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  • 51.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Tillmar, Malin
    To play or not to play: that is the question: entrepreneuring as gendered play2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 206-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can play be used to unravel the discourse of the gendered hero entrepreneur and instead describe mundane entrepreneuring? Further, how can the doing of gendered social orders be problematized when entrepreneuring is equated with play? In this article we answer these questions by engaging with the French social theorist Caillois’ (1961) conceptualization of play as being at the heart of all higher culture. Two ethnographic cases act as our vehicle in analysing play as entrepreneuring. From a rich description of these cases we find that it is not a question of playing or not playing, but about how to play. All four forms of play described by Caillois are present, which illustrates the variation of entrepreneuring and the richness of activities conducted in the ‘doing of entrepreneurship’. Further, both ways of playing discussed by Caillois are found. Whilst these two ways are interrelated on a continuum in the theory of play, they have been separated in entrepreneurship discourse, where they underpin the tendency to differentiate between the hero entrepreneur and ordinary people. Finally, we engage in a more interpretive and reflective discussion on entrepreneuring as performative acts through which social orders can be not only reproduced but also transformed.

  • 52.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Verduijn, Karen
    Introduction: challenges for entrepreneurship education2018In: Revitalizing entrepreneurship education: Adopting a critical approach in the classroom / [ed] Berglund Karin; Verduijn Karen, Oxon: Routledge, 2018, p. 3-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Verduijn, Karen
    Revitalizing entrepreneurship education: Adopting a critical approach in the classroom2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This edited book, Revitalizing Entrepreneurship Education, aims to provide a compilation of how insights from Social Sciences more generally have, via Critical Entrepreneurship Studies(CES), entered our classrooms. There is nowadays a range of approaches in the academic landscape in which entrepreneurship is dressed up in new ‘outfits’. With these ‘alternative’ entrepreneurships follows the construction of a moral entrepreneurship/entrepreneur, that is to be brought more in line to (understandings of) societal developments. Bringing this awareness into the classroom calls for the revitalization of some of EE’s extant approaches. It calls for developing new, fresh and challenging approaches.The authors in this volume work with issues such as reflexivity, gender, the entrepreneurial self, responsibility, awareness, creativity and vulnerability to move both themselves and students. The individual chapters in the book offer inspirational examples of adopting other pedagogical approaches, and of how they (continuously) revitalize their educational endeavours. We hope the contributions in this book will reach Entrepreneurship Educators all around the world and that they can help to ignite a spark, and to bring something new to their interactions with students; the decision-makers of all our futures.  

  • 54.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Verduijn, Karen
    What Critical Entrepreneurship Education Can Learn From Critical Management Education2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Wettermark, Anna
    Crusaders of market hope: Disconnecting the other from her own experiences2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Wettermark, Anna
    Entreprenörskap i högre utbildning: En nyliberal trojansk häst eller en möjlighet till radikal omprövning?2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Wigren, Caroline
    Ethnographic approaches to entrepreneurship and small business research: What lessons can we learn?2014In: Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Small Business and Entrepreneurship / [ed] Alan L. Carsrud, Malin Brännback, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, p. 201-227Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professor Paul Reynolds said in a speech that entrepreneurs quickly learn how to tell the polished stories about their journeys when they are asked by researchers and journalists about what they have done and achieved. The notion of polished stories is also recognized byWilliam Gartner (2007) in a special issue on narrative, reflecting upon the fact that he can name dozens of entrepreneurs, and he has several logico-scientific descriptions, explanations, categories, concepts and hypotheses about entrepreneurs, but he cannot say much about their stories. Consequently, it has been argued that the field of entrepreneurship studies needs new concepts if it is to take seriously the ambition to understand entrepreneurs, entrepreneurship and entrepreneuring (e.g. Hjorth et al., 2003; Johannisson, 2011; Steyaert, 2007; Gartner, 2007; Huse and Landström, 1997). In this chapter we will show how entrepreneurship and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can be researched through the ethnographic method, focusing on understanding the social context of a certain phenomenon or person. Specifically, four ethnographic studies are introduced, which will be discussed as themes: context; the role of the researcher; the research process; and lessons learned.

