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  • 51.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Covid-19 as a Generator of Pending Narratives: Developing an Empirical Tool to Analyze Narrative Practices in Constructing Futures2021In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 20, article id 1609406921996855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article describes the basic elements of the pending narrative and develops them into a tool of qualitative analysis by taking examples from Covid-19-related reports, opinions and editorials in the news. The pending narrative is a powerful story form, persuading the responsible actors in public to take action by stirring up compelling passion for a specific goal. It has a cogency that comes from the threat that if we do not act in the right way now, the continuity of life will be jeopardized. Crises are fertile breeding grounds for pending narratives, and the arrival of the Covid-19 virus is an expressive example of a situation threatening the continuity of human life around the globe. These circumstances feed on the emergence of pending narratives, which translate the unknown, uncertain and frightening future from open, multiple and unpredictable trajectories into more closed, predictable and controllable pathways. In the development of the pending narrative into a tool of qualitative analysis, the article takes influences from narratology, Bamberg's theory on positioning analysis, Greimas' narrative semiotics and critical discourse analysis. It proposes that in the analysis of pending narratives we benefit from the separation of three levels. On the first level, pending narratives highlight disorder and the menacing trajectory of the anti-subject, and outline a qualifying trajectory for the subject to overcome the threat. On the second level they persuade the responsible actors and the audience to identify with the qualifying trajectory and to take action or support it. And on the third level they articulate the kind of values, identities and moral order in aid of which the required action is taken.

  • 52.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Drinking habits as described in the pub and drinking diaries of young adults2008In: Painting the Town Red: pubs, restaurants and young adults' drinking cultures in the Nordic countries / [ed] Börje Olsson & Jukka Törrönen, Helsinki: Nordic Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research (NAD) , 2008, p. 41-72Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Identiteettien ja subjektiasemien analyysi haastatteluaineistossa (The analysis of identities and subject positions in interview data)2010In: Haastattelun analyysi (An analysis of interview) / [ed] Johanna Ruusuvuori, Pirjo Nikander & Matti Hyvärinen, Tampere: Vastapaino , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Kuvaus, näkökulma ja ääni (Description, viewpoint and voice): Representaatioiden analyysi empiirisessä sosiaalitutkimuksessa (Analysing representations in empirical social research)2010In: Representaatio (Representation): Tiedon kivijalasta tieteiden työkaluksi (From a basis of knowledge to a tool of sciences) / [ed] Tarja Knuuttila & Aki Petteri Lehtinen, Helsingfors: Gaudeamus Helsinki University Press , 2010, p. 276-304Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Kvinnans skyldigheter, friheter och njutningar i svenska och finska damtidningsannonser med alkoholmotiv från 1960-talet till 2000-talet2012In: Samhället, alkoholen och drogerna: Politik, konstruktioner och dilemman / [ed] Jessica Storbjörk, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag, 2012, p. 130-155Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Naistenlehdet symbolisen vallan käyttäjinä 1960-luvulta tähän päivään: alkoholiaiheiset tekstit juomiseen liittyviä resursseja rakentamassa2014In: Yhteiskuntapolitiikka, ISSN 1455-6901, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 388-412Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Relational Agency and Identity Navigation in Life Stories on Addiction: Developing Narrative Tools to Analyze the Interplay Between Multiple Selves2022In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 21, article id 16094069221078378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In life stories on addiction, in which dependence is experienced as an antagonistic force, agency manifests as enigmatic. As narrators in these stories usually describe how they lost their agency to a substance, we may ask who then takes over the agency and is the actor. Can material things act with agency? By taking influences from actor–network theory, Bambergs’ narrative positioning theory, Greimas’ narrative semiotics, symbolic interactionism, and critical discourse studies, I propose that addiction stories can be productively approached with an ontology that conceptualizes actors’ agency as relational. According to this ontology, individuals develop addiction in relation to heterogeneous attachments that form an enabling assemblage. Moreover, I propose that life stories on addiction are narratives in which narrators navigate their addiction by negotiating with multiple selves. These selves can be productively identified and analyzed from the perspectives of “story,” “interaction,” and “identity claim.” As a story, in which actors are positioned vis-à-vis one another, life stories on addiction can be approached as narratives that describe the confrontation between the trajectory of the self that is driven by addiction and the trajectory of the self that seeks mastery over one’s life. As an interaction between narrators and interlocutors, life stories on addiction can be examined as performances of interactive selves who do positive face-work to neutralize, rationalize, and justify their “deviant” behavior. And as identity claims, life stories on addiction can be considered embodiments of ideal or normative selves that are articulated in relation to the dominant discourses and master narratives of surrounding culture. By using examples from life stories on addiction, the article aims to clarify with what kinds of concepts and narrative tools we can analyze the interplay between multiple selves in addiction stories. 

