Change search
Refine search result
12 51 - 71 of 71
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Pascanu, Vlad
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Carson, Fabian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Vico Solano, Marta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Su, Jie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Johansson, Magnus J.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Selective Heterogeneous C−H Activation/Halogenation Reactions Catalyzed by Pd@MOF Nanocomposites2016In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 22, no 11, p. 3729-3737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A directed heterogeneous C−H activation/halogenation reaction catalyzed by readily synthesized Pd@MOF nanocatalysts was developed. The heterogeneous Pd catalysts used were a novel and environmentally benign Fe-based metal–organic framework (MOF) (Pd@MIL-88B-NH2(Fe)) and the previously developed Pd@MIL-101-NH2(Cr). Very high conversions and selectivities were achieved under very mild reaction conditions and in short reaction times. A wide variety of directing groups, halogen sources, and substitution patterns were well tolerated, and valuable polyhalogenated compounds were synthesized in a controlled manner. The synthesis of the Pd-functionalized Fe-based MOF and the recyclability of the two catalysts are also presented.

  • 52.
    Pascanu, Vlad
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    González Miera, Greco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Inge, A. Ken
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Metal-Organic Frameworks as Catalysts for Organic Synthesis: A Critical Perspective2019In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 141, no 18, p. 7223-7234Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent advances in organic chemistry and materials chemistry have enabled the porosity of new materials to be accurately controlled on the nanometer scale. In this context, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have rapidly become one of the most attractive classes of solid supports currently under investigation in heterogeneous catalysis. Their unprecedented degree of tunability gives MOFs the chance to succeed where others have failed. The past decade has witnessed an exponential growth in the complexity of new structures. MOFs with a variety of topologies and pore sizes show excellent stability across wide ranges of pH and temperature. Even the controlled insertion of defects, to alter the MOF's properties in a predictable manner, has become commonplace. However, research on catalysis with MOFs has been sluggish in catching up with modern trends in organic chemistry. Relevant issues such as enantioselective processes, C-H activation, or olefin metathesis are still rarely discussed. In this Perspective, we highlight meritorious examples that tackle important issues from contemporary organic synthesis, and that provide a fair comparison with existing catalysts. Some of these MOF catalysts already outcompete state-of-the-art homogeneous solutions. For others, improvements may still be required, but they have merit in aiming for the bigger challenge. Furthermore, we also identify some important areas where MOFs are likely to make a difference, by addressing currently unmet needs in catalysis instead of trying to outcompete homogeneous catalysts in areas where they excel. Finally, we strongly advocate for rational design of MOF catalysts, founded on a deep mechanistic understanding of the events taking place inside the pore.

  • 53.
    Pascanu, Vlad
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Hansen, Peter R.
    Bermejo Gomez, Antonio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ayats, Carles
    Platero-Prats, Ana E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Johansson, Magnus J.
    Pericas, Miquel A.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Highly Functionalized Biaryls via Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling Catalyzed by Pd@MOF under Batch and Continuous Flow Regimes2015In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 123-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diverse set of more than 40 highly functionalized biaryls was synthesized successfully through the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction catalyzed by Pd nanoparticles supported in a functionalized mesoporous MOF (8 wt% Pd@MIL-101(Cr)-NH2). This could be achieved under some of the mildest conditions reported to date and a strong control over the leaching of metallic species could be maintained, despite the presence of diverse functional groups and/or several heteroatoms. Some of the targeted molecules are important intermediates in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and we clearly exemplify the versatility of this catalytic system, which affords better yields than currently existing commercial procedures. Most importantly, Pd@MIL-101-NH2 was packed in a micro-flow reactor, which represents the first report of metallic nanoparticles supported on MOFs employed in flow chemistry for catalytic applications. A small library of 11 isolated compounds was created in a continuous experiment without replacing the catalyst, demonstrating the potential of the catalyst for large-scale applications.

