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  • 51.
    Tengö, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Brondizio, Eduardo S.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Malmer, Pernilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Spierenburg, Marja
    Connecting Diverse Knowledge Systems for Enhanced Ecosystem Governance: The Multiple Evidence Base Approach2014In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 579-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Indigenous and local knowledge systems as well as practitioners' knowledge can provide valid and useful knowledge to enhance our understanding of governance of biodiversity and ecosystems for human well-being. There is, therefore, a great need within emerging global assessment programs, such as the IPBES and other international efforts, to develop functioning mechanisms for legitimate, transparent, and constructive ways of creating synergies across knowledge systems. We present the multiple evidence base (MEB) as an approach that proposes parallels whereby indigenous, local and scientific knowledge systems are viewed to generate different manifestations of knowledge, which can generate new insights and innovations through complementarities. MEB emphasizes that evaluation of knowledge occurs primarily within rather than across knowledge systems. MEB on a particular issue creates an enriched picture of understanding, for triangulation and joint assessment of knowledge, and a starting point for further knowledge generation.

  • 52.
    Tengö, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hill, Rosemary
    Malmer, Pernilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Raymond, Christopher M.
    Spierenburg, Marja
    Danielsen, Finn
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Weaving knowledge systems in IPBES, CBD and beyond-lessons learned for sustainability2017In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 26-27, p. 17-25Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Indigenous peoples and local communities live in, manage and own vast areas often rich in biodiversity and critical for ecosystem services. Bridging indigenous and local knowledge systems with scientific knowledge systems is vital to enhance knowledge, practice, and ethics to move towards sustainability at multiple scales. We focus on international science-policy processes and present a framework for evidence-based guidance on how tasks to mobilise, translate, negotiate, synthesise and apply multiple forms of evidence can bridge knowledge systems. Effective engagement of actors, institutions and knowledge-sharing processes is crucial in each of these tasks. We use examples from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) to illustrate and discuss our framework.

  • 53.
    Tengö, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Johansson, Kristin
    Rakotondrasoa, F
    Lundberg, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Andriamaherilala, J-A
    Rakotoarisoa, J-A
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Taboos and forest governance: Informal protection of hot spot dry forest in southern Madagascar2007In: Ambio, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 683-691Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 54. Tidball, Keith G.
    et al.
    Metcalf, Sara
    Bain, Mark
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Community-led reforestation: cultivating the potential of virtuous cycles to confer resilience in disaster disrupted social-ecological systems2018In: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 797-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human relationships with trees can result in widespread citizen-led reforestation projects that catalyze social-biological-reinforcing feedback loops and set in motion virtuous cycles that restore perturbed social-ecological systems. These virtuous cycles confer resilience in such systems that counterbalance the tendency for vicious cycles to be triggered by destructive behavior and neglect. Given this argument, we ask: how do we cultivate the potential for virtuous cycles to confer resilience in social-ecological systems? To answer this question, we review feedback mechanisms and identify virtuous cycles catalyzed via ecological restoration to highlight their importance to the resilience of social-ecological systems. We then conceptualize these cycles with a causal map (also known as a causal loop diagram) illustrating an example where restoration activities and civic ecology practices contributed to feedbacks and virtuous cycles. Following from this example, we discuss approaches for recognizing and investing in virtuous cycles that accompany social-ecological systems and outline approaches for managing such cycles.

  • 55.
    Tuvendal, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Ecosystem Services Linking Social and Ecological Systems: River Brownification and the Response of Downstream Stakeholders2011In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 21-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The theoretical framework of ecosystem services and that of resilience thinking are combined in an empiricalcase study of a social-ecological system. In the River Helge å catchment in southern Sweden, a slow increase in dissolved organiccarbon (DOC) results in brownification of the water with consequences on ecosystem services in the lower part of the catchmentof concern by local resource managers. An assessment of ecosystem service delivery was conducted to (1) identify plausibledrivers of brownification in the study site and assess future ecosystem service delivery for stakeholders in downstream areas.An analysis of the perspective of beneficiaries, using qualitative methods, was pursued to (2) evaluate the impacts ofbrownification on downstream stakeholders.

  • 56.
    Tuvendal, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Response strategy assessment: a tool for evaluating resilience for the management of social–ecological systems2012In: Resilience and the Cultural Landscape: Understanding and Managing Change in Human-Shaped Environments / [ed] Tobias Plieninger and Claudia Bieling, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 57. Tuvendal, Magnus
    et al.
    Jaramillo, Fernando
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Scoping appropriate scale for successful wetland managementManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
12 51 - 57 of 57
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