  • 58.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Safe, funny and frightening drinking situations from children’s viewpoint: Comparing recalled childhood stories about others’ drinking in Scandinavia2019In: International journal on drug policy, ISSN 0955-3959, E-ISSN 1873-4758, Vol. 67, p. 34-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article analyzes retrospective childhood stories related to others’ drinking (N = 336). The stories have been told in a focus group context in Finland and Sweden. Hence, they are stories about the past that have been constructed in the present. The retrospective childhood stories are analyzed from the perspective of emotions, seen as relational and situational sociocultural constructions, by paying attention to what kind of contact and emotional responses children develop to others’ drinking in specific situations. The analysis demonstrates how in an intoxicated-oriented drinking culture the presence of alcohol may signify something outside the bounds of everyday life, in the case of which children develop an ambiguous contact with drinking in which many kinds of positive or negative emotions can emerge, such as love, fun, fear, shame or curiosity. In the Finnish narratives, children’s emotional socialization to drinking is regulated by situations of heavy domestic drinking, festive drinking and moderate routine drinking at home. In the Swedish narratives, children’s emotional socialization to drinking is governed by festive situations, moderate routine drinking at home and meal drinking. Fear dominates the Finnish participants’ recalled childhood stories, whereas fun is the most common emotion in the stories from Sweden. The differences between Finnish and Swedish emotions recalled from childhood in relation to drinking may reflect differences in these culture’s drinking practices and/or social interaction norms. The article demonstrates how adults’ childhood memories on drinking provide an important ‘indirect’ source to get knowledge on children’s ways of experiencing and responding to others’ drinking in various situations.

  • 59.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Situational, cultural and societal identities: analysing subject positions as classifications, participant roles, viewpoints and interactive positions2014In: Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour, ISSN 0021-8308, E-ISSN 1468-5914, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 80-98Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Using vignettes in qualitative interviews as clues, microcosms or provokers2018In: Qualitative Research Journal, ISSN 1443-9883, E-ISSN 1448-0980, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 276-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Recent studies have introduced new productive theoretical orientations to the vignette studies. There is not, however, sufficient analytical discussion on how the vignettes can be used in qualitative interviews for different functions. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

    Design/methodology/approach - Whatever theoretical framing the researcher decides to apply in qualitative interviews using vignettes, the paper proposes that it is always important to consider in what way the chosen vignettes refer to the object under examination, whether they represent it as clues (metonyms, symptoms, enigmatic traces), as microcosms (icons, metaphors, totems, ideal types, homologies) or as provokers (anomalies, taboos, controversies).

    Findings - When vignettes are used as clues in interviews, they can be introduced as puzzling traces, tracks or indexes which together with the interview questions carry out the interviewees to metonymic reasoning. When vignettes are used in interviews as microcosms, the interview questions are built so that they encourage the interviewees to consider the vignettes as icons that mimic reality or realities, their actors, situations, acts, events and processes. And when vignettes are used as provokers, they are selected and produced so that they challenge the forms, boundaries, meanings and habits of the well-known and plausible realities of the interviewees.

    Originality/value - The paper demonstrates with examples how vignettes function in the interviews as clues, microcosms or provokers and shows why it is important to pay attention to this.

  • 61.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Virikehaastattelu2017In: Tutkimushaastattelun Käsikirja / [ed] Matti Hyvärinen, Pirjo Nikander, Johanna Ruusuvuori, Vastapaino, 2017, p. 233-255Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Women’s responsibilities, freedoms and pleasures: an analysis of Swedish women's magazines' alcohol-related advertisements from the 1960s to the 2000s2014In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 640-662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the building of the Swedish welfare state, men and women have been seen as equal in their roles as parents, breadwinners, and citizens. This conception is not confirmed by the images produced by advertising. The article presents an analysis of alcohol-related advertisements published in Swedish women’s magazines from the 1960s to the 2000s. The advertisements are approached as representations of gendered performances in which gender is made visible “here and now” by placing women in particular subject positions that are related to private or public spheres and associated with specific kinds of gender norms reflecting women’s shifting responsibilities,freedoms, and pleasures. The article asks what kind of drinking-related subject positions have been portrayed as desirable in women’s magazine advertisements over the past few decades and how those positions have changed as we move closer to the present day. The analysis reveals both continuity and variability in alcohol-related subject positions in Swedish women’s magazine advertisements. It shows how women’s responsibilities, freedoms, and pleasures have expanded from the traditional domain of the private sphere to multiple new areas as Sweden has developed from a modern welfare state to a late-modern competition state. However, this does not mean that the traditional gender norms have disintegrated and been replaced by equal gender norms. Rather, it seems that traditional gender norms continue to be reproduced in alcohol-related advertising.

