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  • 51.
    Kollnitz, Andrea
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Pecorari, Marco
    Fashion, Performance & Performativity2020Book (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Kollnitz, Andrea
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Wallenberg, LouiseStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Modernism och mode2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    I Modernism och mode diskuteras modets starka och mångfacetterade betydelse för modernismen och dess olika uttryck under perioden 1900-1960 i tio icke tidigare publicerade essäer författade av såväl svenska som internationella forskare. Boken, som är den första omfattande svenska publikationen i ämnet, visar hur mode inom modernismen ges en uttalad och proklamerad position som konst under en tid då den kommersiella modeproduktionen mer och mer kopplas till massproduktion och -konsumtion. Boken belyser bland annat Isaac Grünewalds och Sigrid Hjerténs modemedvetna själviscensättning, modedesignern Jean Patous kreationer mellan konst och business, Elsa Schiaparellis surrealistiska modedesign, modets roll inom den italienska futurismen och ryska konstruktivismen, Magos modernistiska filmkostym, filmen som modernistiskt allkonstverk och modets filosofiska betydelser i förhållande till modernism och modernitet.

  • 53.
    Kollnitz, Andrea
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Weltzien, Friedrich
    Subversive Selbstermächtigung. Surrealistische Modefotografie bei Leonor Fini und Wols2017In: Fotogeschichte, ISSN 0720-5260, Vol. 37, no 146, p. 3-14Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Koskinen, Maaret
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Wallenberg, LouiseStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Harry bit för bit : Harry Scheins många ansikten2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Laakkonen, Viivi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Finland's Biggest Dress Party: A Study of the Role of Women's Appearances at the Independence Day Reception2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Finland’s Biggest Dress Party – A Study of the Role of Women’s Appearances at the Independence Day Reception, aims to understand the role of dresses at Finland’s Independence Day Reception by focusing on how the reception has earned a title “Finland’s biggest dress party”, and meanings behind the dresses. The aims are studied combining fashion and media studies in three analytical chapters focusing on the media’s development and influence, how the dresses work as a communication tool and what kind of messages are sent through dresses, and Finnishness and national identity in the dresses. The chapters are linked to each other by the importance of the communication between the dresses, the media and the audience during the hype around the Independence Day Reception. The study is based on interviews, which were conducted with seven reception guests and three dress designers, archival studies, visual culture studies and (fashion) media discourse. The study draws on theories by Roland Barthes, Malcolm Barnard and Erving Goffman.

  • 56.
    Labrague, Michelle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Patagonia, A Case Study in the Historical Development of Slow Thinking2017In: Journal of Design History, ISSN 0952-4649, E-ISSN 1741-7279, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 175-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article traces some of the historical roots of 'slow' through changes in ecology, design thinking and practice and implications for fashion and design histories. It sees 'slow', as present in slow design and slow fashion, as a contemporary idea that marks renewed interest in sustainability debates whilst indicating additional shifts since the second wave of environmentalism in the mid-twentieth century. As fashion and design history expands to incorporate environmental history, this article presents a historical case study of the material culture of the American activewear brand Patagonia. Their logo and early catalogues highlight some of the tensions between the differing schools of ecological thought and the problems presented by applying those values to design and sportswear practice. Similarly, sustainability has been linked to a variety of issues from environmental preservation and waste to sweated labour. Therefore, this article uses slow and its focus on locality and mindfulness as theoretical touchstones for environmental thinking in the histories of design and fashion.

  • 57.
    Lunden, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Oscar Night in Hollywood: Edith Head and the Emergence of the Academy Awards Fashion Pres-Show2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Mardell, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    "Questioning the boundaries between fast- and slow fashion"2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 59.
    McNeil, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    A cultural history of dress and fashion in the age of Enlightenment2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 60.
    McNeil, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Alchemical Power. On the Duchess and the Ladies who Lunched2013In: Vestoj: The Journal of Sartorial Matters, no 4, p. 17-26Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The power of fashion clothing to attract attention has never been so pervasive, but its meaning has changed. What once seemed unobtainable and was achieved via years of aesthetic and personal ‘training’ sits on a stage quite different from that of the inter-war years. This world disappeared with the Second World War, despite various attempts to revive it in the fashions and entertainments of the 1950s and its mythological reflection in Hollywood films of that era. The essay reconsiders the infamous essay by Truman Capote; a part of his unfinished novel Answered Prayers, published as La Côte Basque 1965 in Esquire in 1975.

