero marker. An attempt is made here to correlate the two different object constructions to Tsunoda’s verb-type hier- archy, which was conceived to capture the degree of affectedness. It appears that the more affected a direct object is, the more likely it is to receive the direct object marker; whenever the object is little affected or unaffected, the zero-marked construction is preferred.

  • 87.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    À l'écoute des voyelles dans les noms des souverains gréco-macédoniens en hiéroglyphes égyptiens2016In: Chronique d'Égypte, ISSN 0009-6067, Vol. 91, no 182, p. 285-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [fr]

    L’auteur examine l’emploi de signes notant les voyelles dans l’écriture hiéroglyphique à l’époque gréco-romaine. L’analyse des noms portés par les membres de la dynastie lagide suggère que la présence d’un signe de voyelle est liée aux différences entre les syllabes du grec et celles de l’égyptien. Les voyelles brèves ont tendance à être notées plus souvent dans les syllabes atones que dans les syllabes toniques, puisque l’égyptien contemporain, à la différence du grec, ne connaissait que peu de voyelles différentes dans cette position. L’article se conclut par une discussion de l’origine de la notation vocalique.

  • 88.
    Engsheden, Åke
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Winkler, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Three Coptic Letters in the Museum Gustavianum2018In: Journal of Juristic Papyrology, ISSN 0075-4277, Vol. 47, p. 101-115Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Schallin, Ann-Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Asine revisited: En marinarkeologisk undersökning2022In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 1, p. 49-50Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 90. Gines Taylor, Catherine
    et al.
    Kabala, Irene
    Karivieri, Arja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Sigma2016In: The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology / [ed] Paul Corby Finney, William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2016, p. 504-504Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Att upptäcka antiken: Recensioner av Stephen L. Dyson, In pursuit of ancient pasts. A history of Classical Archaeology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, New Haven och London 2006, och Great moments in Greek archaeology, red. Panos Valavanis, Los Angeles 20072009In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 4, p. 38-43Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 92.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Cymbalspelande satyrer: Ett populärt motiv bland restauratörer av antik skulptur2009In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. -, no 3, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Spelar han cymbaler, eller kanske flöjt? Förvirringen kan bli stor när man tittar närmare på antika skulpturer som restaurerats. Följ med på upptäcktsfärd bland (till synes) cymbalspelande satyrer!

  • 93.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Dancing with decorum: The eclectic usage of kalathiskos dancers and pyrrhic dancers in Roman visual culture2012In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 5, p. 7-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines two groups of motifs in Roman visual culture: females modelled on kalathiskos dancers, and males modelled on pyrrhic dancers. Eclecticism is emphasized as a strategy which was used to introduce novelties that were appropriate within a Roman cultural context. The figures representing kalathiskos dancers and pyrrhic dancers were both changed in an eclectic manner and this resulted in motifs representing the goddess Victoria, and the curetes respectively.

    Kalathiskos dancers and eclectic Victoriae figure on many different media at least from the Augustan era and into the 2nd century AD. It is argued here that the establishment of these two motifs in Roman visual culture is closely related to the aesthetics which came to the fore during the reign of Augustus. Thereafter, both kalathiskos dancers and eclectic Victoriae lingered on in the Roman cultural context until many of the material categories on which they were depicted ceased to be produced.

    Unlike the kalathiskos dancers, the male figures modelled on pyrrhic dancers are so rare within Roman visual culture that we can only assume they were, to some extent, perceived as an inappropriate motif. This can most likely be explained by the negative attitude, amongst the Roman elite, towards male dancing.

  • 94.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Dancing with decorum: The eclectic uses of kalathiskos dancers in Roman visual culture2012Conference paper (Other academic)
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    Dancing with decorum - poster
  • 95.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Den ofrivillige cymbalspelaren: En satyrskulpturs genomslag i tid och rum2011In: Okonstlad konst: Om äkthet och autenticitet i estetisk teori och praktik / [ed] Axel Englund, Anna Jörngården, Lindome: Symposion Brutus Östlings bokförlag, 2011, p. 87-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    En pompejansk Medusa2013In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 36-36Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 97.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Ett mystiskt moln över Medelhavet2010In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 2, p. 28-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 98.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Färgsprakande höst på Medelhavsmuseet2010In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 3, p. 41-41Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 99.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Graciöst vapenskrammel: Beväpnade, manliga dansare i romersk bildvärld2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Intertextualitet och romersk visuell kultur: Ett nytt angreppssätt för romersk idealskulptur2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Projektets grundläggande forskningsfråga rör idealskulpturens roll inom den romerska världen. Sedan 1800-talets mitt har sådana skulpturer i första hand studerats som romerska kopior efter grekiska original, utifrån den kopiekritiska metoden. Men under de senaste tjugo åren har kopiekritikens dominerande ställning kritiserats upprepade gånger. Kritiken rör framför allt det faktum att metoden inte tar i beaktande skulpturernas roll inom den romerska kulturella kontexten. Men trots kritiken har inget annat angreppsätt ännu lyckats konkurrera med kopiekritiken. Detta projekt syftar till att formulera ett nytt angreppssätt för studiet av dessa fascinerande skulpturer, en metod som har en stor potential att ge nya insikter beträffande idealskulpturens plats i det romerska samhället. Det nya angreppssättet utgår ifrån konceptet intertextualitet, och det introducerar således också ett teoretiskt och tvärvetenskapligt element till den aktuella debatten om hur romerska idealskulpturer bör tolkas.

    Download (pdf)
    Program
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