  • 58.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Wigren-Kristoferson, Caroline
    A picture is worth a thousand words… but an artifact is worth a changed world2012In: Curiosity and Serendipity - a conference on qualitative methodsin the social sciences: Abstracts, 2012, p. 79-79Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Wigren-Kristoferson, Caroline
    Using artefacts to evoke stories in interview settings2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 60. Bird, A
    et al.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Cross cultural management in the age of globalization2009In: International Journal of Cross Cultural Management, ISSN 1470-5958, E-ISSN 1741-2838, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 139-143Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Butler, Nick
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    The Trouble with Jokes: Humour and Offensiveness in Contemporary Culture and Politics2024Book (Refereed)
    Download (pdf)
    cover
  • 62. Choi, Soki
    et al.
    Holmberg, Ingalill
    Löwstedt, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Brommels, Mats
    Managing clinical integration: a comparative study in a merged university hospital2012In: Journal of Health Organization & Management, ISSN 1477-7266, E-ISSN 1758-7247, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 486-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper explores critical factors that may obstruct or advance integration efforts initiated by the clinical management following a hospital merger. The aim is to increase our understanding of why clinical integration succeeds or fails.

    Design/methodology/approach - We compare two cases of integration efforts following the Karolinska University Hospital merger in Sweden. Each case represents two merged departments of the same specialty from each hospital site. We conducted 53 interviews with individuals representing various staff categories and collected documents to check data consistency.

    Findings - The study identifies three critical factors that seem to be instrumental for the process and outcome of integration efforts – clinical management’s 1) interpretation of the mandate, 2) design of the management constellation and 3) approach to integration. Obstructive factors are: a sole focus on the formal assignment from the top; individual leadership; and the use of a classic, planned, top-down management approach. Supportive factors are: paying attention to multiple stakeholders; shared leadership; and the use of an emergent, bottom-up management approach within planned boundaries. These findings are basically consistent with the literature’s prescriptions for managing professional organisations.

    Practical implications - Managers need to understand that public healthcare organisations are based on multiple logics that need to be handled in a balanced way if clinical integration is to be achieved – especially the tension between managerialism and professionalism.

    Originality/value - By focusing on the merger consequences for clinical units, this paper addresses an important gap in the healthcare merger literature.

  • 63.
    Demir, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Learning to strategize in the multinational firm: The role of positioning between experts and novices2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Demir, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Realizing Strategy: The Dialectics of Teaching by Doing and Learning by Immersion in Practice2010In: / [ed] Strategic Management Society (SMS) conference, Rome, 12-15 September, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Demir, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Scenarios of (dis)organizing decision base through enterprise systems 2005In: EAMSA conference proceedings, “The Transfer of Organisational Practices: Enhancing Competitiveness in Asia/Pacific-European Business Relationships. , 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Demir, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Yaklef, Ali
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    The Internet and Cross-Border Intermediaries 2006In: The Euro-Asia Management Studies Association (EAMSA) Annual Conference, Seoul, Korea, 23-25 November.    / [ed] the Euro-Asia Management Studies Association (EAMSA) Annual Conference, Seoul, Korea, 23-25 November., 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Di Gangi, Paul
    et al.
    Loyola University Maryland - Baltimore, MD.
    Teigland, Robin
    Stockholm School of Economics - Stockholm, Sweden.
    Flåten, Björn-Tore
    University of Agder - Kristiansand, Norway.
    Giovacchini, Elia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Are we in this together?  Exploring private-collective knowledge communities2011In: ICIS 2011 PROCEEDINGS, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing trend within the literature on value creation is the introduction of private-collective knowledge communities, which create opportunities for organizations to leverage knowledge. In these communities, participants privately invest in a project’s success by freely revealing and contributing their personal resources such as expertise and time to a public good. Firms then use these public goods as the basis for their own product offering. In this paper, we focus on describing the nature of the relationships that exist within private-collective knowledge communities and subsequently develop a framework for how researchers and practitioners can understand the organization-user dynamics found within these communities. As such, our research questions are as follows: What factors impact the organization-user dynamics in private-collective knowledge communities and how do these factors affect the nature of the relationships within these communities? We conclude with initial results supporting our model and discuss future steps, limitations, and contributions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 68. Dodd, Sarah
    et al.
    Lage-Arias, Serxia
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Jack, Sarah
    Hytti, Ulla
    Verduijn, Karen
    Transforming enterprise education: sustainable pedagogies of hope and social justice2022In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 34, no 7-8, p. 686-700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on Alistair Anderson's work, this paper proposes transforming enterprise education to deeply address questions of sustainability, social justice and hope in our time of multiple and complex crises. New pedagogies, practices, vocabularies and connections help us to enact crises in entrepreneurial, ethical and creative ways, enabling us to remain hopeful in the face of unknown horizons. Drawing from critical pedagogies, from Epistemologies of the South, and from the wisdoms of Alistair Anderson, the paper outlines how transforming to a more, hopeful, socially just and sustainable enterprise education could move us beyond present alternatives. We suggest that transforming enterprise education (TrEE) would better facilitate students as ethical change-makers when they engage with their worlds, and its unseen future horizons. TrEE emphasizes the time needed for questioning dominant meanings and space for experimenting with new ones. It invites re-placing us in the margins and with the excluded. It takes an expansive view of the ecosystem, and places enterprise within its wider context. It focuses students, teachers, entrepreneurs and various other stakeholders in learning together with the non-human and relies on sustainable stewardship, social justice and hope at the core of transforming enterprise education.