  • 54.
    Pascanu, Vlad
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Yao, Qingxia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bermejo Gomez, Antonio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Mikaela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Yun, Yifeng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Wan, Wei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Samain, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martin-Matute, Belen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sustainable Catalysis: Rational Pd Loading on MIL-101Cr-NH2 for More Efficient and Recyclable Suzuki-Miyaura Reactions2013In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 19, no 51, p. 17483-17493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Palladium nanoparticles have been immobilized into an amino-functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF), MIL-101Cr-NH2, to form Pd@MIL-101Cr-NH2. Four materials with different loadings of palladium have been prepared (denoted as 4-, 8-, 12-, and 16wt%Pd@MIL-101Cr-NH2). The effects of catalyst loading and the size and distribution of the Pd nanoparticles on the catalytic performance have been studied. The catalysts were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), N-2-sorption isotherms, elemental analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). To better characterize the palladium nanoparticles and their distribution in MIL-101Cr-NH2, electron tomography was employed to reconstruct the 3D volume of 8wt%Pd@MIL-101Cr-NH2 particles. The pair distribution functions (PDFs) of the samples were extracted from total scattering experiments using high-energy X-rays (60keV). The catalytic activity of the four MOF materials with different loadings of palladium nanoparticles was studied in the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction. The best catalytic performance was obtained with the MOF that contained 8wt% palladium nanoparticles. The metallic palladium nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed, with an average size of 2.6nm. Excellent yields were obtained for a wide scope of substrates under remarkably mild conditions (water, aerobic conditions, room temperature, catalyst loading as low as 0.15mol%). The material can be recycled at least 10times without alteration of its catalytic properties.

  • 55.
    Platero-Prats, Ana E.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Argonne National Laboratory, USA.
    Bermejo Gómez, Antonio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Chapman, Karena W.
    Martin-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Functionalising metal-organic frameworks with metal complexes: the role of structural dynamics2015In: CrystEngComm, ISSN 1466-8033, E-ISSN 1466-8033, Vol. 17, no 40, p. 7632-7635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of iridium-functionalised UiO-67 metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) were synthesised under conditions that simulate kinetically- and thermodynamically-controlled regimes. The degree of functionalisation depends on the reaction time and relative acidity of the native- and metallo-linkers, and can be optimised by controlling the reaction time.

  • 56. Roy, Souvik
    et al.
    Pascanu, Vlad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pullen, Sonja
    González Miera, Greco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ott, Sascha
    Catalyst accessibility to chemical reductants in metal-organic frameworks2017In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 53, no 22, p. 3257-3260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A molecular H-2-evolving catalyst, [Fe-2(cbdt)(CO)(6)] ([FeFe], cbdt = 3-carboxybenzene-1,2-dithiolate), has been attached covalently to an amino-functionalized MIL-101(Cr) through an amide bond. Chemical reduction experiments reveal that the MOF channels can be clogged by ion pairs that are formed between the oxidized reductant and the reduced catalyst. This effect is lessened in MIL-101-NH-[FeFe] with lower [FeFe] loadings. On longer timescales, it is shown that large proportions of the [FeFe] catalysts within the MOF engage in photochemical hydrogen production and the amount of produced hydrogen is proportional to the catalyst loading.

  • 57. Roy, Souvik
    et al.
    Pascanu, Vlad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pullen, Sonja
    González-Miera, Greco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ott, Sascha
    A MOF-Supported H2 Evolution Photocatalyst with Remarkable Stability and Improved EfficiencyArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Sahoo, Suman
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry, Structural Chemistry.
    Lundberg, Helena
    Ahlsten, Nanna
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry, Structural Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Heterogeneous Rh-Catalyzed Reactions of Allylic Alcohols2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of metal-catalyzed reactions that are atom-economical, environmentally benign, and highly selective and that take place under mild reaction conditions is of extreme importance. The isomerization of allylic alcohols to the corresponding carbonyl compounds can be catalyzed by transition metal complexes. We have shown before that this transformation involves the formation of metal enolates. When this isomerization is performed under homogeneous conditions in the presence of an electrophile, a new C-C bond is formed in a regioselective manner.

    1 Here, we present our studies towards the use of immobilized transition metal complexes as heterogeneous catalysts in tandem transformations of allylic alcohols. Different strategies and supports for the immobilization have been compared in this study.