  • 61.
    McNeil, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    'Beauty in Search of Knowledge': Eighteenth-Century Fashion and the World of Print2017In: Fashioning the Early Modern: Dress, Textiles, and Innovation in Europe, 1500-1800 / [ed] Evelyn Welch, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 62.
    McNeil, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    "Beyond the horizon of hair": masculinity, nationhood and fashion in the Anglo-French Eighteenth century2013In: Hinter dem Horizont, Band 2: Projektion und Distinktion landlicher Oberschichten im europaischen Vergleich, 17-19. Jahrhundert / [ed] Dagmar Friest, Frank Schmekel, Aschendorff Verlag, 2013, 1, p. 79-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fashion is a distinctive format as it is both an economic product and a part of the imaginative horizon. It exists in a double register of material actions and also in its representations. The wearing of false hair in replacement of one’s own is a cultural act that was transformed from the social requisite of an élite to a more individualised consumer choice over the course of the long-eighteenth century. Worn almost universally by men in England and very widely in France by the early-eighteenth century, the wig was offered in a variety of formats and qualities, and was constantly subject to fashion change and also innovation in design. Over the course of the century changing priorities about health, science and also aesthetics became allied with notions of comfort and convenience, meaning that the wig did not become ‘old fashioned’ but rather was ‘re- fashioned’ in new ways. Even at the time when the wearing of one’s own hair was gaining currency in the 1760-1770s, ‘fashion’ created new tastes for very high toupées, long tails and particularly mannered appearances for male wigs. Although wigs represented a cost, the hair of young men could likely be modified or amplified with false hair in order to appear fashionable. This paper will present aspects of the evidence that survives for this practice, as well as speculating at length on what the hairstyles might have meant or inferred. In this way, the chapter will consider both a social, bodily and material culture practice – hairstyling and hair-pieces – with broader social, psychological and cultural meanings.

  • 63.
    McNeil, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Caricature and Fashion- History of Mockery2013In: Reproduction, Representation, and Communication: Print Culture 1600-1900 / [ed] Kei-yin Huang, Taipei, Taiwan: National Yang-Ming University , 2013, p. 35-56Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    English Version of Italian Article: McNeil, P.K. 2010, 'Caricatura e moda: storia di una presa in giro' in Muzzarelli, M.G., Riello, G. & Tosi Brandi, E. (eds), Moda. Storia e Storie, Bruno Mondadori, Milan, pp. 156-167 

  • 64.
    McNeil, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Conspicuous Waist: Queer Dress in the "Long Eighteenth Century"2013In: A Queer History of Fashion: from the closet to the catwalk / [ed] Valerie Steele, New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013, p. 71-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Why do many young gay men wish to appear thin, rich and pretty? What are the precursors for this way of being in the world? Why does society blame gay male designers for extreme female fashion trends? How do persecuted minorities manage their identity via clothing and fashionable looks? These are big questions indeed. They can be tested in part through an historical overview and a series of case studies.

    This chapter will examine the tantalising but difficult hypothesis that ‘gay style actually sets trends. It’s what straight people take fashion from’. Richard Martin proposed this in his short article ‘The Gay Factor in Fashion’ in Esquire Gentlemen, 1993, when he argued that gay male influence in the refining and defining of masculine style ‘by dint of their attraction to their own gender’ had never been more pronounced than in the street style of that period: ‘Straight suburban males in recent years have absorbed gay style signatures, including earrings and bandannas, and are now often indistinguishable from the gay clones of the 1970s... Christopher Street is our sartorial Ellis Island’.