  • 63.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Härkönen, Janne
    Juomisen ritualistiset ja yksilölliset motiivit ja niiden yhteys humalaan 2000-luvun Suomessa2016In: Yhteiskuntapolitiikka, ISSN 1455-6901, Vol. 81, no 2, p. 161-173Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Härkönen, Janne
    Studying ritual and individual orientations to alcohol use: Drinking motives and their connection to intoxication in Finland in the 2000s2016In: International journal on drug policy, ISSN 0955-3959, E-ISSN 1873-4758, Vol. 29, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Finland was an agricultural country until the 1960s. Thereafter, Finland modernized rapidly. Studies have postulated that as Finland becomes modernized, intoxication-oriented drinking would gradually decrease. Current studies, however, show that heavy episodic drinking has lately become more common among men and women. Simultaneously, drinking is seldom motivated by the purpose of getting drunk. The article tackles this conundrum by approaching drinking motives from a ritual and an individual perspective. We study what kinds of drinking motives currently exist in Finland, their prevalence among different population groups, how they vary by social background, and their association with intoxication. Methods: The data were collected as part of the nationally representative Drinking Habit Survey in 2008. It consists of verbal descriptions on the most recent drinking occasion (N = 521), estimations of its blood alcohol content, and responses to pre-defined standardized motive questions related to the latest drinking occasions (N = 8732). Results: Besides the motive 'to get drunk', also the motives of drinking as a 'time-out' ritual, 'to get into the mood' and 'I drunk to brighten up' predict a wet drinking occasion. Overall, Finns highlight drinking motives of sociability, relaxation, meal drinking and situational factors. The more educated orientate to their drinking more with motives that express mastery of cultural capital and individuality. The less educated and the young, again, orientate to their drinking more with motives that imply intoxication and external expectations. Conclusions: Whereas the ritual perspective discloses what kinds of situations predict intoxication, the individual perspective reveals what kinds of individualistic orientations are associated with drunkenness. These perspectives partly speak past each other and are difficult to combine. The article proposes that situational perspective would serve as a bridge between them and enable the incorporation of results from different research traditions.

  • 65.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Juslin, Inka
    Alkohol i damtidningsannonser från det sena 1960-talet till 2000-talet2010In: Nordisk alkohol- & narkotikatidskrift, ISSN 1455-0725, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 141-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The data for this article consist of alcohol or alcohol-related advertisements appearing in seven Finnish women’s magazines: Kodin Kuvalehti (1967–2006),Kotiliesi (1967–2006), Kauneus & Terveys (1967–2006), Me Naiset (1976–2006), Gloria (1991–2006), Trend (1991–2006) and Cosmopolitan (1999–2006). We are interested, firstly, in what kind of subject positions these advertisements have contributed to construct for women’s drinking from the 1960s to the present day. Secondly, we analyse the shifts and transformations that have happened in these subject positions with a view to inferring how the cultural position of drinking has changed. Our analysis is grounded in semiotic and phenomenological ways of reading visual materials

  • 66.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Juslin, Inka
    Alkoholi naistenlehtien mainnossa 1960-luvulta tähän päivään (Alcohol in the addvertisements of woman magazines from 1960s up to now2008In: Sosiologipäivät Lapin Yliopistossa (Conference on sociology in the University of Lapland 27-28.3.2008), 2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 67.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Juslin, Inka
    From Genius of the Home to Party Princess: Drinking in Finnish women's magazine advertisements from the 1960s to the 2000s2013In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 463-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The data for this article consist of alcohol-related advertisements published in seven Finnish women's magazines from 1967 to 2006. We are interested in finding out what kind of alcohol-related subject positions these magazines have created for women audiences from the 1960s onwards, to see how those positions have changed and what these changes tell us about the changes that have happened in the cultural position of drinking in Finland. Our analysis applies semiotic and discourse analytical methods. It shows that in the advertisements from the 1960s, women were placed in the subject position of full-time mother responsible for taking care of the heterosexual relationship. Women's drinking was associated with the private space of the home, with eating meals and socialising with family and friends. Women's subject positions in the 1970s and 1980s were still largely the same, but they also took on slightly new features. The 1990s and 2000s saw the emergence of the active woman who appears in public places, and drinking was associated with women's own time, enjoyment and pleasure. During the period under review we see the emergence of a drinking, self-assertive woman who is a responsible and distinctive consumer, a consumer who toys with stereotypes, and a partying consumer.

  • 68.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Kalle, Tryggvesson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Alcohol, health and reproduction: an analysis of Swedish public health campaigns against drinking during pregnancy2015In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 57-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes two recent Swedish public health campaigns targeting pregnant women's drinking: A good start, a pamphlet by the Swedish National Institute of Public Health, and Advice about food for you who are pregnant, a brochure by the Swedish National Food Administration. It conceptualizes the public health campaigns as governmental attempts to steer citizens' behavior and behavior-related desires, aspirations, and beliefs toward a certain understanding of normal healthy lifestyle. The public health campaigns are seen as part of larger processes of bio-power. By applying critical discourse analysis, the article, first, asks how drinking during pregnancy is represented in the campaigns as a health risk. Second, it analyses how the pamphlets advise women to take action to restrain from drinking during pregnancy and what kind of knowledge the pamphlets use to legitimate intervening in the women's lifestyles. And finally, it analyses how the pamphlets try to persuade the women to identify with the proposed information and recommendations. The analysis shows that the campaigns construct an intimate partnership between the state and the citizen. By extending the medical public health gaze to reach inside the female body to emphasize how easily fetal development can be disturbed, and by making women's individual lifestyle choices both the cause of and solution to potential damage during fetal development, the pamphlets make mothers solely responsible and culpable for the health status of the fetus. Partners and fathers are practically absent from the campaign pamphlets. Both campaigns bypass the responsibilities of communities and other broad social institutions in preventing drinking during pregnancy. The campaigns, though having many similarities, differ from each other in terms of the kinds of choices they have made inrepresentationsaction, and identification.