  • 69.
    Fabel, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    E-deltagandets potential: En explorativ studie av hur offentliga myndigheter möter sociala medier2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Internet has been transformed. The new Internet, Web 2.0, is all about interactivity, communication and conversations. Citizens and stakeholders demand transparency and influence. The individuals that contribute their knowledge and views demand insight into how their contribution is used to develop the organization, or they leave the conversation. At the same time the Swedish parliament requires improved efficiency, availability and access to government services.

    Previous research shows there is a trend towards issue arenas where issues and topics, not organizations, are at the center of communication. The emergence of e-government represents a paradigm shift, from emphasizing standardization and cost-efficiency, to an emphasis on coordinated network building, external collaboration, and customer services. This transformation from bureaucracy to networked governance requires new strategies.

    To explore these trends and phenomena research interviews have been conducted with representatives for three Swedish government agencies. The empirical findings have then been illuminated with neo-institutional theory and analyzed with governance and communication strategy concepts and theories.

    The findings show that the three agencies have taken some small steps toward the virtual issue arenas. Some employees participate in social media, but the participation isn’t formalized and knowledge isn’t aggregated within the organizations. The general knowledge of social media is low and there seems to be institutionalized myths affecting the decision environment. Management consists of members of similar age. Top management from different agencies in the sector frequently meets, and the agencies await and follow the other agencies examples.

    The new e-logic challenges existing power structures, as well as the myth of authority, since external actors gain power over business development. In order to fully participate in the conversation in virtual issue arenas, a change in organizational culture is likely needed, and potentially generational change might be necessary to facilitate the change in culture. Engaging in a few, carefully selected e-projects will enable the agencies to learn and expand the engagement gradually. The accumulated experience may lead to a change in the institutionalized myths, thus enabling the predicted paradigm shift.

    Download full text (pdf)
    edeltagandets_potential_MikaelFabel
  • 70.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    A critique of Hofstede’s fifth national culture dimension2003In: International Journal of Cross Cultural Management, ISSN 1470-5958, E-ISSN 1741-2838, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 347-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using indigenous knowledge of Chinese culture and philosophy, this article critiques Geert Hofstede’s fifth national culture dimension, i.e. ‘Confucian dynamism’, also referred to as ‘long-term orientation’. The basic premise on which the dimension is founded is scrutinized and the way in which this index has been constructed is assessed in detail. It is argued that there is a philosophical flaw inherent in this ‘new’ dimension. Given this fatal flaw and other methodological weaknesses, the usefulness of Hofstede’s fifth dimension is doubted. The article concludes by calling for new visions and perspectives in our cross cultural research.

  • 71.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Att göra affärer i dagens Kina2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En introduktion om vad det innebär för svenska företag att göra affärer i Kina och en presentation av det kinesiska samhället, dess politik, ekonomi, och kultur ur ett svensk-kinesiskt perspektiv.