    But ‘gay fashion’ before that point was often far from butch. This overview begins with the development of sodomitical subcultures in early-eighteenth century western Europe. Much is known of their fashionable taste including extreme colours, clashing colours and patterns, and sometimes cross-dressing. The chapter goes on to examine the function and tenacity of the aristocratic dress codes of the fin-de-siècle dandy which were adopted by numerous queer men until the 1960s.We still see this being played out in the generational conflict in the film The Boys in the Band (1970).  These Wildean strategies survive, what Alan Sinfield in his The Wilde century : effeminacy, Oscar Wilde, and the queer moment (1994) called the constellation of ‘effeminacy, leisure, idleness, immorality, luxury, insouciance, decadence and aestheticism’. As well as suggesting difference and excess, aristocratic dress codes might also have been adopted as the suggestion of wealthy assurance could excuse eccentric behaviour considered ‘other’. The corollary is the inter-war mannish lesbian such as the artist Gluck, whose eccentric but purposeful adoption of male dress in public was a privilege of her great wealth.

  • 65.
    McNeil, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    'Donald Friend (1915-1989) 'Love Me Sailor' 1949'2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Catalogue entry on a painting concerning literary censorship painted by Australian artist Donald Friend in the remote town of Hill End, 1940s.

  • 66.
    McNeil, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Georg Simmel: the ‘philosophical Monet’2014In: Thinking through fashion: a guide to key theorists / [ed] Agnes Rocamora, Anneke Smelik, London: I.B. Tauris, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 67.
    McNeil, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies. University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.
    Ideology, Fashion and the Darlys’ "Macaroni" Prints2015In: Dress and Ideology: Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present / [ed] Shoshana-Rose Marzel and Guy Stiebel, Bloomsbury Academic, 2015, p. 111-136Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As John B. Thompson notes, the concept and theory of ideology ‘first appeared in late eighteenth-century France’ via the thinking of the PhilosopheDestutt de Tracy[1] and has come to mean ‘systems of thought’, ‘systems of belief’ or ‘symbolic systems’ which pertain to social action or political practice’.[2] Central to the study of ideology is the rise of ‘mass communication’ and its relationship with the state. Writing mainly regarding the influential role of the press in twentieth-century life, Thompson acknowledges its seventeenth and eighteenth century precursive forms and remarks that ‘[t]he reproducibility of symbolic forms is one of the key characteristics that underlies the commercial exploitation of technical media by institutions of mass communication, and the commodification of symbolic forms which these institutions pursue and promote’.[3]If ideology is promulgated by and within mass communication and viewing positions, how then are we to interpret the matter of looking at an eighteenth-century caricature? How might an ideological effect work within what was considered a ‘low’ art form? What was the caricature’s relationship with ‘high art’? What intensity of viewing is necessary – how many people need to be able to ‘see’ - for there to be an ‘ideological’ impact? Is there a concrete difference between the reception of a political caricature, and one concerning manners, such as arose in very large numbers in the last third of the eighteenth century in England? How can we determine the ideological function of eighteenth-century printed satires of fashion? What was the ideological role when observed of the ‘witty expressions and humorous sallies’ that were a popular consumer item, as d’Archenholz observed of the many such broadsheets being sold in the streets of

    [1] John B. Thompson, Ideology and Modern Culture: Critical Social Theory in the Era of Mass Communication (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1990), p. 2.

    [2] Thompson adds: 'For social life is, to some extent, a field of contestation, in which struggle takes place through words and symbols as well as through the use of physiscal force.' Ibid., p. 10.

    [3] Ibid., p. 166.