  • 69.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Maunu, Antti
    Friendship and Social Emotions in Young Adult Finns' Drinking diaries2011In: Sociological Research Online, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 16, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the article we examine the management of social emotions and friendship bonds by analysing the young adults' pub and drinking diaries. We assume that emotions that are embodied in the management of friendship ties can be reduced to the emotions of pride and shame. According to Scheff, as primary social emotions, they are present in all communication and action. They express for the participants of interaction the actual "temperature" of social relations. Pride refers to a strong and safe involvement in interaction, in which individuals feel themselves fine and respectful. In a shameful state, individuals, in turn, experience themselves negatively in the eyes of others, which imply that social bonds are intimidated. The analysis of drinking experiences from the viewpoint of pride and shame brings expressively forth how drinking strengthens or weakens different kinds of social relations and dynamics and how actors try to attach to them or secede from them. In the diary narratives, the pride and shame of drinking is most strongly associated with reinforcement and bonding efforts of ties of friendship that are considered laid-back and like-minded. In relation to them the status, competition, the emphasis of one's self and indulging in love affairs occur in the narratives considerably more seldom, and if they occur, they rather contribute to shameful experiences or remain subordinate to friendship.

  • 70.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Maunu, Antti
    Gender and drinking situations in the regulation of drinking: An analysis of drinking diaries2007In: Cooperation conference on Drugs and Health, Stockholm, Sweden., 2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 71.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Maunu, Antti
    Light transgressions and heavy sociability:: Alcohol in young adult Finns’ narratives of a night out2007In: Addiction Research & Theory, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 365-381Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Maunu, Antti
    Miten nuoret aikuiset säätelevät humalajuomistaan?2007In: Nuoret ja alkoholi / [ed] Christoffer Tigerstedt, Helsinki: Alkoholi- ja huumetutkijain seura & Nuorisotutkimusverkosto , 2007, p. 59-87Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Maunu, Antti
    Sociability, self and diaries: How young adults reflect and regulate their intoxication-oriented drinking?2008In: KETTIL BRUUN SOCIETY. Social and epidemiological research on alcohol, 2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 74.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Maunu, Antti
    Whilst it’s red wine with beef, it’s booze with a cruise!: Genres and gendered regulation of drinking situations in diaries2007In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.: English Edition, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 177-199Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Månsson, Josefin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Roumeliotis, Filip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Following the changes in young people’s drinking practices before and during the pandemic with a qualitative longitudinal interview material2023In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper analyses how the Covid-19 pandemic affected young people’s alcohol-related assemblages, trajectories of becoming and identity claims in Sweden. The data is based on longitudinal qualitative interviews among heavy and moderate drinking young people (n=23; age range 15–24 years). The participants were interviewed two to three times before the Covid-19 pandemic and once at the end of it, between 2017 and 2021. The analysis draws on actor-network theory and narrative positioning approach. The analysis demonstrates how the lockdown produced trajectories of becoming boring, normal, stress-free, self-caring, self-confident and shielded. In these trajectories, drinking was positioned into relations that either increased young people’s capacities for well-being or decreased them. Due to the lockdown, some participants learnt to be moved by relations that contributed to replace drinking with competing activities, while others experienced that the lockdown made drinking a more attractive activity, turning it into a collective force that helped them to overcome isolation. The results show how drinking is a heterogeneous activity which may increase or decrease young people’s capacities for well-being, depending on what kinds of assemblages and trajectories of becoming it is embedded in.

  • 76.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Månsson, Josefin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Roumeliotis, Filip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    How Covid-19 restrictions affected young people's well-being and drinking practices: Analyzing interviews with a socio-material approach2022In: International journal of drug policy, ISSN 0955-3959, E-ISSN 1873-4758, Vol. 110, article id 103895Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Covid-19 restrictions – as they made young people's practices in their everyday life visible for reflection and reformation – provide a productive opportunity to study how changing conditions affected young people's well-being and drinking practices.

    Methods: The data is based on qualitative interviews with 18- to 24-year-old Swedes (n=33) collected in the Autumn 2021. By drawing on the socio-material approach, the paper traces actants, assemblages and trajectories that moved the participants towards increased or decreased well-being during the lockdown.

    Results: The Covid-19 restrictions made the participants reorganize their everyday life practices emphatically around the home and communication technologies. The restrictions gave rise to both worsened and improved well-being trajectories. In the worsened well-being trajectories, the pandemic restrictions moved the participants towards loneliness, loss of routines, passivity, physical barriers, self-centered thoughts, negative effects of digital technology, sleep deficit, identity crisis, anxiety, depression, and stress. In the improved well-being trajectories, the Covid-19 restrictions brought about freedom to study from a distance, more time for significant others, oneself and for one's own hobbies, new productive practices at home and a better understanding of what kind of person one is. Both worsened and improved well-being trajectories were related to the aim to perform well, and in them drinking practices either diminished or increased the participants’ capacities and competencies for well-being.

    Conclusions: The results suggest that material domestic spaces, communication technologies and performance are important actants both for alcohol consumption and well-being among young people. These actants may increase or decrease young people's drinking and well-being depending on what kinds of relations become assembled.

  • 77.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Rolando, Sara
    Safe and unsafe drinking situations through children’s eyes: Comparing recalled childhood emotions regarding family members’ drinking from Italy and Scandinavia2018In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 220-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how people in childhood responded emotionally to family members’ drinking in Finland, Italy, and Sweden. The data consist of retrospective childhood memories told and shared in a focus group context. The results suggest that in the Mediterranean drinking cultures, children develop a neutral and safe emotional contact with drinking. In the intoxication-oriented drinking cultures, in turn, children build an ambivalent contact with drinking with more or less positive or negative emotions. However, the results also reveal that this ambivalence does not need to be per se a threatening circumstance regarding children’s safety.

  • 78.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Rolando, Sara
    Women’s changing responsibilities and pleasures as consumers: An analysis of Finnish, Italian and Swedish women’s magazine’s alcohol-related advertisements from the 1960s to the 2000s2017In: Journal of Consumer Culture, ISSN 1469-5405, E-ISSN 1741-2900, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 794-822Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1960s, feminist movements have emphasized that men and women should beseen as equal in their roles as parents, breadwinners, and citizens. This conception is not confirmed by the images produced in advertising. This article presents an analysis ofalcohol-related advertisements published in Finnish, Italian, and Swedish women’smagazines from the 1960s to the 2000s. The advertisements are approached as performative texts in which gender is made visible ‘‘here and now’’ by placing women inparticular consumer positions relative to private or public spheres and by associating specific kinds of gender expectations and norms that reflect women’s shifting responsibilities and pleasures. The article asks what kind of drinking-related identities havebeen portrayed as desirable in women’s magazine advertisements over the past fewdecades and how they have changed as we move closer to the present day. The analysis reveals both continuity and variability in alcohol-related consumer identities in advertisements in Finnish, Italian, and Swedish women’s magazines. It shows that as Finland, Italy, and Sweden have developed from modern societies to late-modern societies, women’s responsibilities and pleasures have expanded from the traditional domain of the private sphere into multiple new areas. The expansion of women’s identities has occurred differently in each geographical area. This does not, however, mean that the traditional gender norms have disintegrated and been replaced by equal gender norms. Rather, it seems that traditional gender norms continue to be reproduced with varying nuances in alcohol-related advertising.

  • 79.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Rolando, Sara
    Beccaria, Franca
    Masculinities and femininities of drinking in Finland, Italy and Sweden: Doing, modifying and unlinking gender in relation to different drinking places2017In: Geoforum, ISSN 0016-7185, E-ISSN 1872-9398, Vol. 82, p. 131-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we analyze how Finnish, Italian and Swedish men and women are doing, modifying and unlinking gender in relation to different drinking places and situations. In the study, Finland and Sweden represent the Nordic intoxication-oriented drinking cultures, whereas Italy, in turn, represents the Mediterranean meal drinking cultures. The data were collected in a similar way in Finland, Italy and Sweden from 2007 to 2010, covering four different age groups. From each country at least eight male and eight female groups were selected, i.e. two male and two female groups from each age group, one representing higher and the other lower social status professions. All focus groups were asked to interpret a set of pictures representing different kinds of drinking places and situations, such as a couple's moderate wine drinking at a sidewalk table, heavy drinking among men in a bus, and playful drinking among women while dancing. In the analysis we emphasize the flexibility of doing gender and the possibility of challenging conventional gender performances. We assume that doing gender is a multi-dimensional process mediated by structures, hierarchies, identities, situations and agency. Our analysis presents a mosaic repertoire of masculinities and femininities that change shape depending on how the place is seen in terms of a drinking space or situation. The masculinities and femininities are not reducible to any single hierarchy of dominant and subordinate masculinities and femininities. Rather, the doing, modifying and unlinking of masculinities and femininities vary by geographical area, age and/or education, as well as by drinking situation.

  • 80.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Roumeliotis, Filip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Juomisen maskuliinisuudet suomalais- ja ruotsalaisryhmien kuvaamina2013In: Yhteiskuntapolitiikka, ISSN 1455-6901, Vol. 78, no 1, p. 35-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drinking masculinities as described in Finnish and Swedish group interviews

    This article works from the assumption that women’s emancipation, increased alcohol use and appearance on traditionally male-dominated drinking scenes in the Nordic countries have combined to challenge the masculine hegemony of drinking and brought greater diversity to gendered drinking styles and in general added to the complexity of the phenomenon. The assumption regarding the diversification of drinking styles is tested in the light of data collected in focus group interviews. The aim is to find out what kinds of drinking masculinities are constructed by Finnish (N=16) and Swedish (N=19) informants in different age groups as they discuss different drinking styles that they consider culturally possible for men and women in different situations.

  • 81.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Roumeliotis, Filip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Masculinities of drinking as described by Swedish and Finnish age-based focus groups2014In: Addiction Research and Theory, ISSN 1606-6359, E-ISSN 1476-7392, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 126-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with masculinities in drinkingby analysing how focus groups from Sweden and Finland discuss male and female drinking in diverse drinking situations. It argues that women’s strengthened independency in working life, their increased drinking in domestic and public settings,and their entrance into drinking situations that used to be male dominated have challenged the cultural domination of traditional masculinity in drinking and made drinking styles a more diverse and heterogeneous phenomenon within and across gender groups. The analysis shows that the focus groups construct masculinities in which manhood is associated with creativity, depression, violence,virility, flaˆneurism, nurture, homosociability, business masculinity and weakness. These masculinities oppose, interlace or intermingle with femininitiesand change the shape depending on the situation,drinking company and the perspective of the viewer.Their broad spectrum shows that, in Finland and Sweden, there are multiple independent and strong drinking masculinities and femininities, none of which is given a self-evident hegemony over theothers. Thus, the study points out that the masculinities and femininities of today are not reducible to any single hierarchy of dominant and subordinate masculinities. For the current hegemonic masculinities, it seems to be typical that they vary locally, regionally and globally, intersect in specific wayswith class, age and generation, and form multidimensional, paradoxical and tension-driven relationships with each other and with femininities.

  • 82.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Roumeliotis, Filip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT, Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
    Why are young people drinking less than earlier? Identifying and specifying social mechanisms with a pragmatist approach2019In: International Journal of Drug Policy, ISSN 0955-3959, Vol. 64, p. 13-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent surveys have found a strong decrease in alcohol consumption among young people and this trend has been identified in European countries, Australia and North America. Previous research suggests that the decline in alcohol consumption may be explained by changes in parenting style, increased use of social media, changes in gender identities or a health and fitness trend. We use qualitative interviews with drinking and non-drinking young people from Sweden (N = 49) to explore in what way and in what kinds of contexts these explanations may hold true and how they alone or together may explain declining alcohol consumption among young people. By using the pragmatist approach, we pay attention to what kinds of concerns, habits, practices, situations and meanings our interviewees relate to adolescents' low alcohol consumption or decline in drinking. By analyzing these matters, we aim to specify the social mechanisms that have reduced adolescents' drinking. Our paper discovers social mechanisms similar to previous studies but also a few that have previously been overlooked. We propose that the cultural position of drinking may have changed among young people so that drinking has lost its unquestioned symbolic power as a rite of passage into adulthood. There is less peer pressure to drink and more room for competing activities. This opening of a homogeneous drinking culture to the acceptance of differences may function as a social mechanism that increases the success of other social mechanisms to reduce adolescents' drinking. Furthermore, the results of the paper suggest a hypothesis of the early maturation of young people as more individualized, responsible, reflective, and adult-like actors than in earlier generations. Overall, the paper provides hypotheses for future quantitative studies to examine the prevalence and distribution of the identified social mechanisms, as well as recommends directions for developing effective interventions to support young people's healthy lifestyle choices.

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  • 83.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Roumeliotis, Filip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung München, Germany; ELTE Eötvös Loránd University Budapest, Hungary.
    How do social media-related attachments and assemblages encourage or reduce drinking among young people?2021In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 515-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that young people’s online practices have become a continuous, seamless and routine part of their physical and social worlds. Studies report contradictory findings on whether social media promotes intoxication-driven drinking cultures among young people or diminishes their alcohol consumption. By applying actor-network theory, our starting point is that the effects of social media depend on what kinds of concerns mediate its use. Social media alone cannot make young people drink more or less but influences their drinking in relation to specific attachments that we call here ‘assemblages’. The data consist of individual interviews among girls (n = 32) and boys (n = 24) between 15 and 19 years old from Sweden, covering topics such as alcohol use, social media habits and leisure time activities. The paper maps the variety of assemblages that mediate young people’s online practices and analyzes how young people’s drinking-related social media assemblages increase, decrease or exclude their alcohol consumption. The analysis shows that social media-related attachments seem to reduce our interviewees’ use of alcohol by providing competing activities, by transforming their drinking under the public eye, by reorganizing their party rituals to be less oriented towards drinking and by facilitating parents’ monitoring of their drinking situations.

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  • 84.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Gunnarsson, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Online gambling venues as relational actors in addiction: Applying the actor-network approach to life stories of online gamblers2020In: International journal of drug policy, ISSN 0955-3959, E-ISSN 1873-4758, Vol. 85, article id 102928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background With the emerging technologies of the Internet and smartphones during the last decades, the gambling environment has undergone a massive transformation. In Sweden, and Europe in general, online gambling has more than doubled since 2007.

    Method The paper studies online gambling venues (OGVs) as relational actors of addiction. By drawing on the actor-network theory (ANT) and assemblage thinking, we examine how OGVs, as actors in specific networks of attachment, enable the development of gambling addiction and facilitate its continuation. The data consists of life story interviews with 34 online gamblers.

    Results Online gambling venues extend the scope of gambling opportunities through space, providing an easy portable 24-hours-a-day access to gambling online and on smartphones. This increases the spatial mobility of gambling to diverse contexts. By linking gambling to more unpredictably evolving patterns of relations, online gambling venues also increase gambling's temporal mobility to intrude in the habitual trajectories of everyday life. By enhancing the gambling mobility through space and time, OGVs simultaneously extend the scope of situations in which gambling may transform from a controlled activity into an addiction. It is then that the actor-networks of gambling infiltrate in the actor-networks of work, domestic life and leisure, and start to feed processes where they are translated to serve the interests of gambling.