  • 72.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Chinese Business Negotiating Style1999Book (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Chinese business style: a regional approach2005In: Challenges for China's development: an enterprise perspective / [ed] David H. Brown, Alasdair MacBean, London: Routledge, 2005, p. 156-172Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The existing knowledge of Chinese business style is based largely on the perception of China as one single homogeneous land and the Chinese as doing business in “the Chinese style”. This “one China, one style” approach had its advantages and was acceptable at a time when Western companies started embarking on their China mission. But, after many years of extensive operations on Chinese soil, Western managers have come to realize that there exist “many Kingdoms” within the Middle Kingdom and there is a variety of “Chineseness” among the Chinese. How to understand and cope with the diverse patterns of Chinese business behaviour within China poses an increasing challenge to management. The purpose of this chapter is to conduct an exploratory study of the diversity of Chinese business styles from a regional subcultural perspective. A survey was conducted among Swedish companies to identify the differences in Chinese business negotiating style between Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou. The profiles of businesspeople from the three regions are discussed and compared with each other. The chapter concludes with a number of theoretical and managerial implications.

  • 74.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Cross-cultural management is at crossroads2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Den kinesiske erhvervskultur2006In: Jeg skal til Kina / [ed] Kjeld Erik Brødsgaard, København: Forlagskompagniet/Jepsen & Co , 2006, p. 37-53Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Efterord av Tony Fang2007In: Möjligheternas Rike: Svenska entreprenörer i Kina / [ed] David Stockelberg, Göteborg: Poolen , 2007, p. 178-186Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 77.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    From "Onion" to "Ocean": Paradox and change in national cultures. 2006In: Academy of International Business (AIB) annual meeting, Beijing, June 23-26. , 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    From “onion” to “ocean”: paradox and change in national cultures2005In: International Studies of Management and Organization, ISSN 0020-8825, E-ISSN 1558-0911, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 71-90Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Negotiation: the Chinese style.2006In: Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 50-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Nordic culture and Nordic people: A Chinese perspective2008In: Making it in China / [ed] Merete Lie, Ragnhild Lund, Gard Hopsdal Hansen, Høyskoleforlaget , 2008, p. 71-89Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 81.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    The "coop-comp" Chinese negotiation strategy2003In: Trust and antitrust in Asian business alliances: historical roots and current practices / [ed] John B. Kidd, Frank-Jurgen Richter, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003, p. 121-150Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    The moon and the sun of culture. 2004In: The Academy of International Business (AIB), Competitive Paper. Stockholm, July 10-13. , 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Yin Yang: A New Perspective on Culture2012In: Management and Organization Review, ISSN 1740-8776, E-ISSN 1740-8784, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 25-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I propose a Yin Yang perspective to understand culture. Basedon the indigenous Chinese philosophy of Yin Yang, I conceptualize culture as possessinginherently paradoxical value orientations, thereby enabling it to embrace opposite traitsof any given cultural dimension. I posit that potential paradoxical values coexist in anyculture; they give rise to, exist within, reinforce, and complement each other to shapethe holistic, dynamic, and dialectical nature of culture. Seen from the Yin Yangperspective, all cultures share the same potential in value orientations, but at the sametime they are also different from each other because each culture is a unique dynamicportfolio of self-selected globally available value orientations as a consequence of thatculture’s all-dimensional learning over time.

  • 84.
    Fang, Tony
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Axelsson, Björn
    Strategic change towards global sourcing: Ericsson in China2005In: Developing sourcing capabilities: creating strategic change in purchasing and supply management / [ed] Björn Axelsson, Frank Rozemeijer, Finn Wynstra, Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2005, p. 305-322Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Fang, Tony
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Faure, Guy Olivier
    Chinese Communication Characteristics: A Yin Yang Perspective2011In: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, ISSN 0147-1767, E-ISSN 1873-7552, Vol. 35, p. 320-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on Chinesecommunication has so far focused on the understanding of the impact of traditional Confucian cultural values on Chinesecommunicationcharacteristics. While this Confucian-oriented Chinesecommunication style remains meaningful and in many situations powerful in Chinese society and in communication between Chinese and western professionals, the paradox inherent in Chinese culture and communication has rarely been researched. Moreover, China's three decades of rapid economic progress and unprecedented interactions with the rest of the world have contributed to an emergent Chinesecommunication style, which differs from the traditional one. Based on the philosophical principle of Yin Yang, this paper provides a framework to capture the paradox and change of Chinesecommunicationcharacteristics in today's changing Chinese society. Implications for how to communicate effectively with the Chinese from practitioners’ point of view are also discussed.