  • 59.
    Sahoo, Suman
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Lundberg, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Edén, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Physical Chemistry.
    Ahlsten, Nanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wan, Wei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Single Site Supported Cationic Rhodium(I) Complexes for the Selective Redox Isomerization of Allylic Alcohols2012In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The isomerization of allylic alcohols to carbonyl compounds by a heterogeneous rhodium complex is reported. Different silica material supports and catalyst/ligand systems were evaluated. The most efficient catalyst in terms of catalytic activity and stability was found to be a cationic rhodium(I) complex with sulfonated phosphine ligands anchored on a mesoporous aluminosilica AlSBA-15. The heterogeneous complex catalyzed the isomerization of a variety of allylic alcohols in excellent yields with very low catalyst loadings (0.5 mol %). The catalyst could be recycled without significant loss of activity or selectivity. The optimized catalyst was characterized by N2 sorption, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, as well as solution and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopies.

  • 60.
    Sanz-Marco, Amparo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martinez-Erro, Samuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Selective Synthesis of Unsymmetrical Aliphatic Acyloins through Oxidation of Iridium Enolates2018In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 24, no 45, p. 11564-11567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first method to access unsymmetrical aliphatic acyloins is presented. The method relies on a fast 1,3-hydride shift mediated by an Ir-III complex in allylic alcohols followed by oxidation with TEMPO+. The direct conversion of allylic alcohols into acyloins is achieved in a one-pot procedure. Further functionalization of the C alpha' of the alpha-amino-oxylated ketone products gives access to highly functionalized unsymmetrical aliphatic ketones, which further highlights the utility of this transformation.

  • 61.
    Sanz-Marco, Amparo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mozina, Stefan
    Martinez-Erro, Samuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Iskra, Jernej
    Martin-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of alpha-Iodoketones from Allylic Alcohols through Aerobic Oxidative Iodination2018In: Advanced Synthesis and Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, E-ISSN 1615-4169, Vol. 360, no 20, p. 3884-3888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient method for the synthesis of alpha-iodoketones from allylic alcohols and elemental iodine is reported. We show in this paper that the isomerization of allylic alcohols catalyzed by iridium(III) complexes can be combined with an aerobic oxidative iodination protocol, resulting in a straightforward method for the synthesis of a wide range of alpha-iodoketones as single constitutional isomers and in high yields under mild reaction conditions.

  • 62.
    Stewart, Beverly
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nyhlén, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martin-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Privalov, Timofei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    A computational study of the CO dissociation in cyclopentadienyl ruthenium complexes relevant to the racemization of alcohols2013In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 927-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of an active 16-electron ruthenium sec-alkoxide complex via loss of the CO ligand is an important step in the mechanism of the racemization of sec-alcohols by (eta(5)-Ph5C5) Ru(CO)(2)X ruthenium complexes with X = Cl and OtBu. Here we show with accurate DFT calculations the potential energy profile of the CO dissociation pathway for a series of relevant (eta(5)-Ph5C5) Ru(CO) 2X complexes, where X = Cl, OtBu, H and (COOBu)-Bu-t. We have found that the CO dissociation energy increases in the following order: OtBu (lowest), Cl, COOtBu and H (highest). Using the distance between ruthenium and C-CO, r = Ru-C-CO, as a constraint, and by optimizing all other degrees of freedom for a range of Ru-CO distances, we obtained relative energies, Delta E(r) and geometries of a sufficient number of transient structures with the elongated Ru-CO bond up to r = 3.4 angstrom. Our calculations provide a quantitative understanding of the CO ligand dissociation in (eta(5)-Ph5C5) Ru(CO)(2)Cl and (eta(5)-Ph5C5) Ru(CO) 2(OtBu) complexes, which is relevant to the mechanism of their catalytic activity in the racemization of alcohols. We recently reported that exchange of the CO ligand by isotopically labeled (CO)-C-13 in the Ru-(OBu)-Bu-t complex occurs twenty times faster than that in the Ru-Cl complex. This corresponds to a difference of 1.8 kcal mol(-1) in the CO dissociation energy (at room temperature). This is in very good agreement with the calculated difference between the two potential energy curves for Ru-OtBu and Ru-Cl complexes, which is about 1.8-2 kcal mol(-1) around the corresponding transition states of the CO dissociation. The calculated difference in the total energy for CO dissociation in (eta(5)-Ph5C5) Ru(CO)(2)X complexes is related to the stabilization provided by the X group in the final 16-electron complexes, which are formed via product-like transition states. In addition to the calculated transition states of CO dissociation in Ru-OtBu and Ru-Cl complexes, the calculated transient structures with the elongated Ru-CO bond provide insight into how the geometry of the ruthenium complex with a potent heteroatom donor group (X) gradually changes when one of the COs is dissociating.