    Conclusion By giving us tools to challenge simplistic and taken-for-granted explanations of gambling addiction and by allowing us to grasp the flux and changing nature of addiction as a relational pattern of heterogeneous contextual attachments, the actor-network theory can help us to understand the complexity and multiplicity of gambling problems. The knowledge on what kinds of contextual attachments in diverse actor-networks enable harmful gambling and sustain unhealthy relations helps practitioners to focus treatment interventions especially on these contextual linkages and their configurations.

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  • 85.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Roumeliotis, Filip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Health, risk-taking and well-being: doing gender in relation to discourses and practices of heavy drinking and health among young people2020In: Health, Risk and Society, ISSN 1369-8575, E-ISSN 1469-8331, Vol. 22, no 5-6, p. 305-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last 20 years, adolescents’ heavy drinking in many western countries has declined. Simultaneously, researchers have identified an increased interest in health among young people. The paper compares adolescents’ gendered discourses and practices on intoxication and health in order to clarify the role gender plays in their current low alcohol consumption. The data consists of semi-structured interviews about alcohol, health and leisure activities among adolescents aged between 15 and 19 (N = 56). In the coding of the material, we have singled out two approaches to health and well-being among the participants, which we name the ‘social’ and ‘physical health’ approaches. By drawing on Butler’s work on ‘gender as performativity’, Connell’s understanding of gendered identities as ‘multidimensional’ and Bourdieu’s concept of ‘habitus’, we analyse how the participants align with, negotiate or oppose the hegemonic masculinities and femininities in these approaches, and examine the everyday practices that the two approaches are embedded in. Our analysis shows that the participants’ gendered performances in the ‘physical health’ approach are more variable, reflective and critical than those in the ‘social health’ approach. Moreover, the physical health approach modifies young people’s risk-taking practices of heavy drinking and helps to reinforce practices that favour young people’s low alcohol consumption. We propose that the move from doing gender in relation to risk-taking by heavy drinking towards doing it more through health- and physical appearance-related activities may generate processes that narrow the gender gap between masculinities and femininities and encourage new kinds of interaction and gender blending between them.

  • 86.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Roumeliotis, Filip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Månsson, Josefin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Negotiating Emerging Adulthood With Master and Counter Narratives: Alcohol-Related Identity Trajectories Among Emerging Adults in Performance-Oriented Neoliberal Society2021In: Journal of Adolescent Research, ISSN 0743-5584, E-ISSN 1552-6895Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzes how emerging adults negotiate their relation to alcohol in the context of declining youth drinking and how this relationship changes over time. The sample consists of longitudinal qualitative interview data (N = 28) with 9 boys and 19 girls aged 15 to 21. The participants were recruited through schools, social media and non-governmental organizations from mainly the Stockholm region and smaller towns in central Sweden to reach a heterogeneous sample in terms of sociodemographic factors and drinking practices. We interviewed the participants in-depth three times between 2017 and 2019. Thematic coding of the whole data with NVivo helped us select four cases for more detailed analysis, as they represented the typical trajectories and showed the variation in the material. We used the master narrative framework and Bamberg’s narrative positioning analysis to examine the data. The analysis demonstrates what kinds of narrative alignments in identity development encourage heavy drinking, moderate alcohol consumption, and fuel abstinence. The results suggest that the decline in youth drinking is produced by a co-effect of multiple master narratives that intersect and guide the identity development away from heavy drinking.

  • 87.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Roumeliotis, Filip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany; ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary.
    ‘Social health’, ‘physical health’, and well-being: Analysing with bourdieusian concepts the interplay between the practices of heavy drinking and exercise among young people2021In: International journal of drug policy, ISSN 0955-3959, E-ISSN 1873-4758, Vol. 91, article id 102825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The article examines the interplay between the practices of heavy drinking and exercise among young people. The comparison helps to clarify why young people are currently drinking less than earlier and how the health-related discourses and activities are modifying young people's heavy drinking practices.

    Methods: The data is based on interviews (n = 56) in Sweden among 15–17-year-olds and 18–19-year-olds. By drawing on Pierre Bourdieu's concepts of habitus, field, and capital, we examine what kinds of resources young people accumulate in the fields of heavy drinking and exercise, how these resources carry symbolic value for distinction, and what kind of health-related habitus they imply.

    Results: The analysis shows that young people's practices in the social spaces of intoxication and exercise are patterned around the ‘social health’ and ‘physical health’ approaches and shaped by gendered binaries of masculine dominance. The ‘physical health’ approach values capable, high-performative, and attractive bodies, whereas the ‘social health’ approach is oriented towards accumulating social capital. The analysis demonstrates that these approaches affect the interviewees’ everyday life practices so that the ‘physical health’ approach has more power over the ‘social health’ approach in transforming them.

    Conclusion: As the ‘physical health’ approach appears to modify young people's practices of drinking to be less oriented to intoxication or away from drinking, this may partly explain why young people are drinking less today than earlier. Compared to drinking, the physical health-related social spaces also seem to provide more powerful arenas within which to bolster one's masculine and feminine habitus. This further suggests that intoxication may have lost its symbolic power among young people as a cool activity signalling autonomy, maturity, and transgression of norms.