  • 68.
    McNeil, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    ‘Movement and Pep’: Re-animating the Duchess of Windsor’s clothing fashions2013In: Mode und Bewegung: Beiträge zur Theorie und Geschichte der Kleidung / [ed] Anna-Brigitte Schlittler, Katarina Tietze, Berlin: Gebr. Mann Verlag , 2013, p. 57-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Between the wars the Duchess of Windsor  (1895/6?-1986) was a quintessential female sartorial modernist. It was an image built on a type of obsessive discipline and iteration of gestures and actions in ‘appearing’ and also in managing a household – ‘she was always in control’, noted her friend Carol Petrie. Photographic and drawn representations of her by Man Ray, Cecil Beaton and Horst played a role in disseminating new silhouettes and profiles for modern women. Yet these images are frozen, and they drain the kinesic element of wearing garments for which she was notable. The Duchess of Windsor brought her clothes, which now hang as empty relics, into a range of animated performances, which can be reconstructed through film, photography and memoirs. The jewellery collection, the sale of which reinvigorated her fame after her death, constituted a type of endless writing over the body, being inscribed with private messages in the prince’s hand-writing by the jeweler-engravers. Their technical and aesthetic innovation lay in their ability to move, to be flexible and pliable, to mould to her clothes and her body. Her initials and quasi-royal cipher were embroidered onto both inner and outer clothing, and incorporated into the structure of her dwelling spaces. This paper will relate the modernity of the Duchess’ sartorial movement to more archaic and emblematic poses. Perhaps her appearance was so compelling because it linked her contemporary life to early-modern traditions of personal jokes and personal allegiances reiterated through the wearing of clothes, craft practices and gift exchange. 

  • 69.
    McNeil, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    ‘Sparks Set in Gold’: A New History of Jewellery2013In: Art History, ISSN 0141-6790, E-ISSN 1467-8365, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 867-870Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 70.
    McNeil, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    The Domestic Environment2013In: The Museum magazine, Issue three: Glorious Days: Australia 1913 / [ed] Michelle Hetherington, Canberra: National Museum of Australia , 2013, p. 121-133Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Domestic life is by definition ephemeral. Nonetheless, we can marshal much evidence from material culture, oral histories, living wage and housing commissions held before the War to create a snapshot of domestic lives in 1913. The choice and design of homes and their fit-out meant a great deal, financially and psychologically. Most of these homes were in cities: they contained more than one third (37%) of the population at this date. The loan schemes that enabled the purchase of homes in all Australian states by the 1920s have their roots in the Workers’ Housing Acts, for example that of Western Australia of 1913.[2] This was a dynamic period of social progress, marked by the professionalization of housecraft, cookery and mother-craft within the domestic science movement that emerged here and in the United States of America from the 1890s. New attitudes appeared at this time in Australian domestic architecture in terms of internal planning, the size of windows, the access to outdoors and the management of light. The possiblity of living in a flat was purposefully raised for the first time, and the role of worker’s housing came under increasing scrutiny.

    [1] Total population of Australia in 1911 was 4,492,000. Sydney’s population was 630,000; Melbourne 589,000; Brisbane 139,000; Adelaide 190,000; Perth 107,000; Hobart 39,000. W.D. Borrie, The European Peopling of Australasia. A Demographic History 1788-1988, Australian National University, Canberra, 1994, p.183.

    [2] In New South Wales, the Government Savings Bank advanced 75 per cent of the valuation in 1913. Working class suburbs such as Balmain and Newtown had only 25 per cent owner-occupiers compared with 75 per cent in a suburb such as Canterbury. Robin Walker, ‘Aspects of working-class life in industrial Sydney in 1913’, Labour History, v. 58, May 1990, p. 39.

    Accompanies an exhibition exploring Australia before the Great War (WW I).

  • 71.
    McNeil, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Thea Proctor: Towards a stylish Australia2013In: Sydney Moderns: Art for a New World / [ed] Daniel Thomas, Denise Mimmocchi, Deborah Edwards, Sydney, N.S.W: Art Gallery of New South Wales , 2013, p. 98-103Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 72.
    McNeil, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Miller, Sandra
    Fashion Writing and Criticism: History, Theory, Practice2014Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "Fashion Writing and Criticism" provides students with the tools to critique fashion with skill and style. Explaining the history and theory of criticism, this innovative text demonstrates how the tradition of criticism has developed and how this knowledge can be applied to fashion, enabling students to acquire the methods and proper vocabulary to be active critics themselves. Integrating history and theory, this innovative book explains the development of fashion writing, the theoretical basis on which it sits, and how it might be improved and applied. Through concise snapshot case studies, top international scholars McNeil and Miller analyse fashion excerpts in relation to philosophical ideas and situate them within historical contexts. Case studies include contemporary examples of fashion writing, as well as Diana Vreeland at Harper's Bazaar and Richard Martin on Karl Lagerfeld. Accessibly written, "Fashion Writing and Criticism" enables readers to understand, assess and make value judgments about the fascinating and changeable field of fashion [publisher's abstract]