  • 86.
    Fang, Tony
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Fridh, C
    Schultzberg, S
    The failure of Telia-Telenor merger negotiation2003In: The First International Biennale on Negotiation, NEGOCIA, Paris, December 11-12., 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Fang, Tony
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Fridh, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Schultzberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Why did the Telia-Telenor merger fail?2004In: International Business Review, ISSN 0969-5931, E-ISSN 1873-6149, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 573-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to examine through a case study of the merger of Telia–Telenor why firms from apparently similar national cultures can fail to form a co-operative venture. Telia and Telenor were the largest telecom operators in Sweden and Norway, respectively. Both were government-owned with a strong monopoly over their respective national markets for a long time. Despite perceived similarities between the negotiating parties in national culture, corporate practice, and language, the negotiation eventually went askew and the ongoing merger ended in December 1999 after only two months in existence. We describe the process of the Telia–Telenor merger negotiation and analyze it from a cross-cultural management perspective. Our major finding is that historical sentiments, feelings and emotions, if not handled well, can cause fatal damage to cross-cultural business ventures.

  • 88.
    Fang, Tony
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Kriz, A
    Cross-cultural challenges to the IMP paradigm: Evidence from China2000In: Paper presented at the 16th IMP annual conference, Bath, U.K., September 7-9. , 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 89.
    Fang, Tony
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Kriz, A
    Trust in Chinese relational networks: Moving from guanxi to xinren2003In: The 2003 IMP Annual Meeting, University of Lugano, September 4-6, www.impgroup.org, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Fang, Tony
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Yang, D
    Pykäläinena, T
    Alleviating piracy through open source strategy: An exploratory study of business software firms in China2009In: The Journal of strategic informations systems, ISSN 0963-8687, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 165-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper advances the existing knowledge of anti-piracy strategies by proposing an open source strategy (OS strategy) to alleviate software piracy based on a qualitative, case-based, exploratory study of eight software firms operating in China. The paper shows that the OS strategy is conditionally adoptable, depending on how users are willing to pay for services (market conditions); how critical and complex software is required for upgrading and modifications (software conditions); and how firms can avoid resources overloading and/or shortage (firm conditions). The paper also identifies several new indicators to assess the effectiveness of the OS strategy against piracy. Managerial implications about how to improve business in piracy-ridden environment are discussed.

     

  • 91.
    Fang, Tony
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Zhao, S
    Worm, V
    The changing Chinese culture and business behaviour2008In: International Business Review, ISSN 0969-5931, E-ISSN 1873-6149, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 141-145Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 92. Fayolle, Alain
    et al.
    Landström, Hans
    Gartner, Bill William
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    The institutionalization of entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship and Regional Development: Questioning the status quo and re-gaining hope for entrepreneurship research2016In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 28, no 7-8, p. 477-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we briefly identify three main challenges/issues that should be taken into consideration in the institutionalization of entrepreneurship research: (1) recognizing the complexity of the phenomenon under study; (2) producing interesting, relevant and useful research results for all stakeholders; and (3) developing a critical posture in research. Following the discussion of these challenges/issues we introduce the five contributions to the Special Issue that, in different ways, problematize and challenge mainstream research and approaches. These articles use ‘dissensus discourses’, apply critical, ideological and paradigmatic stances and in some cases underline the importance of contextual factors.

  • 93. Fayolle, Alain
    et al.
    Landström, HansGartner, William B.Berglund, KarinStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Institutionalization of entrepreneurship research2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 94. Fjellstrom, Daniella
    et al.
    Bai, Wensong
    Oliveira, Luis
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Springboard internationalisation in times of geopolitical tensions2023In: International Business Review, ISSN 0969-5931, E-ISSN 1873-6149, Vol. 32, no 6, article id 102144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geopolitical tensions and a world where state interventions are driven by national security and ideology present novel challenges for emerging market multinational enterprises (EMNEs). Often, individual companies are targeted, and their corporate growth gets curbed. These phenomena are derived from non-market factors, which are generally absent in the springboard view of the international business discourse that explains the foreign expansion of EMNEs by viewing these firms as ambidextrous organisations capable of handling conflicting requirements. This research aims to understand the international expansion of EMNEs under geopolitical tensions by incorporating non-market factors into the ambidexterity model to enrich the springboard view. A case study of Huawei and its exclusion from the telecommunications industry in Sweden forms the empirical base of this research. The contributions are twofold. First, within the springboard view, the ambidexterity model can be upgraded by incorporating non-market factors that better explain the international expansion of EMNEs in changing geopolitical and business contexts. Second, the research highlights the management of EMNEs' subsidiaries while considering geopolitical tensions.

  • 95. Fletcher, R
    et al.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Assessing the impact of culture on relationship creation and network formation in emerging Asian markets2006In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 40, no 3/4, p. 430-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this article is to develop an alternative approach to researching the impact of culture on relationship creation and network formation in Asian markets.Design/methodology/approach– A conceptual approach is taken.Findings– The paper has argued that in Asian markets culture can be better understood on the basis of cultural groupings (e.g. ethnic grouping) than on politically defined and artificially created national boundaries. The assessment and comparison of cultural differences and similarities in Asia can be conducted by using an “enlarged” emic approach. Given the idiosyncratic nature of relationships and the increasing significance of the emic contexts enriched by globalisation, the proposed approach is likely to generate a better understanding of the impact of culture on relationship creation and network formation in emerging Asian markets.Practical implications– Managers doing business in emerging Asian markets need to go beyond traditional national culture stereotypes to capture cultural diversities and paradoxes in terms of, for example, ethnic culture, regional culture, professional culture, and emerging global culture groupings within and across national borders.Originality/value– Differing from the “either/or” nature of the mainstream scholarship which tends to bipolarise national cultures, this paper emphasises the “both/and” character of Asian cultures which intrinsically embrace paradoxes in philosophies, values, and behaviours. The paper has suggested that an “enlarged” emic approach to cross‐cultural clustering and comparison be used in Asian contexts to better understand the workings of relationship creation and network formation in emerging Asian markets.

  • 96. Ghauri, Pervez N.
    et al.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Negotiating with the Chinese: a process view2003In: International business negotiation / [ed] Pervez N. Ghauri, Jean-Claude Usunier, Oxford: Pergamon Press, 2003, 2. uppl., p. 411-434Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Giovacchini, Elia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Virtual worlds: A new approach to innovation and growth for SMEs in the EU2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 98.
    Grassman, Rickard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Bracamonte, Vanessa
    Davis, Matthew
    Sato, Maki
    Attitudes to Cryptocurrencies: A Comparative Study between Sweden and Japan2021In: The Review of Socionetwork Strategies, ISSN 2523-3173, no 15, p. 169-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore how cryptocurrencies have been received in Sweden and Japan, and what specific attitudes and discourses may reveal about the ethical implications surrounding this new technology. By way of topic modelling prevalent discourses on social media among users of cryptocurrencies, and teasing out the more culturally situated significance in such interactions through discourse analysis, our aim is to unpack the way certain tropes and traces around the notion of autonomy may provide a fruitful lens through which we may discern how this technology has been received in each respective country. The ultimate aim of the paper is to shed light on the attitudes that inform the way this technology is perceived and the cultural and ideological nuances that this brings to the fore, as well as how this culturally nuanced view may help us better discern the potential advantages and ethical challenges associated with this new technology. 

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  • 99.
    Haftor, Darek
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Adapting to local ethical standards: a case of a global company2011In: International Journal of Business and Globalisation, ISSN 1753-3627, E-ISSN 1753-3635, International Journal of Business and Globalisation, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 367-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The normative challenges that emerge from a global-local tension, particularly with regard to the supra-legal normativity structures, such as ethical, aesthetical, or creedal, are addressed here. This study investigates a globally operating company that successfully adapted to the local ethical conditions, which contributed to its achievement of business success. Theoretically regarded, it is not clear how the phenomena of globalisation should be conceived. This investigation assumes a novel approach to the conceptual elaboration of globalisation, based upon some selected components from the Cosmonomic philosophy of H. Dooyeweerd. A multi-modal analysis of this case is presented, which uncovers inherent normativity structures governing the involved actors. This in turn provides a rationale for why the alignment between the ethical and economic norms may be congruent and positive. In this way, some initial and tentative proposals are advanced here for an alternative approach to the conception of the phenomena of globalisation.

  • 100.
    Haftor, Darek
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Kajtazi, M
    Exploring the Notion of Information: a Proposal for a Multifaced Understanding2010Conference paper (Refereed)
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