  • 88.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Simonen, Jenni
    The exercise of symbolic power by women's magazines from the 1960s to the present: the discursive construction of fields, positions and resources in alcohol-related texts2015In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 37, no 8, p. 1138-1157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses alcohol-related articles appearing in Finnish women's magazines from the 1960s to the present day. Women's magazines are approached as institutions constituting feminine publicities that address issues of interest as well as problems and contradictions in women's everyday life. Influenced by Pierre Bourdieu's concepts of field, habitus and capital, data analysis focuses around three main questions: (1) in what kinds of fields do the texts locate drinking; (2) what kinds of drinking-related subject positions do the texts offer their readers; and (3) what kinds of economic, social, cultural, physical, emotional and symbolic resources do they discursively construct and attach to these subject positions? The analysis shows that throughout the study period, women's magazines' alcohol-related texts position women readers into the realm of home and family and construct capitals that reinforce a caring ethics'. On the other hand, from the 1990s onwards, alcohol-related texts in women's magazines also begin to assign women to consumer positions of hedonistic consumer, rational consumer, status-oriented consumer, expert consumer and the consumer who is keen to break away from formality and construct capitals for these positions as well as wage through them a symbolic struggle over which lifestyles are in' and which are out'.

  • 89.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Simonen, Jenni
    Tigerstedt, Christoffer
    "Disease" of the Nation, Family and Individual: Three Moral Discourses of Alcohol Problems in Finnish Women's Magazines from the 1960s to the 2000s2015In: Substance Use & Misuse, ISSN 1082-6084, E-ISSN 1532-2491, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 454-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women's magazines can be seen as a genre that form feminized public spaces where everyday life contradictions of women's life are negotiated. The study examines the ways in which Finnish women's magazines have dealt with alcohol problems. The data covers six primary sampling years: 1968, 1976, 1984, 1992, 2000 and 2008. The data is analyzed by drawing on the concept of 'moral regulation'. The analysis shows that a family-centered framing dominated the constructions of alcohol problem: fathers' and husbands' alcoholism appeared as a main object of regulation in all decades under study, while mothers' and wives' alcoholism was much less prevalent.

  • 90.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Tigerstedt, Christoffer
    Following the moving and changing attachments and assemblages of 'addiction': Applying the actor network approach to autobiographies2018In: International journal on drug policy, ISSN 0955-3959, E-ISSN 1873-4758, Vol. 54, p. 60-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article applies actor network theory (ANT) to autobiographical data on alcohol dependence to explore what ANT can offer to the analysis of 'addiction stories'. By defining 'addiction' as a relational achievement, as the effect of elements acting together as a configuration of human and non-human actors, the article demonstrates how the moving and changing attachments of addiction can be dynamically analyzed with concepts of 'assemblage', 'mediator', 'tendency', 'translation', 'trajectory', 'immutable mobile', 'fluid' and 'bush fire'. The article shows how the reduction of alcohol dependence simply to genetic factors, neurobiological causes, personality disorders and self-medication constitutes an inadequate explanation. As 'meta theories', they illuminate addiction one-sidedly. Instead, as ANT pays attention to multiple heterogeneous mediators, it specifies in what way the causes identified in 'meta theories' may together with other actors participate in addiction assemblages. When following the development of addiction assemblages, we focus on situational sequences of action, in which human and non-human elements are linked to each other, and we trace how the relational shape of addiction changes from one sequence to another as a transforming assemblage of heterogeneous attachments that either maintain healthy subjectivities or destabilize them. The more attachments assemblages of addiction are able to make that are flexible and durable from one event to another, the stronger also the addiction-based subjectivities. Similarly, the fewer attachments that assemblages of addiction are able to keep in their various translations, the weaker the addiction-based subjectivities also become. An ANT-inspired analysis has a number of implications for the prevention and treatment of addiction: it suggests that in the prevention and treatment of addiction, the aim should hardly be to get rid of dependencies. Rather, the ambition should be the identification of attachments and relations that enable unhealthy practices and the development of harm as part of specific actor networks.

  • 91.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Tigerstedt, Christoffer
    Socialisation into cultural forms of drinking in Finland: A qualitative analysis of different age groups' retrospections2008In: KETTIL BRUUN SOCIETY. Social and epidemiological research on alcohol, 2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 92.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Tigerstedt, Christoffer
    Vismanen, Elina
    Mitä annettavaa toimijaverkostoteorialla on riippuvuuksien tutkimiselle? (): Alkoholi toimijana omaa alkoholismia kuvaavissa elämäkerroissa [What can an actor-network theory give to the analysis of dependencies?: Alcohol as an actor in the autobiographies that deal with one’s own alcoholism]2015In: Sosiologia, ISSN 0038-1640, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 19-37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Välipakka, Inka
    Perheen puutarhassa: Poiskäännyttämistä intiimissä ja julkisessa tilassa2007In: Pääsy kielletty: Poiskäännyttämisen politiikka ja sosiaaliturva / [ed] Sakari Hänninen, Jouko Karjalainen, Kirsi-Marja Lehtelä, Helsinki: Stakes , 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
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