  • 63.
    Vazquez-Romero, Ana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bermejo Gómez, Antonio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Acid- and Iridium-Catalyzed Tandem 1,3-Transposition/3,1-Hydrogen Shift/Chlorination of Allylic Alcohols2015In: ACS Catalysis, ISSN 2155-5435, E-ISSN 2155-5435, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 708-714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for the selective synthesis of alpha-chlorocarbonyls from allylic alcohols is presented. The reaction occurs through an acid- and iridium-catalyzed tandem process that combines a 1,3-transposition, a 3,1-hydrogen shift, and a chlorination process, and can be applied to a wide range of alpha-aromatic and heteroaromatic secondary allylic alcohols. Saturated non-chlorinated ketones or other side-products derived from overchlorination were not detected.

  • 64.
    Vico Solano, Marta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    González Miera, Greco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pascanu, Vlad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Inge, A. Ken
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martín‐Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Versatile Heterogeneous Palladium Catalysts for Diverse Carbonylation Reactions under Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide Pressure2018In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 1089-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we report a versatile carbonylation protocol using heterogeneous Pd-0 nanoparticles supported on the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) MIL-88B-NH2 (Fe/Cr). The synthesis of a vast array of carbonyls, which includes amides, esters, carboxylic acids, and -ketoamides, was achieved through mono- and dicarbonylation reactions. The selectivity could be controlled simply by tuning the reaction conditions. Superior activity and selectivity were recorded in some cases compared to that achieved with commercial Pd/C. However, the utility of an elaborate catalyst support is questionable and important reactivity and recyclability issues are discussed.

  • 65. Yang, Tao
    et al.
    Bartoszewicz, Agnieszka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ju, Jing
    Sun, Junliang
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Liu, Zheng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Wang, Yingxia
    Li, Guobao
    Liao, Fuhui
    Martin-Matute, Belen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lin, Jianhua
    Microporous Aluminoborates with Large Channels: Structural and Catalytic Properties2011In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 50, no 52, p. 12555-12558Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Yao, Qingxia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bermejo Gómez, Antonio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Su, Jie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Pascanu, Vlad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Yun, Yifeng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zheng, Haoquan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Chen, Hong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Liu, Leifeng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martin-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Series of Highly Stable Isoreticular Lanthanide Metal-Organic Frameworks with Expanding Pore Size and Tunable Luminescent Properties2015In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 27, no 15, p. 5332-5339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of highly porous isoreticular lanthanide-based metal organic frameworks (LnMOFs) denoted as SUMOE-7I to SUMOE-7IV (SU = Stockholm University; Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, and Gd) have been synthesized using tritopic carboxylates as the organic linkers. The SUMOF-7 materials display one-dimensional pseudohexagonal channels with the pore diameter gradually enlarged from 8.4 to 23.9 angstrom, as a result of increasing sizes of the organic linkers. The structures have been solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction or rotation electron diffraction (RED) combined with powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). The SUMOF-7 materials exhibit robust architectures with permanent porosity. More importantly, they exhibit exceptionally high thermal and chemical stability. We show that, by inclusion of organic dye molecules, the luminescence properties of the MOFs can be elaborated and modulated, leading to promising applications in sensing and optics.