  • 73.
    McNeil, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Riello, Giorgio
    Luxury: a Rich History2016Book (Refereed)
  • 74.
    McNeil, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies. University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    Riello, Giorgio
    ‘The Fashion Arts’: Jean Michel Frank, Elsa Schiaparelli and the Inter-war Aesthetic Project2013In: Fashion Cultures Revisited: Theories, Explorations and Analysis / [ed] Stella Bruzzi and Pamela C. Gibson, London: Routledge, 2013, 2, p. 217-233Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between art and fashion has a long and complicated history. Their commercial potential, their reliance on creativity and the mondaine lives of their protagonists, have made of art and fashion an established pairing at least since the rise of couture and impressionist art in 1860s France. The same can be said for fashion and design, though theirs is a more recent affair. In the early twentieth century the couturier Paul Poiret played with the idea of design, but it was only in the post-war period that the alliance between design and fashion became strong, in particular with the rise of prêt-à-porter, the made-in-Italy and American casualwear and lifestyles. The danger is of constructing histories in which fashion remains a distinct unit of analysis that only interacts with other realms of material creation as if fashion were separate from either art or design.

    This essay takes a different approach to the relationship and emphasises the imbrication of interior design and fashion. Elizabeth Wilson’s concept of the ‘fashion arts’ might be usefully employed here (Wilson 2004: 377). She argues that the interwar period saw designers’ practices widen and encompass a whole range of the visual arts. The ensemble, whether dress or room, was more than the sum of its parts, and several famous designers extended their interests across materials, genres and professional labels. Collaborations were common as was the creation of aesthetic projects through conversations between designers, couturiers and artists. We should consider here also the view of Rita Felski (2011: 231) that the ‘uncoupling of modernity’ from ‘aesthetic modernism’ permits an eclectic yet coherent range of approaches to emerge in the ‘cultures of femininity’ in modern fashion. That is, a more complex range of approaches to modernism might be possible than the architecture of Le Corbusier and the Purism of Amédée Ozenfant.

    Our focus is on an ‘improbable’ couple: the French interior designer Jean-Michel Frank and the Italian-born couturiere Elsa Schiaparelli.

  • 75.
    McNeil, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies. University of Technology, Sydney.
    Riello, Giorgio
    University of Warwick.
    Walking the Streets of London and Paris: Shoes in the Enlightenment2011In: Shoes: A History from Sandals to Sneakers / [ed] G Riello and P McNeil, Berg Publishers, 2011, 1:2, p. 94-115Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 76.
    McNeil, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Steorn, PatrikStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Fashion and Print Culture: Translation and transformation: Special Issue of Konsthistorisk tidskrift/Journal of Art History2013Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fashion is both a material product and a feature of the imagination. The way in which it is visualized, disseminated and distributed through representations is central to its social impact and influence across time and place. A study of print culture as it relates to fashion also requires the type of detailed understandings of the producers and reading publics for eighteenth-century periodicals and earlier forms of print. Yet the study of the construction and dissemination of the first fashion magazines is still little understood. Much has to be learned regarding the consumption of print culture generally as it pertains to fashion. What was the relationship between publishers, writers and illustrators of the fashion design press in France, England and Sweden? Who provided the narrative structure and imaginary settings of these magazines that continue to animate contemporary advertising today? How did the transmission of ideas in print work in practice?

    The dominance of an English-French dialogue about fashion is not just a product of the dominance of contemporary Western European foci in cultural history, in part a product of the languages that were taught in schools and colleges until recently. Even in the 18th century, fashion was often discussed as a type of dialogue between France and England. The eighteenth-century periodical Cabinet des Modes was itself positioned as a type of dialogue between England and France, suggesting that fashion derived from these two principal fashion capitals. Indeed, it changed its name at one stage to Magasin des Modes Nouvelles Françaises et Anglaises, allowing both a pictorial and a rhetorical dialogue to take place on the page, and inserting both countries into a cosmopolitan circuit ideas and of exchange. How then can we narrate the story of fashionability in countries other than France and England, what can be learned from national collections and foreign language texts than remain poorly accessed outside those countries?

    This special issue of the KT publishes findings related to the HERA funded project ‘Fashioning the Early Modern 1500-1800’ and the portfolio to be managed by McNeil and Dr Patrik Steorn, its post-doctoral researcher, ‘Print Culture and Fashion Products’. Editors' Introduction plus 9 articles; 8 in English and 1 in French.

  • 77.
    McNeil, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies. University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    Steorn, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    The Medium of Print and the Rise of Fashion in the West2013In: Konsthistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-3609, E-ISSN 1651-2294, Vol. 82, no 3, p. 135-156Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Molander, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Single Fathers in Control: Photo Diaries and the Power Balance in the Research Situation2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 79.
    Molander, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Swedish single fathers feeding the family2019In: Feeding Children Inside and Outside the Home / [ed] Vicky Harman, Benedetta Cappellini, Charlotte Faircloth, Routledge, 2019, p. 156-173Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With fatherhood currently in a state of flux, the following chapter on Swedish single fathers cooking for their children shows that these caregiving fathers’ masculinities remain relatively intact. While staying firmly anchored in one’s professional identity, these days the caregiving father fits in with the ideal of Swedish masculinity. But even if it is fairly common among Swedish middle class fathers to share responsibility for their children if the parents separate, fathers’ engagement with their children is not yet taken for granted and expectations are lower than for mothers. The fathers in this study had a rather pragmatic approach to cooking that took departure from their own cooking interest and capabilities. Three themes characterized the men’s various approaches: i) Cooking as an interest; ii) Cooking as a hardship and iii) Cooking as a part of life. Independent of their approach, most of the men’s cooking emerged as instrumental and matter-of-factly. Their relation to the market was characterized by pragmatism rather than worry and they saw no problem in retreating to market solutions every now and then. Without the pursuit of self-sacrifice, their cooking emerged as an expression of love and care for their children.

  • 80.
    Molander, Susanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Hartmann, Benjamin Julien
    Emotion and practice: Mothering, cooking, and teleoaffective episodes2018In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 371-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While emotions are a central facet of consumer culture, relatively little is known about how they are tied to the embodied and tacit aspects of everyday living. This article explores how practices organize emotions and vice versa. Pairing Schatzki's teleoaffective structure with emotions understood as intensities that are deeply inscribed in the structural blueprints of practices, we propose that the organization of emotions and practices is recursive and based on three teleoaffective episodes: anticipating, actualizing, and assessing. To illustrate this, we present an analysis of empirical material from an ethnographic study on mothering. The practice-emotion link we unfold contributes to understanding the operation of emotions in consumer culture by specifying how practices and emotions are co-constitutive. This offers novel insights into the embodied and routinized nature of emotions, illuminates the connection between practices and individuals, and highlights the role of emotions in practice change.

  • 81.
    Molander, Susanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Kleppe, Ingeborg Astrid
    Östberg, Jacob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Hero shots: Involved fathers conquering new discursive territory in consumer culture2019In: Consumption, markets & culture, ISSN 1025-3866, E-ISSN 1477-223X, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 430-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore how visual expressions of culture offer new discursive territory within which consumer cultural ideals can be negotiated on a global scale. Through a critical visual analysis of the revelatory case Swedish Dads we find hero shots depicting involved fathers where children’s needs and the hermetic confines of the home take center stage, as opposed to the traditional fatherhood ideals portrayed in western contemporary advertising, media and popular culture. We demonstrate how the Swedish state’s gender ideology was encoded into a communicative event in the form of hero shots and subsequently dispersed by visual consumers as well as political and commercial stakeholders pushing this particular agenda and/or capitalizing on its tendencies. This in such a way that the event conquered new discursive territory fostering new types of consumer cultural negotiations on fatherhood ideals also in other cultural settings.

  • 82.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Anti-lyx: En samtida bildberättelse om Fersenska mordet den 20 juni 18102015In: Det svenska begäret : Sekler av lyxkonsumtion / [ed] Paula von Wachenfeldt, Klas Nyberg, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2015, p. 130-164Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Avslutande reflexioner2017In: Ekonomisk kulturhistoria: Bildkonst, konsthantverk och scenkonst 1720−1850 / [ed] Klas Nyberg, Stockholm: Kulturhistoriska Bokförlaget , 2017, p. 177-179Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 84.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Deborah Simonton & Anne Montenach (eds.), Female agency in the urban economy: Gender in European towns, 1640-1830 2015In: Sjuttonhundratal, ISSN 1652-4772, Vol. 12, p. 294-295Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Editor’s introduction2013In: “This is all fake, this is all plastic, this is me” : A study of the interrelations between style, sexuality and gender in contemporary Stockholm(Philip Warkander, diss.), Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013, p. 5-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Ekonomisk kulturhistoria2017In: Ekonomisk kulturhistoria: Bildkonst, konsthantverk och scenkonst 1720−1850 / [ed] Klas Nyberg, Stockholm: Kulturhistoriska Bokförlaget , 2017, p. 11-19Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Ekonomisk kulturhistoria : Bildkonst, konsthantverk och scenkonst 1720−18502017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Från tekniköverföring till produktinnovationer2013In: Dolda innovationer: Textila produkter och ny teknik under 1800-talet / [ed] Klas Nyberg, Pia Lundqvist, Stockholm: Kulturhistoriska bokförlaget , 2013, p. 10-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna bok om textila produktinnovationer har sin utgångspunkt i de kommersiella entreprenörer som växte fram i början av 1800-talet. De var ett nytt slags företagare med en internationell referensram som förmedlade av ny teknik och nya försäljningsmetoder från de industriella huvudländerna. Nu spreds den första industriella revolutionen från Storbritannien till regioner också i Europas utkant. Antologin ger en ny tolkning av den industriella revolutionens dynamik.Forskningen har kunnat visa att entreprenörerna spelade en avgörande roll framväxten av fabrikssystemet i Norden. De kombinerade kunskaper om tekniska och kommersiella utländska landvinningar med kunskap om den växande efterfrågan på skandinaviska hemmamarknaden. Sverige och de övriga nordiska länderna saknade stora städer och massmarknader. Konsumenterna bestod av små befolkningskoncentrationer som var spridda över en stor yta. Därför krävdes en mer aktiv försäljningsorganisation i Norden jämfört med övriga Europa. Mekaniker, formgivare, ämbetsmän och köpmän ingick i de textila entreprenörernas personliga nätverk.

  • 89.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Förord2013In: Dolda innovationer: Textila produkter och ny teknik under 1800-talet / [ed] Klas Nyberg, Pia Lundqvist, Stockholm: Kulturhistoriska bokförlaget , 2013, p. 7-9Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna bok om textila produktinnovationer har sin utgångspunkt i de kommersiella entreprenörer som växte fram i början av 1800-talet. De var ett nytt slags företagare med en internationell referensram som förmedlade av ny teknik och nya försäljningsmetoder från de industriella huvudländerna. Nu spreds den första industriella revolutionen från Storbritannien till regioner också i Europas utkant. Antologin ger en ny tolkning av den industriella revolutionens dynamik.Forskningen har kunnat visa att entreprenörerna spelade en avgörande roll framväxten av fabrikssystemet i Norden. De kombinerade kunskaper om tekniska och kommersiella utländska landvinningar med kunskap om den växande efterfrågan på skandinaviska hemmamarknaden. Sverige och de övriga nordiska länderna saknade stora städer och massmarknader. Konsumenterna bestod av små befolkningskoncentrationer som var spridda över en stor yta. Därför krävdes en mer aktiv försäljningsorganisation i Norden jämfört med övriga Europa. Mekaniker, formgivare, ämbetsmän och köpmän ingick i de textila entreprenörernas personliga nätverk. I antologin studerar en grupp textilforskare en magnifik tygprovssamling från KTH:s föregångare Tekniska Instituet. Syftet med undersökningarna är att belysa, utforska och precisera de små stegvisa men osynliga viktiga textiltekniska produktinnovationer (mönster, färgning, efterberedning) som förändrade textilmarknaden under 1800-talet. Resultaten visar vad dessa kommersiellt aktiva entreprenörer konkret gjorde när de revolutionerade textilmarknaden. Samlingen, som tidigare tillhörde Tekniska museet i Stockholm, har överförts till Textilmuseet i Borås där den förtecknats och konserverats. Projektet är ett samarbete mellan Textilmuseet, Uppsala universitet samt Textilhögskolan i Borås.

  • 90.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Manufakturstatistikens källvärde2015In: Från kläde till silkesflor : Textilprover från 1700-talets svenska fabriker / [ed] Elisabet Stavenow-Hidemark, Klas Nyberg, Stockholm: Kulturhistoriska Bokförlaget , 2015, p. 321-324Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 91.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Mecenatskretsar kring Pehr Hörberg2017In: Ekonomisk kulturhistoria : Bildkonst, konsthantverk och scenkonst 1720−1850 / [ed] Klas Nyberg, Stockholm: Kulturhistoriska Bokförlaget , 2017, p. 73-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Modets historiska ursprung: Den statliga manufakturens betydelse för modets uppkomst och spridning i Norden under tidigmodern tid2015In: I utkanter och marginaler : 31 texter om kulturhistoria : en vänbok till Birgitta Svensson / [ed] Marianne Larsson, Anneli Palmsköld, Helena Hörnfeldt, Lars-Eric Jönsson, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 2015, p. 338-350Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Måleri och bildkonst i Stockholm 1720–1846: en sammanfattande översikt2017In: Ekonomisk kulturhistoria: Bildkonst, konsthantverk och scenkonst 1720−1850 / [ed] Klas Nyberg, Stockholm: Kulturhistoriska Bokförlaget , 2017, p. 49-52Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 94.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Nya perspektiv på 1700-talets textilmanufakturer2015In: Från kläde till silkesflor : Textilprover från 1700-talets svenska fabriker / [ed] Elisabet Stavenow-Hidemark, Klas Nyberg, Stockholm: Kulturhistoriska Bokförlaget , 2015, p. 13-48Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 95.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Porfyr – tillverkning, marknad och priser2016In: Porfyr : Den kungliga stenen / [ed] Elsebeth Welander-Berggren, Stockholm: Sven-Harrys konstmuseum , 2016, p. 40-45Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Stat, skrå och hallrätt: nya perspektiv på 1700-talets kulturella guldålder2017In: Ekonomisk kulturhistoria: Bildkonst, konsthantverk och scenkonst 1720−1850 / [ed] Klas Nyberg, Stockholm: Kulturhistoriska Bokförlaget , 2017, p. 21-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Strömberg, Peder Gudmundsson2013In: Svenskt Biografiskt Lexikon: Häfte 166. Strömberg−Stålhammar / [ed] Åsa Karlsson, Stockholm: Riksarkivet , 2013, p. 2-6Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Nyberg, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Textilindustrin förnyades på bred front2013In: Företagsminnen, ISSN 1101-7473, no 4, p. 46-47Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 99.
    Nyberg, Klas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Ciszuk, Martin
    Textilmanufakturernas tillverkning 1744−18102015In: Från kläde till silkesflor : Textilprover från 1700-talets svenska fabriker / [ed] Elisabet Stavenow-Hidemark, Klas Nyberg, Stockholm: Kulturhistoriska Bokförlaget , 2015, p. 325-347Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Nyberg, Klas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Hagberg, Axel
    Appendix 1: Måleriets och bildkonstens sociala förhållanden 1720–18502017In: Ekonomisk kulturhistoria : Bildkonst, konsthantverk och scenkonst 1720−1850 / [ed] Klas Nyberg, Stockholm: Kulturhistoriska Bokförlaget , 2017, p. 183-187Chapter in book (Other academic)
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