  • 67.
    Yao, Qingxia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Bermejo Gómez, Antonio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Su, Jie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Pascanu, Vlad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Yun, Yifeng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zheng, Haoquan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Chen, Hong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Liu, Leifeng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Highly porous isoreticular lanthanide metal-organic frameworksManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As an emerging type of porous materials, metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) have the advantages over conventional inorganic porous materials in that their structures and functions are systematically and predictably designable. Isoreticular expansion is an efficient way for systematic design and control of pore size and shape for MOFs. By using our proposed strategy, a series of highly porous isoreticular lanthanide-based metal-organic frameworks with systematic pore apertures has been obtained, which afford an isoreticular series of MIL-103 structures (termed SUMOF-7I to IV) with pore apertures ranging from 7.2 Å to 23 Å. These materials demonstrated exhibit robust architectures with permanent porosity, and exceptional thermal stability and chemical stability in various solvents. The combination of luminescence property and significant porosity of these MOFs enable them as a potential platform for multifunctional purpose.

  • 68.
    Yuan, Ning
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Pascanu, Vlad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Huang, Zhehao
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Heidenreich, Niclas
    Leubner, Sebastian
    Inge, A. Ken
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Gaar, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stock, Norbert
    Persson, Ingmar
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Probing the active catalytic species generated from Pd(II)@MIL-101-NH2 in Heck coupling reactions: An operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy studyArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Yuan, Ning
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Pascanu, Vlad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Huang, Zhehao
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Valiente, Alejandro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Heidenreich, Niclas
    Leubner, Sebastian
    Inge, Andrew Kentaro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Gaar, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stock, Norbert
    Persson, Ingmar
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Probing the Evolution of Palladium Species in Pd@MOF Catalysts during the Heck Coupling Reaction: An Operando X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study2018In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 140, no 26, p. 8206-8217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanism of the Heck C-C coupling reaction catalyzed by Pd@MOFs has been investigated using operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance (H-1 NMR) kinetic studies. A custom-made reaction cell was used, allowing operando PXRD and XAS data collection using high-energy synchrotron radiation. By analyzing the XAS data in combination with ex situ studies, the evolution of the palladium species is followed from the as-synthesized to its deactivated form. An adaptive reaction mechanism is proposed. Mononuclear Pd(II) complexes are found to be the dominant active species at the beginning of the reaction, which then gradually transform into Pd nanoclusters with 13-20 Pd atoms on average in later catalytic turnovers. Consumption of available reagent and substrate leads to coordination of Cl- ions to their surfaces, which causes the poisoning of the active sites. By understanding the deactivation process, it was possible to tune the reaction conditions and prolong the lifetime of the catalyst.

  • 70.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Yao, Qingxia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bermejo Gómez, Antonio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Su, Jie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Pascanu, Vlad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Yifeng, Yun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zheng, Haoquan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Chen, Hong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Liu, Leifeng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Abdelhamid, Hani N.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    A series of highly stable isoreticular lanthanide metal-organic frameworks with tunable luminescence properties solved by rotation electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction2016In: Acta Crystallographica Section A: Foundations of Crystallography, ISSN 0108-7673, E-ISSN 1600-5724, Vol. A72, p. 136-136Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Åberg, Jenny B.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nyhlén, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Privalov, Timofei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    CO Assistance in ligand exchange of a ruthenium racemization catalyst: identification of an acyl intermediate2009In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 131, no 27, p. 9500-9501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An acyl intermediate in the activation of eta(5)-(Ph(5)Cp)Ru(CO)(2)Cl by t-BuOK was identified by means of in situ FT-IR measurements and NMR spectroscopy. This strongly supports the conclusion that the ligand exchange takes place via CO assistance, i.e., that the activation occurs via nucleophilic attack by tert-butoxide on one of the CO ligands. The tert-butoxycarbonyl intermediate shows stretching vibrations at 1933 and 1596 cm(-1), corresponding to the CO and COOt-Bu groups, respectively. In the (13)C NMR spectrum, the CO group appears at 209.5 ppm and the COOt-Bu group at 208.7 ppm. The NMR assignments were confirmed by density functional theory calculations. The subsequent alcohol-alkoxide exchange is also thought to take place via CO assistance. However, no intermediate in that step could be detected.

12 51 - 71 of 71
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf